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KEY IDEAS IN LINGUISTICS PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE

KEY IDEAS IN LINGUISTICS PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE

KEY IDEAS IN LINGUISTICS PHILOSOPHY OF

  • Page 4 and 5: Key Ideas in Linguistics and thePhi
  • Page 6 and 7: ContentsPrefaceAcknowledgementsNote
  • Page 8: PrefaceThe ideas described in this
  • Page 11 and 12: Notes on ContributorsVarol Akman, C
  • Page 14 and 15: ACCEPTABILITY/GRAMMATICALITYAccepta
  • Page 16 and 17: ut also structural descriptions oft
  • Page 18 and 19: ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHYSee also: Analyt
  • Page 20 and 21: ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHYpurports to make
  • Page 22 and 23: ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHYverified or fals
  • Page 24 and 25: ANALYTIC/SYNTHETICF. P. Ramsey. Lon
  • Page 26 and 27: ANALYTIC/SYNTHETICsentences to thei
  • Page 28 and 29: ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCEinnovate, or
  • Page 30 and 31: BEHAVIOURISMrather humourous public
  • Page 32 and 33: BEHAVIOURISMof meaning, his commitm
  • Page 34 and 35: COGNITIVISMCognitivism can be defin
  • Page 36 and 37: COGNITIVISMextends to these factors
  • Page 38 and 39: CONNOTATION/DENOTATIONcomplex expre
  • Page 40 and 41: CONTINUITYunique biological and gen
  • Page 42 and 43: CONVERSATION ANALYSISspeakers in a
  • Page 44 and 45: CONVERSATION ANALYSIS‘declines at
  • Page 46 and 47: CONVERSATION ANALYSISonly two peopl
  • Page 48 and 49: CONVERSATION ANALYSIStime and place
  • Page 50 and 51: CORPORAsame content, this is known
  • Page 52 and 53:

    CORPORAthis reason, Europarl is fre

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    CORPORAtheories or NLP systems. The

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    CREATIVITYreality. Some term for th

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    DECONSTRUCTIONThe very mention of t

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    DEDUCTION/INDUCTIONoutcast of lingu

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    DEDUCTION/INDUCTIONtook that to be

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    DEDUCTION/INDUCTIONterms) in unders

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    DEDUCTION/INDUCTIONto twenty-one mo

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    DEFINITE DESCRIPTIONSpresence of th

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    DESCRIPTIVISMBlack (eds) (1980), Tr

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    (CRITICAL) DISCOURSE ANALYSISlingui

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    (CRITICAL) DISCOURSE ANALYSISis par

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    (CRITICAL) DISCOURSE ANALYSIScertai

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    DISTINCTIVE FEATURESBeyond the Clau

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    EMPIRICISM/RATIONALISMof another. T

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    EMPIRICISM/RATIONALISMrational insi

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    EMPIRICISM/RATIONALISMsubject matte

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    EMPIRICISM/RATIONALISMparticular fa

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    FEMINISMof the 1960s and 1970s star

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    GENERATIVE PHONOLOGYSecond Language

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    GLOSSEMATICSThe debate between the

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    HOLISMand Søn. Reprinted Copenhage

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    HOLISMmasse, but to express this mo

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    IDEATIONAL THEORIESwhen Ludwig Witt

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    IMPLICATUREsational’ contexts of

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    IMPLICATUREQuantity maxim 2, we dra

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    IMPLICATURE(1) The Q-Principle (whe

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    INDETERMINACYuse is behavioural: di

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    INDETERMINACYThe quus and quook rea

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    INTEGRATIONISMbetween linguistics,

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    INTEGRATIONISMthe final arbiter - t

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    INTENTIONALITYfoundational and esse

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    INTUITIONa desire is satisfied if a

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    INTUITIONtermed ‘performance’.

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    LANGUAGE GAMEScontext of publicly-k

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    LANGUAGE GAMESthe choices of other

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    LANGUAGE OF THOUGHTWittgenstein and

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    LANGUE/PAROLEReferring to two aspec

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    LANGUE/PAROLEguage, does not manife

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    LINGUISTIC RELATIVITYworkers would

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    nor an implicit reference to time i

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    LOGICmally, an argument has at leas

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    LOGICfirst, then the second; but no

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    LOGICWe read this as ‘a is F’.

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    LOGICAL FORM(1984), The Complete Wo

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    LOGICAL POSITIVISMlogically coheren

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    METAPHORlinked to cognitive psychol

  • Page 146 and 147:

    METAPHORliterary analysis’ (1999:

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    MINIMALISMfor language optimally sa

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    MINIMALISMbecame separated. The fea

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    MODEL-THEORETIC SEMANTICSmodality b

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    MODEL-THEORETIC SEMANTICSlanguage b

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    NAMESKey Thinkers: Frege, Gottlob;K

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    OPTIMALITY THEORYof the truth of th

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    OPTIMALITY THEORY/bʊnd/ *FOV Max I

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    ORDINARY LANGUAGE PHILOSOPHYMcCarth

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    ORDINARY LANGUAGE PHILOSOPHYWilhelm

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    ORDINARY LANGUAGE PHILOSOPHYOLP at

  • Page 168 and 169:

    Wittgenstein, Ludwig (1922/1961). T

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    POLITENESSintonation’ (p. 7). The

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    POLITENESSLesser1. without redressi

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    Lakoff, Robin (1973). ‘The logic

  • Page 176 and 177:

    PORT-ROYAL LOGICColloquial name for

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    POSSIBLE WORLD SEMANTICSthe way the

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    POSSIBLE WORLD SEMANTICSbut the tro

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    POSSIBLE WORLD SEMANTICSdissolved.

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    POSTSTRUCTURALISMnetwork of relatio

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    PRESUPPOSITIONWriting and Differenc

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    PRESUPPOSITIONThus, it seems to be

  • Page 190 and 191:

    PRESUPPOSITIONApart from these tech

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    PRIVATE LANGUAGEpresuppositions are

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    PROPOSITIONALATTITUDESA proposition

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    PROPOSITIONAL ATTITUDESThese puzzle

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    PROPOSITIONSPrimary sourcesFrege, G

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    PROTOTYPEto be equally representati

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    PSYCHOANALYSIStial in forming gramm

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    PSYCHOANALYSISFigure 5Here, the pic

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    RELEVANCE THEORYJakobson, Roman (19

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    RELEVANCE THEORYpositive cognitive

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    RELEVANCE THEORYallowed by the spea

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    SENSE DATAWorking Papers in Linguis

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    SENSE/REFERENCEare two different as

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    SENSE/REFERENCEmeanings of its cons

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    SIGNS AND SEMIOTICSsentences which

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    SIGNS AND SEMIOTICSRibot and Paul P

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    SITUATIONAL SEMANTICSEco, Umberto (

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    SITUATIONAL SEMANTICSrendered as

  • Page 226 and 227:

    SPEECH ACT THEORYSpeech act theory

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    SPEECH ACT THEORYmodification, and

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    SPEECH ACT THEORYabout); (2) prepar

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    STRUCTURALISMReid, T. (1894). The W

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    STRUCTURALISMsuch as anthropology a

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    STRUCTURALISMof their language, the

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    SYSTEMIC-FUNCTIONAL GRAMMARBloomfie

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    SYSTEMIC-FUNCTIONAL GRAMMARAs relat

  • Page 242 and 243:

    SYSTEMIC-FUNCTIONAL GRAMMARto be im

  • Page 244 and 245:

    SYSTEMIC-FUNCTIONAL GRAMMARRise in

  • Page 246 and 247:

    TRANSFORMATIONAL-GENERATIVE GRAMMAR

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    TRANSFORMATIONAL-GENERATIVE GRAMMAR

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    TRANSFORMATIONAL-GENERATIVE GRAMMAR

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    TRUTH THEORIESmost central issues i

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    TRUTH THEORIESin the world (say, a

  • Page 256 and 257:

    TRUTH THEORIESnothing do with a lan

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    TRUTH VALUESee also: Definite Descr

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    UNIVERSAL GRAMMARThis second usage

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    UNIVERSAL GRAMMARacquisition proces

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    USE/MENTIONIntroduction. Second edi

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    IndexEntries are indicated in bold.

  • Page 268 and 269:

    INDEXHeidegger, Martin, 44Herder, J

  • Page 270 and 271:

    INDEXQuine, W. V. O., 8-9, 11-12, 1

  • Page 272 and 273:

    ERRATUMThe publisher and editors of

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