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David Cappaert, Michigan State University, bugwood.orgEmerald Ash Borer:Ash Tree IdentificationPreparing for the Emerald Ash Borerhttp://nyis.info/eab


Ash Trees are easy to IdentifyAll three Ash, white, green andblack, have:• Opposite Branching• Pinnately Compound Leaves(5-11 leaflets)• Large, Stout, Terminal Buds• Noticeable Bud Scars• Oar Shaped, Dry Fruit (samaras)• Diamond Pattern in the Bark(white and green ash)Robert Vidéki, Doronicum Kft., Bugwood.orgPreparing for the Emerald Ash Borerhttp://nyis.info/eab


Ash TreesDavid Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.orgPreparing for the Emerald Ash Borerhttp://nyis.info/eab


Paul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.orgBill Cook, Michigan State University, Bugwood.orgOpposite BranchingBuds (therefore leaves and branches) growdirectly across from each other. Only a fewtrees in NY have opposite branching:Ash, Maple, and Horsechestnut/Buckeye.Opposite,AshAlternate,BeechPreparing for the Emerald Ash Borerhttp://nyis.info/eab


Opposite branchingAlso, note the stout twigsto hold their largecompound leavesDavid Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.orgPreparing for the Emerald Ash Borerhttp://nyis.info/eab


Pinnately Compound LeavesCompound leaves: leaves made up of multipleleaflets.Pinnate: Leaflets arranged linearly along a rachis(stem)LeafletTerminalLeafletRachis7 531Bud642Keith Kanoti, Maine Forest Service, Bugwood.orgPreparing for the Emerald Ash Borerhttp://nyis.info/eab


Keith Kanoti, Maine Forest Service, Bugwood.orgPaul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.orgGreen Ash: 7-9 leafletsBlack Ash: 7-11 leafletsWhite Ash: 5-9 (7) leafletsKeith Kanoti, Maine Forest Service, Bugwood.orgPreparing for the Emerald Ash Borerhttp://nyis.info/eab


Bill Cook, Michigan State University,Bugwood.orgPaul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.orgGreen AshLarge, Stout Buds& Prominent Leaf ScarsBlack AshWhite AshPaul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.orgPreparing for the Emerald Ash Borerhttp://nyis.info/eab


Bill Cook, Michigan State University,Bugwood.orgBill Cook, Michigan State University,Bugwood.orgBlack CherryPaul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.orgOther Twigs and BudsYellow BirchNorway MaplePreparing for the Emerald Ash Borerhttp://nyis.info/eab


Paul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.orgFranklin Bonner, USFS (ret.), Bugwood.orgFruitWhite AshAsh fruit a single samara: seedsurrounded by dry, oar shapedwings that help with dispersal.SeedGreen AshPreparing for the Emerald Ash Borerhttp://nyis.info/eab


BarkAs white and greenash trees age theirbark develops distinctdiamond patterns.Young ash trees havesmooth bark.Keith Kanoti, Maine Forest Service, Bugwood.orgPreparing for the Emerald Ash Borerhttp://nyis.info/eab


Black AshBarkBlack ash treeshave flakeybark as theyage. But, adiamondpattern maystill be seen.Preparing for the Emerald Ash Borerhttp://nyis.info/eabKeith Kanoti, Maine Forest Service, Bugwood.org


Look Alike TreesAlthough ash are quite unique looking, there area few trees that could be mistaken for ash.• Norway Maple• Box Elder• Elderberry• Mountain-ash (not a true ash)• Hickory and WalnutPreparing for the Emerald Ash Borerhttp://nyis.info/eab


NorwayMapleSimilarities• Opposite Branches• Diamond Patten BarkDifferences• Large, simple Leaves• Paired samarasPaul Wray, Iowa State University, www.forestryimages.orgPreparing for the Emerald Ash Borerhttp://nyis.info/eabSteve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org


Box Elderaka- Ash-leaf MapleSimilarities• Opposite Branching• Compound, PinnateLeaves• Diamond Pattern BarkDifferences• Lobed terminal leaflet• 3-5 leaflets• Reddish stems/youngbarkBill Cook, Michigan State University, Bugwood.orPreparing for the Emerald Ash Borerhttp://nyis.info/eabBill Paul Cook, Wray, Michigan Iowa State University, Bugwood.org


ElderberrySimilarities• Oppositebranching• Pinnatelycompound leafDifferences• Shrub• Soft/pithy twigs• BerriesJohn Cardina, The Ohio State University, Bugwood.orgChris Evans, River to River CWMA, Bugwood.orgPreparing for the Emerald Ash Borerhttp://nyis.info/eabJohn Cardina, The Ohio State University, Bugwood.org


Mountain-AshSimilarities• Pinnately compoundleafDifferences• Leaflet number andserrations• Smooth bark• Alternate branches• BerriesBoris Hrasovec, Faculty of Forestry, Bugwood.orgPreparing for the Emerald Ash Borerhttp://nyis.info/eabTom DeGomez, University of Arizona, Bugwood.org


Hickory and WalnutThis group of trees primarily has pinnatelycompound leaves, but alternate branching,nuts and varying bark types (some of whichcan look diamond like).Bitternut HickoryBlack WalnutShagbark HickoryPaul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.orgPaul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.orgPaul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.orgPreparing for the Emerald Ash Borerhttp://nyis.info/eab


Steps inIdentifying AshTreesDoes the tree have:1. Opposite Branching(with stout twigs)2. Pinnate CompoundLeaves3. 5-11 (7) Leaflets4. Single Samara5. PronouncedDiamond PatternBarkPreparing for the Emerald Ash Borerhttp://nyis.info/eabTom DeGomez, University of Arizona, Bugwood.org


On-Line Identification Resources• Know Your Trees:http://ecommons.cornell.edu/bitstream/1813/86/2/art.pdf• CU Woody Plant Database:http://woodyplants.mannlib.cornell.edu/• Virginia Tech Dendrology:http://cnre.vt.edu/dendro/dendrology/main.htmPreparing for the Emerald Ash Borerhttp://nyis.info/eab


CreditsNYS EAB Web Site: http://nyis.info/eab• Presentation prepared by– Rebecca Hargrave, Horticulture and Natural ResourcesExtension Educator, Cornell Cooperative Extension ofChenango County, jrh45@cornell.edu, and– Mark Whitmore, Forest Entomologist with CornellUniversity Department of Natural Resourcesmcw42@cornell.edu• Funded by USDA/APHIS andCornell UniversityFeb. 1, 2012Preparing for the Emerald Ash Borerhttp://nyis.info/eab

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