Gender Equality and the Convention on Biological - Gender Climate

gender.climate.org

Gender Equality and the Convention on Biological - Gender Climate

ong>Genderong> ong>Equalityong> ong>andong> ong>theong>ong>Conventionong> on BiologicalDiversity: A COMPILATION OFDECISION TEXT


FOREWORDIn every region of ong>theong> world, women ong>andong> men have unique relationships with, dependenciesupon, ong>andong> expertise regarding ong>theong>ir environments.In ong>theong> last twenty years ong>andong> more, gender equality has been ong>andong> continues to be recognized as acritical crosscutting issue in ong>theong> major multilateral environmental agreements. In 1992, Agenda21 set ong>theong> stage with Chapter 24: “Women have considerable knowledge ong>andong> experience inmanaging ong>andong> conserving natural resources.” By 2012, a great variety of legal instruments ong>andong>norm-setting agreements integrate text that promotes gender equality ong>andong> women’s rights,including across ong>theong> outcomes of ong>theong> three key United Nations environmental agreements:ong>theong> ong>Conventionong> on Biological Diversity (CBD), ong>theong> Framework ong>Conventionong> on Climate Change(UNFCCC), ong>andong> ong>theong> ong>Conventionong> to Combat Desertification (UNCCD).From preamble ong>andong> shared vision text, to actionable language for programming ong>andong> finance, thispolicy language has recognized that ong>theong> integration of women’s rights ong>andong> gender equality issuesinto ong>theong> mitigation of biodiversity loss, climate change ong>andong> desertification is not only essentialbut maximizes ong>theong> efficacy of interventions, programs ong>andong> resources. The CBD agreements leadwith an extraordinary array of text, which is compiled in ong>theong> pages to follow. Direct quotesfrom outcomes of ong>theong> last twenty years are archived here, as a reference tool for policy-makersong>andong> practitioners alike.Words on paper are crucial, but healthy ecosystems ong>andong> gender equality both will be a livedreality only when full implementation is realized. One of ong>theong> greatest challenges faced bygovernments, project practitioners, gender experts ong>andong> oong>theong>r development partners is to ensurethat gender sensitive policies agreed at international fora are ong>theong>n implemented appropriatelyong>andong> fully.The Parties to ong>theong> CBD, agreeing gender text in ong>theong>ir decisions as early as 1996, at ong>theong> thirdConference of Parties in Argentina, are in a trail-blazing position. Committing to gendermainstreaming in CBD’s 2010 decision X/19 ong>andong> integrating gender equality into its StrategicPlan for Biodiversity 2011-2020, Parties are in a unique position to pursue transformativeimplementation, including by meeting ong>theong> Aichi Biodiversity Targets.The Women’s Environment ong>andong> Development Organization, a women’s global advocacyorganization, ong>andong> ong>theong> CBD Secretariat are proud to partner to provide technical support toParties in taking next steps toward gender-responsive implementation. It is our hope that thistext compilation serves as a useful tool, to remind all stakeholders of ong>theong> strong foundationupon which to continue working towards truly sustainable development.Mr. Braulio F. de Souza DiasExecutive SecretarySecretariat, ong>Conventionong> onBiological DiversityMs. Cate OwrenExecutive DirectorWomen’s Environment ong>andong>Development Organization2


UNEP/CBD/COP/5/23 (2000)V/16. Article 8(j) ong>andong> related provisionsPreamble “Recognizing ong>theong> vital role that women play in ong>theong> conservation ong>andong> sustainable useof biodiversity, ong>andong> emphasizing that greater attention should be given to strengong>theong>ning thisrole ong>andong> ong>theong> participation of women of indigenous ong>andong> local communities in ong>theong> programmeof work,”10. “Requests Parties, Governments, subsidiary bodies of ong>theong> ong>Conventionong>, ong>theong> ExecutiveSecretary ong>andong> relevant organizations, including indigenous ong>andong> local communities, whenimplementing ong>theong> programme of work contained in ong>theong> annex to ong>theong> present decision ong>andong>oong>theong>r relevant activities under ong>theong> ong>Conventionong>, to fully incorporate women ong>andong> women’sorganizations in ong>theong> activities;“Annex Programme of work on ong>theong> implementation of Article 8(j) ong>andong> relatedprovisions of ong>theong> ong>Conventionong> on Biological DiversityI. General Principles 1. “(...) Full ong>andong> effective participation of women of indigenous ong>andong> localcommunities in all activities of ong>theong> programme of work.”II. Tasks of ong>theong> first phase of ong>theong> programme of workTask 4. “Parties to develop, as appropriate, mechanisms for promoting ong>theong> full ong>andong> effectiveparticipation of indigenous ong>andong> local communities with specific provisions for ong>theong> full, activeong>andong> effective participation of women in all elements of ong>theong> programme of work taking intoaccount ong>theong> need to: (…)(e) Promote culturally appropriate ong>andong> gender specific ways in whichto document ong>andong> preserve women’s knowledge of biological diversity”V/25 Biological diversity ong>andong> tourismAnnex Assessment of ong>theong> interlinkages between tourism ong>andong> biological diversity. II.Potential impacts on biological diversity of tourism. B. Socio-economic ong>andong> culturalimpacts of tourism.29. Impacts on cultural values “Tourism has a highly complex impact on cultural values.(…). Furong>theong>rmore, ong>theong>y may affect gender relationships through, for example, offering differentemployment opportunities to men ong>andong> women.”4


E. Participatory mechanisms for indigenous ong>andong> local communities21. “ (…) invites Parties ong>andong> Governments to use ong>theong> report as a basis for ong>theong> establishmentong>andong>/or strengong>theong>ning of mechanisms at ong>theong> national ong>andong> local levels aimed at promoting fullong>andong> effective participation of indigenous ong>andong> local communities, especially women, in ong>theong>decision-making process regarding ong>theong> preservation, maintenance ong>andong> utilization of traditionalknowledge relevant for ong>theong> conservation ong>andong> sustainable use of biological diversity;”23. “Urges Parties ong>andong> Governments to strengong>theong>n ong>theong>ir efforts to support capacity-buildingaimed at ong>theong> full ong>andong> effective participation of indigenous ong>andong> local communities, particularlywomen, in decision-making processes regarding ong>theong> preservation, maintenance ong>andong> utilizationof traditional knowledge relevant for ong>theong> conservation ong>andong> sustainable use of biological diversityat all levels (local, national, regional ong>andong> international); (…)”Annex I Outline of ong>theong> composite report on ong>theong> status ong>andong> trends regarding ong>theong> knowledge,innovations ong>andong> practices of indigenous ong>andong> local communities relevant to ong>theong> conservationong>andong> sustainable use of biodiversity, ong>andong> ong>theong> plan ong>andong> timetable for its preparation4. Identification of national processes that may threaten ong>theong> maintenance, preservation ong>andong>application of traditional knowledge6. “A number of factors that may threaten ong>theong> maintenance of traditional knowledge also occurat ong>theong> local community level, by disrupting ong>theong> processes of intergenerational transmission oflanguages, cultural traditions ong>andong> skills. (…)These issues would be explored under ong>theong> followingheadings: 5.4 Social factors (including demographic, gender ong>andong> familial factors)”7. “(…). Many indigenous ong>andong> local communities, particularly women, have also taken ong>theong>irown initiatives to preserve, protect ong>andong> promote ong>theong> use of ong>theong>ir traditional knowledge. (…)”Annex II Recommendations for ong>theong> conduct of cultural, environmental ong>andong> socialimpact assessments regarding developments proposed to take place on, or whichare likely to impact on, sacred sites ong>andong> on long>andong>s ong>andong> waters traditionally occupiedor used by indigenous ong>andong> local communities.C. Socio-economic impact assessments. 14. “In socio-economic impact assessments, socialdevelopment indicators consistent with ong>theong> views of indigenous ong>andong> local communities shouldbe developed ong>andong> should give consideration to gender (…)”II. General Provisions 17. “The vital role that women play, in particular indigenous women,in ong>theong> conservation ong>andong> sustainable use of biological diversity ong>andong> ong>theong> need for ong>theong> full ong>andong>effective participation of women in policy-making ong>andong> implementation for biological diversityconservation should be fully taken into consideration, in accordance with ong>theong> ong>Conventionong>.”VI/13. Sustainable usePreamble “Recognizing furong>theong>r ong>theong> important role played by women in ong>theong> conservation ong>andong>sustainable use of biological diversity,”6


VI/15. Incentive measuresAnnex 1 Proposals for ong>theong> design ong>andong> implementation of incentive measuresA. Identification of ong>theong> problem: purpose ong>andong> issue identification. 7. “Identification of relevantexperts ong>andong> stakeholders. As well as including policy-makers, experts ong>andong> scientists, ong>theong> rangeof stakeholders should include ong>theong> private sector, women, ong>andong> local communities (…)”VI/21. Annex to The Hague Ministerial Declaration of ong>theong> Conference of ong>theong>Parties to ong>theong> ong>Conventionong> on Biological DiversityAnnex Contribution from ong>theong> Conference of ong>theong> Parties to ong>theong> ong>Conventionong> onBiological Diversity to ong>theong> World Summit on Sustainable DevelopmentB. Experience gained ong>andong> lessons learned in implementing ong>theong> ong>Conventionong> on BiologicalDiversity 16. “ The world’s poor (…) Unless ong>theong>y are fully involved in decision-making ong>andong>benefit-sharing, it is unlikely that long-term solutions to ong>theong> problem of biodiversity loss canbe found. In developing mechanisms to ensure such involvement, it is vital that issues of genderong>andong> social structure are properly addressed (…)”VI/22. Forest biological diversity32. “Urges Parties to recognize in particular ong>theong> vital role that women in indigenous ong>andong> localcommunities play in ong>theong> sustainable use ong>andong> conservation of forest biological diversity, especiallybut not limited to ong>theong> sustainable use ong>andong> conservation of non-timber resources, ong>andong> values;”7


UNEP/CBD/COP/7/21 (2004)VII/1. Forest biological diversity11. “Urges ong>theong> Executive Secretary to facilitate ong>theong> full ong>andong> effective participation of indigenousong>andong> local communities ong>andong> oong>theong>r relevant stakeholders in implementing ong>theong> expong>andong>edprogramme of work on forest biological diversity by developing local capacities ong>andong> participatorymechanisms, including women, in assembling, disseminating, ong>andong> synong>theong>sizing information onrelevant scientific ong>andong> traditional knowledge on forest biological diversity”VII/11. Ecosystem approach. Annex I Refinement ong>andong> elaboration of ong>theong>ecosystem approach, based on assessment of experience of parties inimplementationPrinciple 1: The objectives of management of long>andong>, water ong>andong> living resources are a matterof societal choice. Implementation guidelines “1.5 Ensure that ong>theong> decision-making processcompensates for any inequities of power in society, in order to ensure that those who arenormally marginalized (e.g. women, ong>theong> poor, indigenous people) are not excluded or stifledin ong>theong>ir participation.”Principle 2: Management should be decentralized to ong>theong> lowest appropriate level.Implementation guidelines. “2.5 In choosing ong>theong> appropriate level of decentralization, ong>theong>following are relevant factors that should be taken into account in choosing ong>theong> appropriatebody: ong>theong> effect on marginalized members of society (e.g. women, marginalized tribal groups)”VII/12. Sustainable Use (Article 10)6.“Invites Parties ong>andong> Governments, (…) ong>theong> compilation ong>andong> analysis of case-studies ong>andong> existingliterature on sustainable use consistent with practical principle 6: (b) The role of indigenous ong>andong>local communities, ong>andong> women in ong>theong> sustainable use of components of biodiversity;”VII/14. Biological Diversity ong>andong> tourismAnnex. International guidelines for activities related to sustainable tourism development invulnerable terrestrial, marine ong>andong> coastal ecosystems ong>andong> habitats of major importance forbiological diversity ong>andong> protected areas, including fragile riparian ong>andong> mountain ecosystems.5. Impact assessment 42. “Socio-economic ong>andong> cultural impacts related to tourism may include:(f) Intergenerational conflicts ong>andong> changed gender relationships;”VII/16. Article 8(j) ong>andong> related provisionsAnnex Elements of a plan of action for ong>theong> retention of traditional knowledge, innovationsong>andong> practices of indigenous ong>andong> local communities embodying traditional lifestyles relevantfor conservation ong>andong> sustainable use of diversity. E. Capacity-building, education ong>andong> training26. “Specific capacity-building activities should be targeted at indigenous women ong>andong> womenin rural or oong>theong>rwise marginal communities, ong>andong> at traditional knowledge, innovations ong>andong>practices.”8


Annex Akwé: Kon voluntary guidelines for ong>theong> conduct of cultural, environmental ong>andong> socialimpact assessments regarding developments proposed to take place on, or which are likely toimpact on, sacred sites ong>andong> on long>andong>s ong>andong> waters traditionally occupied or used by indigenousong>andong> local communitiesI. Purpose ong>andong> approach 3(b) “Properly take into account ong>theong> cultural, environmental ong>andong> socialconcerns ong>andong> interests of indigenous ong>andong> local communities, especially of women who oftenbear a disproportionately large share of negative development impacts;”III Procedural considerations 8 (c) “Establishment of effective mechanisms for indigenous ong>andong>local community participation, including for ong>theong> participation of women, ong>theong> youth, ong>theong> elderlyong>andong> oong>theong>r vulnerable groups, in ong>theong> impact assessment processes;”IV. Integration of cultural, environmental ong>andong> social impact assessments as a singleprocess C. Social impact assessments39. “In order to effectively undertake a social impact assessment with respect to an indigenousor local community that is or is likely to be affected by a proposed development, ong>theong> screeningong>andong> scoping phases should take into account gender ong>andong> demographic factors, (…)”42. “In social impact assessments, social development indicators consistent with ong>theong> views ofindigenous ong>andong> local communities should be developed ong>andong> should include gender, (…)”43. “In determining ong>theong> scope of a social impact assessment, ong>theong> following should be considered:d) ong>Genderong> considerations;”1. Baseline studies 44. “In ong>theong> conduct of baseline studies, ong>theong> following areas should, interalia, be addressed: (h) Traditional systems of production (food, medicine, artefacts), includinggender roles in such systems;”45. “In particular, in relation to subsistence-based indigenous ong>andong> local communities, ong>theong>following additional social factors should also be taken into consideration, including impactsong>theong>reon: (c) Importance of gender roles ong>andong> relations;”4. ong>Genderong> considerations 48. “In social impact assessments, ong>theong>re is a particular need toexamine ong>theong> potential impacts of a proposed development on women in ong>theong> affected communitywith due regard to ong>theong>ir role as providers of food ong>andong> nurturers of family, community decisionmakersong>andong> heads of households, as well as custodians of biodiversity ong>andong> holders of particularelements of (gender-specific) traditional knowledge, innovations ong>andong> practices.”V. General considerations52. “The following general considerations should also be taken into account when carrying outan impact assessment for a development proposed to take place on, or which is likely to impacton, sacred sites ong>andong> on long>andong>s ong>andong> waters traditionally occupied or used by indigenous ong>andong> localcommunities: (b) ong>Genderong> considerations;”B. ong>Genderong> considerations 54. “The vital role that women ong>andong> youth play, in particular womenong>andong> youth within indigenous ong>andong> local communities, in ong>theong> conservation ong>andong> sustainable useof biological diversity ong>andong> ong>theong> need for ong>theong> full ong>andong> effective participation of women in policymakingong>andong> implementation for biological diversity conservation should be fully taken intoconsideration.”9


G. Participatory mechanisms for indigenous ong>andong> local communitiesPreamble “Recognizing furong>theong>r ong>theong> vital role that women play in ong>theong> conservation ong>andong>sustainable use of biological diversity ong>andong> affirming ong>theong> need for ong>theong> full participation ofwomen at all levels of policymaking ong>andong> implementation for biological diversity conservation,as recognized in ong>theong> preamble of ong>theong> ong>Conventionong>,”6. “Invites Parties ong>andong> Governments, in consultation with indigenous ong>andong> local communities,where ong>theong>y have not already done so, to: (b) Establish national, subregional ong>andong>/or regionalindigenous ong>andong> local community biodiversity advisory committees, taking into account genderequity at all levels;”VII/27. Mountain biological diversity. Annex. Programme of work onmountain biodiversityGoal 2.2. To respect, preserve, ong>andong> maintain knowledge, practices ong>andong> innovations ofindigenous ong>andong> local communities in mountain regions 2.2.3.“Promote networking,collaborative action ong>andong> participation of indigenous ong>andong> local communities in decision-makingprocesses, paying particular attention to ong>theong> empowerment of women, in order to maintainmountain biodiversity ong>andong> its sustainable use.”Goal 3.5. To increase public education, participation ong>andong> awareness in relation to mountainbiological diversity 3.5.5.“Furong>theong>r promote ong>theong> education of women ong>andong> ong>theong>ir role in ong>theong>conservation ong>andong> dissemination of traditional knowledge.”VII/28. Protected areas (Articles 8 (a) to (e)). Annex. Programme of workon protected areasGoal 2.2 – To enhance ong>andong> secure involvement of indigenous ong>andong> local communities ong>andong>relevant stakeholders Suggested Activities of ong>theong> Parties. 2.2.1. Carry out participatory nationalreviews of ong>theong> status, needs ong>andong> context-specific mechanisms for involving stakeholders,ensuring gender ong>andong> social equity, in protected areas policy ong>andong> management, at ong>theong> level ofnational policy, protected area systems ong>andong> individual sites.VII/29. Transfer of technology ong>andong> technology cooperation (Articles 16 to 19)Preamble “Recognizing ong>theong> vital role of indigenous ong>andong> local communities, in particular ong>theong> roleof women, ong>andong> ong>theong> value of traditional knowledge related to ong>theong> conservation ong>andong> sustainableuse of biological diversity,”VII/32. The programme of work of ong>theong> ong>Conventionong> ong>andong> ong>theong> MillenniumDevelopment GoalsPreamble “The Conference of ong>theong> Parties, Recognizing that world leaders at ong>theong> MillenniumSummit have established ong>theong> Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) as ong>theong> focus ofglobal efforts to combat poverty, hunger, disease, illiteracy, environmental degradation ong>andong>discrimination against women, ong>andong> that ong>theong> Millennium Development Goals agenda providesong>theong> framework for ong>theong> entire United Nations system to work coherently toward ong>theong>se commonends,”10


UNEP/CBD/COP/8 (2006)VIII/5. Article 8(j) ong>andong> related provisionsB. Composite report on status ong>andong> trends regarding ong>theong> knowledge innovations ong>andong>practices relevant to ong>theong> conservation ong>andong> sustainable use of biological diversity13. “Requests ong>theong> Executive Secretary to collaborate with Parties in convening, subject to ong>theong>availability of financial resources, regional ong>andong> subregional workshops to assist indigenous ong>andong>local communities in capacity-building, education ong>andong> training, with particular emphasis on ong>theong>participation of women from indigenous ong>andong> local communities.”Annex. Draft Criteria for ong>theong> operation of ong>theong> voluntary funding MecanismA. Administrative context, structure ong>andong> processes of ong>theong> fund (j) Collaboration with oong>theong>rTrust Funds “The Secretariat will remain in contact with oong>theong>r relevant funds to ensurecomplementarity, to achieve gender, (…)”B. Proposed recommendations for selection criteria for beneficiaries of ong>theong> fund.(i) Main Criteria (b) “ong>Genderong> balance should be applied, recognizing ong>theong> special role ofindigenous ong>andong> local community women (in knowledge, innovations ong>andong> practices) fromindigenous ong>andong> local communities;”(iii) Requirements (b) “(…) Nominating bodies are strongly encouraged to ascertain ong>theong>availability of individuals before ong>theong>y are nominated ong>andong> to nominate a number of cong>andong>idatesin priority order taking into account geographic, age ong>andong> gender equity;” ong>andong> (f) “TheSecretariat only considers a maximum of two (2) applicants per organization or communityong>andong> organizations or communities submitting two names are requested to consider genderbalance (ong>andong> where possible, to submit both a male ong>andong> a female applicant);”VIII/10. Operations of ong>theong> ong>Conventionong>Annex III Consolidated modus operong>andong>i of ong>theong> subsidiary body on scientific,technical ong>andong> technological adviceH. Ad hoc technical expert group meetings (b) “(…) The ad hoc technical expert groups shall becomposed of no more than fifteen experts nominated by Parties competent in ong>theong> relevant fieldof expertise, with due regard to geographical representation, gender balance (…)”VIII/23. Agricultural biodiversityAnnex Proposed framework for a cross-cutting initiative on biodiversity for foodong>andong> nutritionD. Elements Element 3. Conserving ong>andong> promoting wider use of biodiversity for food ong>andong>nutrition Rationale “(...) Indigenous ong>andong> local communities, ong>andong> ong>theong> preservation of ong>theong>ir localsocio-cultural traditions ong>andong> knowledge, play a critical role, as do women, for ong>theong> maintenanceof diverse food systems.”(...)11


UNEP/CBD/COP/9/29 (2008)IX/8. Review of implementation of goals 2 ong>andong> 3 of ong>theong> Strategic PlanNational biodiversity strategies ong>andong> action plans 8. “Recalling ong>theong> guidance provided by ong>theong>Conference of ong>theong> Parties (…), urges Parties in developing, implementing ong>andong> revising ong>theong>irnational ong>andong>, where appropriate, regional, biodiversity strategies ong>andong> action plans, ong>andong>equivalent instruments, in implementing ong>theong> three objectives of ong>theong> ong>Conventionong>, to: Meeting ong>theong>three objectives of ong>theong> ong>Conventionong>: (d) Promote ong>theong> mainstreaming of gender considerations;”IX/11. Review of implementation of Articles 20 ong>andong> 21A. In-depth review of ong>theong> availability of financial resources “Resolving to significantly reduceong>theong> gaps in funding for biological diversity, 7. Urges Parties, ong>theong> Global Environment Facility,ong>andong> relevant organizations to include gender, indigenous peoples ong>andong> local communitiesperspectives in ong>theong> financing of biodiversity ong>andong> its associated ecosystem services;”Annex Strategy for resources mobilization in support of ong>theong> achievement ofong>Conventionong>’s three objectives for ong>theong> period 2008-2015.III. Guiding Principles. 9. “The strategy calls for special consideration to ong>theong> following guidingprinciples during its implementation: (f) Take into account gender ong>andong> socio-economicperspectives.”IX/13. Article 8(j) ong>andong> related provisionsB. Composite report on ong>theong> status ong>andong> trends (…) Noting ong>theong> research made available by ong>theong>Secretariat, (…) 4. “Notes also ong>theong> unique value of biodiversity related traditional knowledge,innovations ong>andong> practices of indigenous ong>andong> local communities, especially those of women,in contributing to ong>theong> understong>andong>ing ong>andong> evaluation of impacts of climate change, includingvulnerabilities ong>andong> adaptation options ong>andong> oong>theong>r forms of environmental degradation, ong>andong>encourages Parties, Governments, ong>andong> relevant international organizations, with ong>theong> full ong>andong>effective participation ong>andong> prior informed consent of indigenous ong>andong> local communities, todocument, analyse ong>andong> apply, as far as possible ong>andong> where appropriate, ong>andong> in accordancewith Article 8(j) of ong>theong> ong>Conventionong>, such knowledge in ways that complement science-basedknowledge;”D. Plan of action for ong>theong> retention of traditional knowledge: measures ong>andong> mechanisms toaddress ong>theong> underlying causes for ong>theong> decline of traditional knowledge. 4. Invites Parties ong>andong>Governments, with ong>theong> input of indigenous ong>andong> local communities, to report on positivemeasures for ong>theong> retention of traditional knowledge in areas relevant for ong>theong> conservationong>andong> ong>theong> sustainable use of biological diversity, such as those contained in but not limited toong>theong> annex hereto. “ (j) Initiatives bringing togeong>theong>r women, youth ong>andong> elders;”12


E. Participatory mechanisms for indigenous ong>andong> local communities in ong>theong> ong>Conventionong>5. “Encourages Parties, Governments ong>andong> relevant international organizations, (…) to develop,including in local languages, as appropriate, alternative means of communicating publicinformation on traditional knowledge related to ong>theong> conservation ong>andong> sustainable use ofbiodiversity, in plain language ong>andong> diverse community-friendly formats, (…), in order to ensureong>theong> full ong>andong> effective participation of indigenous ong>andong> local communities, including womenong>andong> youth, at local, national ong>andong> international levels, while supporting ong>theong> development byindigenous ong>andong> local communities of ong>theong>ir own media tools;”7. “Requests ong>theong> Executive Secretary to: (c) Monitor ong>theong> use of ong>theong> ong>Conventionong> website ong>andong>,in particular, ong>theong> Article 8(j) homepage ong>andong> ong>theong> Traditional Knowledge Information Portal, ong>andong>to consult with Parties, indigenous ong>andong> local communities, ong>andong> ong>theong>ir organizations, includingyouth ong>andong> women, (…)”Annex Draft elements of a code of ethical conduct to [promote][ensure] respect forong>theong> cultural ong>andong> intellectual heritage indigenous ong>andong> local communities relevant toong>theong> conservation ong>andong> sustainable use of biological diversitySection 3 Ethical principles. A General ethical principles Non-discrimination 9. “The ethicsong>andong> guidelines for all activities/interactions should be non-discriminatory, taking into accountaffirmative action, particularly in relation to gender, disadvantaged groups ong>andong> representation.”Section 4 Methods ong>Genderong> considerations 28. “Methodologies should take into account ong>theong>vital role that indigenous ong>andong> local community women play in ong>theong> conservation ong>andong> sustainableuse of biological diversity, affirming ong>theong> need for ong>theong> full ong>andong> effective participation of womenat all levels of policy-making ong>andong> implementation for biological diversity conservation, asappropriate.”IX/24. ong>Genderong> Plan of Action“The Conference of ong>theong> Parties Welcomes ong>theong> development by ong>theong> Executive Secretary of ong>theong>ong>Genderong> Plan of Action under ong>theong> ong>Conventionong> on Biological Diversity, (UNEP/CBD/COP/9/INF/12/Rev.1), ong>andong> invites Parties to support ong>theong> implementation of ong>theong> Plan by ong>theong> Secretariat.”13


UNEP/CBD/COP/10/27 (2010)X/1. Access to genetic resources ong>andong> ong>theong> fair ong>andong> equitable sharing ofbenefits arising from ong>theong>ir utilizationAnnex 1. Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources ong>andong> ong>theong> fair ong>andong> equitablesharing of benefits arising from ong>theong>ir utilization to ong>theong> ong>Conventionong> on BiologicalDiversityPreamble “Recognizing also ong>theong> vital role that women play in access ong>andong> benefit-sharingong>andong> affirming ong>theong> need for ong>theong> full participation of women at all levels of policy-making ong>andong>implementation for biodiversity conservation,”Article 12. Traditional Knowledge Associated with Genetic Resources. 3. “Parties shallendeavour to support, as appropriate, ong>theong> development by indigenous ong>andong> local communities,including women within ong>theong>se communities, (..)”Article 22. Capacity3. “As a basis for appropriate measures in relation to ong>theong> implementation of this Protocol,(…) such Parties should support ong>theong> capacity needs ong>andong> priorities of indigenous ong>andong> localcommunities ong>andong> relevant stakeholders, as identified by ong>theong>m, emphasizing ong>theong> capacity needsong>andong> priorities of women.”5. Measures in accordance with paragraphs 1 to 4 above may include, inter alia:(j) “Special measures to increase ong>theong> capacity of indigenous ong>andong> local communities wiong>theong>mphasis on enhancing ong>theong> capacity of women within those communities in relation to accessto genetic resources ong>andong>/or traditional knowledge associated with genetic resources.”Article 25 Financial Mechanism ong>andong> Resources 3. (…)in providing guidance with respect to ong>theong>financial mechanism referred to in paragraph 2 above, for consideration by ong>theong> Conference ofong>theong> Parties, shall take into account (…) ong>theong> capacity needs ong>andong> priorities of indigenous ong>andong> localcommunities, including women within ong>theong>se communities.X/2. The Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 ong>andong> ong>theong> Aichi BiodiversityTargetsPreamble3. “Urges Parties ong>andong> oong>theong>r Governments, with ong>theong> support of intergovernmental ong>andong> oong>theong>rorganizations, as appropriate, to implement ong>theong> Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 ong>andong>in particular to: (a) Enable participation at all levels to foster ong>theong> full ong>andong> effective contributionsof women, indigenous ong>andong> local communities, civil-society organizations, ong>theong> private sectorong>andong> stakeholders from all oong>theong>r sectors in ong>theong> full implementation of ong>theong> objectives of ong>theong>ong>Conventionong> ong>andong> ong>theong> Strategic Plan;”14


8. “Recalls decision IX/8, which called for gender mainstreaming in national biodiversitystrategies ong>andong> action plans, ong>andong> decision IX/24, in which ong>theong> Conference of ong>theong> Parties approvedong>theong> gender plan of action for ong>theong> ong>Conventionong>, which, among oong>theong>r things, requests Parties tomainstream a gender perspective into ong>theong> implementation of ong>theong> ong>Conventionong> ong>andong> promotegender equality in achieving its three objectives, ong>andong> requests Parties to mainstream genderconsiderations, where appropriate, in ong>theong> implementation of ong>theong> Strategic Plan for Biodiversity2011-2020 ong>andong> its associated goals, ong>theong> Aichi Targets, ong>andong> indicators;”Annex. Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 ong>andong> ong>theong> Aichi Biodiversity Targets“Living in harmony with nature”IV. Strategic goals ong>andong> ong>theong> Aichi Biodiversity Targets Strategic goal D. Enhance ong>theong> benefitsto all from biodiversity ong>andong> ecosystem services Target 14: “By 2020, ecosystems that provideessential services, including services related to water, ong>andong> contribute to health, livelihoods ong>andong>well-being, are restored ong>andong> safeguarded, taking into account ong>theong> needs of women, indigenousong>andong> local communities, ong>andong> ong>theong> poor ong>andong> vulnerable.”V. Implementation, Monitoring, Review ong>andong> Evaluation. 17. “Partnerships at all levels arerequired for effective implementation of ong>theong> Strategic Plan, (…). Partnerships with (…) women,will be essential to support implementation of ong>theong> Strategic Plan at ong>theong> national level. (…)”VI. Support Mechanisms 20. “Capacity-building for effective national action: (…). Capacitybuildingon gender mainstreaming in accordance with ong>theong> ong>Conventionong>‘s gender plan of action,ong>andong> for indigenous ong>andong> local communities concerning ong>theong> implementation of ong>theong> Strategic Planat national ong>andong> subnational levels should be supported.”X/6. Integration of biodiversity into poverty eradication ong>andong> development6. Notes, in efforts to integrate biodiversity into poverty eradication ong>andong> developmentprocesses, ong>theong> importance of: (b) “Mainstreaming gender considerations ong>andong> ong>theong> promotionof gender equality;”X/16. Technology transfer ong>andong> cooperation1. Recognizing ong>theong> potential contribution of a Biodiversity Technology Initiative (BTI) topromoting ong>andong> supporting ong>theong> effective access to ong>andong> transfer of relevant technology (...)emphasizes that: (a) Such a Biodiversity Technology Initiative needs to: vii) “Take into accountthat ong>theong> participation, approval ong>andong> involvement of women, indigenous ong>andong> local communitiesong>andong> all relevant stakeholders is key for ong>theong> successful transfer of technology of relevance to ong>theong>ong>Conventionong>;”X/17. Consolidated update of ong>theong> Global Strategy for Plant Conservation2011-2020Annex Update Global Strategy for Plant Conservation 2011-2020.G. Implementation of ong>theong> Strategy. 16. “(…) in addition to ong>theong> Parties to ong>theong> ong>Conventionong>,furong>theong>r development ong>andong> implementation of ong>theong> strategy should involve a range of actors,including(…) (iv) communities ong>andong> major groups (including indigenous ong>andong> local communities,farmers, women, youth) (…)”15


X/19. ong>Genderong> mainstreaming“The Conference of ong>theong> Parties, Recalling its decision IX/24, in which it welcomed ong>theong>development by ong>theong> Executive Secretary of ong>theong> ong>Genderong> Plan of Action under ong>theong> ong>Conventionong>on Biological Diversity, 50 ong>andong> invited Parties to support ong>theong> Secretariat‘s implementation ofong>theong> Plan,Emphasizing ong>theong> importance of gender mainstreaming in all programmes of work under ong>theong>ong>Conventionong> in order to achieve ong>theong> objectives of ong>theong> ong>Conventionong> ong>andong> its Strategic Plan forBiodiversity 2011-2020,1. Expresses its appreciation to ong>theong> Government of Finlong>andong> for its generous financial contributionthat made it possible for a position of ong>Genderong> Programme Officer to be established within ong>theong>Secretariat;2. Requests ong>theong> Executive Secretary, subject to availability of resources, in cooperation withoong>theong>r intergovernmental ong>andong> non-governmental organizations, to enhance efforts to fullyimplement ong>theong> Plan of Action in order to mainstream gender considerations in all aspects ofong>theong> work under ong>theong> ong>Conventionong> ong>andong> formulate clear indicators to monitor progress;3. Encourages Parties ong>andong> oong>theong>r Governments to contribute to ong>theong> implementation of ong>theong>ong>Genderong> Plan of Action, including through ong>theong> provision of financial ong>andong> oong>theong>r support;4. Invites Parties to consider gender as a core cross-cutting issue in ong>theong> implementation ofbiodiversity-related activities;5. Recalling its decision IX/8, urges Parties to promote ong>theong> mainstreaming of genderconsiderations in developing, implementing ong>andong> revising ong>theong>ir national ong>andong>, where appropriate,regional, biodiversity strategies ong>andong> action plans, ong>andong> equivalent instruments, in implementingong>theong> three objectives of ong>theong> ong>Conventionong>, taking into account ong>theong> guidance provided in ong>theong>Technical Series No. 49.”X/22. Plan of action on subnational governments, cities ong>andong> oong>theong>r localauthorities for biodiversityAnnex Plan of Action on Subnational Governments, cities, ong>andong> oong>theong>r local authoritiesfor biodiversity (2011-2020).D. Indicative list of activities. (p) “In line with ong>theong> communication, education ong>andong> publicawareness programme of ong>theong> ong>Conventionong> on Biological Diversity, encourage local authoritiesto reach out to major groups such as children ong>andong> youth, women, (…)”X/24. Review of guidance to ong>theong> financial mechanismAnnex Consolidated guidance to ong>theong> financial mechanism of ong>theong> ong>Conventionong>E. Review of ong>theong> effectiveness of ong>theong> financial mechanism. 2. The Global EnvironmentFacility should take ong>theong> following action to furong>theong>r improve ong>theong> effectiveness of ong>theong> financialmechanism: 2.8 “ong>Genderong> (a) Including gender, indigenous peoples ong>andong> local communities‘perspectives in ong>theong> financing of biodiversity ong>andong> ecosystem services;”16


X/25. Additional guidance to ong>theong> financial mechanismArticle 8(j) ong>andong> related provisions 12. “Invites ong>theong> Global Environment Facility, internationalfunding institutions ong>andong> development agencies ong>andong> relevant non-governmental organizations,where requested, ong>andong> in accordance with ong>theong>ir mong>andong>ates ong>andong> responsibilities, to considerproviding assistance to indigenous ong>andong> local communities, particularly women, to raise ong>theong>irawareness ong>andong> to build capacity ong>andong> understong>andong>ing regarding ong>theong> elements of ong>theong> code ofethical conduct;”X/35. Biodiversity of dry ong>andong> sub-humid long>andong>s2. Urges Parties ong>andong> oong>theong>r Governments, where appropriate, to: (a) “Develop ong>andong> implement,or revise existing, drought-management plans ong>andong> early-warning systems at all levels, (…)seeking: (ii) To direct biodiversity management for ong>theong> prevention of desertification, includingthrough ong>theong> involvement of all stakeholders, particularly women (…) in accordance withtraditional community-based strategies, particularly through customary use systems;”X/40. Mechanisms to promote ong>theong> effective participation of indigenous ong>andong>local communities in ong>theong> work of ong>theong> ong>Conventionong> A. Capacity-building efforts3. “Encourages ong>theong> Secretariat to continue its efforts to facilitate ong>theong> effective implementationof decisions regarding capacity-building102 through workshops using a train-ong>theong>–trainermethodology ong>andong> extending opportunities to all regions, with a view to increasing ong>theong> numberof indigenous ong>andong> local community representatives, particularly women, who are familiar withong>andong> participate in ong>theong> work of ong>theong> ong>Conventionong>, including its implementation at ong>theong> nationalong>andong> local level;”4. “Invites Parties, Governments ong>andong> relevant organizations, including indigenous ong>andong> localcommunity organizations, to consider collaborating with ong>theong> Secretariat to establish similarinitiatives in oong>theong>r regions, with ong>theong> view to building ong>andong> strengong>theong>ning ong>theong> capacity ofindigenous ong>andong> local community representatives, particularly women ong>andong> young people, toeffectively participate in ong>theong> work of ong>theong> ong>Conventionong>”X/42 The Tkarihwaié:ri code of ethical conduct to ensure respect for culturalong>andong> intellectual heritage of indigenous ong>andong> local communitiesRelevant to ong>theong> conservation ong>andong> sustainable use of biological diversity.Preamble 6. “Invites ong>theong> Global Environment Facility, international funding institutions ong>andong>development agencies ong>andong> relevant non-governmental organizations, where requested, ong>andong>in accordance with ong>theong>ir mong>andong>ates ong>andong> responsibilities, to consider providing assistance toindigenous ong>andong> local communities, particularly women, to raise ong>theong>ir awareness ong>andong> to buildcapacity ong>andong> understong>andong>ing of ong>theong> elements of ong>theong> code of ethical conduct.”17


Annex The Tkarihwaié:ri code of ethical conduct to ensure respect for culturalong>andong> intellectual heritage of indigenous ong>andong> local communities Relevant to ong>theong>conservation ong>andong> sustainable use of biological diversity.Section 2 Ethical Principles. A. General Ethical Principles. Non-discrimination 9. “The ethicsong>andong> guidelines for all activities/interactions should be non-discriminatory, taking into accountaffirmative action, particularly in relation to gender, disadvantaged groups ong>andong> representation.”B. Specific Considerations. Recognition of indigenous ong>andong> local community social structures-Extended families, communities ong>andong> indigenous nations 21. “For indigenous ong>andong> localcommunities all activities/interactions, take place in a social context. The role of elders,women, ong>andong> youth is paramount in ong>theong> process of cultural dissemination, which dependsupon intergenerational transfer of knowledge, innovation ong>andong> practices. Therefore, ong>theong> societalstructure/s of indigenous ong>andong> local communities should be respected, including ong>theong> right to passon ong>theong>ir knowledge in accordance with ong>theong>ir traditions ong>andong> customs.”Section 3 Methods. ong>Genderong> considerations 29. “Methodologies should take into account ong>theong>vital role that indigenous ong>andong> local community women play in ong>theong> conservation ong>andong> sustainableuse of biological diversity, affirming ong>theong> need for ong>theong> full ong>andong> effective participation of womenat all levels of policy-making ong>andong> implementation for biological diversity conservation, asappropriate.”X/43. Multi-year programme of work on ong>theong> implementation of Article8(j) ong>andong> related provisions of ong>theong> ong>Conventionong> on Biological Diversity.Participation. b) Local Communities 21. “Noting that ong>theong> involvement of local communitiesin accordance with Article 8(j) has been limited for various reasons, decides to convene an adhoc expert group meeting of local-community representatives, bearing in mind geographic ong>andong>gender balance, (…)”Capacity-building, community education ong>andong> public awareness 23. “Furong>theong>r requests ong>theong>Executive Secretary to continue to develop communication, education ong>andong> public awarenessactivities ong>andong> products, including with ong>theong> contributions of indigenous ong>andong> local communities, toassist in ong>theong> community education of indigenous ong>andong> local communities about ong>theong> work of ong>theong>ong>Conventionong> ong>andong> also raising awareness of ong>theong> general public about ong>theong> role of indigenous ong>andong>local communities, especially ong>theong> role of indigenous ong>andong> local community women knowledge inconservation, sustainable use of biodiversity ong>andong> oong>theong>r global issues, including climate change;”Decision LinksTEXT OF THE CONVENTIONhttp://www.cbd.int/convention/text/UNEP/CBD/COP/3/38 (1996)http://www.cbd.int/decisions/cop/?m=cop-03UNEP/CBD/COP/5/23 (2000)http://www.cbd.int/decisions/cop/?m=cop-05UNEP/CBD/COP/6/20 (2002)http://www.cbd.int/decisions/cop/?m=cop-06UNEP/CBD/COP/7/21 (2004)http://www.cbd.int/decisions/cop/?m=cop-07UNEP/CBD/COP/8 (2006)http://www.cbd.int/decisions/cop/?m=cop-08UNEP/CBD/COP/9/29 (2008)http://www.cbd.int/decisions/cop/?m=cop-09UNEP/CBD/COP/10/27 (2010)http://www.cbd.int/decisions/cop/?m=cop-1018


World Trade Centre · 413 St. Jacques Street,Suite 800 | Montreal, Quebec Canada | H2Y 1N9Tel: 1(514) 288 2220 | Fax: 1 (514) 288 6588email: secretariat@cbd.intwww.cbd.int355 Lexington Avenue, 3rd Floor | New York, NY | 10017-6603Tel 212.973.0325 | fax 212.973.0335 | email wedo@wedo.orgLike us on facebook.com/WEDOworldwideFollow us @WEDO_Worldwidewww.wedo.orgCreditsCompilation ong>andong> Photos: Andrea Quesada AguilarDesign ong>andong> layout: Pablo Porta Barrantes

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines