Views
3 years ago

Vol. 2 No.8 - 20 June - Adm.monash.edu

Vol. 2 No.8 - 20 June - Adm.monash.edu

Vol. 2 No.8 - 20 June -

Art expoTwo tier courses•get conditionalYes, this picture was taken in1985, The subject is LarryParkinson, whose work will bepart of the Fine Art Department'sgreen lightmajor exhibition ofstaffand postgraduatestudent work this year. The further development of Members of Council expressedThe exhibition will run for atwo tier courses in con­ concern aboutmonth at the McClelland Gallery,junction with the Holmesglen • The failure of Federal andLangwarrin, a State Regional and Frankston TAFE Colleges State authorities, whileGallery. has been approved by enthUSiastically supporting the .Council- but only after a long development of the newIt will be opened by Dr Eric and sometimes heated course, to guarantee anWestbrook at 2.30pm on Sunday debate at the June meeting. increase in the Institute's7 July and close on Friday 2 Council's endorsement of the student quota - and funding ­August courses- with the first students for it.due to be enrolled at the TAFE • Academic standards.Colleges next year and at • Industrial issues, with TAFEChisholm in 1987 - carried the staff teaching an Advancedrider that additional student Education course.quota and full funding must be • The political implications inprovided by Federal and State relation to long term funding ofauthorities. tertiary education. ·Other conditions were that • The possibility that whilethe pilot two tier programs be the Faculty of Technology wasrestricted to the special developing the new courses,technology courses being the two tier structure woulddeveloped; that the Academic become a model other SchoolsBoard be satisfied with would be forced to adopt.standards and staffing; and • The speed with which thethat the Director advise proposal was being pushedCouncil of the outcome of through.meetings with local staff 'While I am generally in favourassociations and the Council of of TAFE/CAE co-operation, IAcademic Staff Associations. am concerned that we aregoing into a new course whereThe Director, Mr Patrickwe are a little doubtful.Leary, told Council a two year'We shouldn't rush like theUG3 Associate Diploma wouldgaderene swine down the hillbe taught at the TAFE Collegesinto this enterprise', Mrand a three year UG1Anthony Bailey cautioned.Bachelor's degree courseAcademic standards andwould be taught at Chisholm atindustrial issues concerned Mrboth campuses.Arthur Crook, an AcademicThe courses would be newly Staff representative.developed, generalised tech­ He said he did not accept thenology programs, with the Director's contention thatAssociate Diploma providing TAFE staff were better placedstudents with a computing to teach those of disqualificationand the degree advantaged background norcourse providing a broader that TAFE was in a betterqualification with the possibility position than a CAE to open upof some specialisation through educational access.electives in both the second On the industrial side, Mrand third years.Crook noted that the Council ofThere would be a common Academic Staff Associations,first year at TAFE.CAS A, was legally responsiblein the industrial arena for staffAt the end of that year,teaching all tertiary coursesstudents would have theand that complex industrialoption, subject to results, ofissues would have to be dealtcontinuing on for the secondwith before TAFE staff couldyear of the Diploma at TAFE, orteach the first year of degreemoving over to Chisholm withcourses.direct entry into the secondCASA was very concernedyear of the degree course.that the two tier proposal wasEach of the TAFE Colleges the beginning of an economywould take 75 students intothe drive in tertiary education,first year, while Chisholm since TAFE teaching waswould offer 50 places in the .. considerably cheaper thansecond year of the degree Advanced Education teaching.course.The General Staff representative,Mr Paul Rodan, agreed,saying the sort of support theState and Federal authoritieswere giVing the two tierThe youth of today face a that as products of the tertiary and other tertiary institutions advantage of the country, and proposal ' often hides otherEconomic crisis today's challengedaunting challenge that is education system, they had a for their involvement with to help promote the cause of concerns, such as getting kidseverybitas urgentand real as special role to play in aiding industry in research and tertiary education. off dole queues and cuttingthe challenge ofWorld War II Austral ia to get itself out of its development. One- hundred-and-forty-five costs'.faced by the youth of 45 economic mess. Tertiary institutions had an graduands from the School of Faculty of Technologyyears ago_ Through their education, they important role to play in this Art and Design, David Syme academic staff. were soThe challenge today is an had acquired knowledge and area, particularly in their ability Business School, the School of concerned about the neweconomic crisis of major expertise which could be the to bring together the multi­ Education, the Faculty of direction that a petition wasproportions with Australia basis for the creation of new disciplinary teams needed to Technology and the School of circulating and already had asliding down to near the bottom business, new industry and attackthe complex problems of Scoial and Behavioural Studies large number of Signatories,of the OECD table. new employment which would the present day. received their awards at the calling for a pause in the twoThat was the message given help lift Australia out of the The President of Chisholm Frankston ceremony, the third tier course development whileto graduands by Mr Frank doldrums. Council, DrCliveCoogan, in his and final Conferring Ceremony the philosophy behind it wasLees, delivering the Occasional 'We are on the way to being a closing address, picked up Mr this year. considered in more depth.Address at the Conferring third world nation', Mr Lees Lees' point about theThe second Academic StaffCeremony on 12 June at warned. relationship between research • The School of Social and Frankston campus. To turn the economic position and development and economic Behavioural Studies passed a representative, Mr Tim Haslett, Mr Lees, an engineer, is development. milestone with this year's expressed concern aboutaround, research and developacademicstandards, the lackRegional Associate for theConferrings.ment which would lead to new While research and developofadditional student quota forLondon-based International industries and new business ment was the engine of the The Head of AppliedAssociation of Consultants in were essentiah economy, tertiary education Psychology, Mr Colin Cameron,the new course, and theHigher Educational Institutions, awas the engine of research and says eight of the graduatespossibility of other Schoolsmember of the VictorianMr Lees cited the example ofdevelopment.shared the honour of being thebeing forced into similarcommittee of the AustralianChina, which had used itsarrangements.scientists and technologists to In its commitment to tertiary first in the School to completeScientific Industry Association,build an economy which had education, to producing the their entire courses at 'I can see the politicala Director of the Institute ofstarted from being in debt and researchers of the future, Frankston campus. ramifications of these programsDrug Technology, and wasformerly Chief Executivenow had $68-billion in Australia was near the bottom He says two of them are still at in terms of meeting Governoverseascredits. of the OECD ladder, saved from ment objectives, but academically IOfficer of the Applied Research Chisholm undertaking postthinkthey could be realand Development Division of Australia needed to use its last place only by Turkey, graduate studies in psychology,Swinburne Institute of Tech­ talent and expertise in the Portugal and Greece.~hile two others are doing trouble', Mr Haslett said.nology. same way. He urged the graduates to post-graduate work at other• More Page 2Mr Lees told the graduands Mr Lees praised Chisholm use their training to the best institutions.I

Vol. 1 No.9 - 21 June - Adm.monash.edu
Vol. 4 no.8 - Adm.monash.edu - Monash University
Vol. 2 No.16 - 17 October - Adm.monash.edu
Vol. 2 no.7 - Adm.monash.edu - Monash University
Vol. 1 No.2 - 15 March - Adm.monash.edu
Vol. 2 no.9 - Adm.monash.edu - Monash University
Vol. 2 No.1 - Adm.monash.edu - Monash University
Vol. 2 No.3 - 28 March - Adm.monash.edu - Monash University
Vol. 3 No.6 - October - Adm.monash.edu
Vol..3 No.4 - August - Adm.monash.edu - Monash University
The Footplate: vol. 20, no. 5 (May-June, 1937)
Vol. 3 no.5 - Adm.monash.edu - Monash University
Vol. 8 Iss. 2 - iarfc
Pholeos Vol. 20 (1 & 2).indd - WUSS
Vol. 5 No.1 - Adm.monash.edu - Monash University
Vol. 3 no.7 - Adm.monash.edu - Monash University
Vol. 1 No.19 - 22 November - Adm.monash.edu
May/June - Vol 71, No 8 - International Technology and Engineering ...
Vol. 9 No. 8 June 18 - University of Port Harcourt
Vol 8, no 21 (25 June) - Nutrition Society of Australia
vol.8 iss.2 - Grand Banks Yachts
Vol. 1 No.6 - 10 May - Adm.monash.edu
Vol. 3 no.10 - Adm.monash.edu - Monash University
Vol. 1 no.9 - Adm.monash.edu - Monash University
Vol. 4 no.1 - Adm.monash.edu - Monash University