Publication in pdf format - Threshold

threshold.ie

Publication in pdf format - Threshold

stthreshold what we doThreshold is a national not-for-profit organisation established in 1978. Our mission is tosolve people’s housing problems and to campaign for a better housing system. We focus onthose who are in greatest need of our support - the marginalised and those suffering frompoverty and inequality.Over the past 28 years, Threshold has helped many thousands of people move from inadequate housing and homelessnessto become successful members of sustainable communities. We influence housing policy in Ireland and provide anindependent voice on housing issues. We contributed significantly to the introduction of the Residential Tenancies Act2004, which provides increased protections for tenants and landlords in the private rented sector.Threshold provides independent advice and advocacy services through our advice centres in Dublin, Cork, Galway andLimerick and via outreach clinics in outlying areas. Through these services, Threshold offers support to people experiencinghousing problems. We help people who are homeless, as well as those who are living in private rented accommodation andsocial housing. Homeowners and landlords who are experiencing problems are also welcome to consult Threshold’s advicecentres.We offer unique accommodation placement services to homeless people seeking housing in the private rented sector.Threshold’s Access Housing Unit in Dublin, sponsored by the Homeless Agency, and our regional placement services basedin Galway and Cork help people to move out of homeless hostels and shelters by linking landlords with suitable homelesstenants. We also provide follow-up support to ensure that tenants are managing in their new home. We plan to expandthese services to other local authority areas around the country.Threshold also creates new housing models, particularly the Gilabbey Court Housing Project in Cork city. Established in1985, this project helps couples and families with limited financial means to save towards buying a new home.Threshold’s advice centres run education programmes in secondary schools and third-level colleges, with an emphasis onstudents in disadvantaged areas. We offer information and training to community groups, while at the same time informinglandlords and other housing providers on the provisions of housing legislation.By campaigning for appropriate housing as a right, Threshold promotes the vision that everyone in Ireland has access toan affordable, secure and suitable home. We campaign for policies that develop vibrant neighbourhoods and sustainablecommunities that promote an inclusive society.In carrying out research through our Housing Research Unit, and presenting our findings at local and national levels,Threshold makes the case for housing reform. Our report ‘Opportunity Knocks: Institutional Investment in the PrivateRented Sector in Ireland’, supported by the Irish Bankers Federation, looked at ways of encouraging Irish financialinstitutions to directly invest in the private rented property market, especially at the end of the market providing forhouseholds on modest or low incomes. Reports under completion in 2006 include an analysis of the supply of suitableaccommodation for single person households and a joint research report with OPEN (One Parent Exchange and Network)looking at accommodation standards required for lone parent families living long-term in the private rented sector.Threshold is engaged in a joint lobbying campaign to end homelessness in Ireland, called the MakeRoom campaign, withFocus Ireland, the Simon Communities of Ireland and the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. We also participate in HomelessFora and the Community Platform, sit on the Private Residential Tenancies Board and work in close co-operation withCitizens Information Services. We also work with FÁS and employ people on Community Employment and Job Initiativeschemes. We are members of the European Anti-Poverty Network (EAPN), which campaigns at European level to endpoverty and social exclusion.


stt h r e s h o l d t ha rn en su ha ol lrd e ap no nr ut a2006l r e p o r t 2006contentsApproximately Board of Directors one and in Management five Irish households Team live in either 2 social rentedor private rented accommodation. Renters are concentrated in urbanChairperson’s statement 3areas with over two-fifths (41%) living in the Dublin area. Rentersare Director’s much report more likely than owner occupiers to live in 5a bedsitter orapartment, Some of the with poorest 29% families of renters live in rented compared homeswith 1% of 7 owners in thistype of accommodation. A disproportionate number of renters live inThreshold’s advice and advocacy work 10poverty; over a third (35%) have incomes below the poverty line usedby Southern EU, region and advice over a centre fifth (21%) live in consistent poverty. 16Western region advice centre 21As revealed by the 2002 Census the private sector has become the predominant sourceof Limerick rental accommodation, Advice Centreaccounting for 141,459 units in that year. 24 While cateringfor Access moderate housing and higher unit income groups, the private rented sector 26 is also playing anincreasing role in housing people surviving on very low incomes. At the end of 2005,Promoting housing reform through research and 3060,000 recipients of rent supplement were living in the sector. In addition, the newcampaigningRental Accommodation Scheme (RAS) which is gradually being extended to recipientsin Fundraising long term need of housing will rely heavily on private rented housing. 33Financial report 36Current information shows that rents are high and that they increased during 2005.The Contact ‘privately details owned and rent staff index’ members published by the Central Statistics 38Office shows rentsnationally were 4.3% higher in December 2005 than 12 months earlier. The DAFT.ie index confirms the upward trend and reports stronger inflation in Galway City andDublin than elsewhere. More detailed information about regional variations in rentshould become available through the Private Residential Tenancies Board (PRTB).Renting privately continues to strain the budgets of less well off households. Accordingto 2005 rental market statistics from DAFT.ie, a single person seeking a studio unitin Dublin 1 paid €581 per month on average. Assuming the tenant earned €15,912annually, equivalent to the minimum wage on a 39 hour week, 44% of their grossincome would be spent on housing. Even if they were in a position to share two-bedroomaccommodation, the average rent remained high at €421 per person per month.Threshold’s 2004 survey of rent supplement recipients in Cork City revealed thatsome rent ceilings under that scheme were too low, with one in five paying more to thelandlord than the contribution required out of their welfare benefits.Despite the high cost of renting, a lot of accommodation particularly at the lower endof the rented market is of poor quality. It has long been illegal for landlords to letsubstandard property below the requirements of the Housing (Standards for RentedHouses) Regulations, 1993 or the fire safety provisions for multiple property unitsin the Fire Safety Act 1981. But high demand for rented accommodation combinedwith poor enforcement of regulations by local authorities means that many landlordscontinue to get away with renting substandard accommodation to vulnerable people.However it is likely that the requirements of the new Rental Accommodation Scheme1


t h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006board of dirctors &management teamrspat r i c k b u r k ed i r e c to rl o u i s e k e n n e dyl i m e r i c k a dv i c eLeft to Right: Aideen Hayden, Lance O’Brien, Des Byrne, Brian Murphy, Thora Mackey, Patrick Burke (Director),Missing from photograph: Ted Crosbie, PJ Drudy, Trócaire Joye, Margaret O‘Neill, Martini Molloy, Malachy Walsh.Missing from photographs of Mangagement Team are Declan White and Aine Daly.b o b j o r da nr e s e a r c h & c o m m u n i c at i o n sm a r g a r e t o’n e i l ls o u t h e r n r e g i o ne dwa r d k i e r n a na c c o u n ta n ts t e p h e n l a r g ee a s t e r n r e g i o n2r u s s e l l c h a p m a na c c e s s h o u s i n g u n i td e i r d r e m u r p h yw e s t e r n r e g i o n


stt h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006Rents have been rising, driven up by interest rate hikes which are being passed on bylandlords to tenants. According to figures produced by DAFT.ie, rents in Dublin haverisen by 20% since 2004 and by 23% in Cork; Galway fared little better with anincrease of 21%. The realities of high rents for those on minimum wage mean thatmany of our clients are vulnerable to even the smallest changes in circumstances. Anillness, a family wedding, a communion and worst of all Christmas can put many intodebt.For those in Ireland today not eligible for rent supplement, because they are workingmore that the limit of thirty hours per week, it must appear unfair that there is nofinancial support at all with high housing costs. This is particularly so when comparedwith the support and sympathy for first time house buyers. We must not continue toignore the need for support for those on low incomes who cannot afford to buy. Rentarrears reflect the tip of the iceberg of the hidden poverty in Ireland today. We wouldask that some real thought be given to income supports for those in rented housing, thisis surely as justifiable as mortgage tax relief!I would like to thank Threshold’s Board of Directors and staff for their contributionover the past year. I would also like to thank all of Threshold’s funders large and small.Without such generous support and unstinting loyalty it would not have been possiblefor us to have helped the 18,246 people who needed our services in the past year.Aideen Hayden4


t h r e s h o l d t ha rn en su ha ol lrd e ap no nr ut a2006l r e p o r t 2006director’sreportb o b j o r da nApproximately is the one national in five Irish organisation households that live helps in either people social with rentedor housing private problems rented accommodation. and campaigns Renters for a better are concentrated housing system. in urbanareas with over works two-fifths mainly with (41%) tenants living living in the Dublin the private area. Renters rentedare sector, much but more also likely local than authority owner tenants occupiers and to people live in a who bedsitter are orapartment, homeless. When with 29% Threshold of renters began compared its work with in 1978, 1% of tenants owners living in thistype in rented of accommodation. homes had little A disproportionate or no legal protection number but of renters Threshold live inpoverty; was there over to a negotiate third (35%) with have landlords incomes to below secure the ‘human poverty solutions’ line usedby to the serious EU, and problems, over a such fifth (21%) as illegal live evictions in consistent and poverty. withholding ofrent deposits.As revealed by the 2002 Census the private sector has become the predominant sourceof The rental implementation accommodation, of the accounting Residential for Tenancies 141,459 Act units 2004 in that and year. the establishment While catering offor the moderate Private Residential and higher Tenancies income groups, Board the (PRTB) private mean rented that sector the rights is also and playing obligations anincreasing of both landlords role in and housing tenants people are surviving now enshrined on very in low law. incomes. Vulnerable At people the end facing of 2005, illegal60,000 eviction, recipients invalid notice of rent of termination, supplement were unreasonable living in the rent sector. increases, In addition, or invasion the new ofRental privacy, Accommodation now have recourse Scheme to a new (RAS) dispute which resolution is gradually mechanism. being extended Threshold to recipients ensuresin that long people term who need are of unable housing to will access rely their heavily rights on private can do rented so with housing. our help. Our workis focused on tenants because when a serious problem occurs in the landlord-tenantCurrent information shows that rents are high and that they increased during 2005.relationship, it is the tenant who faces the risk of homelessness.The ‘privately owned rent index’ published by the Central Statistics Office shows rentsnationally Threshold’s were clients 4.3% come higher mainly December from the low-priced 2005 than end 12 months of the private earlier. rented The DAFT. sector,ie single index people confirms who the cannot upward get into trend social and reports housing, stronger families inflation receipt in of Galway rent supplement, City andDublin workers than employed elsewhere. on low More wages, detailed and migrants information who about have regional come to variations Ireland to in work. rentshould Our clients become numbered available 18,000 through in 2006, the Private over half Residential (54%) of Tenancies whom had Board incomes (PRTB). lessrsThresholdthan €15,000 which is below minimum wage levels (€15,514 pa). Our figures confirmRenting privately continues to strain the budgets of less well off households. Accordingnational statistics which show that 35% of renters have incomes below the EUto 2005 rental market statistics from DAFT.ie, a single person seeking a studio unitpoverty threshold [see p.7]. The traditional housing route in Ireland, home ownership,in Dublin 1 paid €581 per month on average. Assuming the tenant earned €15,912is therefore open to few of our clients, even with the government’s ‘affordable’ homeannually, equivalent to the minimum wage on a 39 hour week, 44% of their grossownership schemes.income would be spent on housing. Even if they were in a position to share two-bedroomaccommodation, Threshold’s timely the intervention average rent is crucial remained for high vulnerable at €421 tenants per person to realise per month. the improvedThreshold’s protection possible 2004 survey under of legislation. rent supplement Our staff recipients support in clients Cork who City may revealed be unable that tosome claim rent their ceilings legal rights under because that scheme of difficulties were too such low, as with low one literacy in five skills, paying poor more English to thelandlord language than skills, the health contribution difficulties required or other out problems. of their welfare Threshold benefits. gets positive results fortenants by negotiating directly with landlords and by advocating for our clients throughDespite the high cost of renting, a lot of accommodation particularly at the lower endthe dispute resolution service provided by the PRTB. We prepare cases and representof the rented market is of poor quality. It has long been illegal for landlords to lettenants at PRTB adjudication and tribunal hearings.substandard property below the requirements of the Housing (Standards for RentedHouses) While the Regulations, protection afforded 1993 by the the fire Residential safety provisions Tenancies for Act multiple 2004 property is a most units positivein development, the Fire Safety legislation Act 1981. and policy But high needs demand to go for further rented to accommodation provide appropriate combined securitywith and legal poor protection enforcement of tenants. regulations Threshold by local is concerned authorities about means the that number many of landlords clientscontinue who come to to get us away with problems with renting around substandard securing accommodation the return of rent to deposits, vulnerable with people. 1,977However people asking it is likely us for that help the in 2006. requirements This issue of the has new remained Rental the Accommodation single biggest issue Scheme fortenants since Threshold was established almost 30 years ago. A landlord who unfairly5


t h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006stwithholds a rent deposit can make it impossible for a vulnerable tenant to afford newaccommodation and puts them at risk of homelessness. A high proportion of casescoming before the PRTB are also related to the return of deposits. Urgent Governmentaction is needed to address this problem.Threshold improved its capacity to advise and advocate for people with housingproblems in 2006. A new Threshold advice centre opened in Limerick. Threshold’sCork Advice Centre moved to a refurbished property on South Mall. Work also beganto identify a more permanent home for Threshold’s Galway Advice Centre. In Dublin,additional outreach services were established and an out-of-hours service open onThursday evenings makes it easier for people to get our help. A legal officer wasappointed to assist Threshold clients and to support staff to bring cases before thePRTB. Our Access Housing Unit worked in partnership with homeless services to helppeople move permanently out of homelessness.I would like to thank the Board and staff of Threshold for their dedication andcommitment over the past year. I would particularly like to thank former Director,Patrick Burke, for his contribution to Threshold’s work over the past three years. Wewish him well in his new role as CEO of the Simon Communities of Ireland.As Threshold’s new Director, I will build on the progress made in 2006. This involvesdeveloping our advocacy services before hearings of the PRTB. It means providingadvice in multiple languages and using new technologies to reach the people who needus. It means growing our placement services and rolling out projects under the RentalAccommodation Scheme. This will ensure that Threshold is there for tenants with ahousing crisis and can prevent the most vulnerable from becoming homeless.Bob Jordan Director6


250020001500100050001977 1378 1291 1105 816 732 417 257 2532395%7%13%75%h o u s i n g in i r e l a n d b y t y p e o f o c c u pa n c y(c e n s us 2006)Social HousingPrivate RentedOtherabcde abcdeOwner Occupiedsome of the poorestfamilies live inrented homesApproximately one in in five Irish households live live in either in either social rentedor social private rented rented or private accommodation. rented accommodation. Renters are concentrated Renters are in urbanareas concentrated with over in two-fifths urban areas (41%) with living over in two-fifths the Dublin (41%) area. living Rentersare in the much Dublin more area. likely Renters than owner are much occupiers more to likely live in than a bedsitter owner orapartment, occupiers to with live 29% in a of bedsitter renters compared or apartment, with with 1% of 29% owners of renters in thistype compared of accommodation. with 1% of owners A disproportionate in this type number of accommodation. of renters live A inpoverty; disproportionate over a third number (35%) of have renters incomes live below in poverty; the poverty a line third usedby (35%) the EU, have and incomes over a fifth below (21%) the poverty live in consistent line used by poverty. the EU, andover a fifth (21%) live in consistent poverty.As revealed by the 2002 Census the private sector has become the predominant sourceof As rental revealed accommodation, by the 2006 Census accounting the private for 141,459 sector has units become in that the year. predominant While cateringfor source moderate of rental and accommodation, higher income groups, accounting the private for almost rented 150,000 sector units. is also While playing catering anincreasing for moderate role and in housing higher income people groups, surviving the on private very low rented incomes. sector At is the also end playing of 2005, an60,000 increasing recipients role in housing of rent supplement people surviving were on living very in low the incomes. sector. In addition, the newRental Accommodation Scheme (RAS) which is gradually being extended to recipientsAt the end of 2006, 60,000 recipients of rent supplement were living in the privatein long term need of housing will rely heavily on private rented housing.rented sector. Many single people on rent supplement live in bedsits; the total number ofCurrent bedsits in information 2006 was 8,751, shows that of which rents 5,405 are high were and in that Dublin. they In increased addition, during the new 2005. RentalThe Accommodation ‘privately owned Scheme rent (RAS) index’ published which gradually by the Central being Statistics extended to Office recipients shows in rents longnationally term need were of housing 4.3% will higher rely in heavily December on private 2005 rented than 12 housing. months earlier. The DAFT.ie index confirms the upward trend and reports stronger inflation in Galway City andCurrent information shows that rents are high and that they increased during 2006.Dublin than elsewhere. More detailed information about regional variations in rentThe ‘privately owned rent index’ published by the Central Statistics Office shows rentsshould become available through the Private Residential Tenancies Board (PRTB).nationally were 8.6% higher in December 2006 than 12 months earlier. The DAFT.ieRenting index confirms privately the continues upward trend to strain and the reports budgets stronger of less inflation well off in households. commuter According countiesto (Meath, 2005 Kildare, rental market Louth statistics and Wicklow) from by DAFT.ie, 16.4% a in single the past person three seeking years. a Rents studio increased unitin Dublin 1 by paid almost €581 20% per since month 2004, on average. rents in Assuming Cork were the 23% tenant higher, earned 21% €15,912 in Galwayannually, and 17% equivalent in Limerick. to More the minimum detailed wage information on a 39 about hour week, regional 44% variations of their in gross rentincome should become would be available spent on through housing. the Even Private if they Residential were in a Tenancies position to Board share (PRTB). two-bedroomCOLORSaccommodation, the average rent remained high at €421 per person per month.Renting privately continues to strain the budgets of less well off households. AccordingThreshold’s 2004 survey of rent supplement recipients in Cork City revealed thatto 2006 rental market statistics from DAFT.ie, a single person seeking a studio unitsome rent ceilings under that scheme were too low, with one in five paying more to thein Dublin 1 paid €676 per month on average. Assuming a single person tenant earnerlandlord than the contribution required out of their welfare benefits.€15,514 annually, equivalent to the minimum wage on a 39 hour week, 57% of theirDespite gross income the high would cost be of spent renting, on housing. a lot of accommodation Even if they were particularly in a position at to the share lower endof two-bedroom the rented market accommodation, is of poor the quality. average It has rent long remained been illegal high at for €706 landlords per person to let persubstandard month (59% property gross income). below the requirements of the Housing (Standards for RentedHouses) Regulations, 1993 or the fire safety provisions for multiple property unitsThreshold’s Cork 2004 survey of rent supplement recipients revealed that some rentin the Fire Safety Act 1981. But high demand for rented accommodation combinedceilings under that scheme were too low, with one in five were paying more to thewith poor enforcement of regulations by local authorities means that many landlordslandlord than the contribution required out of their welfare benefits.continue to get away with renting substandard accommodation to vulnerable people.However Despite Otherit is high likely cost that of renting, the requirements a lot of accommodation of the new Rental particularly Accommodation the lower Scheme endHousing in Ireland by Type of Occypancy (Census 2006)Owner OccupierPrivate RentedSocial Housing7t h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006


abcdeabcdet h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006Approximately positive developments one in five Irish for households people living live in either social rentedor in private the private rented rented accommodation. sector Renters are concentrated in urbanareas A number with of policy over two-fifths developments (41%) in 2006 living should in benefit the vulnerable Dublin area. tenants Renters living in theare private much rented more sector: likely than owner occupiers to live in a bedsitter orapartment, with 29% of renters compared with 1% of owners in this■■ The Department of the Environment, Heritage and Local Government hastype of accommodation. A disproportionate number of renters live inintroduced a new national housing policy framework, called ‘Delivering Homes,poverty; over a third (35%) have incomes below the poverty line usedSustaining Communities’, that promises to expand social housing provision andby the EU, and over a fifth (21%) live in consistent poverty.thereby help to ease market pressure.As revealed by the 2002 Census the private sector has become the predominant source■■ The DEHLG is developing a new national homeless strategy based on anof rental accommodation, accounting for 141,459 units in that year. While cateringindependent review of Ireland’s National Homeless Strategies.for moderate and higher income groups, the private rented sector is also playing anincreasing ■■ The Residential role in housing Tenancies people Act surviving 2004 which on very was low implemented incomes. At in the full end at of the 2005, start of60,000 2005 recipients gives many of rent households supplement greater were security living in of the tenure. sector. In addition, the newRental ■■ The Accommodation dispute resolution Scheme service (RAS) established which is under gradually the new being Private extended Residential to recipientsin long Tenancies term need Board of housing makes will it easier rely heavily for tenants on private and landlords rented housing. to resolve disputes. TheCurrent service information received shows approximately that rents 13,000 are high dispute and that cases they in increased 2006. during 2005.The ■■ ‘privately The Rental owned Accommodation rent index’ published Scheme by is now the Central active in Statistics all local authority Office shows areas rents andnationally is pioneering were 4.3% innovative higher approaches in December to 2005 providing than 12 quality months and earlier. affordable The DAFT. privateie index rented confirms housing the to upward long-term trend rent and supplement reports stronger recipients. inflation in Galway City andDublin than elsewhere. More detailed information about regional variations in rent■■ Under a new Action Programme on Minimum Standards, the DEHLG willshould become available through the Private Residential Tenancies Board (PRTB).introduce new minimum standards regulations for the private rented sector andRenting revise privately guidelines continues the to enforcement strain the budgets of standards of less by well local off authorities. households. Accordingto 2005 rental market statistics from DAFT.ie, a single person seeking a studio unitin Dublin 1 paid €581 per month on average. Assuming the tenant earned €15,912annually, equivalent to the minimum wage on a 39 hour week, 44% of their grossincome would be spent on housing. Even if they were in a position to share two-bedroomaccommodation, the average rent remained high at €421 per person per month.Threshold’s 2004 survey of rent supplement recipients in Cork City revealed thatsome rent ceilings under that scheme were too low, with one in five paying more to thelandlord than the contribution required out of their welfare benefits.Despite the high cost of renting, a lot of accommodation particularly at the lower endof the rented market is of poor quality. It has long been illegal for landlords to letsubstandard property below the requirements of the Housing (Standards for RentedHouses) Regulations, 1993 or the fire safety provisions for multiple property unitsin the Fire Safety Act 1981. But high demand for rented accommodation combinedwith poor enforcement of regulations by local authorities means that many landlordscontinue to get away with renting substandard accommodation to vulnerable people.However it is likely that the requirements of the new Rental Accommodation Scheme9


25002000150010005001105 816 732 417 257 25323901977 1378 1291 1105 816 732 417 257 253239t h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006threshold’s advice andadvocacy work25%21%54%2%5%20%c l i e n t s b y h o u s e h o l d i n c o m eUnder €15,000€15,000 - €25,000Over €25,000c l i e n t s b y c o u n t ry o f b i r t hIrelandOther EuropeanAfricaAustralia & USAAsia & Middle EastOtherCOLORSsection describes the main problems faced by tenantscontacting Threshold’s four advice centres in 2006. The centresoffer information and advice about housing, especially privaterental accommodation, and they advocate on behalf of clients whoare at risk of homelessness.Clients by Household IncomeProfile of threshold’s clientsThreshold provided information, advice and advocacy services to a total of 18,246people in 2006. It is also worth noting that on average over 10,000 unique visitorssought information from the Threshold website every month in 2006. Over half (54%)of Threshold’s household clients have an income of less than €15,000 [compared withAverage Industrial Earnings of €33,000 and Annual Minimum Wage of €15,514].The proportion of landlords contacting Threshold was higher than before theintroduction of the Residential Tenancies Act in 2004 with many queries related to thenew regulatory regime and their responsibilities under the Act. But the vast majorityof clients were households (69%), typically tenants. Most third party clients, such asCitizens Information Centres, were also calling on behalf of tenants.COLORScurrent accommodation of household clientscurrent accommodation percentage (%)Clients by Country of BirthPrivate Rented 81%Homeless 6%Local Authority 3%Licensee 2%Owner Occupied 2%Other 6%total 100%Over 25The vast majority of households (81%) seeking Threshold’s help were living in the15k - 25kprivate rented sector, 6% were homeless and 3% were living in local authority housing.Under 15,000Despite the general increase in incomes in Ireland in 2006 the percentage of clientsfalling into the lowest income category declined only marginally, from 57% in 2005to 54% in 2006. The percentage reporting incomes of more than €25,000 grew from23% in 2005 to 25% in 2006.A growing proportion of Threshold’s clients come from new communities in Ireland,including migrant workers, refugees and asylum seekers. Almost a fifth (18%) ofrstThisthe households seeking help did not have English as a first language and withoutThreshold’s help would have been unable to solve their housing difficulties.2%1%70%10Other


s25002000t h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006Approximately Almost half (46%) one of Threshold’s in five Irish household households clients are live aged in 25-34 either years, social followed rentedor by 18-24 private years rented (23%) accommodation. and 35-49 years (23%). Renters The over are 50 concentrated age group are in 7% urban ofareas Threshold’s with clients over and two-fifths the over 65 (41%) age group living are in 2%. the This Dublin reflects area. a small Renters butare noticeable much increase more likely in the number than owner of older occupiers people affected to live by homelessness in a bedsitter and housing orapartment, problems. with 29% of renters compared with 1% of owners in thistype of accommodation. A disproportionate number of renters live inpoverty; Main problems over a third affecting (35%) have threshold’s incomes below clients the poverty line usedThe by the main EU, problems and over faced a by fifth Threshold (21%) clients live in in 2006 consistent concerned poverty. return of deposits,housing As revealed repairs, by the minimum 2002 Census standards, the private affordability, sector housing has become access the and predominant adequacy. sourceDepositof rentalretentionaccommodation,has longaccountingbeen a majorforproblem141,459forunitsThreshold’sin that year.clients.WhileManycateringclientseachfor moderateyear areandplacedhigherat riskincomeof homelessnessgroups, the privatebecauserentedthey cannotsector ismovealsoonplayingto newanaccommodationincreasing role inunlesshousingtheypeoplerecoversurvivingtheir renton verydeposit.lowWhileincomes.theAttotalthenumberend of 2005,of casesfell60,000fromrecipients2,325 inof2005renttosupplement1,977 in 2006,weretheylivingremainedin the sector.alarminglyIn addition,high.the newRental Accommodation Scheme (RAS) which is gradually being extended to recipientsMany landlords are also failing to comply with the notice periods and procedures setin long term need of housing will rely heavily on private rented housing.out in the Residential Tenancies Act 2004. The number of cases where tenants receivedinvalidCurrentnoticeinformationof terminationshows thatfromrentslandlordsare highincreasedand thatfromthey913increasedin 2005duringto 1,3872005.in2006.The ‘privately owned rent index’ published by the Central Statistics Office shows rentsnationally were 4.3% higher in December 2005 than 12 months earlier. The DAFT.Household repairs were a cause of concern for 1,291 clients in 2006. The vast majorityie index confirms the upward trend and reports stronger inflation in Galway City andof clients (92%) were living in the private rented sector. Landlord inaction on repairsDublin than elsewhere. More detailed information about regional variations in rentcontinues to affect the most vulnerable households: over a third (37%) of householdsshould become available through the Private Residential Tenancies Board (PRTB).experiencing problems had children, 44% had incomes of less than €15,000, and 21%didRentingnot haveprivatelyEnglishcontinuesas theirtofirststrainlanguage.the budgets of less well off households. Accordingto 2005 rental market statistics from DAFT.ie, a single person seeking a studio unitin Dublin 1 paid €581 per month on average. Assuming the tenant earned €15,912annually, equivalent to the minimum wage on a 39 hour week, 44% of their grossincome would be spent on housing. Even if they were in a position to share two-bedroomaccommodation, the average rent remained high at €421 per person per month.Threshold’s h o u s i n g p ro b l e m2004 s b y n usurvey m b e r o f cof l i erent n t s supplement recipients in Cork City revealed thatsome rent ceilings under that scheme were too low, with one in five paying more to the20001977landlord than the contribution required out of their welfare benefits.Deposit retentionInvalid notice from landlordRepairsPRTBDespite the high cost of renting, a lot of accommodation particularly at the lower end1500of the rented market is of poor quality. It has long been illegal for landlords to letsubstandard property below the requirements of the Housing (Standards for RentedHouses) Regulations, 1993 or the fire safety provisions for multiple property units1000in the Fire Safety Act 1981. But high demand for 732rented accommodation combinedwith poor enforcement of regulations by local authorities means that many landlords500continue to get away with renting substandard accommodation to vulnerable people.However it is likely that the requirements of the new Rental Accommodation Scheme0138712911105816417257 253 239Rent arrears - private rentedMinimum standardsValid notice from landlordLandlord sellingEviction proceduresIllegal evictionHousing Problem by Number of Clients11


t h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006poor standard of some accommodation in the private rented sector, particularlyat the lower end of the market, is a major problem which Threshold highlighted in itsmedia and policy statements in 2006. The number of tenants living in substandardaccommodation seeking Threshold’s help fell slightly on 2005 but remained high, from785 in 2005 to 732 in 2006.Problems with rent arrears is a concern that places a considerable number of privaterented tenants at risk of homelessness. The number of clients with this problem wasworryingly high at 816 in 2006.Illegal evictions literally deprive families of their homes, for example, where locksare changed to exclude them. These households face a high risk of homelessness. Thenumber of illegal evictions remained high at 239 in 2006.following sections of the report describe in more detail the work of Threshold’s fouradvice centres.rstThe12


stt h r e s h o l d t ha rn en su ha ol lrd e ap no nr ut a2006l r e p o r t 2006eastern regionadvice centreApproximately Overview one in five Irish households live in either social rentedor private rented accommodation. Renters are concentrated in urbanThe advice centre in Dublin saw a 9% increase in demand forareas with over two-fifths (41%) living in the Dublin area. Rentersour service from 8,852 in 2005 to 9,645 in 2006. Whilst it isare much more likely than owner occupiers to live in a bedsitter orworrying that we are being contacted by more people than everapartment, with 29% of renters compared with 1% of owners in thisexperiencing housing problems, many vulnerable clients benefittype of accommodation. A disproportionate number of renters live infrom our interventions to help resolve their problems and inpoverty; over a third (35%) have incomes below the poverty line usedextreme cases prevent homelessness.by the EU, and over a fifth (21%) live in consistent poverty.The advice centre dealt with 13,372 different housing problems, with some clientsAs revealed by the 2002 Census the private sector has become the predominant sourceexperiencing multiple problems. The problems were predominately deposit retentionof rental accommodation, accounting for 141,459 units in that year. While cateringcases (15%), repairs and poor standard accommodation (9%) and notice offor moderate and higher income groups, the private rented sector is also playing antermination queries (9%).increasing role in housing people surviving on very low incomes. At the end of 2005,60,000 In 2006, recipients almost a of third rent of supplement clients (30%) were seeking living in advice the sector. in Dublin In addition, were not the born new inRental Ireland. Accommodation This has implications Scheme for (RAS) the delivery which of is Threshold’s gradually being service, extended as over to a recipients fifthin (21%) long term of clients need did of housing not speak will English rely heavily as a first on private language. rented To ensure housing. that informationon rights and responsibilities is getting out to these new communities, ThresholdCurrent information shows that rents are high and that they increased during 2005.produced a ‘Guide to Renting’ which was translated into a number of languagesThe ‘privately owned rent index’ published by the Central Statistics Office shows rentsincluding French, Polish, Russian, Mandarin Chinese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak andnationally were 4.3% higher in December 2005 than 12 months earlier. The DAFT.Lithuanian.ie index confirms the upward trend and reports stronger inflation in Galway City andDublin than elsewhere. More detailed information about regional variations in rentshould Main become Problem available for through Clients the Private is Return Residential of Deposits Tenancies Board (PRTB).Deposit Renting issues privately are continues the most to common strain the problem budgets faced of less by tenants well off seeking households. advice According fromThreshold’s to 2005 rental Dublin market Advice statistics Centre. from 1,884 DAFT.ie, people a contacted single person us last seeking year with a studio deposit unitissues, in Dublin the 1 majority paid €581 did per not month have their on average. deposit Assuming returned or the felt tenant that earned their landlord €15,912 hadmade annually, unfair equivalent deductions. to the The minimum deposit wage is key on to a the 39 landlord hour week, and 44% tenant of relationship. their grossFrom income the would landlord’s be spent perspective on housing. it provides Even if they security were against a position rent arrears to share or two-bedroomdamageto accommodation, the property above the average normal rent wear remained and tear. high Tenants at €421 are often per person in a vulnerable per month. positionin Threshold’s relation to 2004 the deposit survey as of rent the tenant supplement needs recipients this money in to Cork enable City them revealed to secure thatalternative some rent ceilings accommodation. under that The scheme longer were a tenant too low, goes with without one in getting five paying this money more to thereturned landlord than the more the contribution likely they are required to end out up in of financial their welfare difficulties benefits. in trying to secure anew home.Despite the high cost of renting, a lot of accommodation particularly at the lower endThreshold’s of the rented advice market workers is of poor are quality. often successful It has long in negotiating been illegal the for return landlords of the to let depositbut substandard this is not property always possible. below the Threshold requirements can assist of the the Housing client (Standards to refer a case for to Rented thePrivate Houses) Residential Regulations, Tenancies 1993 or Board the fire (PRTB). safety provisions The PRTB for had multiple dealt with property 99 deposit unitsretention in the Fire cases Safety by Act the end 1981. of But 2005. high In demand 72 of these for rented the landlord accommodation had to return combined the depositeither with poor partially enforcement fully of to regulations the tenant. In by a local recent authorities submission means on updating that many the landlords ResidentialTenancies continue to Act get 2004, away Threshold with renting called substandard for amendment accommodation enabling to the vulnerable PRTB to people. acceptand However administer it is likely security that deposit the requirements payments. of The the tenant new Rental would pay Accommodation up to one months Schemerent to the PRTB at the start of the tenancy. Both landlord and tenant can make an13


p xyzt h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006application to claim the deposit at the end of a tenancy. Interest would also be payableon the monies.Emergency out of hours serviceOur emergency out of hours service, every Thursday evening from 5.30pm-7.30pm,plays an important role in making our service accessible to those in need. 314 clientsbenefited from our doors being open when no one else was there to help. Last year wewitnessed almost a 50% increase on the number contacting us in 2005.We are urgently seeking additional resources to extend our emergency services so thatan advice worker would be on call every evening to deal with situations such as rentreviews, breach of obligations, notice of termination and evictions.14


t htr he rs eh so hl od l d a na nu na ul a l r erp eo pr ot r t 2006Homeless p o l i s h c o n s t rFamily u c t i o n w o rSupportedk e r h e l p e d t oto Find Rented Homes e c u r e r e t u r n o f d e p o s i tGer Krzysztof Harte, Chabier his wife contacted and their six Threshold children on were a Thursday living in evening private rented in May accommodation. 2006. Krzysztof was The a family Polish was inreceipt construction of rent worker supplement who had and to were leave renting his rented a house property for three in April years 2006 when as the landlord decided was selling. to sell The theproperty. deposit of €1,250 was not returned. Krzysztof did not know his rights and took time off work to try and getthe deposit back. A colleague told him about Threshold and he was able to attend the evening clinic. An adviceThe family were given a valid notice of termination by their landlord but were unable to secure additional privateworker contacted the agency concerned and was informed the money was retained to cover the costs ofrented housing that accepted rent supplement during that period. The family travelled to England to secure housingrepairing damage.and employment but became homeless after a month. They then returned to return to Limerick to try again.Attempts by telephone to informally negotiate the return of the deposit in this case were unsuccessful so theThe family called into the Limerick advice centre after stepping off the train from England. They had no where to goclient was assisted in referring the case to the Private Residential Tenancies Board (PRTB) in July 2006. Thethat evening and a limited supply of money. An advice worker managed to secure short term accommodation for theadjudication case was heard in November 2006 seven months after he left the property and four months afterfamily and got in contact with the local homeless persons centre on their behalf to arrange a meeting for the next day.the initial application was submitted to the PRTB.The following day the Harte family was offered emergency bed and breakfast accommodation by the homeless personsKrzysztof had limited English and without Threshold’s support, he would not have taken the case. It wascentre. An advice worker again helped the family to secure bed and breakfast accommodation that would accept anecessary to get a translator for the PRTB hearing at which the advice worker had to answer for the clientlarge family until such time as private rented accommodation could be found.on many occasions as he did not fully understand what was happening. The hearing lasted for one hour andThe it was family agreed spent on four the weeks day that in emergency €1,000 be accommodation. returned to the During client. this Krzysztof time they was worked extremely closely happy with Threshold’s with theadvice outcome. staff to source and secure private rented accommodation. The advice team located a suitable property in thecity environs and rang the landlord on behalf of the Harte family. The Harte family went to view the house that eveningand were very happy with it.15 15


pqt h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006southern regionadvice centreNew PremisesCork Threshold moved to new premises at 22 South Mall in January 2006 throughthe generous support of the Capuchin Order. Funds to develop the new Advice Centrewere provided by the Dormant Accounts fund, People In Need Trust, The ConstructionIndustry Federation and prominent Cork business people.Cork Threshold now has a spacious modern safe environment to meet with clients. Themove has increased our profile making it easier for people who need our services to findus. For example, we have seen a significant increase in the number of people contactingour service with between 40 to 55 callers per day.OverviewCork Threshold assisted 4,426 clients with a total of 6,187 queries during 2006, with74% being self-referrals, 17% third party and 9% landlords. During 2006 the keyhousing issues clients presented with were:IssueTotalSeeking Accommodation 856Deposit Retention 388Invalid Notice of Termination 303Repairs 243Rent Arrears 158PRTB 158Minimum Standard Regulations 153Illegal Eviction 53The highest proportion of queries (37%) was from people seeking accommodation. Themain housing problems were related to deposit retention (24%), invalid notice (19%),PRTB cases (10%) and minimum standards (9%).Advocacy WorkThe level of advocacy work needed has increased substantially due to the varied andcomplex needs of many of our client group. A growing number who present have poorcommunication and literacy skills. A quarter of clients (25%) were born outside Irelandand a high proportion (15%) did not have English as a first language. Advice workersnow work for long periods of time with individual clients. They gather the necessaryinformation to identify the key housing issues and from there create a plan of action tohelp the client resolve their housing problems.An increasing part of our work involves taking cases to the dispute resolution serviceprovided by the PRTB. Cork Threshold supported 24 clients through the process and16


pqApproximately represented 7 clients one at adjudication in five Irish and households tribunal hearings live with in either positive social outcomes rented foror clients. private Problems rented included accommodation. deposit retention, Renters invalid notice are concentrated of termination and in illegal urbanareas eviction. with over two-fifths (41%) living in the Dublin area. Rentersare much more likely than owner occupiers to live in a bedsitter orapartment, Placement with Service 29% of renters compared with 1% of owners in thisA type total of of accommodation. 856 people availed of A Cork disproportionate Threshold’s Placement number Service of renters to secure live private inrented poverty; accommodation over a third with (35%) 465 of have them describing incomes themselves below the as poverty homeless. line 665 usedcallers by the aged EU, between and over 18-24 a fifth years (21%) presented live to Cork in consistent Threshold during poverty. 2006 seeking ourassistance. As revealed by the 2002 Census the private sector has become the predominant sourceYoungof rentalpeopleaccommodation,leaving care,accountingespecially thosefor 141,459withoutunitsfamilyinorthatrelativesyear. Whileto callcateringuponforforsupportmoderateareandparticularlyhigher incomeat riskgroups,of homelessness.the private rentedThresholdsectorcanishelpalsothemplayingtoansecureincreasingshortroletermin housingaccommodationpeople survivingto addressontheirvery lowimmediateincomes.housingAt theneed.end ofWe2005,can60,000explainrecipientshow theofrentrentsupplementsupplementsystemwere livingworks,inhelpthe sector.with theInCorkaddition,CitytheCouncilnewhousingRental Accommodationapplication process,Schememake(RAS)themwhichawareisofgraduallyhousing optionsbeing extendedavailabletotorecipientsthemandin longmaketermreferralsneed oftohousingother organizations.will rely heavilyWeonprovideprivateaccessrentedtohousing.telephones for viewingappointments. Current information Skilled shows advice that workers rents are high on hand to that provide they increased assistance during with their 2005.search The ‘privately for private owned rented accommodation.index’ published by the Central Statistics Office shows rentsnationally were 4.3% higher in December 2005 than 12 months earlier. The DAFT.Gilabbeyie index confirmsCourtthe upwardHousingtrendSchemeand reports stronger inflation in Galway City andDuringDublin than2006,elsewhere.Cork ThresholdMore detailedwelcomedinformationfive new participantsabout regionalon tovariationsour scheme.in rentDuringtheirshouldtwobecomeyear tenancy,availablethethroughProjecttheManagerPrivatewillResidentialwork withTenancieseach participantBoard (PRTB).to createa Renting personal privately budget continues plan, identify to strain where the further budgets savings of less can well be off made households. and explore According housingoptions to 2005 available rental market to them statistics to prepare from them DAFT.ie, for home a single ownership. person seeking a studio unitDespitein Dublinescalating1 paid €581houseperprices,monthwithon average.our supportAssumingfour participantsthe tenant earnedsucceeded€15,912inpurchasingannually, equivalenttheir owntohomesthe minimumduring 2006wageandon aone39participanthour week,opted44% oftotheirreturngrossto privaterentedincomeaccommodation.would be spent on housing. Even if they were in a position to share two-bedroomaccommodation, the average rent remained high at €421 per person per month.Threshold’s 2004 survey of rent supplement recipients in Cork City revealed thatOutreach Programmessome rent ceilings under that scheme were too low, with one in five paying more to thelandlord than the contribution required out of their welfare benefits.t r a l e et h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006We continued to deliver our monthly Outreach Clinics to Tralee Co. Kerry during theDespite the high cost of renting, a lot of accommodation particularly at the lower endyear with an increasing demand of our services. With the assistance of the Citizensof the rented market is of poor quality. It has long been illegal for landlords to letInformation Centre we now promote our services to the area by means of local radio insubstandard property below the requirements of the Housing (Standards for Rentedthe lead up to the clinics each month.Houses) Regulations, 1993 or the fire safety provisions for multiple property unitsin the Fire Safety Act 1981. But high demand for rented accommodation combinedwith c l o n m poor e l a nenforcement d t h u r l e s of regulations by local authorities means that many landlordscontinue Demands to on get the away Clonmel with and renting Thurles substandard Advice Clinics, accommodation though constant, to vulnerable were low. people. WhileHowever at the same it is time likely demands that the increased requirements from of other areas new Rental of the Accommodation region particularly Scheme theWaterford area.17


pqt h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006Approximately The Report titled ‘Building one in on five Reality’ Irish carried households out by Mr. live Joe in Finnerty either social and Dr. Cathal rentedor O’Connell private of Applied rented Social accommodation. Studies Department Renters U.C.C. are is due concentrated to be published in and urbanareas launched with in 2007. over two-fifths (41%) living in the Dublin area. Rentersare much more likely than owner occupiers to live in a bedsitter orapartment, with 29% of renters compared with 1% of owners in thistype of accommodation. A disproportionate number of renters live inpoverty; over a third (35%) have incomes below the poverty line usedby the EU, and over a fifth (21%) live in consistent poverty.As revealed by the 2002 Census the private sector has become the predominant sourceof rental accommodation, accounting for 141,459 units in that year. While cateringfor moderate and higher income groups, the private rented sector is also playing anincreasing role in housing people surviving on very low incomes. At the end of 2005,60,000 recipients of rent supplement were living in the sector. In addition, the newRental Accommodation Scheme (RAS) which is gradually being extended to recipientsin long term need of housing will rely heavily on private rented housing.Current information shows that rents are high and that they increased during 2005.The ‘privately owned rent index’ published by the Central Statistics Office shows rentsnationally were 4.3% higher in December 2005 than 12 months earlier. The DAFT.ie index confirms the upward trend and reports stronger inflation in Galway City andDublin than elsewhere. More detailed information about regional variations in rentshould become available through the Private Residential Tenancies Board (PRTB).Renting privately continues to strain the budgets of less well off households. Accordingto 2005 rental market statistics from DAFT.ie, a single person seeking a studio unitin Dublin 1 paid €581 per month on average. Assuming the tenant earned €15,912annually, equivalent to the minimum wage on a 39 hour week, 44% of their grossincome would be spent on housing. Even if they were in a position to share two-bedroomaccommodation, the average rent remained high at €421 per person per month.Threshold’s 2004 survey of rent supplement recipients in Cork City revealed thatsome rent ceilings under that scheme were too low, with one in five paying more to thelandlord than the contribution required out of their welfare benefits.Despite the high cost of renting, a lot of accommodation particularly at the lower endof the rented market is of poor quality. It has long been illegal for landlords to letsubstandard property below the requirements of the Housing (Standards for RentedHouses) Regulations, 1993 or the fire safety provisions for multiple property unitsin the Fire Safety Act 1981. But high demand for rented accommodation combinedwith poor enforcement of regulations by local authorities means that many landlordscontinue to get away with renting substandard accommodation to vulnerable people.However it is likely that the requirements of the new Rental Accommodation Scheme19


t h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006l o n e p a r e n t a t r i s k d u e t or e d u c e d p a y m e n tMary, a single parent with a teenage son, called to our Advice Centre in a distressed state. Mary had receiveda letter from her CWO a few weeks earlier but she did not understand the letter fully. Mary thought she hadto increase her rental payments to her landlord by €5 but in fact her rent supplement was being cut from €75to €5 weekly. A few weeks later her landlord contacted her and advised Mary if she could not afford to paythe rent she would have to move out.Mary was afraid of becoming homeless. She was in the third year of a Community Employment scheme andher son was settled in the local school. Prior to that, Mary had separated from an abusive partner and hadbeen forced to live in an emergency homeless hostel. For the past three years, Mary had been trying very hardto rebuild her life.A Threshold advice worker contacted the CWO to clarify Mary’s position. As Mary was in receipt of a oneparent allowance and a payment from her Community Employment Scheme it was viewed that she was justover the cut off point. Therefore her rent was being reduced by €70. The advice worker emphasised the effectthis reduction of rent supplement had for Mary. But the CWO stated the decision was correct.Mary made an appeal and she opted for a verbal hearing where she would have the opportunity to speak. Asthe risk of eviction was high Threshold secured an early date for the hearing and attended the appeal with her.With Threshold’s help, Mary succeeded in retaining more of her rent supplement which meant that she didnot have to move out of her home.20


t h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006Placement ServicebcdeabcdeThreshold has for many years been offering a placement service for homeless peopleand people about to lose their accommodation. This service involves going throughthe accommodation list of the local newspapers and helping our clients to makeappointments with landlords. This service operates every Wednesday and, in 2006, weextended our opening hours until 8pm. If necessary, or if the client requests it, ourHomeless Advice Worker will accompany the client when they are meeting the landlord.22


t htr he rs eh so hl od l d a na nu na ul a l r erp eo pr ot r t 2006Homeless Family Supportedto Find Rented Homei l l e g a l l y e v i c t e d t e n a n tGer Harte, his wife and their six children were living in private rented accommodation. The family was inreceipt of rent supplement and were renting a house for three years when the landlord decided to sell thea w a r d e d € 5,000 c o m p e n s a t i o nproperty.The Jenny family rang were the given Galway a valid Advice notice Centre of termination a panic. by She their had landlord come home but were from unable doing to her secure shopping additional to find private thatrented the locks housing on her that home accepted had been rent supplement changed. Everything during that she period. owned The family was locked travelled inside. to England It was Friday to secure morning. housingand Threshold employment contacted but became the landlord homeless who, after despite a month. having They then illegality returned of to his return actions to Limerick explained to try to again. him, insistedthat he would not re-admit the tenant except to pack her belongings.The family called into the Limerick advice centre after stepping off the train from England. They had no where to gothat The evening advice worker and a limited contacted supply the of local money. authority An advice and worker arranged managed for the to secure tenant short to be term housed accommodation in homeless for thefamily accommodation. and got in contact The advice with worker the local also homeless established persons that centre the on client their was behalf near to the arrange top of a meeting the housing for the list next day.and there was a suitable house in her area. This was in need of some refurbishment so the advice workerThe following day the Harte family was offered emergency bed and breakfast accommodation by the homeless personsrequested that the local authority complete this work as a priority.centre. An advice worker again helped the family to secure bed and breakfast accommodation that would accept alarge In the family meantime until such the advice time as worker private requested rented accommodation an emergency could tribunal be found. hearing from the PRTB. The tribunalawarded the tenant €5,000 less a small amount for outstanding bills. The tenant’s new home was ready withinThe family spent four weeks in emergency accommodation. During this time they worked closely with Threshold’sabout a month of the eviction and the compensation which she received for the eviction enabled her to buyadvice staff to source and secure private rented accommodation. The advice team located a suitable property in thenecessary items she needed. She is now settled and happy and, after years of moving around in the privatecity environs and rang the landlord on behalf of the Harte family. The Harte family went to view the house that eveningrented sector, she hopes to raise her children in her new local authority home.and were very happy with it.23 23


9090limerick advicecentreNew Centre Opened in 2006The new Limerick Advice Centre at 26 Catherine Street, Limerick, was officially openedby Minister Willie O’ Dea T.D., on 1st November, 2006. The premises was successfullyrefurbished during the summer of 2006 thanks to funding secured through the DormantAccounts Fund. The centre delivers free information, advice and advocacy services tohelp people solve their housing problems.The Limerick Advice Centre received a total of 941 queries from 658 clients since itopened its doors on 21st August 2006. Of these clients, over a fifth (22%) were notborn in Ireland and 15% did not speak English as their first language. A total of 22%of clients were rent supplement recipients. The main problems encountered includedminimum standards (21%), deposit retention (20%), invalid notice (15%), and PRTBcases (8%).Outreach and Placement ServiceThe advice centre currently runs an outreach service to the Citizens Information Centrein Ennis, Co.Clare on a fortnightly basis. A placement service is available to all clientsevery week to guide and support them in their searches for suitable accommodation.Schools PresentationsOur Advice Team have been going out to secondary schools throughout Limerick Cityand County giving presentations on the private rented sector. The presentations educatedstudents on their rights and obligations as tenants.Public Awarenesst h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006The Limerick advice centre held a coffee morning on Wednesday 13th December, toraise awareness amongst the general public and the local business community about theservices provided. The local radio station Live 95FM provided free advertising. Manythanks to all the local businesses who supported our efforts and donated prizes for araffle on the morning.24


t htr he rs eh so hl od l d a na nu na ul a l r erp eo pr ot r t 2006Homeless h o m e l e s s f a m iFamily l y s u p p o r tSupportede dto Find Rented Homet o f i n d h o m eGer Harte, his wife and their six children were living in private rented accommodation. The family was in receiptreceipt of rent supplement of rent supplement and were and renting were renting a house a for house three for years three when years the when landlord the landlord decided decided to sell the to sell property. theproperty.The family were given a valid notice of termination by their landlord but were unable to secure additional privateThe rented family housing were given that accepted a valid notice rent of supplement termination during by their that landlord period. but The were family unable travelled to secure to additional England private to securerented housing housing and employment that accepted but rent became supplement homeless during after that a period. month. The They family then travelled returned to England to Limerick to secure to try housing again.and employment but became homeless after a month. They then returned to return to Limerick to try again.The family called into the Limerick advice centre after stepping off the train from England. They had nowhereThe to go family that called evening into and the little Limerick money. advice An advice centre after worker stepping managed off the to secure train from short England. term accommodation They had no where for to the gothat family. evening The following and a limited day supply the Harte of money. family An was advice offered worker emergency managed to bed secure and breakfast short term accommodation for by the localfamily homeless and persons got in contact centre. with An the advice local worker homeless again persons helped centre the on family their to behalf secure to arrange bed and a breakfast meeting for accommodationthe next day.that would accept a large family until such time as private rented accommodation could be found.The following day the Harte family was offered emergency bed and breakfast accommodation by the homeless personscentre. The family An advice spent worker four weeks again in helped emergency the family accommodation. to secure bed and During breakfast this time accommodation they worked that closely would with accept alarge Threshold’s family until advice such staff time to as source private and rented secure accommodation private rented could accommodation. be found. The advice team located a suitableproperty in the city environs and rang the landlord on behalf of the Harte family. The Harte family went to viewThe family spent four weeks in emergency accommodation. During this time they worked closely with Threshold’sthe house that evening and moved into the house four days later. The family is happy with their new home andadvice staff to source and secure private rented accommodation. The advice team located a suitable property in thetheir children have enrolled in the local school.city environs and rang the landlord on behalf of the Harte family. The Harte family went to view the house that eveningand were very happy with it.25 25


250020001500100050001977 1378 1291 1105 816 732 417 257 253239t h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 20061%72%t e n a n c i e s c r e at e d 2006Single MaleOne Parent FamilySingle FemaleFamilyCouple563%18%6%access housing unitThreshold’s Access Housing Unit (AHU), funded by the HomelessAgency, helps people to move out of emergency homeless servicesand into longer term accommodation in the private rented sectorin the Dublin city and county area.How the Access Housing Unit WorksHomeless people are referred to the AHU by homeless services and the AHU projectteam assess the homeless person’s ability to live independently and cope with a tenancyin the community. The AHU then finds a private landlord with suitable accommodation,accompanies the homeless person to view the accommodation, establishes rentalpayment support and ensures the homeless person is aware of their rights andresponsibilities of their tenancy to ensure sustainability. The AHU assists the homelessperson in setting up their new home and establishing a community base through theprovision Tenacies of our Created tenancy 2006 sustainment service.Tenancies CreatedIn 2006, the AHU created 72 tenancies in the private rented sector. This included 75adults and 25 children. Over 70% of tenancies created were for single men which isrepresentative of the high number of single men who are homeless. One parent familieswere the next largest group housed through the AHU.The Access Housing Unit has completed its fourth year of work. 2006 was a busy yearfor the AHU which saw a 30% increase in referrals from over 30 homeless services.The AHU could not function without private rented landlords taking on tenants witha homeless background. In 2006, 70% of tenancies created were through repeatlandlords returning to the unit to offer accommodation after they had a good experiencewith a previous tenancy.r e f e r r a l s to t h e a h uReferrals to AHU120010751000800600400200211COLORS1463014170200320042005Single Male 2006TotalSingle FemaleOne Parent FamilyFamily26Couple


250020001500100050001977 1378 1291 1105 816 732 417 257 253239t h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 20066226c l i e n t s s u p p o r t e d b y t e n a n c y6s u s ta i n m e n t s e r v i c eSingle MaleSingle FemaleOne Parent FamilyApproximately Tenancy Sustainment one five Service Irish households live in either social rentedor The private Tenancy Sustainment rented accommodation. Service is aimed Renters specifically are at helping concentrated homeless people in urban toareas make an with effective over transition two-fifths to their (41%) new home living and in maintain the Dublin the tenancy area. on Renters their ownare in the much long term. more We likely provide than a range owner of practical occupiers assistance, to live advice in a and bedsitter informationapartment, services to the with tenant 29% so that of they renters can assume compared full responsibility with 1% for of their owners tenancy. in thistype Support of is accommodation. offered around practical A disproportionate issues such as rent number and bill payments, of renters housekeeping, live poverty; life skills and over linking a third in with (35%) local community have incomes services. below The service the poverty also provides line usedby emotional the EU, support and as over moving a fifth from (21%) homelessness live in to consistent home a big poverty. step in a person’s life.As One revealed key element by the to 2002 the work Census of tenancy the private sustainment sector has is become the home the visit. predominant Much of the sourceof support rental provided accommodation, happens accounting the home for which 141,459 allows units the tenancy in that year. sustainment While catering worker tofor monitor moderate progress and and higher identify income issues groups, that the may private put a rented tenancy sector at risk, also for example, playing an unpaidClients Supported increasing bills lying by Tenency around, role in housing guests living people in surviving the flat, no on food very in low the incomes. press, rubbish At the building end of 2005, up, canSustainment Service60,000 be indicative recipients of other of rent problems supplement in the tenant’s were living life. in The the tenancy sector. In sustainment addition, the worker newRental can then Accommodation identify the root Scheme cause of (RAS) the problem which is and gradually address being it with extended the client to recipients thuspreventing long term tenancy need of breakdown housing will and rely a return heavily to on homelessness.private rented housing.Current In 2006 information the Tenancy shows Sustainment that rents Worker are high provided and that support they to increased 50% of during tenancies 2005.The created ‘privately by the owned AHU. rent Again index’ over published 70% of households by the Central were Statistics single males Office living shows in bedsit rentsnationally accommodation were 4.3% spread higher across in Dublin. December 2005 than 12 months earlier. The DAFT.ie index confirms the upward trend and reports stronger inflation in Galway City andDublinNew Initiativesthan elsewhere. MorewithindetailedtheinformationAHU in 2006about regional variations in rentshould become available through the Private Residential Tenancies Board (PRTB).r e n ta l a c c o m m o d a t i o n s c h e m e (r a s)Renting The Rental privately Accommodation continues to Scheme strain the (RAS) budgets is a new of less initiative well off introduced households. to According cater forto the 2005 accommodation rental market needs statistics of persons from who DAFT.ie, are in a receipt single person of rent seeking supplement, a studio normally unitin for Dublin more than 1 paid 18 €581 months, per and month who on have average. a long-term Assuming housing the tenant need. earned Homeless €15,912 personsannually, automatically equivalent qualify to for the this minimum scheme. wage The scheme on a 39 is hour being week, administered 44% of their by local grossincome authorities would and be is spent intended on housing. to provide Even an if additional they were source in a position of good to quality share rented two-bedroomaccommodation, COLORS for the eligible average persons rent remained to enhance high the at response €421 per of person local per authorities month.Threshold’s to meeting long 2004 term survey housing of rent need. supplement Local authorities recipients will in Cork enter City into revealed contractual thatsome arrangements rent ceilings with under private that landlords scheme to were secure too the low, medium with one to in long-term five paying availability more to the oflandlord private rented than the accommodation contribution required for the RAS. out of their welfare benefits.Despite The Access the Housing high cost Unit of renting, partnership a lot of with accommodation Dublin City particularly Council and at a private the lower landlord endof operate the rented 23 units market of accommodation is of poor quality. in Dublin It has long city for been homeless illegal for formerly landlords homeless to letsubstandard people. The AHU property provide below a property the requirements management of the function Housing and (Standards tenancy sustainment for RentedHouses) service for Regulations, the 23 units. 1993 The or tenant the fire is provided safety provisions with pretenancy for multiple training property and induction unitsin prior the to Fire move Safety in, assistance Act 1981. with But move high demand in tenancy for rented sustainment accommodation support combined for as longwith as required. poor enforcement The aim of of the regulations project is to by have local all authorities tenants living means independently that many landlords in goodcontinue quality, affordable to get away accommodation. with renting substandard The properties accommodation are built to an to excellent vulnerable standard people. andOne Parent FamilyHowever rents are it at is an likely affordable that the differential requirements rents of rate the new through Rental Dublin Accommodation City Council. SchemeSingle FemaleSingle Male27


6t h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006d u b l i n l i o n s c l u b ‘f l at o u t k i t s’A new partnership in 2006 saw Threshold’s Access Housing Unit working with DublinLions to help people make the move from homelessness to independent living in Dublin.Dublin Lions have generously agreed to sponsor the cost of creating a special ‘flatout’kit for Threshold clients. The kit will be available to clients who move out ofhomelessness and into private rented accommodation. The kit will consist of essentialhousehold groceries such as milk, tea, bread, sugar as well as towels and toiletries andone or two basic electrical items like a kettle or toaster. Threshold staff work with theclient in creating a kit that best suits their needs. While no money is given, the client issaved the cost of purchasing such essential items in the early and critical stages of theirtenancy.28


t htr he rs eh so hl od l d a na nu na ul a l r erp eo pr ot r t 2006Homeless h o m e l e s s w o m Family a n s u p p o r t eSupporteddto Find Rented Homet o l i v e i n d e p e n d e n t l yGer Helen Harte, was referred his wife and to their Access six children Housing were Unit living by her in Community private rented Welfare accommodation. Officer. Helen The is 47 family years was old, in and areceipt lone parent of rent with supplement two children; and both were children renting are a house in the for care three of the years HSE. when Helen the landlord was homeless decided on to and sell off the for sixproperty. years when referred to the Unit.The Helen family was were drifting given through a valid notice life; she of suffered termination from by their ill health landlord but did were not see unable her to children secure additional who were private in care.rented Helen had housing suffered that accepted abuse as rent a child supplement and later during again that in period. her married The family life. Helen travelled was to deteriorating England to secure in emergency housingand homeless employment accommodation but became as homeless it was a after chaotic a month. place They to live then and returned she was to return vulnerable. to Limerick She never to try had again. a stablehome of her own.The family called into the Limerick advice centre after stepping off the train from England. They had no where to gothat The evening tenancy and sustainment a limited supply worker of from money. the An AHU advice met worker with managed Helen and to carried secure short out an term interview accommodation and assessment for thefamily with her and to got identify in contact her with ability the to local live homeless independently persons and centre to plan on their what behalf type to of arrange supports a meeting were needed. for the Several next day.meetings established Helen’s ability to live independently; however it was necessary for her to accept supportThe following day the Harte family was offered emergency bed and breakfast accommodation by the homeless personsfrom the Tenancy Sustainment Worker especially around budgeting, contacting her landlord, dealing withcentre. An advice worker again helped the family to secure bed and breakfast accommodation that would accept asocial welfare services, and general life skills.large family until such time as private rented accommodation could be found.Helen was only allowed a limited rent cap under the SWA Rent Supplement Scheme as she was assessed asThe family spent four weeks in emergency accommodation. During this time they worked closely with Threshold’sa single person. This would allow her bedsit style accommodation. The project team secured a viewing of aadvice staff to source and secure private rented accommodation. The advice team located a suitable property in theflat and accompanied her to view the property and meet the landlord. They also helped her to secure a rentcity environs and rang the landlord on behalf of the Harte family. The Harte family went to view the house that eveningsupplement payment and rent deposit from a CWO. They then helped her to move into her new home.and were very happy with it.29 29


t h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006promoting housingreform through researchThreshold’s Research Unit analyses housing problems, identifiespractical solutions to people’s housing needs and campaigns fortheir adoption by government and others. Threshold introduced anew national client database and produced a number of importantresearch reports and policy submissions in 2006.abcdeand campaigningDevelopment of Threshold’s Client DatabaseThreshold’s advice and advocacy services are targeted at households experiencinghousing disadvantage, especially those at risk of homelessness. Threshold piloted andintroduced a new client database at the end of 2006 to improve the collection of dataabout services provided to measure more effectively the situations of clients, theirproblems, the assistance given and the outcomes. The aim is to be able to manageour resources, identify issues promptly and assess the impact of our interventions.The introduction of the dispute resolution process under the PRTB underlines theimportance of evaluating Threshold’s mediation and advocacy efforts.Open Door? Better Homes for One Parent Families under theRental Accommodation SchemeA joint project with OPEN (One Parent Exchange and Network) and partly fundedby the Combat Poverty Agency was based on the premise that families assessed inlong term housing need should be accommodated in suitable dwellings of good quality.This research aimed to influence the establishment of dwelling standards for the newRental Accommodation Scheme. The recommendations addressed the key features ofappropriate accommodation for a one parent families living longer-term in the privaterented sector.Supply of Single Person AccommodationThreshold commenced a research project analysing the supply of suitableaccommodation that may be accessed by single person households on low incomesin Dublin, Cork, Galway and Limerick, as part of a research project funded by theCombat Poverty Agency. A national survey of advertised bedsit/one-person lettingswas conducted in August and November. We also consulted local authorities andvoluntary housing bodies requesting data about their provision of housing to singlepeople by age group. The findings were discussed with officials from the Department ofthe Environment, Heritage and Local Government, Department of Social and FamilyAffairs and Superintendent CWOs supervising the rent supplement scheme.30


abcdeabcdet h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006Approximately Action Programme one in on five Minimum Irish households Standards live in either social rentedAt or the private launch rented of Threshold’s accommodation. Annual Report Renters 2005, the are Minister concentrated for Housing in and urban UrbanRenewal, areas with Noel over Ahern two-fifths T.D., announced (41%) an action living programme in the Dublin on tackling area. substandard Rentersaccommodation are much more in the likely private than rented owner sector. occupiers Threshold was to live subsequently in a bedsitter invited to or makesubmissions apartment, on with the content 29% of the renters minimum compared standards with regulations 1% of and owners good enforcement in thispractice type of by accommodation. local authorities. We A made disproportionate submissions to both number the Department of renters of live the inEnvironment poverty; over and a the third Centre (35%) for Housing have Research incomes in below November the 2006. poverty line usedby the EU, and over a fifth (21%) live in consistent poverty.Minimum As revealed by Standards the 2002 Census in the private European sector has Policy become Context the predominant sourceIn of rental a joint accommodation, two-year project accounting led by EAPN for Ireland, 141,459 Threshold units in that is contributing year. While an catering analysisof for the moderate development and higher of minimum income housing groups, the standards private in rented Ireland sector and is the also potential playing for anEuropean-wide increasing role initiatives. housing people The project surviving involves on very some low seven incomes. EU states, At the including end of 2005, newaccession 60,000 recipients countries. of The rent aim supplement is to determine were living if working the towards sector. In minimum addition, social the newstandards Rental Accommodation is an appropriate Scheme way (RAS) of promoting which social is gradually inclusion being across extended Europe. to recipients The finalreport in long of term the need project of housing will be launched will rely heavily at a transnational private rented conference housing.June 2007.Current information shows that rents are high and that they increased during 2005.The ‘privately owned rent index’ published by the Central Statistics Office shows rentsnationally were 4.3% higher in December 2005 than 12 months earlier. The DAFT.ie index confirms the upward trend and reports stronger inflation in Galway City andDublin than elsewhere. More detailed information about regional variations in rentshould become available through the Private Residential Tenancies Board (PRTB).Renting privately continues to strain the budgets of less well off households. Accordingto 2005 rental market statistics from DAFT.ie, a single person seeking a studio unitin Dublin 1 paid €581 per month on average. Assuming the tenant earned €15,912annually, equivalent to the minimum wage on a 39 hour week, 44% of their grossincome would be spent on housing. Even if they were in a position to share two-bedroomaccommodation, the average rent remained high at €421 per person per month.Threshold’s 2004 survey of rent supplement recipients in Cork City revealed thatsome rent ceilings under that scheme were too low, with one in five paying more to thelandlord than the contribution required out of their welfare benefits.Despite the high cost of renting, a lot of accommodation particularly at the lower endof the rented market is of poor quality. It has long been illegal for landlords to letsubstandard property below the requirements of the Housing (Standards for RentedHouses) Regulations, 1993 or the fire safety provisions for multiple property unitsin the Fire Safety Act 1981. But high demand for rented accommodation combinedwith poor enforcement of regulations by local authorities means that many landlordscontinue to get away with renting substandard accommodation to vulnerable people.However it is likely that the requirements of the new Rental Accommodation Scheme31


t h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006y o u n g m o t h e r i n r e n t a r r e a r sh e l p e d t o k e e p h e r h o m eAgatha is a parent with two children who contacted Threshold in October 2006 because she feared losing herhome.Agatha was working in a restaurant as a waitress but lost her job. She had applied for rent supplement butfound she had to be assessed by the local authority before payment could commence. She was under pressurefrom her landlord to pay almost €1,000 rent owing and feared being given notice to leave her home.Threshold’s advice worker contacted Galway City Council to fast track Agatha’s housing needs assessment.The advice worker was successful in ensuring that the Council bypassed the usual six week’s processing timeand that the assessment was carried out in just one week.The advice worker also contacted Agatha’s landlord to keep him informed of the situation, to reassure himand to explain the procedure when applying for rent supplement. The advice worker negotiated with theclient’s Community Welfare Officer regarding commencement of payment of rent supplement and backpayments owing.Two weeks after Agatha first contacted Threshold her Community Welfare Officer forwarded back paymentsof rent supplement to her bank account. Agatha has informed us that there is no further threat to hertenancy and she and her landlord have a good relationship.32


250020001500100050001977 1378 1291 1105 816 732 417 257 253239qrt h r e s h o l d t ah nr ne us ah l o lrd e pa on rn t u a2006l r e p o r t 2006f und raisingThreshold is a not-for-profit organisation which would not be ableto operate without the invaluable support of our donors who in2006 generously contributed €810,143 in support of our work.This enables Threshold to help the people who are in dire needof our services. Each year Threshold helps thousands of peoplewith advice and support. We would like to take this opportunity tothank everyone who donated to Threshold in 2006.2.75%7.03%15.42%10.10%10.54%s o u r c e o f p r i vat e s e c to r f u n d i n gDirect MailMajor Donor ProgrammePledge DonorsTrusts, Corporate & LegaciesEventsHopestar Xmas AppealCharity ShopsCall CharityCommunity0.15%0.27%39.15%14.58%Trusts, Corporates & LegaciesWith the support of trusts, corporates and legacies we raised €84,150 in 2006.Threshold is constantly trying to pursue funding from different sources to ensure ourgoal in helping people who are on the margins of our society.Dogs NightEach year Threshold has our annual ‘Night at the Dogs’ which takes place atShelbourne Greyhound Stadium in December. Last year 230 people attended over twonights and we raised €52,095 for Threshold.One night alone was proudly sponsored by Bovale Developments to include staff,suppliers and clients alike who we would like to thank for their continued support.Also we would like to thank our other supporters who kindly take part each year bypurchasing tickets, advertising in the race sponsorship and taking part in the raffle.Cork Threshold in the MarketCork Threshold held its eighth annual ‘Threshold in the Market’ fundraising event atthe Farmgate Restaurant English Market on Friday December 1st., 2006. A total of€15,976 was raised on the night making it our most profitable event yet.The evening kicked off with guests enjoying mulled wine followed by fine food and wineand seasonal entertainment. Our sincere thanks and appreciation goes to Kay Harte,proprietor of the Farmgate Restaurant, John and Tina O’Flynn, Amanda Neari, andProfidia for their ongoing support and assistance.Major Donor ProgrammeCommunityRaising the Roof in GalwayCOLORS This musical extravaganza which took place on the 25th June included classical,traditional, contemporary and barber shop music and was a huge success. The eveningwas rounded off with an excellent supper and as a fundraiser it was the most successfulto date for the Western Regional Office, raising close to €17,043.Oledge Donors33


qHope Star Christmas Appealt h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006This annual appeal provides companies and small businesses with an opportunity tosupport Threshold’s work. We encourage companies to make a donation to Thresholdin lieu of sending Christmas cards to their clients. In return, we take out a full pageadvertisement in the Sunday Business Post. In 2006, 136 companies supported ourHope Star Appeal helping us to raise €58,580 for Threshold’s work. We are mostgrateful to Hamilton Osborne King who are the main supporters of our Hope StarAppeal.Circle of FriendsThreshold’s Circle of Friends are regular donors who support our work. This enablesThreshold to budget and plan ahead for our future service. Monthly donors areconstantly growing and in 2006 monthly donations totalled €87,794.Tax RefundsAs an Irish registered charity, Threshold can claim a refund under the tax relief schemeon donations to eligible charities. When a P.A.Y.E. Donor gives €250 or more toThreshold during the tax year, Threshold may be able to reclaim tax paid on their gift.In 2006. Threshold claimed and received a tax refund of €9,496 on donations received.Our sincere thanks to all who completed and returned their tax refund forms and thusenabled Threshold to derive the full value of their support.Charity ShopsThreshold has three charity shops based in Ballincollig in County Cork, and Tralee andCastle Island in County Kerry. Our shops sell high quality second hand clothes and othervarious items at low cost prices with value for money quality. Our funds help to supportThreshold’s regional advice centres.Our charity shop employees / volunteers are experienced and always there to help.Threshold is always looking for new volunteers and we are also seeking to form afundraising committee. If you are interested in taking part please get in touch with ourfundraising department in the Dublin office. We would be delighted to hear from you.We would like to thank all our customers and volunteers who helped to make ourcharity shops such a success in 2006.Easter Egg AppealThresholds first Easter Egg Appeal commenced last year and is aimed at newcompanies and local businesses. This appeal raised €4,312 in support of our work. A bigthank you to everybody who took part and also to our suppliers Celtic Chocolate.34qr


Parachute Jumpt h r e s h o l d t ha rn en su ha ol lrd e ap no nr ut a2006l r e p o r t 2006rThreshold is always seeking new exciting events and last year we held our first everParachute Jump. This took place in October and involved Thresholds staff, friends andsupporters.We raised €7,209 and everybody who signed up went ahead with the jump on theday. We would like to thank all of our brave supporters for their nerves of steel. Suchsupport is sincerely recognised.Sleep Out for ThresholdThe NUI Galway branch of Young Fine Gael did a sleep out for Threshold duringChristmas Week and raised €3,000. They were so cheerful on the night they appearedto be enjoying themselves despite that fact that it was quite cold, though thankfully notraining. This is the second occasion that Young Fine Gael did a sleep out for Thresholdand we very much appreciate their assistance.Special ThanksThreshold would like to extend its very grateful thanks to everybody who has donatedthroughout the year. We would especially like to thank the following companies:Bovale DevelopmentsThe Lions ClubHamilton Osborne KingCyril O’Neill & CoIrish Nationwide Building SocietyHT Meagher O’ReillyMKN Properties LimitedJackie Greene Construction ltdWilliam Neville & SonsGannon Homes LtdDouglas Newman GoodJaycee QuickprintR Braken & companyDurkan new Homes LtdIrish Home Builders AssociationGibbons AssociatesDorville Homes LtdModus LinkThe McGrath GroupGrafton ArchitectsModus LinkNCB GroupPJ Hegarty & SonsSmith Foy & PartnersThe Tuam Herald35


t h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006financial report2006mno2006 was a challenging year for Threshold. We opened an AdviceCentre in Limerick and increased our staff numbers in our otheradvice centres to meet increased demand and improve the qualityof our services. Thanks to the generosity of our private public andcorporate funders our overall income increased by 9.7%.i n c o m e a n d e x pen d i t ur e 2006Income €Total 2,121,342Donations & Fundraising 810,143Grants 905,430Grants FAS Community Employment268,217SchemeCharity Shops 27,778Rental Income 45,573Miscellaneous 64,201Expenditure €Total 2,129,749Salaries & Pensions 1,027,435FAS Community Employment Scheme 268,217Fundraising 248,406Administration /Research 244,522Premises 157,608Publications/Printing/Postage/Stationary 175,354Transitional Housing (Gilabbey Court)8,207Expenses36


t h r e s h o l d t ha rn en su ha ol lrd e ap no nr ut a2006l r e p o r t 20061%13%43%mnos o u r c e o f i n c o m e 2006GrantsDonations & FundrasingGrants FAS Community Employment SchemeMiscellaneousCharity ShopsRental Income3%2%38%mnoStatutory Funding/Grants €Total 1,173,647Government Subsidies 360,000FAS Community Employment Scheme 268,217Homeless Agency 281,519Dublin City Council 60,000Cork County Council 15,000Cork City Council 8,000Galway City Council 12,000Galway County Council 3,500Dun Laoghaire/Rathdown County council 7,000South Dublin County Council 5,000Fingal County Council 5,000Kildare County Council 500Wicklow County Council 500Southern Health Board 16,500Western Health Board 32,500An Pobal 92,482Other Statutory agencies/CombatPoverty5,92937


stt h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006contact details andstaf f members 2006head office21 StoneybatterDublin 7Tel: 01 678 6310headoffice@threshold.ieDirectorPatrick BurkeAdministrative Officer/PA to Director Nichola ClancyResearch & Communications Manager Bob Jordan (Director 2007)Research OfficerLillian BuchananAccountantEdward Kiernanfundraising21 StoneybatterDublin 7Tel: 01 678 6097fundraising@threshold.ieEvents & Retail ManagerAisling DonoghueFundraising ManagerDeclan WhiteFundraising AssistantZadrhiena Nooneadvice centresEastern Region Advice Centre21 StoneybatterDublin 7Tel: 01 678 6096info@threshold.ieServices Co-ordinatorStephen LargeFÁS Community Employment Supervisor Carol FitzmauriceAdvice WorkersSharon Clinton, Sheila Dunne, ClaireLane, Patricia Martin and Teresa SnowAdvice Workers (FÁS CE)Sinead Burke, Jennifer Dowling,Barry Doyle, Angelo Incrocci, SiobhanMcKenna and Miriam TyrrellReception/Administration (FÁS CE) Jackie Keating, Cara Thorpe, JimMcMahon and Yvonne Davies38


t h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 200622 South MallCorkPh: 021 427 8848threshold@eircom.netServices Co-ordinatorSenior Advice WorkerAdvice WorkersAdvice Workers (FÁS CE)Volunteer AdministratorWestern Region Advice Centre3 Victoria PlaceMerchants RoadGalwayPh: 091 563 080thresholdgalway@eircom.netServices Co-ordinatorAdvice WorkersAdvice Workers (FÁS CE)Advice Worker (FAS JI)Limerick Advice Centre26 Catherine StreetLimerickPh: 061 405 400limerick@threshold.ieServices Co-ordinatorAdvice WorkersAdministratorrstSouthern Region Advice CentreMargaret O’NeillCatherine O’SheaRoss Crowley, Evelyn Gibney and JoanneKielyJo Anglin, Mary Cremin, FionaHendrick, Olive Kelly, Eileen Lynch,Mary Maloney, Linda O’Flaherty, PhilO'Regan, Gerard Staunton, Paul Tarpeyand John ThorntonPeggy ManningDeirdre MurphyTrish Carr, Eileen Kilkenny, SinéadRoche and Karina TimothyFrances Dermody and Nic DowlingAnn Faherty and Martina KellyLouise KennedyIris Denieffe and Mary HynesMary Harvey39


t h r e s h o l d a n n u a l r e p o r t 2006rstAccess Housing Unit21 StoneybatterDublin 7Ph: 01 678 60 94ahu@threshold.ieProject Co-ordinatorProject WorkersCharity ShopsCORKUnit 5Ballincollig Shopping CentreWest VillageBallincolligCo. CorkManager Employees (FAS CE)Employees (FAS CE)VolunteersKERRY11 Edward StreetTraleeCo. KerryManagerEmployees (FAS CE)Volunteers40Russell Chapman/Aine DalyBernadette Boylan, Irene Dunne,Thomas Hanlon, Danielle McLaughlinand Louisa SantoroGeraldine McLoughlinEileen Barry, Jean HarnettLouise Krauss, Sheila Noonan andLorraine O’MahonyJames Curran, Mary Doyle, MaryHogan, Mary Howe, Sheila Kelleher,Aoife McLoughlin, Regina Mulcahy,Helen Murphy, Carol Nagle, AnneO’Regan, Betty Penny, Sarah Radwanand Angela Maher.Helen CoyleCeline Daly, Noreen O’Halloran, HelenPhillips and Amal SafarAnn Brosnan, Mary Connelly, GinnyO’Sullivan and Seif Taher


stProduced by True North Job No. 862www.threshold.ie

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines