Nutrition for Sports Nutrition for Sports Performance - PowerBar.Com

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Nutrition for Sports Nutrition for Sports Performance - PowerBar.Com

Sports Nutrition IntroductionBenefits of sports nutrition• Enables you to trainefficiently• Helps provide energy youneed to compete• Helps you prepare for highperformance activities• Promotes muscle buildingand recovery er by providingimportant proteins3


Nutrition for Sports PerformanceOverviewSegments: Sports Nutrition Introduction‣ The Athlete’s Grocery List — Tipsfor Healthy Eating• The 3 Principles of Sports Nutrition• Your Sports Nutrition Game Plan:Hydration to Recovery• The Latest Products and Tools fromPowerBar ® 5


Tips for Healthy Eating• Sports nutrition focuses on whatyou need dto be fueled and dhydrateddduring exercise, and to promoterecovery after exercise• But what are you eating therest of the time, when you’renot exercising?• Cutting-edge sports nutrition isfounded on healthy eating6


Tips for Healthy Eating18Aim for a well-balanced diet:• Carbohydrates from a variety ofwhole grains, vegetables, fruit,and beans• Protein from fish, poultry,lean meats, beans, low-fat ornonfat dairy foods, and eggsor egg whites• Fats from healthy sources, such asvegetable oils, nuts, seeds,and avocados7


Tips for Healthy EatingCarbohydrates• Healthy sources:Whole grain cereals, ea breads, and pasta; a; fruits,vegetables, and beans• Nutritional benefits:Major source of energy, vitamins, minerals,and fiber• Health benefits:Regularity and the maintenanceof good health• Performance benefit:Carbs are your major muscle fuel source forhigh-intensity exercise8


Tips for Healthy EatingProtein• Healthy sources:Fish, poultry, lean meats, low-fat and nonfatdairy foods, seeds, nuts, beans, and eggs• Nutritional benefits:Provides amino acids, the building blocks formaking proteins• Health benefits:Proteins make up muscle and help buildantibodies• Performance benefits:Protein helps in the building and repair of muscletissue, and works with carbs to boost the rate ofrecovery after exercise9


Tips for Healthy EatingFats• Healthy sourcesVegetable e oils like canola a oil and olive oil, nuts, seeds, and fish• Nutritional benefitsMajor source of energy; vitamins A, D, E, K; omega-3 fatty acids and otheressential fats• Health benefitsSupport the maintenance of good health• Performance benefitsFats are the major muscle fuel sources for low-intensity exercise• Limit certain fats• Limit your intake of saturated fats and cholesterol by choosing lean meats and low-fator nonfat dairy foods and egg whites• Keep trans fats intake as low as possible by reading labels and limiting your intake offried fast foods and commercially prepared baked goods10


Tips for Healthy EatingMade SimpleAt meals:• Fill ¾ of your plate with a variety ofcarbohydrate-based foods like fruit,cereals, pasta, bread, potatoes, t andvegetables• Fill the other ¼ of your plate with leanprotein foods, such as fish, poultry, leanmeats, low-fat or nonfat dairy products,beans, and small amounts of nutsand seeds, which provide healthy fats11


Healthy Eating for Athletes:Vitamins and Minerals• Vitamins and minerals are essential to the dietYou can’t make them so you have to get them from foods or dietary supplements• Essential micronutrients have many important functions, including:Supporting growth, repairing tissues, carrying oxygen to muscles and other tissues, and supportingthe metabolism of energy, carbs, protein, and fat• All the essential vitamins and minerals are important to athleticperformance and good health. Some key examples are:B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, and pyridoxine) – for energy and nutrient metabolismVitamin C – a dietary antioxidant that helps to reduce free radicals and lipid oxidation in bodytissuesCalcium and vitamin D – for strong and healthy bonesIron – for red blood cell formation• For extra insurance, consider taking a basic daily multivitamin/mineral supplement 12


Tips for Healthy EatingIn SummaryThe focus ofThe focus ofhealthy eating: sports nutrition:To help ensure that youremain healthy over thelong termTo help keep you hydrated,to fuel your exercise, and topromote recoveryafter exerciseAthletes need both!13


Nutrition for Sports Performance OverviewSegments: Sports Nutrition Introduction The Athlete’s Grocery List — Tips forHealthy Eating‣ The 3 Principles of Sports Nutrition• Your Sports Nutrition Game Plan:Hydration to Recovery• The Latest Products and Tools fromPowerBar ® 14


The 3 Principles of Sports NutritionThe 3 most important principles of sportsnutrition are as follows:• Stay hydrated• Provide fuel for your muscles• Promote optimal recovery after exerciseApply these principles correctly as part of yourtraining, and it will help you compete at your best15


The 3 Principles of Sports NutritionHydration9, 10During exercise, you lose fluid and electrolytes as you sweat:• The key electrolyte is sodium• If you don’t replace both fluid and sodium during exercise, you canbecome dehydratedThe single largest contributor to fatigue during exercise isdehydration caused by fluid and sodium losses:• Inadequate fluid and sodium make your heart work harder and makeexercise much more difficult• Dehydration also impairs concentration and the ability to make tacticaldecisionsComplicating matters is that thirst alone is not a good indicatorof your hydration needs during exercise16


Principles of Sports Nutrition:HydrationLosing over 2% of your body weight due to fluid loss duringexercise means you are dehydrated and your performance hasalready been hampered:• A 2% loss is just 3 lbs for a 150-lb athlete• It is common to lose this much fluid, or more, during a workout orcompetitionConsuming too much plain water during exercise leads tooverhydration, potentially resulting in hyponatremia, which alsoimpairs performance and can have serious health consequencesStay within your hydration zone during exercise:• That means avoid gaining weight during exercise due tooverconsuming fluid• And don’t lose any more than 2% of your body weight due to fluid lossFortunately, dehydration and overhydration can be avoided orminimized by sticking to a disciplined hydration plan17


The 3 Principles of Sports NutritionHydrationTo avoid theperformance-impairingi ieffects of dehydration:• Start training sessions andcompetitions fully hydrated• Rehydrate as needed duringexercise• Fully replace fluid andsodium losses after exercise18


The 3 Principles of Sports NutritionFueling5, 6, 12• Carbohydrates are theprimary muscle fuel formost types of exercise• 60–90 minutes ofendurance training or afew hours in the weightroom can seriouslydeplete carbohydratemuscle fuel stores• Starting exercise with fullcarbohydrate stores candelay the onset of fatigueand help you train orcompete more effectively• Workouts andperformance duringcompetitions suffer if yourdiet does not providesufficient carbs19


The 3 Principles of Sports NutritionFuelingThere are 2 forms ofcarbohydrate in yourbody:• Glucose, whichhcirculates in thebloodstream• Glycogen, which isbundles of glucosestored in the liver andmusclesWhen you’re fullyloaded with carbs, youhave:• About 40 calories ofglucose in thebloodstream• About 1,900 caloriesstored as glycogenin the muscles, ,plusliver glycogen20


The 3 Principles of Sports NutritionFueling“Hitting the Wall”• When you run out of muscle glycogen stores, you relyon your small reserves of liver glycogen to maintainblood glucose levelsl• After liver glycogen stores are used up, blood sugarlevels drop, and you are forced to either slowway down or stop• In some sports this is called “hitting the wall” or “bonking”21


The 3 Principles of Sports NutritionFuelingAvoid “Hitting the Wall”22


The 3 Principles of Sports NutritionFuelingTo avoid running out ofmuscle fuel during workoutsor competitions:• Start training sessions andcompetitions fully fueled• Refuel as needed during exercise• Replenish gy glycogen g stores afterexerciseLow-carb diets are NOT appropriate p for athletes!23


The 3 Principles of Sports NutritionRecovery9• Workouts andcompetitions depleteyour glycogen stores• Muscle tissue isdamaged as you trainand compete, andrequires repair• Your muscles are alsobeing stimulated toadapt to your trainingworkloadRecovery includes:• Reloading carbohydratefuel stores• Repairing and buildingnew muscle tissue• Rehydrating24


The 3 Principles of Sports NutritionRecovery• Recovery is where yourealize the gains fromall of your training• Recovery enables youto be ready for yournext workout orcompetition• The recovery yprocessdoesn’t start afterexercise until youprovide your body thenutritional componentsit needs:• Carbohydrates• Protein• Fluids and sodium25


The 3 Principles of Sports NutritionRecoveryIn order to promote rapidrecovery, as soon as possibleafter training or competing(within 30–60 minutes),consume:• Carbohydrates for glycogenrestoration• Protein for repairing and buildingnew muscle tissue• Fluids and sodium for rehydration26


The 3 Principles of Sports NutritionTo apply these principles correctly, practice themduring training.• When your training and sports nutrition regimen are insync, you maximize your performance gains• It is only through a system of trial and error duringtraining that you can develop your own personalizedsports nutrition plan• Practice your sports nutrition regimen during training.Don’t try anything new on race or game day27


Nutrition for Sports PerformanceOverviewSegments: Sports Nutrition Introduction The Athlete’s Grocery List — Tips forHealthy Eating The 3 Principles of Sports Nutrition‣ Your Sports Nutrition Game Plan:Hydration to Recovery• The Latest Products and Tools fromPowerBar ® 28


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanPutting the principles of sportsnutrition into practice:‣ Start exercise fully hydratedand fueled 5, 6• Carbohydrate load when necessary• Match your sweat rate and knowwhat to hydrate with during exercise• Refuel as needed during exercise• Promote full recovery:• After exercise• Daily strategies29


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanStart Exercise Fully Hydrated and FueledBy starting workouts and competitions fully hydrated:• It can help you train hard and achieve effective/efficient workouts• It can help you competeMake up for any fluid deficits from prior workouts or competitions:• Consume 15–21 fl oz (430–600 ml) of water or a sports drink 2–3 hoursbefore training or competingKeep hydrating as needed during warm-upsMonitor your hydration status before exercise by checking thecolor of your urine:• Light-yellow color is consistent with adequate hydration• If urine is the color of apple juice, more fluids are needed30


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanStart Exercise Fully Hydrated and FueledGlycogen stores get utilized every time you trainor compete:• If fuel reserves aren’t consistently replenished, deficits build,and you feel fatigued during exerciseTop off muscle glycogen fuel stores before exercise:• Consume a carb-based meal 2–4 hours before exercise• Choose familiar carb-based foods and beverages, includingpasta, rice, bread, cereal, vegetables, fruit, and sweeteneddairy products, such as flavored yogurts and flavored milksThe goal is to start fully fueled, but feelingcomfortable:• Avoid slow-to-digest fatty and high-fiber foods prior to exercise• Experiment during training to find the right food items androutine that work best for you31


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanStart Exercise Fully Hydrated and FueledExamples of carb-based pre-exercise meals(2–4 hours before exercise)Breakfast• Cold or hot cereal, fruit, and low-fat or nonfat milk• French toast or pancakes with maple syrup• English muffin with jam and peanut butter, banana, and fruit juiceLunch or Dinner• Pasta with tomato sauce, French bread, steamed vegetables, low-fat/nonfatmilk, pudding, and canned fruit• Grilled chicken sandwich, baked potato with low-fat sour cream or salsa,and low-fat frozen yogurt• Thick-crust cheese pizza, low-fat gelato, and canned peaches• Baked or grilled chicken, turkey, fish, or lean beef; steamed rice; roll;green beans; low-fat frozen yogurt; and fruit juice32


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanStart Exercise Fully Hydrated and FueledConsume an easy-to-digest carb-based snack (about 40–60 gramsof carbs) 30–60 minutes before exercise, along with fluids.If you’ve got pre-game jitters, don’t skip eating entirely:• Try liquid carbohydrate sources in place of solid foodsIdeas for easy-to-digest, carb-based options:• Fruit smoothie or meal-replacement beverage• PowerBar ® Sport Energy bar, PowerBar ® Energy Gel, orPowerBar ® Gel Blasts Energy chews with water• Small roll or sandwich made with a banana and honey• Low-fat or nonfat yogurt or frozen yogurt, gelato, or sorbet33


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanPutting the principles of sportsnutrition into practice: Start exercise fully hydratedand fueled‣ Carbohydrate load when necessary 5,6• Match your sweat rate and knowwhat to hydrate with during exercise• Refuel as needed during exercise• Promote full recovery:• After exercise• Daily strategies34


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanCarbohydrate Load When Necessary• Carbohydrate loading is a research-supported fueling strategy t designeddto help athletes prepare forhigh-endurance activities• Consider carbohydrate loading beforeperiods of intense training or a longendurance event• If you’re exercising at a steady paceand intensity, carbohydrate loadingcan increase endurance by about 20%35


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanCarbohydrate Load When NecessaryHow to Carbohydrate LoadTwo DifferentApproachesCarb-LoadingRegimenExample:150-lb (68-kg) athlete3–4days prior36 3.6–5.5 55g carbs per lb540–825 g carbs per day(Taper exercise for body weight daily for 3–4 days before3–4 days beforeyour event)(8–12 g per kg)1–2 days prior(Rest for 1–2 daysbefore your event)4.5–5.5 g carbs per lbbody weight daily(10–1212 g per kg)675–825 g carbs per dayfor 1–2 days before36


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanCarbohydrate Load When Necessary600-grams carbs-per-day sample menuBreakfast• 1 cup cold breakfast cereal with 1 cup low-fat ornonfat milk• 1 cup canned peaches• 2 slices white toast with jam• 1 cup of orange juiceMorning Snack• 1 PowerBar ® Sport Energy bar• 1 bananaLunch• 1 bagel with banana and honey• 1 sandwich with lean meat, tomato,and lettuce• 1/2 cup canned mandarin oranges or fruit cocktail• 1 cup low-fat or nonfat yogurt with fruit• WaterAfternoon Snack• 2 cups fresh fruit smoothie made with yogurt and frozen orcanned fruit• 1 PowerBar ® Fruit Energize barDinner• 1 1/2 cups pasta• 1 cup tomato sauce with or without lean meat• 1 cup cooked green beans• 1 orange• 1 cup sorbet with fruit• 1 cup fruit juiceEvening Snack• 1 cup cold breakfast cereal with 1 cup low-fat or nonfat milk37


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanPutting the principles of sportsnutrition into practice: Start exercise fully hydratedand fueled Carbohydrate load when necessary‣ Match your sweat rate and knowwhat to hydrate with during9, 10exercise• Refuel as needed during exercise• Promote full recovery:• After exercise• Daily strategies38


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanMatch Your Sweat Rate and Know Whatto Hydrate with During ExerciseTo stay hydrated during exercise, consume fluids at a rate thatclosely matches your sweat rate:• Matching gyour sweat rate generallyrequires about 14–27 fl oz (400–800 ml) offluid every hour of exercise, preferably insmaller amounts taken frequently. But fluidneeds can vary considerably• Calculate your sweat rate to determineyour actual hydration needs• To calculate your sweat rate, and for apersonalized plan to meet your uniquehydration needs, click on thePowerBar Sweat Rate Calculator atwww.powerbar.com/src39


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanMatch Your Sweat Rate and Know Whatto Hydrate with During ExerciseCarry your own sports bottle or fuel belt and usebreaks wisely:• Most athletes can easily consume about 5 fl oz (140 ml) during aquick break; each gulp is about 1 fl oz (30 ml)Monitor the effectiveness of your hydration plan. Manyathletes fall far short of meeting their hydration needsduring exercise:• Weigh yourself before and after practices or competitions• The goal is to stay in your hydration zone and avoid dehydration.That means losing no more than 2% of your body weight duringexercise• If your weight loss is greater than 2%, make a conscious effort totake in more fluids during exercise40


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanMatch Your Sweat Rate and Know Whatto Hydrate with During ExerciseA sports drink is generally the best option when you’re training or9, 10competing. The advantages of a sports drink over plain water are many:• Promotes better performance • The sodium also helps maintainbecause it provides carbohydrates your drive to continue drinkingto fuel your muscles and your brain fluids when exercising, which iscrucial to meeting your fluid needs• Athletes freely consume morefluids when their hydrationbeverage is flavored, as is the casewith a sports drink• Sodium and carbs cause the fluidin the sports drink to be absorbedmore quickly• Sodium also helps you retain thefluid that you’ve consumed41


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanMatch Your Sweat Rate and Know Whatto Hydrate with During ExerciseWater is fine whenexercising for less than1 hour in moderatetemperature conditionsA sports drinkis recommended forexercise of 1 houror longer, andanytime conditionsare hot or humid42


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanPutting the principles of sportsnutrition into practice: Start exercise fully hydratedand fueled Carbohydrate load when necessary Match your sweat rate and knowwhat to hydrate with during exercise‣ Refuel as needed during exercise 7, 8• Promote full recovery:• After exercise• Daily strategies43


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanRefuel As Needed During Exercise• Carbohydrate is the primary muscle fuelutilized during exercise, and stores are limitedit • Carbohydrate refueling needs depend on thelength and intensity of exercise• For long-duration, all-out effort, refuel withsports nutrition products that provide a 2:1blend of glucose and fructose to enhanceenergy delivery to muscles and help prepareyou for high-endurance activities44


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanRefuel As Needed During ExerciseCarb Refueling RecommendationsExercise lasting lessthan 1 hourCarbohydrate intake during exercise is not required to fuel yourperformanceHowever, a sports drink with carbs and sodium can help hydrateyou more effectively under hot and humid conditionsExercise lasting Consume 30–60 g carbs during each hour of exercise to boost1–2 hours performance and help prepare you for high-endurance activitiesIntense training Consume 45–90 g of a 2:1 blend of glucose and fructose perlasting longer than hour of exercise to increase energy delivery to muscles and2–3 hours help prepare you for high-endurance activities45


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanRefuel As Needed During ExercisePowerBar ® C2MAX Energy blend carbs —the leading edge of muscle fueling:• C2MAX is a dual-source energy blend featuring a2:1 blend of glucose to fructose• Breakthrough studies reveal that this blend delivers20–55% more energy to muscles than glucose alone• A recent study revealed this unique fuel produced an8% improvement in athletes’ cycling times 746


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanRefuel As Needed During ExerciseHow PowerBar ® C2MAX Energy blend works:•Fructose and glucose have their ownseparate transport systems in the gut•One transport system allows glucose to beabsorbed, and the other allows fructose tobe absorbed•Two transport systems increase the total rateof carbohydrate absorption from the gut•This leads to more carbohydrate available tobe burned as muscle fuel•Take advantage of the energy provided byPowerBar C2MAX Energy blend47


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanPutting the principles of sportsnutrition into practice: Start exercise fully hydratedand fueled Carbohydrate load when necessary Match your sweat rate and knowwhat to hydrate with during exercise Refuel as needed during exercise‣ Promote full recovery: 5, 9• After exercise• Daily strategies48


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanPromote Full Recovery: After ExerciseYour body is ready to start therecovery process as soon as youfinish your workout orcompetition, but you need toprovide the necessary nutrients:t• Carbohydrates to restoredepleted glycogen stores• Protein to repair and buildmuscle tissue• Fluids and sodium to rehydrate49


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanPromote Full Recovery: After ExerciseCarbohydratesTo speed glycogen restoration after strenuous exercise:• Consume 0.5 grams of carbsper lb (1.1 1 grams per kg) bodyweight within 30 minutes offinishing exercise• For a 150-lb (68-kg) athlete,that equates to 75 grams ofcarbohydrates right after exercise• Repeat this within 2 hoursafter exercise, or consumea carb-based meal• For heavy training, repeat thishourly for the first 3 hours afterexercise, or consume carb-basedmeals and snacks• Simple carbs right after exerciseare more effective at speedingglycogen restoration• This is especially important ifyou are exercising again within24 hours50


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanPromote Full Recovery: After ExerciseFully rebuilding glycogen stores takes about 24 hours on acarb-based diet — but many athletes don’t get enough totalcarbs each dayExerciseTotal DailyCarbohydrate Needs150-lb (68-kg)AthleteLightTraining 4 hours,moderate- tohigh-intensity4.5–5.5 g per lbbody weight (10–12 g per kg)680–816 g ofcarbs per day51


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanPromote Full Recovery: After ExerciseSample intake for about 500 g carbs per day1 cup cereal, 1 cup milk1 cup blueberriesGrams of carbs4521PowerBar ® Sport Energy bar43Sandwich, 2 oz turkey321 cup baby carrots1216 oz chocolate 1% milk521 cup flavored yogurt47BBQ chicken tenderloins, 7.5-oz package341cupwhiterice411 cup cooked sweet potatoes581 PowerBar ® Harvest Energy bar3516 oz cranberry juice68PowerBar ProteinPlus ® protein powder drink mix (1 serving)7Total grams of carbs 495Food values — USDA database. 15 PowerBar values based on analysis.52


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanPromote Full Recovery: After ExerciseProteinMuscle tissue repair and building is criticalto recovery:• Muscle tissue is made up ofproteins, and proteins are madeup of building blocks known asamino acids• When you consume foods, anyprotein present is digested andbroken down into its componentamino acids• These amino acids are thenabsorbed and repackaged intothe proteins your body needsfor the repair and building ofmuscle tissue53


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanPromote Full Recovery: After ExerciseAthletes need more protein than inactive individuals, but most athletes getplenty of protein — and consuming more offers no extra muscle-building orperformance benefitsResistanceExerciseEnduranceExerciseTotal Daily Protein Needs0.55–0.77 g per lb body weight(1.2–1.7 g per kg)0.55–0.73 g per lb body weight(1.2–1.6 g per kg)150-lb (68-kg) Athlete82–116 g proteinper day82–109 g proteinper dayTeenageAthletes0.68–0.91 g per lb body weight(1.5–2.0 g per kg)102–136 g proteinper day54


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanPromote Full Recovery: After ExerciseSample daily intake for about 130 g protein per day1 cup cereal, 1 cup milkPowerBar ProteinPlus ® protein barSandwich, 2 oz turkey½ cup baby carrots1 cup low-fat milk8 oz low-fat yogurt4 oz chicken breast1 cup brown rice1 cup cooked broccoliPowerBar ProteinPlus ® protein powder drink mix (1 serving)Total grams of proteinGrams protein112420188286220128 gramsFood values — USDA database. 15 PowerBar values based on analysis.55


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanPromote Full Recovery: After ExerciseProteinFocus on timing your protein intake in relationto workouts.• Taking in protein after a workout provides the amino acid buildingblocks needed for repairing muscle fibers that get damaged duringexercise and to promote the development of new muscle tissue.Although protein requirements vary between individuals, ingeneral look to consume a minimum of 15–25 grams of proteinwithin an hour after exercise to maximize the muscle building andrepair process.56


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanPromote Full Recovery: After ExerciseFOR RESISTANCE TRAINING: CONSUME ABOUT 20–40 GRAMSOF PROTEIN JUST BEFORE AND/OR JUST AFTER EXERCISE*One time (in one sitting)20–40 grams just after exerciseORIn two sittings10–20 grams just before and 10–20 gramsjust after exerciseORIn hourly intervals for up to 3 hours after exerciseor until regular meals resume5–10 grams just after exercise, and then5–10 grams every hour for 3 hours* Totals based on 0.18 grams per lb body weight (0.4 grams per kg)57


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanPromote Full Recovery: After ExerciseFluids and SodiumEven if you are diligent in your hydration efforts duringexercise, you may lose more fluids than you take in• Weigh yourself before and afterexercise to gauge your net lossof fluids• Replace fluids lost by graduallydrinking 16–24 fl oz per lb lost(1,000–1,500 1 per kg)• Rehydration will be moreeffective when sodium isincluded with the fluid and foodyou consume as you recover58


Your Sports Nutrition Game PlanIt can’t be overemphasized: Practice it during training• When your training and sports nutrition regimen are insync, you help achieve your performance gains• It is only through a system of trial and error duringtraining that you can develop your own personalizedsports nutrition plan• Practice your sports nutrition regimen during training• Don’t try anything new on race or game day59


Nutrition for Sports PerformanceOverviewSegments: Sports Nutrition Introduction The Athlete’s Grocery List — Tips forHealthy Eating The 3 Principles of Sports Nutrition Your Sports Nutrition Game Plan:Hydration to Recovery‣ The Latest Products and Toolsfrom PowerBar ® 60


The Latest Products and Toolsfrom PowerBar ®• Commitment to athletes• Putting products into practice• PowerBar ® PowerCoach —free online training plans atPowerBar.com• Join the PowerBarcommunity61


The Latest Products and Tools from PowerBar ®Commitment to Athletes• Mission: To help you achieve your very best• Passion: Sports, fitness, health, and wellness• Commitment: Helping you reach your goals by providingcutting-edge sports nutrition products:• Products are backed by decades of sports nutrition science, and meetthe nutrition and energy needs of all athletes — from world-classchampions and dedicated amateurs to beginners• PowerBar has a world-class research center with scientists andnutritionists that are dedicated to bringing the best of sports nutrition toathletes everywhere• Whether you’re an elite athlete, t a weekend warrior, or you enjoy theoccasional hike, PowerBar has the right products to meet yourindividual needs62


The Latest Products and Tools from PowerBar ®Putting Products into PracticePowerBar products are designed to beused in combination to meet your sportsnutrition needs.Mix and match to meet the demands ofyour training and competitions.Go to www.powerbar.com to download a two-page product chart,which highlights key product features and usage guidelines.63


Three Phases of Sports NutritionBeforeExercise to providehydration and fuel foroptimal performance.DuringExercise to helpdelay the onset offatigue by rehydratingand refueling.AfterExercise to helpspeed recovery.64


Mix and MatchTo Meet the Demands of Your Training and Competitions65


PowerBar ® Sport Energy BarKey features:Designed to be easy to digest andmade with PowerBar ® C2MAXEnergy blend for more energy tomuscles.Recommended use:Great for before and during higher-hintensity competitions or trainingsessions.Eat one bar 30–60 minutes beforeexercise.For events lasting more than 1 hour,eat 1–2 bars per hour during exercise.66


PowerBar ® Fruit Energize BarKey features:Designed to be easy to digest andmade with PowerBar ® C2MAXEnergy blend for more energy tomuscles.Delivers energy with real fruit and therefreshing taste of a fruit smoothie.Recommended use:Great for before and during higher-hintensity competitions ortraining sessions.Eat one bar 30–60 minutes beforeexercise.For events lasting over 1 hour, eat oneto two bars per hour during exercise.67


PowerBar ® Energy GelKey features:Easy to digest and made withPowerBar ® C2MAX Energy blend formore energy to muscles.Recommended use:Great for before and duringhigher-intensity competitions ortraining sessions.For activities lasting more than 1 hour,take 1 gel every 20–45 minutes duringexercise, followed by a few mouthfulsof water.200 mg sodium per packet. Take 1–2 gels 10–20 minutes beforeexercise.68


PowerBar ® Gel Blasts Energy ChewsKey features:Formulated with PowerBar ® C2MAXEnergy blend for moreenergy to muscles.Customized energy delivery.Recommended use:A great choice hi for use before bf or duringmoderate- and high-intensity exercise.Have a packet of Gel BlastsEnergy chews30–60 minutes before exercise to topoff energy stores.For exercise lasting more than 1 hour,have 1–3 pieces every 10 minutes.69


PowerBar ® Harvest Energy BarKey features:Nt Natural whole hl oats and oat bran, alongwith 10 g protein per 56–58 g bar,deliver nutritious, long-lasting energyand taste great!Recommended use:A great choice hi for use before bf or duringmoderate-intensity exercise and sportssuch as climbing, hiking, and skiing.Eat 1 bar 30–60 minutesbefore exercise.For activities lasting more than 1 hour,eat 1 bar per hour during exercise.70


PowerBar ® Triple Threat Energy BarKey features:Nuts, oat bran, and 10 g protein per53 g bar deliver nutritious, long-lastingenergy and muscle-building power.Recommended use:Tastes like a candy bar but is a greatchoice for use before or duringmoderate-intensity exercise such asteam and action sports.Eat 1 bar 30–60 minutesbefore exercise.For activities lasting more than 1 hour,eat 1 bar per hour during exercise.71


PowerBar ® Energy Bites Coming in August 2010Key features:Customized energy delivery in aEnergy Bites are made with PowerBar ®convenient, resealable pack.C2MAX Energy blend to help getmore energy to working muscles.Recommended use:Usage guide on package suggests howmany bites to consume before andduring exercise, based on body weightand training intensity.72


PowerBar ProteinPlus ® Protein BarKey features:Helps build a lean body and providessustained energy.Contains 24 g per 78 g bar ofPowerBar ® TriSource protein blend,a proprietary protein blend of whey,soy, and casein proteins.These proteins are absorbed bythe body at different rates, to deliver aEatsteady supply of muscle-building16, 17amino acids.Recommended use:Et ½–1 ½1 bar before and/or afterstrength-training workouts to helpsupport muscle growth and repairand to fuel exercise.73


PowerBar ProteinPlus ® Bites Coming in August 2010Key features:Recommended use:Every pouch has 20 g of PowerBar ® E h lbl k f tEach resealable pack features aTriSource protein blend, which personalized usage chart that helpsdelivers a steady supply of musclebuildingamino acids.to have before and after workouts,Customized protein delivery in ayou determine the right serving sizebased on your body weight andconvenient, resealable pack.workout goals.74


PowerBar ® TriSource Protein BlendAdvantage75


PowerBar ® Recovery BarKey features:Specially formulated with theproprietary PowerBar ® TriSource protein blend and the carbohydratesyour body needs to help repair muscletissue and replenish energy stores,so you can get back out thereand compete.Recommended use:Have a PowerBar Recovery bar within30 minutes of your workout orcompetition, and make sure you alsorehydrate to replace lost fluids andelectrolytes.76


PowerBar ProteinPlus ®Protein Powder Drink MixKey features:20 g of PowerBar ® TiS TriSource protein tiblend per serving.TriSource protein blend combineswhey, soy, and casein, which areabsorbed by the body at different ratesto help build lean muscle withsustained amino acid delivery.Available in chocolate or vanilla.Recommended d use:Use immediately after exercise formaximum results.77


About PowerBar ® PowerCoach Personalized training and nutrition plans:• Global, nutrition-based, customizableonline training program• Offers personalized sports nutritionand training from top athletes andsports nutritionists• Focus on your performance withcustomized programs for beginning,advanced, professional, and teenathletes• Daily email reminders and training logto keep you motivated and on target• A personalized daily eating plangeared to meet your unique sportsnutrition needs• Provides tips on improving yourperformance through proper fuelingand hydration during every phase oftraining and competition, as well asthrough promoting muscle recovery


Join the PowerBar ® Community• Register with PowerBar to getaccess to the latest tools in trainingand nutrition• Connect with other athletesaround the globe• Get your own PowerBar profilepage featuring a unique URL• Customize your personal site withblogs, videos, and photos• Access leading-edge sportsnutrition articles, customizedtraining and nutrition plans, andhandy nutrition calculators79


Any Questions?Credit: tdwsport.com80


APPENDIXFrequently Asked Questions (FAQs)Here are some questions you may be asked during the presentation,along with suggested answers. For even more information, check out thePowerBar.com website for articles on a wide range of topics.1) I train early in the morning. I can’t eat a meal a few hours before!What are some alternatives?For early morning games and events, not too many athletes want to get upextra early in order to eat a hearty meal. Instead, a light meal or snack willdo. Many athletes find that a more liquid snack, such as a yogurt, nutritionshake, or energy gel works well. Liquids empty from the stomach faster, sothis works well for those who may have pre-event jitters or a touchystomach. Others will consume an energy bar 30–60 minutes prior toexercise with great success. It is important to top off your energy storesbefore exercise; studies have shown that endurance performance canimprove by 20% for some individuals when they have fueled properly.81


APPENDIXFrequently Asked Questions (FAQs)2) What about caffeine?Caffeine has come into play as an important ergogenic aid in sportsnutrition. It may help you work out harder, or compete at a higher intensitywithout actually feeling like you are. But remember, more is not better inthe case of caffeine; modest doses in the range of 1–3mg/kg— about70–200 mg for a 150-lb (68-kg) person — have been shown to be just aseffective as higher amounts. For more on caffeine, see the article onPowerBar.com — Caffeine and Athletic Performance — in the nutritionarticle library.82


APPENDIXFrequently Asked Questions (FAQs)3) What do I do for everyday eating when I am not exercising?What is a healthy, everyday diet?Aim for a healthy diet:• Carbohydrates from a variety of whole grains, vegetables, fruit, and beans• Protein from fish, poultry, lean meats, beans, low-fat or nonfat dairy foods,and eggs or egg whites• Fats from healthy sources such as vegetable oils, nuts, seeds, and avocadosCompared to the recommendations for healthy eating for the generalpopulation, an athlete needs to increase carbohydrate sources in their diet tomeet the body’s increased demand for energy, as well as increase fluid intaketo cover sweat losses. Studies have shown that a diet that consists of 60–65%carbohydrate during the training period resulted in improved muscle glycogenconcentrations and/or significant improvements in athletic performance. 7 83


APPENDIXFrequently Asked Questions (FAQs)4) I avoid carbs because I have heard they can make you fat.Is this true?Carbs can contribute to weight gain and excess body fat, but only if theyare consumed in excess of what your body needs. This is also true of fatand protein. Remember that as an athlete, you require more fuel, and theprimary fuel for active muscles is carbs. In your daily nutrition plan, aim formore nutrient-dense carbs and limit your intake of low-nutrient carbs suchas candy, soda, and desserts. To optimally fuel for your sport, you shouldaim for simple, readily absorbed carbs soon before, immediately after, aswell as during exercise; carbs that have higher fiber content are better tohave after exercise, or at meals a few hours before. 5 84


APPENDIXFrequently Asked Questions (FAQs)Many athletes fail to take in adequate carbohydrates and adjust their intake astheir training demand changes. Carbohydrate needs will vary depending onthe intensity and time in training.ExerciseTotal DailyCarbohydrate Needs150-lb (68-kg)AthleteLightTraining4 hours, moderatetohigh-intensity4.5–5.5 g per lbbody weight(10–12 g per kg)680–816 g ofcarbs per day85


APPENDIXFrequently Asked Questions (FAQs)5) What are examples of slow-to-digest and fatty foods?We have said in the presentation that you should avoid slow-to-digest fattyand high-fiber foods before exercise. This is because these types of foodstend to stay in your stomach longer. If your stomach is full, you could getstomach cramps and nausea. Blood flow to your digestive system isreduced during exercise, so this could make matters even worse.High-fat foods include things like bacon, fatty meats, fried foods, pastries,salad dressings, pies, nuts, and rich desserts.High-fiber foods include things like beans, raw vegetables, bran cereals,corn, popcorn, nuts, seeds, fruits with skins, and dried fruit.86


APPENDIXFrequently Asked Questions (FAQs)6) This presentation is about helping me improve my sportsperformance. What do I do if I have other exercise goals besidesperformance? For example, weight gain, muscle building, or weightloss?For weight gain and muscle building:First of all, as an athlete you are striving for gains in muscle and strength.Extra body fat is rarely the desired goal and would be unlikely to transferinto enhanced performance.Aim to gain no more than 2–3 lbs (1–1.5 kg) per week, by increasingregular portions of healthful foods. You should be eating 5–6 full meals perday. By increasing your regular calorie consumption by 500–1,000 caloriesper day, along with regular resistance training, you should be on your way.See this article on PowerBar.com for more information: Muscle BuildingNutrition on the Cutting Edge.87


APPENDIXFrequently Asked Questions (FAQs)For weight loss:It is important to realize that a drastic reduction in energy intake cannegatively impact your performance. If at all possible, weight loss shouldbe undertaken in the off-season, before your training begins to ramp up.A realistic goal is to lose about 1 lb (0.45 kg) of body weight per week. Toachieve this, you’ll need a calorie deficit, a shortage of about 500–750calories every day. If you want to drop 5 lbs (2.3 kg), plan on taking about5 weeks to pull it off. To lose 8 lbs (3.6 kg), plan on about 8 weeks. Readthis article on PowerBar.com — Weight Loss for Athletes — for moreinformation.88


APPENDIXFrequently Asked Questions (FAQs)7) I am presenting to a high school team. Can I use the samerecommendations?The answer is yes! Teen athletes have some specific areas to focus on,such as the importance of adequate calcium in their diets, and their proteinneeds per body weight are slightly higher than for adult athletes.In terms of total protein intake, teenage athletes require about 0.68–0.91grams of protein per lb of body weight daily (1.5–2.0 grams per kg). For a150-lb (68-kg) high school athlete, this equates to 102–137 grams ofprotein daily. Most athletes easily consume this amount of protein or morein a day. Consuming more protein than you need offers no performancebenefit and does not further increase your muscle mass. Read this articleon PowerBar.com in the nutrition article library — Sports Nutrition for HighSchool Athletes — for more information.89


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