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3Operating ............................................................................................................................................ 56References .................................................................................................................................................. 59Appendix A: <strong>QEP</strong> Scoring Guide Rubric ...................................................................................................... 61Appendix B: <strong>QEP</strong> Marketing Plan ............................................................................................................... 62Appendix C: Application Math <strong>for</strong> Health Science Course Description ..................................................... 65Appendix D: <strong>QEP</strong> Director Job Description ................................................................................................ 69Appendix E: <strong>QEP</strong> Director Curriculum Vitae .............................................................................................. 72Appendix F: <strong>QEP</strong> Instructor Job Description .............................................................................................. 75Appendix G: Glossary <strong>of</strong> Terms .................................................................................................................. 77Page 3


4Executive Summary<strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong>’s Quality Enhancement Plan (<strong>QEP</strong>), “MESH” <strong>for</strong> Success, (MathematicsEnhancing the Sciences and Health), is designed as a broad-based <strong>College</strong> initiative to improve studentlearning <strong>for</strong> Health Science students in understanding the application <strong>of</strong> mathematical concepts. Studentlearning will be enhanced through the development and implementation <strong>of</strong> a curriculum-specific mathcourse.In the early stages <strong>of</strong> development, stakeholders representing the <strong>College</strong> community analyzed andevaluated key issues that surfaced from a review <strong>of</strong> annual institutional assessment results. Specificissues identified were poor skills in applying mathematical concepts and weak computational skills <strong>of</strong>students, especially those in Health Science programs.Health Science majors comprise 51% <strong>of</strong> <strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong>’s student population. Studentsuccess in Health Science programs is important to the state and local community in order to have asufficient pool <strong>of</strong> skilled workers to fill positions in the expanding healthcare fields. However, retentionin these programs is low. These factors led to the decision to focus the <strong>QEP</strong> on addressing HealthScience students’ poor mathematical problem solving and weak computational skills.Research in these areas validated the need to alter methods <strong>of</strong> delivering instruction as a strategy todevelop students’ mathematical problem solving and computational skills. The development andimplementation <strong>of</strong> a curriculum specific math course combined with contextual teaching methods willbe employed to improve student learning in understanding the application <strong>of</strong> mathematical conceptsutilized in Health Science programs. This should indirectly improve student retention and programcompletion.In addition to the development <strong>of</strong> a curriculum-specific math course, the incorporation <strong>of</strong> math intoprogram-specific courses within the Health Sciences Department will be part <strong>of</strong> the design strategy.Faculty development in the utilization <strong>of</strong> various instructional methodologies will be integral to thesuccess <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong>.The Implementation Plan <strong>for</strong> MESH exhibits a broad-based <strong>College</strong> involvement strongly supported bythe <strong>College</strong>’s administration. The comprehensive assessment plan <strong>for</strong> MESH will utilize <strong>for</strong>mative andsummative assessments to evaluate student learning and the overall effectiveness <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong>.Furthermore, <strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong> (STC) provides evidence <strong>of</strong> its financial capabilities andcommitment to sustain the implementation and completion <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong>.Page 4


5<strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong>Page 5


6<strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong> Pr<strong>of</strong>ile<strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong> (STC) is a unit <strong>of</strong> the <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong> System <strong>of</strong> Georgia (TCSG) whichconsists <strong>of</strong> 25 technical colleges across the state. STC is located in southeast Georgia and servesCandler, Emanuel, Jenkins, Johnson, Montgomery, Tattnall, Toombs, and Treutlen counties. The <strong>College</strong>has campuses in Glennville*, Swainsboro, and Vidalia.Originally, the Swainsboro and Vidalia campuses were separate colleges within TCSG. In January 2008,the TCSG State Board charged a task <strong>for</strong>ce to determine the feasibility <strong>of</strong> merging selected technicalcolleges as a means <strong>of</strong> improving efficiency. The TCSG State Board ultimately gave approval to proceedwith the proposed mergers. On July 1, 2009, Swainsboro <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong> and <strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong><strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong>ficially merged to become the current <strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong>.*The Glennville Campus will close effective August 20, 2012 due to low enrollment.Page 6


7<strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong> Mission and GoalsMission Statement<strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong>, a unit <strong>of</strong> the <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong> System <strong>of</strong> Georgia, provides aninnovative, educational environment <strong>for</strong> student learning through traditional and distance educationdelivery methods focused on building a well-educated, globally competitive work<strong>for</strong>ce <strong>for</strong> <strong>Southeastern</strong>Georgia.The <strong>College</strong> fulfills its mission through associate degree, diploma, and technical certificate <strong>of</strong> credit programs; adult education; continuing education; and customized training and services.Vision<strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong> will be recognized as an educational leader in <strong>Southeastern</strong> Georgia. The<strong>College</strong> will deliver quality, student-centered, and accessible postsecondary education and training. The<strong>College</strong> will empower students <strong>for</strong> success, cultivating innovative and economically thriving communitiesand enterprises.Goals Guarantee student access and the opportunity <strong>for</strong> success at all levels. Build the local work<strong>for</strong>ce <strong>for</strong> economic vitality. Improve the visibility, recognized value, and support <strong>of</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> Education, Adult Education,and Work<strong>for</strong>ce Training. Enhance the <strong>College</strong>’s organizational development in terms <strong>of</strong> educational delivery, facilities andequipment, and internal work<strong>for</strong>ce.<strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong> Values Integrity, honesty, openness, mutual respect, and personal excellence Continuous improvement Making a difference in teaching and learning A strong, visionary Administration A qualified and committed Faculty and Staff Community Partnerships and citizenship Safe, secure, and attractive campuses and facilities Time together <strong>for</strong> planning Positive attitudes and teamwork Accessible and af<strong>for</strong>dable quality programs and services Pr<strong>of</strong>essional Development Communication Fairness, equality, and diversity Work<strong>for</strong>ce development Marketing our uniqueness <strong>for</strong> a competitive advantage Technological advancementPage 7


8Organizational StructureThe <strong>College</strong> is organized into seven divisions to accomplish its mission: (1) Academic Affairs, (2)Administrative Services, (3) Economic Development, (4) Institutional Advancement, (5) InstitutionalEffectiveness, (6) Provost, and (7) Student Affairs. Each division head reports directly to the President.The Academic Affairs Division is divided into four departments: (1) Business Technologies & HumanServices, (2) Environmental & Industrial Technologies, (3) General Education & Learning Support, and (4)Health Sciences. Each department in the Academic Affairs Division is headed by a dean who isresponsible <strong>for</strong> the administration and management <strong>of</strong> the department and reports directly to the VicePresident <strong>for</strong> Academic Affairs.PresidentProvostInstitutionalAdvancementAdministrativeServicesEconomicDevelopmentAcademicAffairsStudent AffairsInstitutionalEffectivenessBusinessTechnologies &Human ServicesEnvironmental &IndustrialTechnologiesHealth SciencesGeneral Education& LearningSupportStudent Demographics<strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong>’s unduplicated enrollment <strong>for</strong> Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 was 3,146 with a fulltime equivalency (FTE) <strong>of</strong> 1,336. Enrollment in FY 2011 was 3,687 with a FTE <strong>of</strong> 1,706. The <strong>College</strong>’sstudent retention rate <strong>for</strong> FY2010 and FY2011 was 67% and 72%, respectively.Full-time students comprise 49% <strong>of</strong> enrollment and part-time students 51%. STC’s student population iscomposed <strong>of</strong> 28% male and 72% female. Enrollment is60% Caucasian, 36% African-American, 3.4% Hispanic,and the remaining 0.6% is multi-racial, Asian, orAmerican Indian. Seventy percent <strong>of</strong> the studentpopulation is 18 to 30 years <strong>of</strong> age, and 30% is 31 years<strong>of</strong> age and older.Ninety percent <strong>of</strong> <strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong>students received the Hope Grant or Scholarship, and63.3% <strong>of</strong> STC’s total population received the Pell Grantin FY 2011.Student Populationby Age GroupUnder 2121-2526-3031-3536-40Over 40Page 8


<strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong> 10<strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong> ProgramsBusiness Technologies & Human ServicesProgram Award Program GroupingAccounting Degree, Diploma Business TechnologiesBusiness Administrative Technology Degree, Diploma Business TechnologiesBusiness Management Degree, Diploma Business TechnologiesComputer In<strong>for</strong>mation Systems-Internet Specialist/Web SiteDesignDegree, DiplomaBusiness TechnologiesComputer in<strong>for</strong>mation Systems-Computer Support Specialist Degree, Diploma Business TechnologiesComputer in<strong>for</strong>mation Systems – Networking Specialist Degree, Diploma Business TechnologiesCosmetology Diploma Human ServicesCriminal Justice Technology Degree, Diploma Human ServicesEarly Childhood Care and Education Degree, Diploma Human ServicesMarketing Management Degree, Diploma Business TechnologiesAdministrative Support AssistantCertificateBusiness TechnologiesCisco Network SpecialistComp TIA A+ Certified PreparationHelp Desk SpecialistHuman Resource Management Specialist (Vidalia Campus)Internet Specialist Web Site Developer (Vidalia Campus)Management/Leadership Specialist (Vidalia Campus)Marketing Management (Entrepreneurship Specialization)Marketing Management (Marketing ManagementSpecialization)Marketing Management (Retail Specialization)Medical Front Office Assistant (Vidalia Campus)Micros<strong>of</strong>t Excel Application Pr<strong>of</strong>essionalMicros<strong>of</strong>t Network AdministratorMicros<strong>of</strong>t Office Applications Pr<strong>of</strong>essional (SwainsboroCampus)Payroll Accounting SpecialistSmall Business Management Specialist (Vidalia Campus)Supervisor/Manager Specialist (Vidalia Campus)<strong>Technical</strong> Management Specialist (Vidalia Campus)Child Development AssociateEarly Childhood Care and Education Basics (SwainsboroCampus)Early Childhood Program Administration (Swainsboro Campus)Introduction to Criminal JusticeShampoo Technician (Swainsboro Campus)CertificateHuman ServicesPage 10


11Industrial and Environmental TechnologiesProgram Award Program GroupingElectronics Technology (Vidalia Campus) Degree, Diploma Industrial TechnologyFish and Wildlife Management (Swainsboro Campus) Degree, Diploma Environmental TechnologyForest Technology (Swainsboro Campus) Degree, Diploma Environmental TechnologyAir Conditioning Technology (Vidalia Campus) Diploma Industrial TechnologyAutomotive Fundamentals Diploma (Vidalia Campus) Diploma Industrial TechnologyAutomotive Technology Diploma (Vidalia Campus) Diploma Industrial TechnologyElectrical Systems Technology Diploma Industrial TechnologyElectronics Fundamentals (Vidalia Campus) Diploma Industrial TechnologyWelding & Joining Technology Diploma Industrial TechnologyForest Technician AssistantWildlife Management Assistant (Swainsboro Campus)Advanced Shield Metal Arc WelderAir Conditioning Technician Assistant (Vidalia Campus)Auto Electrical/Electronic Systems Technician (VidaliaCampus)Automotive Chassis Technician Specialist (VidaliaCampus)Automotive Climate Control Technician (Vidalia Campus)Automotive Engine Per<strong>for</strong>mance Technician (VidaliaCampus)Automotive Engine Repair Technician (Vidalia Campus)Automotive Transmission/Transaxle Tech Specialist(Vidalia Campus)Basic Shielded Metal Arc WelderCommercial Truck DrivingCommercial WiringElectrical Contracting TechnicianElectrical Systems Assistant (Swainsboro Campus)Flux Cored Arc WelderGas Metal Arc WelderGas Tungsten Arc WelderResidential Wiring TechnicianCertificateCertificateEnvironmental TechnologyIndustrial TechnologyPage 11


12Health SciencesProgram Award Program GroupingClinical Laboratory Technology (Vidalia Campus)DegreeHealth SciencesDental Hygiene (Vidalia Campus)Radiologic TechnologyEMS Pr<strong>of</strong>essionsDiplomaHealth SciencesMedical AssistingParamedicine (Vidalia Campus)Pharmacy Technology (Vidalia Campus)Practical NursingSurgical TechnologyAdvanced Emergency Medical Technician (AEMT)Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)Health Care AssistantHealth Care ScienceMedical Administrative TechnicianNurse AideCertificate Health SciencesPage 12


13<strong>QEP</strong> Topic SelectionPage 13


14Topic Selection ProcessTopic Selection TimelineWinter 2010ExplorationSpring 2010Initial <strong>College</strong>AwarenessSummer 2010StakeholdersInputFall 2010Topic ScoringSpring 2011Topic Voted &<strong>QEP</strong>LT FormedThe <strong>QEP</strong> topic selection process began in January 2010, six months into the merger <strong>of</strong> Swainsboro<strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong> and the <strong>for</strong>mer <strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong>. Given the <strong>College</strong>s’ recent merger,the Executive Council (EC) decided that the Vice President <strong>for</strong> Institutional Effectiveness (VPIE) wouldcoordinate a review process to explore the <strong>for</strong>mer <strong>College</strong>s’ annual planning and assessment data toidentify possible issues affecting student learning.Executive Council - ECNameLarry CalhounTeresa ColemanDr. Barry DotsonDr. Cathryn Mitchell*Eide Nesmith/ Charla NailDenise PowellGail WareDavid Yarbrough*Eide Nesmith resigned and was replaced by Charla Nail.TitleProvostVice President <strong>for</strong> Academic AffairsVice President <strong>for</strong> Student AffairsPresidentDirector <strong>of</strong> Institutional AdvancementVice President <strong>for</strong> Administrative ServicesVice President <strong>for</strong> Institutional EffectivenessVice President <strong>for</strong> Economic DevelopmentWinter 2010 - ExplorationThe Institutional Effectiveness (IE) Division began the data review by exploring the planning andassessment database systems <strong>of</strong> both <strong>for</strong>mer <strong>College</strong>s <strong>for</strong> fiscal years 2007, 2008, and 2009. Thesedatabases contain the annual evaluation results <strong>of</strong> program and student learning outcomes, which areentered into the system by faculty. Also, grade distribution reports, employer surveys, and minutesfrom Advisory Committee and Academic Affairs Division meetings were reviewed.Spring 2010 - Initial <strong>College</strong> AwarenessDuring the annual Strategic Planning Day in March 2010, the President, the Vice President <strong>for</strong> AcademicAffairs (VPAA), and the VPIE presented a “<strong>College</strong> Awareness” session. The purpose <strong>of</strong> the session wasto introduce the faculty and staff to the reaffirmation process and to the Quality Enhancement Plantopic selection process.Page 14


15Summer 2010 – Stakeholders’ InputBy the summer <strong>of</strong> 2010, through review ef<strong>for</strong>ts, the IE Division had identified areas <strong>of</strong> concern thatcould affect student learning. Potential topics gleaned from the IE Division’s review <strong>of</strong> data werehighlighted‣ Measurement‣ Problem solving in math‣ Translating math word problems into an equation‣ Computer terminology or readiness‣ Researching a topic‣ Analyzing‣ Attendance‣ Attrition/retention‣ Not turning in assignments‣ Community projects related to course work‣ Peer teaching‣ Writing‣ AdvisementThis list was <strong>for</strong>warded to the Strategic Planning Advisory Group (SPAG) and the Team <strong>of</strong> InstitutionalEffectiveness Reviewers (TIER) <strong>for</strong> review and discussion.SPAG is a standing committee consisting <strong>of</strong> members representing the various divisions <strong>of</strong> the <strong>College</strong>.The committee reviews in-depth situational analyses and utilizes environmental scans, demographicpr<strong>of</strong>iles, labor market trends, and other resources to help determine the future direction <strong>of</strong> the <strong>College</strong>.SPAG annually reviews the <strong>College</strong>’s mission and vision statements as well as the goals and strategicobjectives in the Strategic Plan to recommend any needed updates.Strategic Planning Advisory Group - SPAGName Title DivisionMichael Crumpler Welding Instructor Academic AffairsJennifer Gramiak Dental Hygiene Instructor/Program Director Academic AffairsTina Jernigan Business Technology Instructor Academic AffairsAmanda Lively Assistant Registrar Student AffairsGina Robison Dean, Business Technology and Human Services Academic AffairsSusan Rustin Director <strong>of</strong> Economic Development Economic DevelopmentLori Sweat Accounting Instructor Academic AffairsJohn Thrift Forest Technology Instructor Academic AffairsGail Ware Vice President <strong>for</strong> Institutional Effectiveness Institutional EffectivenessTIER is also a standing committee consisting <strong>of</strong> members representing the various divisions <strong>of</strong> the<strong>College</strong>. This committee meets periodically to review, analyze results, and make recommendations <strong>for</strong>improvements on surveys, data collection, and reports. TIER reviews the Institutional Effectiveness PlanPage 15


16and advises the Vice President <strong>for</strong> Institutional Effectiveness <strong>of</strong> any needed revisions on assessment.Also, the committee reviews assigned compliance certification narratives and documents.Team <strong>of</strong> Institutional Effectiveness Reviewers -TIERName Title DivisionJanene Betts Economic Development Secretary Economic DevelopmentVincent Jackson Director <strong>of</strong> Institutional Research & Planning InstitutionalEffectivenessCharla Nail†Executive Director <strong>of</strong> Student Affairs & Student AffairsRetention*Eide Nesmith/ Charla Nail Director <strong>of</strong> Institutional Advancement InstitutionalAdvancementNora Rhymes Cashier/Banner Technician Administrative ServicesDana Roessler Dean <strong>of</strong> Health Sciences Academic AffairsGail Ware Vice President <strong>for</strong> Institutional Effectiveness InstitutionalEffectiveness*Eide Nesmith resigned and was replaced by Charla Nail.†Charla Nail moved to Institutional Advancement (The Executive Director <strong>of</strong> Student Affairs & Retention position was abolished.)In addition to the list <strong>of</strong> topics developed by the IE Division through the review <strong>of</strong> planning andassessment data, suggestions to improve student learning were solicited from the <strong>College</strong>’s majorstakeholders using an online link located on the STC web site.List <strong>of</strong> Stakeholders and Types <strong>of</strong> Contacts Made During <strong>QEP</strong> Topic Selection ProcessStakeholder GroupEmail Contact to Solicit Inputvia Web SiteFocus Group/Meeting DatesStudents 08/09/10 In Swainsboro, Glennville08/03/10In Vidalia 08/04/10Faculty/Staff/ Administration 06/03/10, 07/13/10, 08/09/10 SPAG/TIER 06/28/10SPAG/TIER 07/12/10Local Board 08/09/10Advisory Committee Groups 09/14/10Secondary Educators 06/03/10, 07/13/10, 08/09/10Legislators 08/09/10Several online suggestions that could impact student learning and supported the list <strong>of</strong> issues previouslyidentified by the IE Division were:‣ Program specific math <strong>for</strong> Health Science students‣ Tutoring <strong>for</strong> Health Science students‣ Career Skills‣ Student tutors <strong>for</strong> math and English‣ Academic coachesPage 16


17Student focus group sessions were also held on all three campuses to determine what the <strong>College</strong> coulddo to improve student learning. Additionally, the possible issues <strong>of</strong> concern identified in the IE Division’sresearch <strong>of</strong> assessment data were shared with the student focus groups.After reviewing and discussing these areas <strong>of</strong> concern, the SPAG and TIER groups combined similar areasand recommended a more focused list <strong>of</strong> potential topics that could impact student learning.Focused List <strong>of</strong> Potential Topics• application math <strong>for</strong> Health Science students• career skills to enhance student success• community projects related to course work• computer terminology readiness• personalized advisement <strong>for</strong> student success• writingAfter discussing the list <strong>of</strong> criteria <strong>for</strong> an appropriate <strong>QEP</strong> topic, the Focused List <strong>of</strong> Potential Topics wasdistributed to the EC.‣ Topic supports college mission‣ Topic supports college vision‣ Issue related to student learning‣ Topic can be assessed or measured‣ Topic within college resources‣ Topic can be implemented‣ Topic can be sustained‣ Topic is a new problem or significant extension <strong>of</strong> a problem‣ Topic was supported by other members <strong>of</strong> the focus group (if applicable)‣ Number <strong>of</strong> strategic goals supported by this topic‣ Number <strong>of</strong> strategic objectives supported by this topicThe EC determined that the two topics Application Math <strong>for</strong> Health Science students and Career Skills toEnhance Student Success would best meet the requirements <strong>for</strong> a suitable <strong>QEP</strong>. The EC requested theVPSA and VPAA discuss these topics with their divisions to ensure these potential <strong>QEP</strong> topics wouldimpact student learning. Feedback received from Student Affairs and Academic Affairs confirmed thatthe topics would impact student learning. The EC suggested moving <strong>for</strong>ward with the two topics.Fall 2010 - Topic ScoringIn September 2010, the IE Division developed a <strong>QEP</strong> Scoring Guide rubric (Appendix A) that wasdistributed to the EC, SPAG, TIER, and Academic Affairs deans. The rubric included a brief summary <strong>of</strong>the two topics being scored along with copies <strong>of</strong> the STC mission, vision, goals, and objectives toreference during the topic scoring process. The scoring results revealed that both topics support studentlearning and met the requirements <strong>for</strong> an appropriate <strong>QEP</strong> topic.Page 17


18Rationale <strong>for</strong> <strong>QEP</strong> Topic ChoiceAfter reviewing the scoring rubric results, the EC discussed the assessment data research along with theinput from the various stakeholders. They also took into account that the Health Science Departmentencompasses over 50% <strong>of</strong> the student enrollment at <strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong>. Student success inHealth Science programs is important to the state and local community in order to have a sufficient pool<strong>of</strong> skilled workers to fill positions in the expanding healthcare fields. The Application Math <strong>for</strong> HealthScience Students topic could improve student learning by focusing on a common problematic area andcould indirectly increase student success in the Health Science programs. Furthermore, implementation<strong>of</strong> the topic is within the <strong>College</strong>’s resources and can be sustained. The EC unanimously agreed thatApplication Math <strong>for</strong> Health Science Students should be recommended as STC’s <strong>QEP</strong>.Spring 2011 - Topic Voted & <strong>QEP</strong> Leadership Team FormedIn the Spring <strong>of</strong> 2011 at the annual Strategic Planning Day, the VPIE and the VPAA co-presented, “TheQuality Enhancement Plan (<strong>QEP</strong>): It takes all <strong>of</strong> us working together to improve student learning!” Areview <strong>of</strong> the process used to identify possible <strong>QEP</strong> topics was presented. A motion and second weremade to approve Application Math <strong>for</strong> Health Science Students as the <strong>College</strong>’s <strong>QEP</strong>. A unanimous votewas given <strong>for</strong> the Application Math <strong>for</strong> Health Science Students topic.The Vice President <strong>for</strong> Academic Affairs then emphasized the importance <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> initiative being“faculty driven” and named the Co-chairs <strong>for</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> Leadership Team. Each co-chair a Health Scienceor Math faculty member, represented one <strong>of</strong> STC’s three campuses: Jennifer Corner, Practical Nursing(Glennville Campus); Tara Powell, Radiologic Technology (Vidalia Campus); and Sonya Wilson,Mathematics (Swainsboro Campus). The co-chairs determined the membership <strong>of</strong> the QualityEnhancement Plan Leadership Team (<strong>QEP</strong>LT).NameJennifer CornerTara Powell†Dana RoesslerCheryl WestSonya WilsonTeresa Coleman**as needed to provide advice and guidance†Tara Powell is now the <strong>QEP</strong> Director.TitlePractical Nursing Instructor/Program DirectorRadiologic Technology Instructor/ Program DirectorDean <strong>of</strong> Health SciencesDean <strong>of</strong> General Education and Learning SupportMathematics InstructorVice President <strong>for</strong> Academic AffairsTopic Supports the <strong>College</strong> MissionThe STC mission statement promotes teaching and learning by emphasizing “…an innovative,educational environment <strong>for</strong> student learning through traditional and distance education deliverymethods focused on building a well-educated, globally competitive work<strong>for</strong>ce <strong>for</strong> <strong>Southeastern</strong>Georgia…”. Application math skills are essential in today’s work<strong>for</strong>ce. Enhancing application math skillswill equip STC graduates to better compete in that work<strong>for</strong>ce.Page 18


19Topic Supports the <strong>College</strong> VisionThe application math topic supports the <strong>College</strong>’s vision. <strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong> will berecognized as an educational leader in <strong>Southeastern</strong> Georgia. The <strong>College</strong> will deliver quality, studentcentered,and accessible postsecondary education and training. The <strong>College</strong> will empower students <strong>for</strong>success, cultivating innovative and economically thriving communities and enterprises. The ApplicationMath <strong>for</strong> Health Sciences <strong>QEP</strong> has broad-based support across the <strong>College</strong> and represents a trulycollaborative ef<strong>for</strong>t to increase the quality <strong>of</strong> education at <strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong>.Topic Supports the <strong>College</strong>’s Strategic Goals and ObjectivesStrategic GoalsImproving application math skills supports student success at all levels, helps build the localwork<strong>for</strong>ce, improves recognized value and work<strong>for</strong>ce training, and will also enhance the internalwork<strong>for</strong>ce as STC explores pr<strong>of</strong>essional development opportunities <strong>for</strong> its faculty to learn andincorporate new ways to improve application math skills in the workplace.Strategic ObjectivesImproving application math skills supports quality instruction to enhance student learning,maximizes the effectiveness <strong>of</strong> programs, and improves program <strong>of</strong>ferings to match work<strong>for</strong>ceneeds.Page 19


20<strong>QEP</strong> DevelopmentPage 20


21<strong>QEP</strong> Development ProcessBeginning in May 2011, the Quality Enhancement Leadership Team (<strong>QEP</strong>LT) began its quest to develop aplan to improve student learning <strong>for</strong> Health Science students in understanding the application <strong>of</strong>mathematical concepts. Many ideas and suggestions were discussed, but the most popular idea was tocreate a course that all Health Science students would take be<strong>for</strong>e entering their program <strong>of</strong> study. Thecourse would involve a specific math curriculum <strong>for</strong> Health Science students to address the issuesdiscovered in the topic selection process.To further assist the <strong>QEP</strong>LT, more input from faculty and students was collected by having the HealthScience students complete a survey. The student survey was administered Spring Semester 2011 andincluded specific questions concerning preparedness in math. It also addressed whether a coursespecifically designed <strong>for</strong> Health Science math would have better prepared them <strong>for</strong> their program. Themajority <strong>of</strong> the students gave specific feedback on the areas where they struggle and expressed that acourse would better prepare future Health Science student <strong>for</strong> their programs. The areas <strong>of</strong> difficultyidentified by the students were word problems related to their program <strong>of</strong> study, decimals/fractions,ratio/proportion, and metric system conversions.To gather additional input from the student population, another survey was launched online during FallSemester 2011. This survey included the largest Health Science population, as most <strong>of</strong> the HealthScience programs begin each Fall semester. Although <strong>for</strong>matted and worded differently, the FallSemester survey asked the same questions. Both surveys produced comparable results.The surveys revealed the students favored the idea <strong>of</strong> a course that would better prepare them <strong>for</strong> themathematics utilized in the Health Sciences. The students also supported the need to see moreproblems actively worked during class time. Another interesting result gleaned from the survey was theamount <strong>of</strong> time that elapsed between the required academic mathematics course and the beginning <strong>of</strong>the Health Science program. At least 73% <strong>of</strong> the survey respondents revealed they began their programfrom six months to a year and a half after completing their required academic mathematics course.To gather input from the Health Science faculty, an in<strong>for</strong>mal email was sent asking their opinions on aspecific course <strong>for</strong> health science mathematics applications and the specific areas in which theirprogram students have difficulty. The faculty responded positively to the idea <strong>of</strong> creating a course, andidentified areas in which students struggle. This feedback helped to determine the competencies thatneeded to be placed within the course curriculum. Furthermore, the responses identified a commonthread, the students’ inability to apply mathematical concepts to a laboratory simulation or activity.The Health Science faculty also agreed the students are not able to demonstrate problem-solving skillswhen per<strong>for</strong>ming calculations. Faculty responded that the students seem unaware <strong>of</strong> how to thinkthrough mathematical word problems or begin to solve the problem. Additionally, some Health Sciencefaculty admitted to having to reteach the mathematics while demonstrating the problem-solvingstrategies to solve the problems.Page 21


22In Fall 2011, the Health Science faculty met with the <strong>QEP</strong>LT to discuss ideas <strong>for</strong> a curriculum that wouldmeet the basic mathematical needs to prepare Health Science students <strong>for</strong> their programs. The groupagreed a problem-solving component embedded in the instruction would be beneficial in preparingstudents <strong>for</strong> program challenges and vital to understanding how to solve mathematical problems.Additionally, this group suggested that contextual teaching methods be utilized to integrate academicknowledge with the occupational in<strong>for</strong>mation <strong>of</strong> the Health Science programs. Faculty members werevery positive and enthusiastic about how this course would help increase student success in the HealthScience programs.Health Science Core RequirementsGeneral education core requirements ensure that prospective Health Science program students areintellectually prepared <strong>for</strong> the many aspects <strong>of</strong> the Health Science curriculums. The Health Sciencediploma and degree programs and several <strong>of</strong> the certificate programs require a general educationmathematics course. Foundations <strong>of</strong> Mathematics, MATH 1012, emphasize the application <strong>of</strong> basicmathematical skills used in the solution <strong>of</strong> occupational and technical problems. <strong>College</strong> Algebra, MATH1111, emphasizes techniques <strong>of</strong> problem solving using algebraic concepts.Health Science Department ProgramsProgram Required Math AwardDental Hygiene MATH 1111 DegreeClinical Laboratory Technology MATH 1111 DegreeRadiologic Technology MATH 1111 DegreeEMS Pr<strong>of</strong>essions MATH 1012 DiplomaMedical Assisting MATH 1012 DiplomaParamedicine MATH 1012 DiplomaPharmacy Technology MATH 1012 DiplomaPractical Nursing MATH 1012 DiplomaSurgical Technology MATH 1012 DiplomaAdvanced Emergency Medical Technician No Math requirement CertificateEmergency Medical Technician No Math requirement CertificateHealth Care Assistant MATH 1012 CertificateHealth Care Science MATH 1111 CertificateMedical Administrative Technician MATH 1012 CertificateNurse Aide No Math requirement CertificatePage 22


23Research CommitteeThe Quality Enhancement Plan Leadership Team (<strong>QEP</strong>LT) appointed a Research Committee to reviewsupporting data, learning strategies, best practices, and course content regarding the application <strong>of</strong>mathematical concepts in the health sciences. The Research Committee, consisting <strong>of</strong> <strong>College</strong> facultyand staff, were divided into sub-committees to better facilitate the research ef<strong>for</strong>t and provide a morefocused research.<strong>QEP</strong> Research CommitteeName Title DivisionSupporting Data ResearchDana Roessler Dean <strong>of</strong> Health Sciences Academic AffairsJennifer Corner Practical Nursing Director, Instructor Academic AffairsKimberly Brown Medical Assisting Director Academic AffairsDr. Bee Hart Mathematics Instructor Academic AffairsDr. Barry Dotson Vice President <strong>of</strong> Student Affairs Student AffairsLearning Strategies/Best PracticesCharlotte Mathews English Instructor Academic AffairsTeresa Coleman Vice President <strong>for</strong> Academic Affairs Academic AffairsCharla Nail Executive Director <strong>of</strong> Student Affairs Student AffairsTara Powell Radiologic Technology Director, Instructor Academic AffairsJim Jones Paramedic Technology Director, Instructor Academic AffairsCourse Content/Course ObjectivesKathy Holt Practical Nursing Instructor Academic AffairsSonya Wilson Mathematics Instructor Academic AffairsCheryl West Dean <strong>of</strong> General Education & Learning Support Academic AffairsBeth Hendrix Practical Nursing Instructor Academic AffairsAssisted all Sub-CommitteesJane Summey Director <strong>for</strong> Library Services Academic AffairsPage 23


24Literature Review and Best PracticesThe <strong>QEP</strong> Research Committee conducted STC’s literature review to identify practices being utilized toexpand mathematical skills and develop an academic-occupational integration to allied healtheducation. The empirical research utilized in the topic selection was reviewed to further direct andstructure the research ef<strong>for</strong>ts <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> Research Committee. Furthermore, instructional strategieswere researched to determine the best practices needed to improve problem-solving skills and basicmathematical competence in the Health Science education programs.Problem solving skillsProblem solving is considered the most complex <strong>of</strong> all intellectual functions and is also defined as ahigher order cognitive process with respect to finding a solution to a difficult problem or situation(Goldstein & Levin, 1987). It is a mental process in which several steps must be employed to come to themost appropriate solution.Additionally, problemsolving is a skill needed t<strong>of</strong>unction in society and to besuccessful in the workenvironment.Bloom’s Taxonomy is widelyutilized to describe thehigher order cognitiveprocess <strong>of</strong> problem solving.The newly-revised Bloom’sTaxonomy demonstratesthe process involved <strong>for</strong>problem solving within thecognitive domain. Problemsolving begins with theBlooms Taxonomy, (Al<strong>for</strong>d, Herbert, & Frangenheim, 2006)remembering,understanding, and applying <strong>of</strong> in<strong>for</strong>mation to a situation or problem. The next step in the problemsolvingprocess is the ability to associate related in<strong>for</strong>mation (conceptual understanding),differentiation, and organization. The final areas are evaluating and creating which are completed afterthe application and analyzing phases have taken place in the cognitive thought process (Anderson &Krathwohl, 2001). According to the empirical data, students in <strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong>’s HealthScience programs are demonstrating difficulty in the mathematical problem solving process.Conceptual knowledge is a common term utilized in the literature and is defined as having knowledge inthe relationships and understanding <strong>of</strong> a concept. According to the research, conceptual understandingis gained through experience and is broadened as the learner gains more experience within the concept.Once the experience has been per<strong>for</strong>med, the overall meaning <strong>of</strong> the concept is associated with thePage 24


25experience (Osterroth, 1994). This validates the instructional bridge needed to connect an academicconcept to the occupational application <strong>of</strong> the concept.Problem solving is taught by utilizing instructional methodologies that enhance and encourage thedevelopment <strong>of</strong> this complex mental process. The Constructivism paradigm suggests that peopleconstruct their own understanding and knowledge through experience and reflection (Learning TheoriesKnowledgebase, 2012). The Constructivism paradigm also encourages educators to utilize effectiveparticipation in learning activities that encompass problem solving and are relevant to the learner(Briner, 2012).Constructivism evolved into Contextual Teaching and Learning (CTL) and was defined and characterizedby the United States Department <strong>of</strong> Education Office <strong>of</strong> Vocational and Adult Education as “a conception<strong>of</strong> teaching and learning that helps teachers relate subject matter content to real world situations”(Berns & Erickson, 2001). CTL enables students to integrate their existing knowledge with pastexperiences in order to make connections and culminate the conceptual knowledge into a higher level<strong>of</strong> thinking. CTL can be used to increase student learning not only in the occupational areas <strong>of</strong> the<strong>College</strong> but also in the academic instruction to foster better problem-solving skills.One approach to CTL is Problem-Based Learning (PBL), an instructional strategy that is student-centeredand incorporates problem-solving skills. According to its design, the student integrates knowledge andskills (theory and practice) to establish an applicable resolution to a defined problem. The skills that aredeveloped in PBL are the ability to think critically, analyze, and solve complex real-world problems. Theuse and effectiveness <strong>of</strong> this learning strategy are deeply rooted in the allied health pr<strong>of</strong>essions as PBLwas traditionally utilized in the training <strong>of</strong> medical doctors and later on incorporated into undergraduatecurriculum (Duch, Groh, & Allen, 2001). Shore, Shore, and Boggs (2004) integrated allied healthapplications into developmental mathematics courses by using PBL techniques. The students expressedhow this approach enabled them to see how mathematics was utilized in real-world scenarios andencouraged them to take the learning <strong>of</strong> mathematics more seriously (Shore, Shore, & Boggs, 2004).Another approach to CTL is Work-Based Learning which occurs when work-place activities areincorporated into the classroom to facilitate meaningful relationships between the concepts and howthey will be used (Berns & Erickson, 2001). In 1998, Virginia Community <strong>College</strong> demonstrated theusefulness <strong>of</strong> integrating real-world simulations into a mathematics course specifically designed <strong>for</strong>healthcare and gained positive feedback from the participants (Pruitt, 1998). The research demonstratesboth teaching strategies could be useful in building problem-solving skills in the Health Sciencecurriculum, as well as the academic curriculum.Weak basic computational skillsThe research concludes that weak academic skills are common in students entering the communitycollege environment across the country (Bailey, 2008). Many studies suggest that even though studentsare assessed on the levels <strong>of</strong> pre-algebra and beginning algebra, they are still lacking basic mathematicalskills. Also, many educators posit that student success in calculating a correct answer in algebra does notassure that the appropriate level <strong>of</strong> conceptual understanding was achieved (McDermott, 1991).Page 25


26Many educated adults remain functionally innumerate despite their many years <strong>of</strong> study and lifeexperiences surrounded by mathematics. The mathematical skills needed to be successful in all fields <strong>of</strong>study, as well as life, are more than simply working a <strong>for</strong>mula or equation (National Council onEducation and the Disciplines , 2012).Studies have shown that nursing and other health care pr<strong>of</strong>essionals are not able to accurately calculateconsistently. Difficulty with basic math and mathematical competence in nursing students, as well asnew graduates, is an issue throughout the United States (Prolifroni, McNulty, & Allchin, 2003).Greenfield, Whelan, & Cohn (2006) noted that medication administration errors are an issue, butmathematical incompetence and practitioner inability to per<strong>for</strong>m basic math skills are at the root <strong>of</strong> thedosage calculation problem.The traditional delivery <strong>of</strong> mathematics in a lecture-based <strong>for</strong>mat is not effective <strong>for</strong> everyone, andmany students do not learn in this manner. A common thread across the literature shows that variedcontent delivery and active learning are more effective instructional methods in math (Shore, Shore, &Boggs, 2004) (Berns & Erickson, 2001). Additionally, an understanding <strong>of</strong> student learning styles raisefaculty awareness regarding the types <strong>of</strong> instructional methods needed to deliver more meaningfulinstruction.The uses <strong>of</strong> technology such as computer-aided instructional programs are indicated by Epper & Baker(2009) to assist in active learning and to accommodate the different learning styles. Utilizing this type <strong>of</strong>technology allows students to spend more time per<strong>for</strong>ming math functions while still receiving aroundthe clock support and remediation. Also, utilizing computer-aided instructional programs gives anotheroption <strong>for</strong> instructional delivery or homework without taking precious classroom time <strong>for</strong> remediation(Twigg, 2005).Last, the literature commonly expressed that practice is the best solution in increasing numerical abilityand that students learn math by per<strong>for</strong>ming mathematical problems regularly. Also suggested wasminimizing the time between learning the skills and the application <strong>of</strong> the mathematical concept (Twigg,2005; Prolifroni, McNulty, & Allchin, 2003).Academic-Occupational IntegrationAs noted previously, many well-educated working individuals do not possess the problem solving andcomputational fluency skills needed in today’s work<strong>for</strong>ce (National Council on Education and theDisciplines , 2012). This issue can be traced back to the traditional <strong>for</strong>ms <strong>of</strong> educational deliverymethods. These methods were based on the Behavioristic views <strong>of</strong> learning and, as times have changed,so have views on and knowledge <strong>of</strong> more effective methods <strong>of</strong> instruction.In most community colleges, instructors are not <strong>for</strong>mally prepared in the theories <strong>of</strong> learning and areinstead recruited from their practicing occupational pr<strong>of</strong>ession to teach. These instructors utilize theirin-field work experience and the way they received instruction to teach their programs (Grubb, 1999).This exhibits how different learning styles and teaching strategies are not always employed in thecommunity college setting.Page 26


27Academic instruction in community colleges <strong>of</strong>ten does not satisfy the needs <strong>of</strong> career preparation asthe courses seem uninteresting and irrelevant to the student’s career goals (Perin, 2000). Most studentscompartmentalize the in<strong>for</strong>mation to progress through the academic education course requirementsand ultimately fail to make the transfer <strong>of</strong> how this general knowledge applies to their career goals. Tobetter support this, The National Mathematics Advisory Panel reported that a need <strong>for</strong> an integratedapproach in preparing students <strong>for</strong> algebra would raise conceptual understanding, computationalfluency, and problem-solving skills (National Mathematics Advisory Panel, 2008).Decades <strong>of</strong> research have expressed the need <strong>for</strong> academic and occupational integration. John Dewey(1916) expressed this in his philosophy <strong>of</strong> education, and it has been corroborated throughout similarwritings. Infused academic courses or applied academics is defined as placing career or real worldcontent within the academic education courses to demonstrate how it relates to the real world. Shore,Shore, & Boggs (2004) demonstrated the usefulness in integrating mathematics with real worldapplications in a developmental mathematics course. The students exposed to the integration <strong>of</strong> themathematics technique per<strong>for</strong>med significantly better than those students who were not taught withthe integration <strong>of</strong> mathematics and allied health applications. The academic-occupational integrationhas been shown to improve the students’ ability to transfer their conceptual knowledge from onecontext to another and enhance their problem solving skills.ConclusionThe literature suggests a link between the strength <strong>of</strong> a student’s problem-solving/computational skillsand the occurrence <strong>of</strong> academic integration in health science education programs. As suggested in theliterature review, a pedagogical change is needed to better cultivate the connection between academicand occupational mathematical skills <strong>of</strong> students. The <strong>College</strong>’s empirical data further validate the need<strong>for</strong> a pedagogical change to assist Health Science students in meeting their educational goals. Thischange could be achieved by integrating problem-solving models into a Health Science math curriculumand using CTL strategies to help students envision their field <strong>of</strong> study through mathematical eyes.Student should then be able to approach real-world situations with increased confidence andcompetence in mathematical problem solving.Page 27


28<strong>QEP</strong> DesignPage 28


29Design TeamBy February 2012, the <strong>QEP</strong> Leadership Team (<strong>QEP</strong>LT) <strong>for</strong>med the Design Team. The Design Team wascharged with defining the focus, goals, student learning outcomes, and the strategies to accomplish theQuality Enhancement Plan (<strong>QEP</strong>) based on the assessment, survey, and research data that had beencollected. The <strong>QEP</strong> Design Team was comprised <strong>of</strong> faculty and staff to continue broad-basedinvolvement during the design phase <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong>.<strong>QEP</strong> Design TeamName Title DivisionDonna Jean Braddy Practical Nursing Instructor Academic AffairsJennifer Corner Practical Nursing Director, Instructor Academic AffairsAshley Harmon Marketing Management Instructor Academic AffairsBrad Hart Director <strong>of</strong> Enrollment Services Student AffairsTara Powell† Radiologic Technology Program Director, Instructor Academic AffairsDana Roessler Dean <strong>of</strong> Health Sciences Academic AffairsDavid Standard Psychology Instructor Academic AffairsGail Ware Vice President <strong>for</strong> Institutional Effectiveness InstitutionalEffectivenessCheryl West Dean <strong>of</strong> General Education & Learning Support Academic AffairsSonya Wilson Mathematics Instructor Academic Affairs† Tara Powell is now the <strong>QEP</strong> Director.Focus, Goals, and Student Learning OutcomesFocus StatementThe focus <strong>of</strong> MESH is to improve student learning <strong>for</strong> Health Sciencestudents in understanding the application <strong>of</strong> mathematicalconcepts.The Design Team used the results <strong>of</strong> the topic selection process and in<strong>for</strong>mation gathered fromsurveying faculty and students to establish a focus <strong>for</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> that supported the <strong>College</strong>’s mission andgoals. The focus was established to provide structure and direction to the <strong>QEP</strong>. This focus addressesstudents’ inability to integrate their mathematical knowledge with the occupational activities commonin the Health Science programs. The Design Team determined that the focus <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> and the goal <strong>of</strong>the <strong>QEP</strong> were the same.Page 29


30GOAL• Improve student learning <strong>for</strong> HealthScience students in understanding theapplication <strong>of</strong> mathematical concepts.The student learning outcomes were written based on the student and faculty input on the areas inwhich students per<strong>for</strong>med poorly upon entering the Health Science programs. These student learningoutcomes will provide a direct measure <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> goal.Student Learning Outcomes1. Students will per<strong>for</strong>m basic mathematical calculations with fractions, decimals, andpercentages.2. Students will per<strong>for</strong>m conversions between the different measurement systems utilizing<strong>for</strong>mulas, mental calculations, proportions, dimensional analysis, and means/extremes.3. Students will interpret measurements utilizing scales, tape measures/rulers, syringes, andthermometers.4. Students will interpret terminology used in mathematical applications <strong>for</strong> Allied Healthprograms.5. Students will per<strong>for</strong>m dosage calculations using ratios, rates, and proportions.6. Students will interpret the importance <strong>of</strong> scientific research statistical measures.7. Students will apply problem-solving skills in the application <strong>of</strong> mathematical concepts.Page 30


31Strategies to Accomplish <strong>QEP</strong>In its infancy, the plan was to improve student learning <strong>for</strong> Health Science students in understanding theapplication <strong>of</strong> mathematical concepts through the development <strong>of</strong> a course. However, the plan wasexpanded to include a redesign <strong>of</strong> the entire Health Science curriculum. This additional strategy will beaccomplished through educating faculty to use innovative teaching strategies and assisting them withintegrating math throughout the Health Science curriculum. These strategies should accomplish the <strong>QEP</strong>and give structure to the implementation.Strategy 1:Health Science MathApplication CourseStrategy 2:Health ScienceCurriculum RedesignPage 31


32Strategy 1: Health Science Math Application CourseDevelop and implement a Health Science Math Application course tobridge the gap between conceptual understanding and the application <strong>of</strong>math concepts in Health Science programs.With the assistance <strong>of</strong> the Health Science and Mathematics faculty, the curriculum <strong>for</strong> a Health Sciencemath course was developed as a strategy to accomplish the <strong>QEP</strong> Goal. The course was designedutilizing feedback from Health Science faculty, students, and the Research Committee. The course wasnamed Allied Health Math Applications (ALMA 1000) and prepares students to apply mathematics intheir Health Science program courses (Appendix C).The course will be taught utilizing lecture, problem solving methods, and innovative teaching strategieswhich will include, but will not be limited to, contextual instructional methods, simulation, scenarioproblems, and lab experiences. This should strengthen the students’ ability to apply mathematics andbuild their numerical literacy in preparation <strong>for</strong> the challenges in the Health Science programs.Additionally, Math XL will be utilized during the course as a supplemental instructional tool. Math XL isan online homework, tutorial, and assessment system which accompanies the textbook that wasselected by the Health Science and Mathematics faculty <strong>for</strong> ALMA 1000. Math XL provides computeraidedinstructional modules that engage students in active learning. These modules can be assigned asadditional practice and are accessible anywhere with internet access. The system is not only adaptableto each student’s learning style but also is self-paced. This approach allows students to practicemathematics and, as a result, better meets their learning needs.Health Science students must complete their required mathematics course, either MATH 1012 or MATH1111, prior to enrolling in the ALMA 1000 course. All Health Science students enrolled in a program witha general education mathematics requirement will be required to take ALMA 1000. Throughout thereview <strong>of</strong> literature and local research, minimizing the time between learning a mathematical conceptand applying it was emphasized as a factor in student success. There<strong>for</strong>e, the Design Team decided thatALMA 1000 should be taken immediately prior to entering major program courses.A pre-test has been developed and will be given at the beginning <strong>of</strong> each ALMA 1000 course to measureentering students’ numerical and application <strong>of</strong> mathematical concepts abilities. The same test will beadministered at the end <strong>of</strong> ALMA 1000 to measure changes in these areas.Page 32


33The Critical Thinking Assessment Test (CAT) will be administered at the beginning and end <strong>of</strong> each ALMA1000 course and again when the students enter their program capstone course. The CAT instrument isdesigned to measure the improvement <strong>of</strong> critical thinking and real-world problem solving skills.In addition to these pre- and post-tests, each student learning outcome will be assessed during thecourse utilizing written tests and skill evaluations to directly measure student learning. Baseline data willbe collected to determine benchmarks.Student Learning Outcomes1. Students will per<strong>for</strong>m basic mathematical calculations with fractions, decimals, andpercentages.2. Students will per<strong>for</strong>m conversions between the different measurement systems utilizing<strong>for</strong>mulas, mental calculations, proportions, dimensional analysis, and means/extremes.3. Students will interpret measurements utilizing scales, tape measures/rulers, syringes, andthermometers.4. Students will interpret terminology used in mathematical applications <strong>for</strong> Allied Healthprograms.5. Students will per<strong>for</strong>m dosage calculations using ratios, rates, and proportions.6. Students will interpret the importance <strong>of</strong> scientific research statistical measures.7. Students will apply problem solving skills in the application <strong>of</strong> mathematical concepts.All students will be required to complete the course with a minimum grade <strong>of</strong> “C” or better to be eligible<strong>for</strong> program admission or program progression. The Pharmacy Technology program requested studentsbe required to complete ALMA 1000 with a “B” or higher since program admission requires this grade<strong>for</strong> the pre-requisite MATH 1012 course.No tuition will be charged <strong>for</strong> ALMA 1000, and the course books will be provided to the students. Thecourse will be <strong>of</strong>fered on the Vidalia and Swainsboro Campuses during the day and evening toaccommodate all students’ schedules. The classrooms utilized <strong>for</strong> ALMA 1000 will be room 842 on theVidalia campus and room 2305 on the Swainsboro Campus.The Design Team requested to pilot test ALMA 1000 in Fall <strong>of</strong> 2012 and Spring 2013 prior toimplementation in Fall 2013. The beta group <strong>for</strong> Fall 2012 will be the Practical Nursing students whohave been accepted to begin the Practical Nursing program Spring 2012. As an incentive to encourageparticipation, the <strong>College</strong> will pay these students’ Assessment Technologies Institute (ATI) fees. The ATIis a required workshop <strong>for</strong> Practical Nursing students that prepare them <strong>for</strong> the state licensing boardexam. The beta group <strong>for</strong> Spring 2013 will be determined during Fall 2012.Page 33


34Strategy 2: Health Science Curriculum RedesignRedesign and Implement a Health Science curriculum that builds on facultydevelopment in the utilization <strong>of</strong> contextual instructional methodologies andintegrates math throughout program specific courses.This strategy is designed to continue building students’ numerical and problem solving abilitiesthroughout their programs. Important components <strong>of</strong> this strategy are identifying and addressingstudent learning styles. The Design Team decided that faculty development would be necessary <strong>for</strong> thesuccessful implementation <strong>of</strong> this strategy.Across the literature, a common voice emphasized the importance <strong>of</strong> utilizing contextual instructionalmethodologies to teach to all learning styles, and the Design Team recognized a need <strong>for</strong> facultydevelopment in this area at <strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong>. Furthermore, to encourage moreinnovative teaching strategies, improve student numerical literacy, and increase program completionwithin the Health Science programs, the faculty will need to be educated in utilizing currently availabletools such as PassKey and Smarter Measure results. These tools are available at the <strong>College</strong> but areunderutilized. Additionally, the Design Team adopted a new tool, the Critical Thinking Assessment Test(CAT), to evaluate real-world problem solving skills <strong>of</strong> the students. The Design Team incorporatedfaculty development into this strategy to educate faculty in contextual instructional methods, familiarizethe faculty with tools to redesign their curricula, and educate them about the importance <strong>of</strong> identifyingstudent learning styles.Smarter MeasureSmarter Measure is a learning readiness assessment that measures the student’s individual attributes,learning styles, reading skills, technical knowledge, and technical competency. These areas providevaluable in<strong>for</strong>mation about the student’s ability to learn and can be utilized in guiding the student’seducation. At the time <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> Design, Smarter Measure Learning Readiness Indicator was not givento all students entering the <strong>College</strong>. To ensure all students are tested with Smarter Measure, theStudent Affairs Division agreed to immediately begin testing all students admitted to the <strong>College</strong>.To educate the faculty in utilizing student results from the Smarter Measure evaluation, the DesignTeam decided that a workshop should be <strong>of</strong>fered <strong>for</strong> all instructional departments. Implementation <strong>of</strong>this workshop will begin Spring 2013 <strong>for</strong> the Health Science faculty. In Summer 2013, the BusinessTechnology and Personal Services faculty will attend the Smarter Measure workshop and finally, theEnvironmental Services, Industrial Technology, and General Education/Learning Support faculty willattend in Fall 2013. The workshops will be led by Student Affairs staff.Page 34


35PassKeyPassKey is a modular diagnostic and prescriptive s<strong>of</strong>tware program that gives computer-aidedinstruction in reading, writing, math, science, and social studies. This s<strong>of</strong>tware is currently availablethrough the <strong>College</strong>’s Student Success Center <strong>for</strong> students who voluntarily come to the Center <strong>for</strong>remediation.To ensure faculty is knowledgeable in utilizing PassKey Modules, mandatory in<strong>for</strong>mational sessions onthe use <strong>of</strong> PassKey Modules will be <strong>of</strong>fered. These sessions will be held on both campuses everysemester by the Student Success Center staff. All faculty will be required to attend a session toencourage the use <strong>of</strong> these student success tools across the <strong>College</strong>.To sustain the increase in numerical skills achieved by students enrolled in ALMA 1000, the HealthScience programs will begin utilizing PassKey Modules within the program courses where studentattrition most commonly occurs. Health Science instructor will be required to embed a minimum <strong>of</strong> fivePassKey Modules into their program curriculum. The requirement <strong>for</strong> incorporating the PassKeyModules into the curriculum will begin FALL 2013.Critical thinking Assessment Test (CAT)In an ef<strong>for</strong>t to increase student problem solving skills, the Design Team decided to implement theCritical Thinking Assessment Test. This test will enhance student learning in two ways. First, the CAT willassess the Health Science students’ improvement <strong>of</strong> problem solving skills from the beginning <strong>of</strong> ALMA1000 to program completion. Secondly, the implementation <strong>of</strong> this tool will develop facultyunderstanding <strong>of</strong> student weaknesses through assessment grading and motivate faculty to change theirown instructional methods to develop students’ problem solving skills.The psychology instructors from both the Vidalia and Swainsboro campuses were elected to conduct theinitial training. In April 2012, two instructors administered the CAT to new students from a variety <strong>of</strong>disciplines to establish <strong>College</strong> baseline scores on the CAT. Faculty training occurs through assessmentgrading. Seven faculty members were selected to begin the training in May 2012.Faculty training occurs each time the CAT is graded and will continue until all faculty are trained. Facultywill be required to rotate grading assessments each semester to continually build assessment gradingskills and to develop understanding <strong>of</strong> student weaknesses to foster a change in instructional methodsthat encourage problem solving skills.Contextual Instructional Methodologies EducationA guest speaker will be invited at least once a year to educate faculty in contextual methods <strong>of</strong>instruction. This presentation should encourage more innovative teaching styles in all academicdepartments <strong>of</strong> the <strong>College</strong> and enhance student learning.Page 35


36<strong>QEP</strong> MarketingTo begin marketing the <strong>QEP</strong>, the Design Teamsponsored a contest to choose a name.Suggestions were solicited from the faculty, staff,advisory committees, and students. The <strong>QEP</strong>Design Team chose the name MESH <strong>for</strong> Success(Mathematics Enhancing the Sciences and Health)from the names submitted <strong>for</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong>. This namewas submitted by a prospective Practical Nursingstudent from the Swainsboro Campus.A Marketing Plan (Appendix B) was developedduring the design phase with the assistance <strong>of</strong> the marketing faculty. Marketing strategies, goals,timeline, and a budget were included in the plan.Selection <strong>of</strong> <strong>QEP</strong> Director<strong>QEP</strong> Director, Tara Powell, <strong>QEP</strong> Name Contest Winner,Wendy FelixThe Design Team and <strong>College</strong> administration recognized the need <strong>for</strong> a <strong>QEP</strong> Director to manage theimplementation and assessment <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong>. The <strong>QEP</strong> Director will also be the lead teacher <strong>for</strong> the newcourse. The Team developed a job description (Appendix D), and posted the position. A member <strong>of</strong> the<strong>QEP</strong>LT, Tara Powell, was hired as the <strong>QEP</strong> Director. (Appendix E)The Design Team also developed a job description (Appendix F) <strong>for</strong> additional ALMA 1000 courseinstructors.Page 36


37ImplementationPage 37


38Implementation PlanThe Design Team recognized the importance <strong>of</strong> the implementation phase <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> and wanted tocontinue broad-based <strong>College</strong> involvement during this phase. The Team wanted to ensure that the areas<strong>of</strong> the <strong>College</strong> most affected by the <strong>QEP</strong> were represented on the Implementation Team. Individualswere also chosen based on their job responsibilities and areas <strong>of</strong> expertise. The purpose <strong>of</strong> theImplementation Team is to ensure all strategies <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> are carried out through each phase (year) <strong>of</strong>the plan.Implementation TeamName Title DivisionJan Brantley Special Needs Specialist (Swainsboro) Student AffairsLeisa Dukes Psychology Instructor (Swainsboro) Academic AffairsJennifer Gramiak Dental Hygiene Program Director (Vidalia) Academic AffairsBeth Hendrix Practical Nursing Instructor (Swainsboro) Academic AffairsVikki Holland Administrative Secretary (Vidalia) Academic AffairsKrysta Jones Director <strong>of</strong> Marketing & Public Relations (Vidalia) Student AffairsTara Powell <strong>QEP</strong> Director (Vidalia) Academic AffairsHelen Thomas Special Needs Specialist (Vidalia) Student AffairsDavid Standard Psychology Instructor (Vidalia) Academic AffairsPhases <strong>of</strong> MESHPre-MESH PhaseDuring the months leading up to the SACSCOC onsite visit, many preparations will be completed toensure a smooth transition <strong>for</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong>. Catalog and web site revisions will include the newrequirements <strong>for</strong> the Health Science programs. Marketing ef<strong>for</strong>ts will be continued to update faculty,staff, students, and other stakeholders <strong>of</strong> the progress <strong>of</strong> MESH.Preparations <strong>for</strong> the ALMA 1000 pilot course will be completed during Summer 2012 and the pilot willbe implemented Fall 2012 and Spring 2013. Baseline data <strong>for</strong> the assessment component <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> willbe gathered during the Summer 2012, Fall 2012, and Spring 2013 semesters. During Summer 2013, allcollected data will be analyzed; the results will be used to make needed changes prior toimplementation <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong>.Faculty and Student Affairs staff members will work together during the Pre-Mesh phase. Instructorsinvolved in training will grade CAT assessments <strong>for</strong> baseline data. During Spring 2013, Student Affairsstaff will present Smarter Measure workshops and PassKey in<strong>for</strong>mational sessions to all Health ScienceFaculty. The following tables provide a visual <strong>of</strong> tasks, completion time, responsible person(s), andresources needed <strong>for</strong> each task.Page 38


Summer 2013Spring 2013Fall 201239Pre-Mesh PhaseTask Complete by Person Responsible ResourcesMarketing August 2012 Krysta Jones$7,000.00Tara PowellSACSCOC onsite visit September 2012 <strong>QEP</strong>LT Covered inseparatebudgetALMA 1000 Pilot December 2012 Tara Powell $6,000.00Baseline Data Collections(ALMA Pilot, CAT & ALMA Test)December 2012 <strong>QEP</strong>IT $1,000.00TimeCAT Training November 2012 David StandardLeisa DukesTimePre-MESH PhaseTask Complete by Person Responsible ResourcesALMA 1000 Pilot Course April 2013 Tara Powell $ 4,000.00ALMA 1000 Pilot CourseApril 2013 Tara Powell TimeAssessment - Data CollectionsCAT Testing & Training March 2013 David StandardLeisa Dukes$500.00TimeSmarter Measure Training - Health April 2013 Helen ThomasTimeScience DepartmentJan BrantleyPassKey In<strong>for</strong>mational Sessions May 2013 Helen ThomasTimeHealth Sciences DepartmentJan BrantleyMarketing May 2013 Krysta Jones $2,000.00Faculty Development Day May 2013 Tara PowellFDD CommitteeTimePre-Mesh PhaseTask Complete by Person Responsible ResourcesALMA 1000 – Adjunct designated July 2013 Dana RoesslerTime<strong>for</strong> PHASE ITara PowellCatalog Revisions July 2013 Health Science (HS) TimeFacultyMarketing August 2013 Krysta Jones $1,000.00Smarter Measure Training -Business Technology & PersonalServicesJune 2013 Helen ThomasJan BrantleyTimeSmarter Measure Training -Business Technology & PersonalServicesJuly 2013Helen ThomasJan BrantleyTimeAssessment Data Analyzed August 2013 <strong>QEP</strong>LT/<strong>QEP</strong>IT TimePage 39


40MESH Phase I - (Fall 2013 - Summer 2014)In the first phase <strong>of</strong> MESH, ALMA 1000 will be a requirement <strong>for</strong> admission to all Health Scienceprograms that have a general education math course. The ALMA 1000 courses will be <strong>of</strong>fered on bothcampuses during the day and evening. The number <strong>of</strong> courses <strong>of</strong>fered will be based on projectedenrollment reports <strong>for</strong> each semester until a trend <strong>for</strong> the number <strong>of</strong> courses needed per campus eachsemester can be determined. Then, an annual schedule will be developed.The CAT test will be given at the beginning <strong>of</strong> each ALMA 1000 course to evaluate student problemsolving skills. Faculty training <strong>for</strong> CAT grading will continue each semester. Health Science faculty will betrained first based on the developed schedule. Once all faculty has been trained, the ImplementationTeam members will create a semester schedule to maintain each faculty member’s development in CATassessment grading.Also, during the first phase <strong>of</strong> MESH, faculty will attend workshops designed to educate them onSmarter Measure uses and results. The Implementation Team members from Student Affairs willconduct the workshops.Faculty development will continue on contextual instructional methodologies. Two faculty members willbe designated by the Implementation Team to work with the deans and the <strong>QEP</strong> Director to developagendas <strong>for</strong> these faculty development workshops. The Chairs will recruit faculty members each year toplan next year’s Faculty Development Day.The PassKey in<strong>for</strong>mational sessions will be held on each campus every semester and conducted by theStudent Success Center staff. These sessions will provide ongoing faculty development and encouragethe use <strong>of</strong> this tool across the <strong>College</strong>.Page 40


SUMMER 2015SPRING 2015FALL 201441MESH Phase II, III, IV, V - (Fall 2014 - Summer 2018)In Phases II - V, ALMA 1000 will continue on the annual schedule, and the CAT grading by faculty members will continue each semester.Assessments <strong>of</strong> ALMA 1000 will be per<strong>for</strong>med each semester, and <strong>QEP</strong> assessment results will be analyzed each year. The assessment <strong>of</strong> ALMA1000 will include but is not limited to pre-and post-test results, student learning outcome results, and CAT scores.MESH PHASE II FALL 2014 – SUMMER 2015TASK Complete by Person Responsible Outcomes ResourcesSmarter Measure Workshop/Pass Key In<strong>for</strong>mationalSessionsDecember Student Affairs Increase Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> Smarter MeasureIncrease Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> PassKey usageALMA 1000 Course December Tara PowellImprove student learning in applying math in HSAdjunct InstructorsImprove student real-world problem solving skillsCAT Testing & Grading November David StandardContinue Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> problem solvingLeisa Dukesinstructional methodsALMA 1000- Course Assessment December Tara PowellIncrease in CAT scoresAdjunctIncrease in Post Scores$300.00$200.00<strong>QEP</strong> Director Salary<strong>QEP</strong> Adjunct Budget$500.00PassKey modules in Health Science program courses August HS Faculty Improve student learningIncrease in course completion$300.00TASK Complete by Person Responsible Outcomes ResourcesSmarter Measure Workshop/Pass Key In<strong>for</strong>mationalApril Student Affairs Increase Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> Smarter Measure$300.00SessionsIncrease Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> PassKey usage$200.00ALMA 1000 Course April Tara PowellImprove student learning in applying math in HS <strong>QEP</strong> Director SalaryAdjunct InstructorsImprove student real-world problem solving skills <strong>QEP</strong> Adjunct BudgetCAT Testing & GradingJanuaryDavid StandardContinue Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> problem solving$500.00MayLeisa Dukesinstructional methodsALMA 1000- Course Assessment May/June Tara Powell/Adjunct Increase in CAT scores/ Increase in Post Scores TimeFaculty Development Day - Contextual Methodologies April/May Beth Hendrix/Jennifer Gramiak Educate Faculty in Contextual Teaching methods $2,000.00Speaker/WorkshopIncrease program completionPassKey modules in Health Science program courses January HS Faculty Improve student learning$300.00Increase in course completionTASK Complete by Person Responsible Outcomes ResourcesSmarter Measure Workshop/Pass Key In<strong>for</strong>mationalJuly Student Affairs Increase Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> Smarter Measure$300.00SessionsIncrease Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> PassKey usage$200.00ALMA 1000 Course August Tara PowellImprove student learning in applying math in HS <strong>QEP</strong> Director SalaryAdjunct InstructorsImprove student real-world problem solving skills <strong>QEP</strong> Adjunct BudgetCAT Testing & Grading August David StandardContinue Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> problem solving$500.00Leisa Dukesinstructional methodsALMA 1000- Course Assessment August Tara PowellIncrease in CAT scoresTimeAdjunctIncrease in Post ScoresPassKey modules in Health Science program courses May HS Faculty Improve student learning$300.00Increase in course completion<strong>QEP</strong> Effectiveness Assessment Analysis August Assessment Analysis Team Review <strong>of</strong> <strong>QEP</strong> Implementation ef<strong>for</strong>ts TimeTimePage 41


SUMMER 2016SPRING 2016FALL 201542MESH PHASE III FALL 2015 – SUMMER 2016TASK Complete by Person Responsible Outcomes ResourcesSmarter Measure Workshop/Pass Key In<strong>for</strong>mationalSessionsDecember Student Affairs Increase Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> Smarter MeasureIncrease Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> PassKey usageALMA 1000 Course December Tara PowellImprove student learning in applying math in HSAdjunct InstructorsImprove student real-world problem solving skillsCAT Testing & Grading November David StandardContinue Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> problem solvingLeisa Dukesinstructional methodsALMA 1000- Course Assessment December Tara PowellIncrease in CAT scoresAdjunctIncrease in Post ScoresPassKey modules in Health Science program courses August HS Faculty Improve student learningIncrease in course completion$300.00$200.00<strong>QEP</strong> Director Salary<strong>QEP</strong> Adjunct Budget$500.00TASK Complete by Person Responsible Outcomes ResourcesSmarter Measure Workshop/Pass Key In<strong>for</strong>mationalSessionsApril Student Affairs Increase Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> Smarter MeasureIncrease Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> PassKey usage$300.00$200.00ALMA 1000 Course April Tara PowellAdjunct InstructorsImprove student learning in applying math in HSImprove student real-world problem solving skills<strong>QEP</strong> Director Salary<strong>QEP</strong> Adjunct BudgetCAT Testing & GradingJanuaryDavid StandardContinue Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> problem solving$500.00MayLeisa Dukesinstructional methodsALMA 1000- Course AssessmentMayTara PowellIncrease in CAT scoresTimeJuneAdjunctIncrease in Post ScoresFaculty Development Day - Contextual Methodologies April/May Beth Hendrix/Jennifer Gramiak Educate Faculty in Contextual Teaching methods $2,000.00Speaker/WorkshopIncrease program completionPassKey modules in Health Science program courses January HS Faculty Improve student learningIncrease in course completion$300.00TASK Complete by Person Responsible Outcomes ResourcesSmarter Measure Workshop/Pass Key In<strong>for</strong>mationalJuly Student Affairs Continue faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> Smarter Measure $300.00SessionsContinue faculty awareness in PassKey Usage$200.00ALMA 1000 Course August Tara PowellImprove student learning in applying math in HS <strong>QEP</strong> Director SalaryAdjunct InstructorsImprove student real-world problem solving skills <strong>QEP</strong> Adjunct BudgetCAT Testing & Grading August David StandardContinue Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> problem solving$500.00Leisa Dukesinstructional methodsALMA 1000- Course Assessment August Tara PowellIncrease in CAT scoresTimeAdjunctIncrease in Post ScoresPassKey modules in Health Science program courses May HS Faculty Improve student learning$300.00Increase in course completion<strong>QEP</strong> Effectiveness Assessment Analysis August Assessment Analysis Team Review <strong>of</strong> <strong>QEP</strong> Implementation ef<strong>for</strong>ts TimeTime$300.00Page 42


SUMMER 2017SPRING 2017FALL 201643MESH PHASE IV FALL 2016 – SUMMER 2017TASK Complete by Person Responsible Outcomes ResourcesSmarter Measure Workshop/Pass Key In<strong>for</strong>mationalSessionsDecember Student Affairs Increase Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> Smarter MeasureIncrease Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> PassKey usageALMA 1000 Course December Tara PowellImprove student learning in applying math in HSAdjunct InstructorsImprove student real-world problem solving skillsCAT Testing & Grading November David StandardContinue Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> problem solvingLeisa Dukesinstructional methodsALMA 1000- Course Assessment December Tara PowellIncrease in CAT scoresAdjunctIncrease in Post ScoresPassKey modules in Health Science program courses August HS Faculty Improve student learningIncrease in course completion$300.00$200.00<strong>QEP</strong> Director Salary<strong>QEP</strong> Adjunct Budget$500.00Smarter Measure Workshop/Pass Key In<strong>for</strong>mationalSessionsDecember Student Affairs Increase Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> Smarter MeasureIncrease Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> PassKey usage$300.00$200.00TASK Complete by Person Responsible Outcomes ResourcesSmarter Measure Workshop/Pass Key In<strong>for</strong>mationalApril Student Affairs Increase Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> Smarter Measure$300.00SessionsIncrease Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> PassKey usage$200.00ALMA 1000 Course April Tara PowellImprove student learning in applying math in HS <strong>QEP</strong> Director SalaryAdjunct InstructorsImprove student real-world problem solving skills <strong>QEP</strong> Adjunct BudgetCAT Testing & GradingJanuaryDavid StandardContinue Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> problem solving$500.00MayLeisa Dukesinstructional methodsALMA 1000- Course AssessmentMayTara PowellIncrease in CAT scoresTimeJuneAdjunctIncrease in Post ScoresFaculty Development Day - Contextual Methodologies April/May Beth Hendrix/Jennifer Gramiak Educate Faculty in Contextual Teaching methods $2,000.00Speaker/WorkshopIncrease program completionPassKey modules in Health Science program courses January HS Faculty Improve student learning$300.00Increase in course completionTASK Complete by Person Responsible Outcomes ResourcesSmarter Measure Workshop/Pass Key In<strong>for</strong>mationalJuly Student Affairs Continue faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> Smarter Measure $300.00SessionsContinue faculty awareness in PassKey usage$200.00ALMA 1000 Course August Tara PowellImprove student learning in applying math in HS <strong>QEP</strong> Director SalaryAdjunct InstructorsImprove student real-world problem solving skills <strong>QEP</strong> Adjunct BudgetCAT Testing & Grading August David StandardContinue Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> problem solving$500.00Leisa Dukesinstructional methodsALMA 1000- Course Assessment August Tara PowellIncrease in CAT scoresTimeAdjunctIncrease in Post ScoresPassKey modules in Health Science program courses May HS Faculty Improve student learning$300.00Increase in course completion<strong>QEP</strong> Effectiveness Assessment Analysis August Assessment Analysis Team Review <strong>of</strong> <strong>QEP</strong> Implementation ef<strong>for</strong>ts TimeTime$300.00Page 43


SUMMER 2018SPRING 2018FALL 201744MESH PHASE V FALL 2017 – SUMMER 2018TASK Complete by Person Responsible Outcomes ResourcesSmarter Measure Workshop/Pass Key In<strong>for</strong>mationalSessionsDecember Student Affairs Increase Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> Smarter MeasureIncrease Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> PassKey usageALMA 1000 Course December Tara PowellImprove student learning in applying math in HSAdjunct InstructorsImprove student real-world problem solving skillsCAT Testing & Grading November David StandardContinue Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> problem solvingLeisa Dukesinstructional methodsALMA 1000- Course AssessmentSeptemberTara PowellIncrease in CAT scoresNovemberAdjunctIncrease in Post ScoresPassKey modules in Health Science program courses August HS Faculty Improve student learningIncrease in course completion$300.00$200.00<strong>QEP</strong> Director Salary<strong>QEP</strong> Adjunct Budget$500.00Smarter Measure Workshop/Pass Key In<strong>for</strong>mationalSessionsDecember Student Affairs Increase Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> Smarter MeasureIncrease Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> PassKey usage$300.00$200.00TASK Complete by Person Responsible Outcomes ResourcesSmarter Measure Workshop/Pass Key In<strong>for</strong>mationalApril Student Affairs Increase Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> Smarter Measure$300.00SessionsIncrease Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> PassKey usage$200.00ALMA 1000 Course April Tara PowellImprove student learning in applying math in HS <strong>QEP</strong> Director SalaryAdjunct InstructorsImprove student real-world problem solving skills <strong>QEP</strong> Adjunct BudgetCAT Testing & GradingJanuaryDavid StandardContinue Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> problem solving$500.00MayLeisa Dukesinstructional methodsALMA 1000- Course AssessmentMayTara PowellIncrease in CAT scoresTimeJuneAdjunctIncrease in Post ScoresFaculty Development Day - Contextual Methodologies April/May Academic Affairs/Tara Powell Educate Faculty in Contextual Teaching methods $2,000.00Speaker/WorkshopIncrease program completionPassKey modules in Health Science program courses January HS Faculty Improve student learning$300.00Increase in course completionTASK Complete by Person Responsible Outcomes ResourcesSmarter Measure Workshop/Pass Key In<strong>for</strong>mationalJuly Student Affairs Increase Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> Smarter Measure$300.00SessionsIncrease Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> PassKey usage$200.00ALMA 1000 Course August Tara PowellImprove student learning in applying math in HS <strong>QEP</strong> Director SalaryAdjunct InstructorsImprove student real-world problem solving skills <strong>QEP</strong> Adjunct BudgetCAT Testing & Grading August David StandardContinue Faculty awareness <strong>of</strong> problem solving$500.00Leisa Dukesinstructional methodsALMA 1000- Course Assessment August Tara PowellIncrease in CAT scoresTimeAdjunctIncrease in Post ScoresPassKey modules in Health Science program courses May HS Faculty Improve student learning$300.00Increase in course completion<strong>QEP</strong> Effectiveness Assessment Analysis August Assessment Analysis Team Review <strong>of</strong> <strong>QEP</strong> Implementation ef<strong>for</strong>ts TimeTime$300.00Page 44


46Assessment <strong>of</strong> MESHThe purpose <strong>of</strong> MESH is to increase student learning <strong>for</strong> Health Science students in understanding theapplication <strong>of</strong> mathematical concepts. Implementing the Health Science mathematics course, ALMA1000, and redesigning the Health Science curriculum should accomplish the goal <strong>of</strong> MESH.To assess the effectiveness <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> strategies, a comprehensive Assessment Plan was developed. TheAssessment Plan includes both summative and <strong>for</strong>mative assessments. These assessments will be usedto demonstrate the effectiveness <strong>of</strong> the MESH strategies in improving student learning.Baseline DataBaseline data will be gathered by giving the ALMA 1000 pre-test and CAT to all degree and diplomaHealth Science students who begin their program in Fall 2012 and Spring 2013. This student populationsampling will not have taken ALMA 1000, will not have been exposed to any <strong>of</strong> the effects <strong>of</strong> the facultydevelopment strategies, and will not have experienced many <strong>of</strong> the factors <strong>of</strong> attrition. This data willalso be collected <strong>for</strong> the Fall 2012 and Spring 2013 ALMA 1000 pilot groups.Baseline data will also be collected from all Health Science students taking capstone courses during fall2012 and Spring 2013 through the administration <strong>of</strong> the ALMA 1000 Pre-/Post-test and CAT. Attritionrates are high in STC’s Health Science programs. So, students taking capstone courses are considered“successful” students. The scores <strong>of</strong> these students will be used to set benchmarks <strong>for</strong> prospectivestudents who will take ALMA 1000. If these benchmarks are met by the end <strong>of</strong> ALMA 1000, students’success rates in the Health Science programs should improve. If needed <strong>for</strong> future research, thisbaseline data will provide a pool <strong>of</strong> in<strong>for</strong>mation <strong>for</strong> “successful” students who have not been exposed toALMA 1000 or any <strong>of</strong> the effects <strong>of</strong> the Health Science curriculum redesign.Effectiveness <strong>of</strong> ALMA 1000At the beginning <strong>of</strong> each ALMA1000 course, the ALMA 1000 Pretest and CAT will be administered. Also,the student learning outcomes will be listed on the syllabus and reviewed with each class.A similar post-test and the CAT assessment will be given at course end as a summative assessment. Thisassessment data will provide specific feedback on the effectiveness <strong>of</strong> ALMA 1000 <strong>for</strong> student learningand understanding the application <strong>of</strong> mathematical concepts. This data, along with feedback fromstudent course evaluations, will be used to update the ALMA 1000 course to continuously improvestudent learning. The ALMA 1000 pre-/post-test will also be given in the program capstone course andthen compared to the results collected at the end <strong>of</strong> ALMA 1000. This data will be an indirect measure<strong>of</strong> the effectiveness <strong>of</strong> the Health Science curriculum redesign.Effectiveness <strong>of</strong> Health Science Curriculum RedesignThe CAT will be given to all diploma and degree Health Science program students during their programcapstone course. These CAT assessments compared to the CAT results collected at the end <strong>of</strong> ALMA1000 should provide feedback concerning any problem solving abilities gained through the HealthPage 46


47Science curriculum redesign. This assessment data will serve as an indirect measure <strong>of</strong> CAT trainingeffectiveness in terms <strong>of</strong> faculty use <strong>of</strong> contextual teaching methods.Program Completion RatesProgram completion rates are reported <strong>for</strong> each Health Science program on an annual basis. These rates<strong>for</strong> FY 2010, FY 2011, and FY 2012 will be averaged to determine a baseline <strong>for</strong> each program’scompletion rate. Changes in program completion rates will be used as an indirect measure <strong>of</strong> theeffectiveness <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong>. Implementation <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> will begin Fall 2013 (FY 2014). So, the programcompletion rates <strong>of</strong> FY 2015 will be the first rates used <strong>for</strong> determining the effectiveness <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong>.Faculty SurveyA survey was given during the Spring 2012 to gather baseline data on the faculty’s current usage <strong>of</strong>Smarter Measure, PassKey, and contextual teaching methods. The results from the survey indicated thatthe majority <strong>of</strong> the faculty does not utilize contextual teaching methods. Additionally, only twoinstructors indicated using PassKey modules <strong>for</strong> supplemental instructional purposes, and threeinstructors indicated using Smarter Measure <strong>for</strong> student success purposes.A faculty survey will be deployed each year at the Faculty Development Day to gather feedback <strong>of</strong> thefaculty’s perception on the Smarter Measure Workshops, PassKey In<strong>for</strong>mational Sessions, and theFaculty Development Day speaker on Contextual Teaching Methods. The faculty survey will provide anindirect assessment <strong>of</strong> the faculty development strategies implemented. Additionally, the survey willalso solicit feedback about the CAT training and its’ effectiveness in developing their understanding <strong>of</strong>students’ weaknesses in problem solving.Assessment <strong>of</strong> ResultsAssessment data will be gathered by the <strong>QEP</strong> Director and entered into the <strong>College</strong>’s online institutionalplanning and assessment database, ensuring that the <strong>QEP</strong> goal and strategies align with the institutionalmission, goals, and objectives. Assessment <strong>of</strong> each strategy/objective will include the measurementmethod, time frame, baseline per<strong>for</strong>mance, results, and analysis.To provide a <strong>for</strong>mative assessment <strong>of</strong> the student learning outcomes <strong>for</strong> each ALMA 1000 class taught,an assessment grading <strong>for</strong>m will be utilized to record each student’s grades <strong>for</strong> each student learningoutcome, pre- and post-test scores <strong>for</strong> ALMA 1000, and pre- & post-CAT data. This in<strong>for</strong>mation will besummarized <strong>for</strong> each course by the <strong>QEP</strong> Director; then all course results will be averaged <strong>for</strong> eachsemester and entered into the institution’s planning and assessment database. This data will provide the<strong>QEP</strong> Assessment Analysis Team a summative comparison <strong>for</strong> each phase (year). Data on indirectmeasurements such as the effectiveness <strong>of</strong> instructional methodologies being utilized and programcompletion rates will also be summarized <strong>for</strong> analysis.Page 47


48<strong>QEP</strong> Assessment Analysis TeamTeresa ColemanVice President <strong>for</strong> Academic AffairsJennifer CornerPractical Nursing Director, InstructorBrad HartDirector <strong>of</strong> Enrollment ServicesTara Powell<strong>QEP</strong> DirectorDana RoesslerDean <strong>of</strong> Health SciencesGail WareVice President <strong>for</strong> Institutional EffectivenessSonya WilsonMathematics InstructorPage 48


49ALMA 1000 - Student Learning Outcomes AssessmentALMA 1000- Course AssessmentSemester:_____________ CRN:_______________ Instructor:_____________Student Learning Outcome Student/ID # TotalStudents will per<strong>for</strong>m basic mathematical calculations withfractions, decimals, and percentages.Students will per<strong>for</strong>m conversions between the differentmeasurement systems utilizing <strong>for</strong>mulas, mentalcalculations, proportions, dimensional analysis, andmeans/extremes.Students will interpret measurements utilizing scales, tapemeasures/rulers, syringes, and thermometers.Students will interpret terminology used in mathematicalapplications <strong>for</strong> Allied Health programs.Students will per<strong>for</strong>m dosage calculations using ratios, rates,and proportions.Students will interpret the importance <strong>of</strong> scientific researchstatistical measures.Students will apply problem solving skills in the application<strong>of</strong> mathematical concepts.Student Total ResultsALMA 1000 Pre / Post TestCAT Pre / PostCAT (Capstone)Page 49


50MESH Goal AssessmentMESH GOAL - Improve student learning <strong>for</strong> Health Science students in understanding the application <strong>of</strong> mathematical concepts.Strategy 1: Health Science Math Application CourseDevelop and implement a Health Science Math Application course to bridge the gap between conceptual understanding and theapplication <strong>of</strong> math concepts in Health Science programs.Assessment Method <strong>of</strong> Assessment Type Time Frame Baseline Benchmark Results AnalysisQuestionWhat increase inscores was notedfrom Pre-test toPost-test inALMA 1000?What increase inCAT results wasnoted from thebeginning <strong>of</strong>ALMA 1000 tothe end <strong>of</strong> ALMA1000?What increasewas noted inprogram coursecompletion ratessince theimplementation<strong>of</strong> MESH?MeasurementALMA 1000 Pre-& Post-TestScoresBeginning ALMA1000 CAT scorescompared toend <strong>of</strong> ALMA1000 CAT scoresProgram courseCompletionratesFormative Direct Beginning andEnd <strong>of</strong> eachSemesterSummative Indirect Beginning andEnd <strong>of</strong> eachSemesterSummative Indirect December <strong>of</strong>each yearbeginning 2015Per<strong>for</strong>manceWill collectduring Fall2012, Spring2013Will collectSummer 2012,Fall 2012, andSpring 2013Health ScienceProgram Coursecompletionrates from2010, 2011,2012Page 50


51MESH GOAL - Improve student learning <strong>for</strong> Health Science students in understanding the application <strong>of</strong> mathematical concepts.Strategy 2: Health Science Curriculum RedesignRedesign and Implement a Health Science curriculum that builds on faculty development in the utilization <strong>of</strong> contextual instructionalmethodologies and integrates math throughout program specific courses.Assessment Method <strong>of</strong> Assessment Type Time Frame Baseline Benchmark Results AnalysisQuestionsWhat increase inthe use <strong>of</strong>contextualteachingmethods hasoccurred?What increasewas noted in theHealth Scienceprogramcompletion ratessince theimplementation<strong>of</strong> MESH?What increasesin CAT scores arenoted at programcompletion?MeasurementFaculty Survey Summative Indirect SpringSemesterbeginning 2014ProgramCompletionCAT ProgramCapstoneSummative Indirect December <strong>of</strong>each yearbeginning 2015Summative Indirect December <strong>of</strong>each yearbeginning 2015Per<strong>for</strong>manceSpring 2012SurveyProgramCompletionRates2010—2011—2012—Will collectSummer 2012,Fall 2012, andSpring 2013Page 51


52<strong>QEP</strong> Organizational StructurePage 52


53Organizational Structure <strong>of</strong> MESHAs MESH <strong>for</strong> Success moved from development to design and planning the implementation, anorganizational structure evolved that would promote successful implementation. The sole responsibility<strong>for</strong> implementing and maintaining <strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong>s’ <strong>QEP</strong> lies with the AcademicAdministration. The Vice President <strong>for</strong> Academic Affairs determined a full-time Quality EnhancementPlan Director would provide direct management and administrative coordination <strong>for</strong> the project.Vice President <strong>for</strong> Academic AffairsThe Vice President <strong>for</strong> Academic Affairs reports directly to the President and will provide oversight <strong>for</strong>the implementation and assessment analysis <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> by working closely with the <strong>QEP</strong> Director andthe Assessment Analysis Team.<strong>QEP</strong> DirectorThe <strong>QEP</strong> Director will report directly to the VP <strong>for</strong> Academic Affairs and will be responsible <strong>for</strong> themanagement and execution <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong>. The Implementation and Assessment Analysis Teams led by the<strong>QEP</strong> Director and will direct all activities associated with the <strong>QEP</strong>. The Director will teach the ALMA 1000course and mentor all adjunct faculty instructors teaching the ALMA 1000 courses. Additionally, theDirector will be responsible <strong>for</strong> allocating and monitoring the project resources, preparing allassessment reports, and facilitating the annual Assessment Analysis Team meetings.Implementation TeamThe Implementation Team is composed <strong>of</strong> faculty and staff members based on their current jobresponsibilities within their respective college division. This team will work together and carry out theimplementation activities providing input, guidance, and recommendations to the <strong>QEP</strong> Director asneeded during the implementation process. Each team member will also assist the <strong>QEP</strong> Director inpromoting the awareness <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> throughout the <strong>College</strong> during the implementation <strong>of</strong> the project.Assessment Analysis TeamThis Assessment Analysis Team will provide support in analyzing the assessment results and evaluatingthe implementation <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong>. This team will review all areas <strong>of</strong> the assessment data at the end <strong>of</strong> eachacademic year to per<strong>for</strong>m a comparative evaluation <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong>’s effectiveness. The membership <strong>of</strong> thisteam will consist <strong>of</strong> representatives from Academic Affairs, Institutional Effectiveness, Student Affairs, aswell as the <strong>QEP</strong> Director, Health Science Faculty member, and a Mathematics faculty member.Additionally, this team will provide support in the final <strong>QEP</strong> Report document preparation.ALMA 1000 Adjunct InstructorsThe adjunct instructors <strong>for</strong> ALMA 1000 will report to the Dean <strong>of</strong> Health Sciences and will be mentoredby the <strong>QEP</strong> Director. The adjunct instructors utilized <strong>for</strong> the ALMA 1000 course will be required to have aHealth Science background. Preference will be given to a registered nurse or Health Science pr<strong>of</strong>essionalwho is knowledgeable about the ALMA 1000 course competencies.Page 53


54MESH Organizational ChartDr. CathrynMitchell,PresidentVP <strong>for</strong>InstitutionalEffectiveness,Gail WareVP <strong>for</strong> AcademicAffairsTeresa ColemanImplementationTeamDirector <strong>of</strong>Library Services,Jane SummeyDean <strong>of</strong> BusinessTechnology &PersonalServices, GinaRobisonDean <strong>of</strong> HealthSciences, DanaRoesslerDean <strong>of</strong> GeneralEducation &LearningSupport, CherylWestAssessmentAnalysis TeamDean <strong>of</strong>Environmental &IndustrialTechnologies,Jessie Garrett<strong>QEP</strong> Director,Tara PowellPage 54


55<strong>QEP</strong> ResourcesPage 55


56Resources<strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong> is a state supported unit under the authority <strong>of</strong> the <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong>System <strong>of</strong> Georgia (TCSG). The financial resources received from the state, federal, and local sources areadequate to provide a sound financial base that enables the <strong>College</strong> to support its mission asdemonstrated through the history <strong>of</strong> the <strong>College</strong>. This solid financial position is the result <strong>of</strong> strongleadership in effective planning and budgeting from the <strong>College</strong>’s administration and TCSG Board <strong>of</strong>Directors.State appropriations make up approximately 68-70% <strong>of</strong> the <strong>College</strong>’s budget. Tuition and fees aresources <strong>of</strong> revenue funded by student enrollment, which may be funded through HOPE, LEAP, PELL,other third parties, or out-<strong>of</strong>-pocket. Tuition and fees and other local revenues make up approximately20-22% <strong>of</strong> the <strong>College</strong>’s budget. The entire <strong>QEP</strong> project will be supported from tuition funds with theexception <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> Director’s salary being funded through state funds. <strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong><strong>College</strong>’s annual budget operates on a fiscal year schedule beginning on July 1 st and ending on thefollowing June 30 th <strong>of</strong> each calendar year.The budget table demonstrates the <strong>College</strong>’s financial appropriations <strong>for</strong> achieving implementation <strong>of</strong>the Quality Enhancement Plan. The following sections will describe the rationale <strong>for</strong> the projected costsdemonstrated in the budget table.PersonnelThe activity section <strong>of</strong> the budget labeled “personnel” includes the costs <strong>for</strong> <strong>QEP</strong> Director’s salary,adjunct faculty, and faculty stipends. The <strong>QEP</strong> Director’s salary will be funded through state funds andincludes fringe benefits. Adjunct faculty <strong>for</strong> teaching ALMA 1000 on the Vidalia and Swainsborocampuses will be funded from the tuition funds generated through student enrollment. To address theadditional time and ef<strong>for</strong>ts <strong>of</strong> the faculty members on the <strong>QEP</strong> Leadership Team and Design Team,stipends were budgeted as compensation <strong>for</strong> their extra work in addition to their teachingresponsibilities.OperatingThe operating costs include equipment, supplies, consultant fees, staff development expenses,marketing, pilot course, and books/s<strong>of</strong>tware. The equipment needed <strong>for</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> consists <strong>of</strong> mainlylaboratory items <strong>for</strong> the contextual teaching methods that will be utilized in the ALMA 1000 course. Thebudget item listed as supplies is <strong>for</strong> replenishing consumables used in the each course’s laboratorycomponent.A consultant was contracted in January 2012 to guide the <strong>College</strong> in developing, designing, andpro<strong>of</strong>reading the plan document. The initial consultant fee was paid during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 andfunds were budgeted <strong>for</strong> additional usage if necessary <strong>for</strong> FY 2013.A comprehensive faculty development budget was planned to include all the strategies <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> andconference expenses that all <strong>QEP</strong>LT members attended to prepare <strong>for</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> process. MarketingPage 56


57expenses were budgeted with the majority <strong>of</strong> the funds utilized within the first year <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> allowingsome expense <strong>for</strong> the remaining four years <strong>of</strong> the project. The pilot course <strong>of</strong> ALMA 1000 will cost anadditional $10,000.00 to cover the student incentive <strong>of</strong> paid fees upon completion <strong>of</strong> the Pilot course.Books will be purchased <strong>for</strong> the ALMA 1000 course and reused each semester. To cover any lost, stolen,or unreturned book costs an additional $1000.00 was budgeted <strong>for</strong> each year. The online homework,tutorial, and assessment system Math XL will be purchased as a supplemental instructional tool toaccompany the textbook <strong>for</strong> ALMA 1000. Also, additional licenses will be needed <strong>for</strong> the increased usein the online PassKey modules <strong>for</strong> the Health Science curriculum redesign strategy.Page 57


58“MESH” <strong>for</strong> Success BudgetPersonnelActivityPlanning Year2012Pilot Project20132014 2015 2016 2017 Line Item Total Totals <strong>for</strong>Project<strong>QEP</strong> Director - full time with $ 51,149.22 $ 102,298.45 $ 102,298.45 $ 102,298.45 $ 102,298.45 $ 102,298.45 $ 562,641.47fringesAdjunct Faculty $ - $ - $ 43,200.00 $ 43,200.00 $ 43,200.00 $ 43,200.00 $ 172,800.00Faculty Stipend $ - $ 9,000.00 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 9,000.00Total Personnel $ 744,441.47OperatingEquipment $ 2,500.00 $ 10,000.00 $ 2,500.00 $ 2,500.00 $ 2,500.00 $ 2,500.00 $ 22,500.00Supplies $ 4,000.00 $ 10,000.00 $ 5,000.00 $ 5,000.00 $ 5,000.00 $ 5,000.00 $ 34,000.00Consultant Fees $ 5,000.00 $ 3,000.00 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 8,000.00Staff Development <strong>for</strong> FacultyFaculty Lunch and Learns $ - $ 2,500.00 $ 1,000.00 $ 1,000.00 $ 1,000.00 $ 1,000.00 $ 6,500.00Faculty Development Day $ - $ 3,000.00 $ 2,000.00 $ 2,000.00 $ 2,000.00 $ 2,000.00 $ 11,000.00Conference Travel Expenses $ 15,000.00 $ 10,000.00 $ 5,000.00 $ 5,000.00 $ 5,000.00 $ 5,000.00 $ 45,000.00Conference Registration $ 2,500.00 $ 1,000.00 $ 500.00 $ 500.00 $ 500.00 $ 500.00 $ 5,500.00Marketing Expenses $ - $ 10,000.00 $ 500.00 $ 500.00 $ 500.00 $ 500.00 $ 12,000.00Pilot project <strong>for</strong> students $ - $ 10,000.00 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 10,000.00Books $ - $ 30,000.00 $ 1,000.00 $ 1,000.00 $ 1,000.00 $ 1,000.00 $ 34,000.00Additional PassKey Licenses $ - $ 1,000.00 $ 1,000.00 $ 1,000.00 $ 1,000.00 $ 1,000.00 $ 5,000.00Math XL $ - $ 5,000.00 $ 23,750.00 $ 23,750.00 $ 23,750.00 $ 23,750.00 $ 100,000.00Total Operating $ 293,500.00Total Budget $ 80,149.22 $ 206,798.45 $ 187,748.45 $ 187,748.45 $ 187,748.45 $ 187,748.45 $ 1,037,941.47Page 58


59ReferencesAl<strong>for</strong>d, G., Herbert, P., & Frangenheim, E. (2006). Bloom's Taxonomy Overview. Innovative TeachersCompanion, 176-224.Anderson, L. W., & Krathwohl, D. R. (2001). A taxonomy <strong>for</strong> learning, teaching and assessing: A revision<strong>of</strong> Bloom's Taxonomy <strong>of</strong> Educational Objectives. New York, NY: Longman.Bailey, T. (2008). Challenge and Opportunity: Rethinking the role and function <strong>of</strong> developmentaleducation in community college. Columbia University, Teachers <strong>College</strong>. New York, NY:Community <strong>College</strong> Research Center.Berns, R., & Erickson, P. M. (2001). An Interactive Web-based Model <strong>for</strong> the Pr<strong>of</strong>essional Development<strong>of</strong> Teachers in Contextual Teaching and Learning Project. The Highlight Zone: Research @ Work,5, 2-9.Briner, M. (2012, March 20). Learning Theories. (USMA Department <strong>of</strong> Mathematical Sciences) Retrievedfrom http://www.dean.usma.edu/math/activities/cape/Constructivism/501learn.htm.Duch, B. J., Groh, S. E., & Allen, D. E. (2001). The power <strong>of</strong> problem-based learning: A practical "how to"<strong>for</strong> teaching undergraduate courses in any discipline. Sterling, VA: Stylus.Goldstein, F. C., & Levin, H. S. (1987). Disorders <strong>of</strong> reasoning and problem-solving ability. London: Taylor& Francis Group.Grubb, W. N. (1999). Edging toward effectiveness: Examining postsecondary occupational education.National Assessment <strong>of</strong> Vocational Educaton.Learning Theories Knowledgebase. (2012, March 19). Paradigms and Perspectives at Learning-Theories.com. Retrieved from Learning-Theories.com: http://www.learningtheories.com/design-based-research-methods.htmlMcDermott, L. (1991). Millikan lecture 1990: What we teach and what is learned-- closing the gap.American Journal <strong>of</strong> Physics, 59, 301-315.National Council on Education and the Disciplines . (2012, February 9). Mathematics and democracy. (L.A. Steen, Ed.) Retrieved from www.maa.org: http://www.maa.org/ql/mathanddemocracy.htmlNational Mathematics Advisory Panel. (2008). Foundations <strong>for</strong> success: The final report <strong>of</strong> the nationalmathematics advisory panel. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department <strong>of</strong> Education. Retrieved fromwww.ed.gov/MathPanelOsterroth, P. H. (1994). Variations in problem solving ability and levels <strong>of</strong> conceptual development.Journal <strong>of</strong> Instructional Psychology, 21(3), 265-267.Page 59


60Perin, D. (2000, March). Curriculum and Pedagogy to Integrate Occupational and Academic Instruction inthe Community <strong>College</strong>: Implications <strong>for</strong> Faculty Development. Community <strong>College</strong> ResearchCenter, pp. 1-3.Prolifroni, E. C., McNulty, J., & Allchin, L. (2003). Medication errors: More basic than a system issue.Journal <strong>of</strong> Nursing Education, 455-8.Pruitt, D. J. (1998). Developing real world simulations in health technology math. Inquiry, 2(1), 6-12.Shore, M., Shore, J., & Boggs, S. (2004). Allied health applications integrated into developmentalmathematics using problem based learning. Mathematics and Computer Education, 2(38), 183-189.Twigg, C. (2005). Math lectures: An oxymoron? Saratoga Springs: The National Center <strong>for</strong> AcademicTrans<strong>for</strong>mation.Page 60


Outstanding (5)Very good (4)Adequate(3)Marginally adequate(2)Inadequate (1)61Appendix A: <strong>QEP</strong> Scoring Guide Rubric<strong>QEP</strong> Scoring GuideName <strong>of</strong> <strong>QEP</strong> Stakeholder<strong>QEP</strong> Topic Summary# <strong>of</strong> Focus Group Participants(If applicable)Date <strong>of</strong> Focus Group (If applicable)Insert the number score you judge appropriate<strong>for</strong> each criteria listed below. The rubric willcalculate your total score automatically. <strong>Click</strong>on the Tabs at the bottom <strong>of</strong> this spreadsheet toview the <strong>QEP</strong> Description, and our Mission,Vision, and Strategic Plan Goals & Objectives.PointValueTopic supports college mission 0Topic supports college vision 0Issue related to student learning 0Topic can be assessed or measured 0Topic within college resources 0Topic can be implemented 0Topic can be sustained 0Topic is a new problem or significant extension <strong>of</strong> aproblem 0Topic was supported by other members <strong>of</strong> thefocus group (if applicable) 0Number <strong>of</strong> strategic goals supported by this topic X 2 = 0Number <strong>of</strong> strategic objectives supported by thistopic X 2 = 0Highest possible score = 97TotalPoints 0Notes:Page 61


62Appendix B: <strong>QEP</strong> Marketing PlanI. Executive Summary<strong>QEP</strong> Marketing PlanIn September <strong>of</strong> 2012, <strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong> will complete a reaffirmation <strong>of</strong> their regionalaccreditation, the Southern Association <strong>of</strong> <strong>College</strong>s and Schools Commission on <strong>College</strong>s (SACSCOC). Alarge portion and requirement <strong>of</strong> this process will involve <strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong>’s QualityEnhancement Plan (<strong>QEP</strong>).STC’s chosen <strong>QEP</strong> will be to strengthen Health Science students understanding <strong>of</strong> mathematics. TheHealth Science students will take a course designed specifically to integrate math skills with healthcareapplications. This course will be at no expense to students.It is vital that as many publics as possible are involved in the <strong>QEP</strong> process and even more critical thatthese publics are aware <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> and its importance to the college. The following marketing plancreates a road map <strong>of</strong> how the <strong>QEP</strong> will be promoted both internally and externally.II. MissionWhoThe <strong>QEP</strong> itself will be most important <strong>for</strong> students enrolling in Health Science programs as they will berequired to take an institutional credit course be<strong>for</strong>e proceeding in their program <strong>of</strong> study. However,awareness and exposure <strong>of</strong> STC’s <strong>QEP</strong> will be marketed to all students, faculty, staff and the generalpublic.What<strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong>’s Quality Enhancement Plan involves mathematics skills <strong>for</strong> HealthScience students.Unique Marketing PositionSTC’s <strong>QEP</strong> will ensure Health Science students are more prepared <strong>for</strong> positions within the healthcarefield. Students will have a greater understanding <strong>of</strong> mathematical concepts and have an advancedability to apply these concepts in a medical setting.III. Quality Enhancement Plan DescriptionWhat is a <strong>QEP</strong>?<strong>QEP</strong> Stands <strong>for</strong> Quality Enhancement Plan. The purpose <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> is to enhance the quality <strong>of</strong>education and student learning at <strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong>.Page 62


63What is <strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong>’s Quality Enhancement Plan?<strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong>’s <strong>QEP</strong> is to strengthen students understanding <strong>of</strong> math that is utilized inour Health Science programs. This will be accomplished by all Health Science Students taking a coursespecifically designed to integrate mathematics with healthcare applications. This course will be at noexpense to the student and books will be provided.Why this <strong>QEP</strong>?Based on internal research <strong>of</strong> faculty and students it was determined that additional Health Sciencemath skills were needed in our students to help them succeed in the Health Science programs. To betterprepare our students <strong>for</strong> their Health Science program, STC has decided to enhance its Health Sciencestudents understanding <strong>of</strong> how math and medical applications are associated in the healthcare field.This will not only increase student learning, but assist in student confidence in mathematicalapplications, help in student retention, and produce a higher quality healthcare pr<strong>of</strong>essional.IV. Target AudienceGenerally speaking, STC’s <strong>QEP</strong> will be mass marketed to all individuals associated with the college.However, the majority <strong>of</strong> the promotional ef<strong>for</strong>t will be directed to students, faculty, and staff.V. BrandingContestThe first component <strong>of</strong> branding the STC <strong>QEP</strong> will be the “Name the <strong>QEP</strong> Contest”. Students, faculty,and staff will be encouraged to submit their entries <strong>for</strong> a chance to win $100 in cash. A panel will beassembled to review the entries and the winning name will be chosen. Contest will conclude March19th and winner will be announced on March 26 th .Logo DevelopmentBeginning the week <strong>of</strong> March 26 th , ef<strong>for</strong>ts will be underway to create/choose a logo to coincide with the<strong>QEP</strong> name. Pr<strong>of</strong>essional logo creation companies will be contacted as well as in house logo creation willoccur. The new logo will be selected by May 2012. The existing contest panel will once again be utilizedin the selection <strong>of</strong> the logo.VI. Marketing StrategiesSTC <strong>QEP</strong> marketing strategies will be implemented in monthly “waves” <strong>of</strong> promotional activities. Anyprint media will be reviewed on a monthly basis to keep the content fresh and current. Here is a brieflist <strong>of</strong> promotional activities.Screen SaversOn-campus FlyersDesktopsANGELEmail blasts<strong>QEP</strong> “party”Promotional productso Book markso Pens/pencilsFacebook pageT-shirtsPage 63


64VII. Marketing GoalsThe goals <strong>for</strong> the marketing <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> are quite simple:Ensure that the overwhelming majority <strong>of</strong> students, staff and faculty are both aware <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong>and have had a chance to participate in the <strong>QEP</strong> creation and implementationThe following is a tentative calendar <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> marketing project:March 2012:Name the Campaign ContestSelect the name <strong>of</strong> the campaign from contest entriesApril 2012:Logo SelectionNaming/BrandingMay 2012:Consider activities/events/parties to provide exposure.Consider creation <strong>of</strong> promotional products to deliver to new students <strong>for</strong> Summer 2012July 2012:Selection <strong>of</strong> promotional productsAugust 2012:Purchase Promotional products<strong>QEP</strong> Class to begin<strong>QEP</strong> Marketing BudgetFY 2013 $10,000FY 2014 $500FY 2015 $500FY 2016 $500FY 2017 $500Total Budget: $12,000FY 2013 Expenditures:500 Stadium Cups with Name/Logo: $7451000 Javelin Pens: $490T-shirts <strong>for</strong> Faculty/Staff (144): $4,000Keychain (300): $425Breakaway Lanyard (300): $640Twist n Chill Fan (500): $565Miscellaneous: $3135$10,000Page 64


65Appendix C: Application Math <strong>for</strong> Health Science Course DescriptionALMA 1000 - Allied Health Math Applications Standard Institutionally Developed <strong>College</strong>: <strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong>EDGE Compatible: NoCourse DescriptionALMA 1000 prepares students in understanding the application <strong>of</strong> mathematics in their health science program courses. The topics included arebasic mathematics, medical terminology, mathematical conversions, weight and measurement applications used in health science programs.Additionally, problem solving strategies, basic principles <strong>of</strong> medication administration, and research in health science will be incorporated intothe course competencies.Teaching StrategiesALMA 1000 will be taught using lecture, problem solving methods, and innovative teaching strategies which will include, but will not be limitedto, contextualization, simulation, scenario problems, and lab experiences in an ef<strong>for</strong>t to strengthen the student’s ability to apply themathematics they already know.Pre-requisitesCertificate Programs with a math component: MATH 1012 with a C or betterDiploma Programs: MATH 1012 with a C or betterDegree Programs: Appropriate algebra placement test score Pharmacy Technology Diploma Program: MATH 1012 with a B or betterCo-requisitesCertificate Programs with a math component: NoneDiploma Programs: NoneDegree Programs: <strong>College</strong> Algebra can be taken during the same semester or earlier since the competencies are not pre-requisiteknowledge <strong>for</strong> ALMA 1000Page 65


66Other RequirementsALMA 1000 with a C or better is an entrance requirement <strong>for</strong> the following programs: Practical Nursing, Medical Assisting, SurgicalTechnology, Radiologic Technology, Health Care Assistant, Health Care Science, Medical Administrative Technician, Dental Hygiene, EMSPr<strong>of</strong>essions, Paramedicine, and Clinical Laboratory Technology.ALMA 1000 with a B or better is an entrance requirement <strong>for</strong> the following program: Pharmacy Technology Diploma ProgramCourse LengthMinutes Contact Hour Semester CreditLecture/Lab/Innovative Strategies: 2250 45Total: 2250 45 3Semester Credit Hours: 3CompetenciesOrder Description Lecture/LabMinutesSemesterCredit Hours1 Problem Solving Strategies (Incorporated) 3212 Basic Mathematics in Health Science (Incorporated) 3213 Medical Terminology Used in Health Science Math Applications 3214 Conversion Applications in Health Science 3245 Weight and Measurement in Health Science 3216 Basic Principles <strong>of</strong> Medication Administration (Incorporated) 3217 Research in Health Sciences 321Totals <strong>for</strong> Course ALMA 1000 – Allied Health Math Applications 2250 3Learning OutcomesProblem Solving StrategiesOrder Description Learning Level <strong>of</strong>Domain Learning1 Use problem solving strategies to solve application problems Cognitive ApplicationPage 66


67Basic Mathematics in Allied HealthOrder Description LearningDomainLevel <strong>of</strong>Learning1 Per<strong>for</strong>m operations and comparisons with fractions, decimals, and percentages Cognitive Analysis2 Per<strong>for</strong>m operations with exponents including powers <strong>of</strong> ten Cognitive Application3 Convert between standard notation and scientific notation Cognitive Application4 Convert between and interpret the medical application <strong>of</strong> Arabic Numerals and Roman Numerals Cognitive Comprehension5 Per<strong>for</strong>m basic allied health applications using ratios, rates and proportions Cognitive Application6 Develop mental calculations skills through drill & practice, contextualization, etc… Cognitive SynthesisMedical Terminology Used in Health Science Math ApplicationsOrder Description Learning Level <strong>of</strong> LearningDomain1 Demonstrate an understanding <strong>of</strong> medical terminology used in health science math Cognitive Comprehension/Application2 Interpret medical abbreviations as related to health science math Cognitive KnowledgeConversion Applications in Allied HealthOrder Description Learning Level <strong>of</strong> LearningDomain1 Demonstrate an understanding <strong>of</strong> the systems <strong>of</strong> measurement and their equivalencies Cognitive Comprehension/Application2 Convert among and between measurement systems (metric, apothecary,household/American/English) using <strong>for</strong>mulas, mental calculations, proportions, dimensionalanalysis, and means/extremesCognitive ComprehensionWeight and Measurement Applications in Allied HealthOrder Description LearningDomainLevel <strong>of</strong>Learning1 Interpret medical measurement devices (scales, tape measure, syringes, wound measurement devices, Cognitive Knowledgeetc…)2 Demonstrate weight and measurement literacy Cognitive ApplicationBasic Principles <strong>of</strong> Medication AdministrationPage 67


68Order Description LearningDomainLevel <strong>of</strong>Learning1 Interpret and translate orders <strong>for</strong> medication Cognitive Knowledge2 Use ratios, rates, and proportions to per<strong>for</strong>m allied health applications and mixture/concentration problems Cognitive Application3 Per<strong>for</strong>m basic dosage calculations. Cognitive ApplicationResearch in Allied HealthOrder Description LearningDomainLevel <strong>of</strong>Learning1 Demonstrate an understanding <strong>of</strong> the importance <strong>of</strong> the scientific method in research Cognitive Comprehension2 Interpret statistical measures used in the health science field Cognitive Evaluation3 Review a scientific journal article related to the health science field Cognitive AnalysisReferencesOrder Reference Type Description1 Book Geurink, K. (2012). Research. Community Oral Health Practice <strong>for</strong> the Dental Hygienist (198-224). St. Louis, MO:Elsevier Saunders2 Book Kennamer, M. (2005). Math <strong>for</strong> health care pr<strong>of</strong>essionals, quick review. Clifton Park, NY: Thomson/DelmarLearning.3 Book Lesmeister, M. (2009). Math Basics <strong>for</strong> the Health Care Pr<strong>of</strong>essional. Upper Saddle River, NJ: PearsonEducation.Page 68


69Appendix D: <strong>QEP</strong> Director Job DescriptionJob Description<strong>QEP</strong> DirectorSupervisor: Vice President <strong>for</strong> Academic Affairs, Teresa ColemanNature <strong>of</strong> Position:Reporting to the Vice President <strong>for</strong> Academic Affairs, the Director <strong>of</strong> the Quality Enhancement Plan (<strong>QEP</strong>) will beresponsible <strong>for</strong> the operational success <strong>of</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> and ensuring exemplary program delivery, quality assessmentand evaluation. This is an excellent opportunity <strong>for</strong> an individual with team management experience to grow andprovide the leadership to operate a quality program.The Director will collaborate with existing campus resources, entities, and services to promote the <strong>QEP</strong> and studentlearning.The <strong>QEP</strong> Director\Instructor is responsible <strong>for</strong> providing organized, up-to-date, and meaningful instructionalactivities which allow students to meet instructional competencies as outlined in course curriculum <strong>for</strong> the qualityenhancement plan. Instruction will include both lecture and any on campus associated laboratory activities <strong>of</strong> thecourse. The <strong>QEP</strong> director\instructor demonstrates leadership, organizes reviews, develops, and assures planeffectiveness, while ensuring compliance with appropriate accrediting agency guidelines to obtain and maintaincollege accreditation.Instructional activities will include the preparation <strong>of</strong> course outlines and objectives as well as the instruction andevaluation <strong>of</strong> students <strong>for</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong> courses only. The instructor is responsible <strong>for</strong> influencing students in awholesome and constructive manner. The <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong> System <strong>of</strong> Georgia (TCSG) programs standards andprogram guides provide the basis <strong>for</strong> instruction and guiding the student in the development <strong>of</strong> essentialoccupational skills to include identifying and selecting appropriate resources and teaching methods and evaluatingthe satisfactory completion <strong>of</strong> stated competencies. The director\instructor will model appropriate work ethics todemonstrate affective behavior commensurate with student expectations.Also, a caring attitude toward students= success and a demonstration <strong>of</strong> intellectual insight and integrityrepresentative <strong>of</strong> <strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> Institute are expected at all times.This position description has been prepared to assist in defining responsibilities, physical demands, workingconditions, and skills needed. It is not intended as a complete listing <strong>of</strong> job duties, responsibilities, and/or essentialfunctions. The descriptive characteristics <strong>of</strong> this position are representative <strong>of</strong> those an employee must meet or willencounter while per<strong>for</strong>ming the essential functions <strong>of</strong> this job and reasonable accommodations may be made toenable individuals with disabilities to per<strong>for</strong>m essential functions. The organization retains the right to add orchange any section <strong>of</strong> this description as necessary.This person serves as the lead instructor <strong>for</strong> the Quality Enhancement Plan. The lead instructor will work with otherplan faculty on all campuses to complete the program budget, schedules, SPIRIT, book orders, and other duties asneeded.Responsibilities and Per<strong>for</strong>mance Expectations:Responsibility:<strong>QEP</strong> PromoterPer<strong>for</strong>mance Expectations:Actively participates in marketing/recruiting/retention ef<strong>for</strong>ts as outlined in school’s manual as requestedCommunicates with adjunct faculty routinely regarding curriculum needsMakes public aware <strong>of</strong> courses through various public relations activitiesPage 69


70Responsibility:<strong>QEP</strong> PlannerPer<strong>for</strong>mance Expectations:Utilizes <strong>QEP</strong> Assessment Analysis Team <strong>for</strong> plan improvementDevelops goals and long range plansMaintains up-to-date equipment improvement planAttend and/or provide input in to faculty meetingsMaintains <strong>QEP</strong> accreditation requirementsParticipate in the evaluation <strong>of</strong> curriculumUnderstanding and commitment to the <strong>College</strong>’s missionExperience in assessment, faculty development, and instructional skillsEffectively plan work activities, schedules, priorities, and utilization <strong>of</strong> resourcesFacilitation and coordination skillsAbility to clearly and effectively present ideas in meetings and in oral presentationsAbility to meet deadlines <strong>for</strong> reports and assignmentsKnowledge, skills and ability to per<strong>for</strong>m all essential functions <strong>of</strong> the jobWorking knowledge <strong>of</strong> technology such as Word and PowerPointExcellent organizational skills with an attention to detailResponsibility:<strong>QEP</strong> Director Creates and maintains a high per<strong>for</strong>mance environment characterized by positive leadershipPer<strong>for</strong>mance Expectations:Maintains up-to-date course in<strong>for</strong>mation:• Catalog• SyllabusSyllabi, including all course requirements and assignments, must be implemented <strong>for</strong> all students.Maintains student records in an orderly mannerPer<strong>for</strong>ms student advisement correctly and effectivelyMaintains student attendance records and reports “No Shows” and “Withdrawal Based on Attendance” <strong>for</strong>msfollowing STC guidelines/deadlines regarding when the <strong>for</strong>ms should be submittedOrganizes lab and classroom with instructional resources availableMaintains current facilities and equipmentOversee, facilitate, and mentor any part-time faculty within the planResponsibility:InstructorPer<strong>for</strong>mance Expectations:Provide classroom instruction <strong>for</strong> the <strong>QEP</strong>Maintains curriculum revisionsVaries teaching methods according to individual needsUtilizes student evaluation instrumentsDemonstrates effective training techniquesDisplays adequate knowledge <strong>of</strong> subject areaDisplays effective interpersonal skills with studentsSelects student instructional supplies and equipmentDevelops teacher-made instructional materials as appropriateProvides outside-the-classroom learning experiences, i.e., field trips, job observations, guest speakers, co-op.Provides safe and appropriate learning environmentDevelop in collaboration with clinical instructor and/or other appropriate school resource staff, remediation planswith students.Assist students in identifying and utilizing resources that may contribute to their successMonitor Student Per<strong>for</strong>mance,Direct students to be responsible and accountable <strong>for</strong> their behaviors in the classroom and laboratoryRefer students to college services as necessary.Grade written assignments and return to students in timely manner.Hold instructor conversations regarding student per<strong>for</strong>mance in private.Responsibility:Member <strong>of</strong> Training Pr<strong>of</strong>essionPage 70


71Per<strong>for</strong>mance Expectations:Continues Education and pr<strong>of</strong>essional development.Serves on school committeesMaintains membership pr<strong>of</strong>essional or civic organizations, and peer groupsMaintains positive interaction with other instructors and pr<strong>of</strong>essional staffBroad educational background and experience which demonstrates knowledge <strong>of</strong> the principles <strong>of</strong> teaching andassessmentKnowledge <strong>of</strong> and experience with best practices in teachingWritten skills to convey ideas, facts and in<strong>for</strong>mation effectively and accurately to students, staff, faculty, and thegeneral publicResponsibility:Work EthicsPer<strong>for</strong>mance Expectations:Enhances the mission <strong>of</strong> the institution by working as a team player.Maintains confidentialityComplies with the policies and procedures <strong>of</strong> the <strong>College</strong> and the <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong> System <strong>of</strong> GeorgiaWorks a flexible schedule as needed to meet the needs <strong>of</strong> the customerDemonstrates courteous behavior toward customers (students, parents, employers, media, and organizational coworkers)Strong interpersonal skills; ability to work collaboratively and collegiallyMinimum Qualifications:Must possess at least a master's degree from an accredited postsecondary institution preferably in a Health ScienceRelated Field with a strong background in math. The applicant must provide documentation <strong>of</strong> the equivalent <strong>of</strong>three years full time experience in the pr<strong>of</strong>essional discipline, as well as experience leading teams. Faculty teachingnon-degree diploma or certificate <strong>of</strong> credit occupational courses: (a) a diploma in the teaching discipline, (b)occupation related college courses, (c) specialized training directly related to the courses taught, or (d)competence gained through work experience and/or other demonstrated competencies and achievements. Whereapplicable, licensing board, and/or program specific accreditation requirements must be met.Page 71


72Appendix E: <strong>QEP</strong> Director Curriculum VitaePERSONAL DATATara Weldon PowellAddress: 208 Williamson Street, Lyons, GA 30436Phone: (912)253-5787Email: tarapowell@ymail.comEDUCATIONIn progressEd.D., Doctorate in Education Administration, Georgia Southern University,Statesboro, GA.May 2009M.B.A., Healthcare Administration, Brenau University, Gainesville, GAAugust 2007B.S.R.S., Radiologic Science, Florida Hospital <strong>College</strong>, Orlando, FLSeptember 1990Diploma Radiologic Technology, Gwinnett <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong>, Lawrenceville,GAACADEMIC EXPERIENCECurrentSeptember 2006September 2006February 2004Radiologic Technology Program DirectorInstruction/Lecturing/Laboratory DemonstrationAcademic AdvisementEnsuring and maintaining compliance <strong>of</strong> program accreditationAssuring program effectivenessProgram BudgetingProgram Marketing <strong>for</strong> Prospective StudentsDeveloped syllabus and overall course structure, including weekly lab practicumFacilitated Advisory Committee Meetings <strong>for</strong> programRadiologic Technology Clinical CoordinatorInstruction/Lecturing/Laboratory DemonstrationAcademic AdvisementCoordinating clinical education <strong>of</strong> studentsAssisting with accreditation complianceDeveloped syllabus and overall course structure, including weekly lab practicum, andadministered all gradesPage 72


73INSTRUCTIONAL COURSE EXPERIENCEImaging Sciences Service Assistant Certificate ProgramAHS 1011 - Anatomy & PhysiologyAHS 1090 - Medical TerminologyRadiologic Technology Diploma ProgramRAD 103 – Body, Trunk, Upper Extremity ProceduresRAD 106 – Lower Extremities & Spine ProceduresRAD 109 – Contrast ProceduresRAD 107 – Principles <strong>of</strong> Radiographic Exposures IRAD 116 – Principles <strong>of</strong> Radiographic Exposures IIRAD 113 – Cranium ProceduresRadiologic Technology Degree ProgramRADT 1070 – Principles <strong>of</strong> Imaging IRADT 2190 – Radiographic PathologyRADT 2260 – Radiologic Technology ReviewRADT 1200 – Principles <strong>of</strong> Radiation Biology andProtectionRAD 101 – Introduction to RadiologyRAD 132 – Clinical PracticeINSTITUTIONAL/ PROFESSIONAL ACCOMPLISHMENTSRAD 119 – Radiographic Pathology and MedicalTerminologyRAD 117 – Radiographic Imaging EquipmentRAD 120 – Principles <strong>of</strong> Radiation Biology and ProtectionRAD 126 – Radiologic Technology ReviewRAD 132 – 138 Clinical Radiography I – VIIRADT 1160 – Principles <strong>of</strong> Imaging IIRADT 1030 – Radiographic Procedures IRADT 1060 –Radiographic Procedures II• DTAE, Phase I <strong>of</strong> the Instructor Training Institute, Dublin, GA, December, 2004.• DTAE, Phase II <strong>of</strong> the Instructor Training Institute, Vidalia, GA. February 21-23, 2006.• DTAE, Phase III <strong>of</strong> the Instructor Training Institute, Vidalia, GA. May 22-24, 2007.• JRCERT, Site Visitor 2008-Present.• ASRT, Leadership Academy <strong>for</strong> Educators, Albuquerque, NM. July 23-26, 2008.• <strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong>, Faculty Counsel, 2009-2011• Quality Enhancement Plan Leadership Team, 2011-Present• SACS/SOC Summer Institute, FT. Worth, TX, July 16-19, 2011.• SACS/COC Annual Conference, Orlando, FL., December 2-5, 2011.• General Education Advisory Committee, STC, 2011-PresentIN-FIELD EXPERIENCEFebruary 2003 –February 2004MRI Manager/Ultrasonographer, Medcross Mobile Scanners, Eastman, GA• Managed MRI Mobile which included over seeing scheduling, ordering <strong>of</strong> supplies, andmaintenance/repairs <strong>of</strong> mobile.• Marketing <strong>for</strong> mobile MRI to increase business from ordering physicians in the area. Companyincreased procedures from 50 per month to 100 per month.• Ultrasound and Mammography in Macon <strong>of</strong>fice.• Gained knowledge and experience in MRI imagingOctober 1993 – March 2004Ultrasonographer/Mammographer, Jeff Davis Hospital, Hazlehurst, GA• Ultrasound and Mammography were primary responsibilities. Also per<strong>for</strong>med CT and NuclearMedicine when needed.• Educated many new staff technologists in CT, Mammography, and Ultrasound.• Attained CT license and Abdomen ultrasound license.Page 73


74• Gained knowledge and experience in Echocardiograms, Peripheral Vascular Ultrasound, andNuclear Medicine.February 1993 – October 1993Special Procedures/Ultrasonographer, Meadows Regional Medical Center, Vidalia, GA• Responsible <strong>for</strong> Special Procedures• Gained knowledge and experience in ultrasound.September 1990 – February 1993Staff Technologist, C<strong>of</strong>fee Regional Medical Center, Douglas, GA• Per<strong>for</strong>med mammography and gained knowledge as well as experience in CT.• Gained license in Mammography.PROFESSIONAL LICENSES• American Registry <strong>of</strong> Radiologic Technology in Radiography, Mammography, and ComputedTomography• American Registry Diagnostic Medical Sonography in AbdomenPROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS• American Society <strong>of</strong> Radiologic Technologist since 1999• Society <strong>of</strong> Diagnostic Medical Sonographers since 1999• Association <strong>of</strong> Educators in Imaging and Radiologic Sciences since 2004• Georgia Educators Association <strong>of</strong> Radiation and Medical Imaging since 2004• Site Visitor with the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology since 2007• Georgia Society <strong>of</strong> Radiologic Technologist since 2011Page 74


75Appendix F: <strong>QEP</strong> Instructor Job DescriptionJob DescriptionHealth Science Application Mathematics InstructorSupervisor: Dean <strong>of</strong> Health Sciences, Dana RoesslerNature <strong>of</strong> Position:The Health Science Application Mathematics Instructor is responsible <strong>for</strong> providing organized, up-to-date, and meaningfulinstructional activities which allow students to meet instructional competencies as outlined in course curriculum <strong>for</strong> thecourse. Instruction will include both lecture and any associated laboratory activities <strong>of</strong> the course. The course instructororganizes, reviews, develops, and assures course effectiveness by reporting all assessment data to the <strong>QEP</strong> Director.Instructional activities will include the preparation <strong>of</strong> course outlines and objectives as well as the instruction andevaluation <strong>of</strong> students in a variety <strong>of</strong> course competencies. The instructor is responsible <strong>for</strong> influencing students in awholesome and constructive manner. TCSG course standards and guides provide the basis <strong>for</strong> instruction and guiding thestudent in the development <strong>of</strong> essential occupational skills to include identifying and selecting appropriate resources andteaching methods and evaluating the satisfactory completion <strong>of</strong> stated competencies. The instructor will participate instudent success ef<strong>for</strong>ts as established by the <strong>College</strong>. The instructor will model appropriate work ethics to demonstrateaffective behavior commensurate with student expectations.Also, a caring attitude toward students equals success and a demonstration <strong>of</strong> intellectual insight and integrityrepresentative <strong>of</strong> <strong>Southeastern</strong> <strong>Technical</strong> Institute are expected at all times.This position description has been prepared to assist in defining responsibilities, physical demands, working conditions, andskills needed. It is not intended as a complete listing <strong>of</strong> job duties, responsibilities, and/or essential functions. Thedescriptive characteristics <strong>of</strong> this position are representative <strong>of</strong> those an employee must meet or will encounter whileper<strong>for</strong>ming the essential functions <strong>of</strong> this job and reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals withdisabilities to per<strong>for</strong>m essential functions. The organization retains the right to add or change any section <strong>of</strong> thisdescription as necessary.Responsibilities and Per<strong>for</strong>mance Expectations:Responsibility:Course Manager/PlannerPer<strong>for</strong>mance Expectations:Syllabi, including all course requirements and assignments, must be implemented <strong>for</strong> all students.Maintains student records in an orderly mannerMaintains course assessment dataMaintains student attendance records and reports “No Shows” and “Withdrawal Based on Attendance” <strong>for</strong>ms following STCguidelines/deadlines regarding when the <strong>for</strong>ms should be submittedOrganizes lab and classroom with instructional resources availableMaintains current facilities and equipmentParticipate in the evaluation <strong>of</strong> curriculumWelcome suggestions <strong>for</strong> changes in content from other course instructorsCommunicates with <strong>QEP</strong> Director routinely regarding curriculum needsResponsibility:InstructorPer<strong>for</strong>mance Expectations:1. Provide classroom instruction <strong>for</strong> didactic Nursing lecture courses.• Maintains program curriculum standards & statewide revisions.• Varies teaching methods according to individual needs.• Utilizes student evaluation instruments.• Demonstrates effective training techniques.• Displays adequate knowledge <strong>of</strong> subject area.• Displays effective interpersonal skills with students.• Selects student instructional supplies and equipment.• Develops teacher-made instructional materials as appropriate.• Provides outside-the-classroom learning experiences, i.e., field trips, job observations, guest speakers, co-op.Page 75


76• Provides safe and appropriate learning environment.• Develop in collaboration with other program faculty, remediation plans with students.• Assist students in identifying and utilizing resources that may contribute to their success.2. Direct, instruct, and guide students in the laboratory setting:• Engage students in comprehensive, individualized instruction in the observation, assessment, and decision-making.• Facilitate development <strong>of</strong> student’s critical thinking, technical, and pr<strong>of</strong>essional skills while maintaining instructor andstudent safety.• Relate assigned readings to student laboratory assignments.3. Monitor Student Per<strong>for</strong>mance.• Direct students to be responsible and accountable <strong>for</strong> their behaviors in the classroom and laboratory. Communicate withstudents regarding student progress.• Refer students to college services as necessary.• Grade written assignments and return to students in timely manner.• Hold instructor conversations regarding student per<strong>for</strong>mance in private.Responsibility:Member <strong>of</strong> Training Pr<strong>of</strong>essionPer<strong>for</strong>mance Expectations:Maintains ethical standards, i.e. student confidentiality, honesty, etc.Continues Education and pr<strong>of</strong>essional developmentMaintains membership pr<strong>of</strong>essional or civic organizations, and peer groupsMaintains positive interaction with other instructors and pr<strong>of</strong>essional staffMaintains current immunization records as set <strong>for</strong>th by the Health PolicyComplies with the policies <strong>for</strong> criminal background check and urine drug screenResponsibility:Work EthicsPer<strong>for</strong>mance Expectations:Enhances the mission <strong>of</strong> the institution by working as a team playerMaintains confidentialityComplies with the policies and procedures <strong>of</strong> the <strong>College</strong> and the <strong>Technical</strong> <strong>College</strong> System <strong>of</strong> GeorgiaWorks a flexible schedule as needed to meet the needs <strong>of</strong> the customerDemonstrates courteous behavior toward customers (students, parents, employers, media, and organizational co-workersDemonstrate Competent Nursing Practice• Know, understand, and follow the accepted standards, laws, and rules regulating the practice <strong>of</strong> allied health pr<strong>of</strong>essions,and function within the scope <strong>of</strong> allied health science practices and course education• Be responsible and accountable <strong>for</strong> practice based on, and limited to, the scope <strong>of</strong> instructor’s education, demonstratedcompetence, and experience• Obtain instruction, supervision, and consultation as necessary be<strong>for</strong>e implementing new or unfamiliar techniques orpractices• Be responsible <strong>for</strong> maintaining current knowledge in broad and/or specialized areas <strong>of</strong> allied health sciences.• Conduct allied health science education without discrimination.Minimum Qualifications:Candidate will be an Allied Health pr<strong>of</strong>essional and must have at least 3 years <strong>of</strong> experience in Health Science field. An RNcredentials are preferred. Faculty teaching non-degree diploma or certificate <strong>of</strong> credit occupational courses: (a) a diplomain the teaching discipline, (b) occupation related college courses, (c) specialized training directly related to the coursestaught, or (d) competence gained through work experience and/or other demonstrated competencies and achievements.Where applicable, licensing board, and/or program specific accreditation requirements must be met.Other Desirable Qualifications:Bachelors degree and previous teaching experience preferred.Page 76


77Appendix G: Glossary <strong>of</strong> TermsAcademic Knowledge – the knowledge students gain through classroom instruction and textbooks. (I.e.English, mathematics, history)Academic-Occupational Integration – placing career or real world content within the academiceducation to demonstrate how it relates to a career or real world application.Allied Health – a group <strong>of</strong> medically prescribed health care services provided by licensed pr<strong>of</strong>essionalsApplied mathematics – to utilize or apply math to specific career duties or real world useAssessment measures – methods used to determine the extent to which the student has gainedachievement <strong>of</strong> expected results identified by the student learning outcomes.Baseline Data – Data collected be<strong>for</strong>e student and faculty enhancements are applied to establishbenchmarks.Benchmark – Comparison <strong>of</strong> student per<strong>for</strong>mance against peer student per<strong>for</strong>mance to establish a level<strong>of</strong> expected outcome attainment per<strong>for</strong>mance.Compartmentalize – to store in short-term memory, learn <strong>for</strong> a test and <strong>for</strong>getCompetencies – Established minimum standards <strong>of</strong> skills and knowledge necessary to become eligible<strong>for</strong> promotion, graduation, certification, or other <strong>of</strong>ficial acknowledgement <strong>of</strong> achievement.Direct Assessment – tangible, visible, self-explanatory evidence <strong>of</strong> exactly what students have and havenot attained during the learning process.Formative Assessment – any assessment per<strong>for</strong>med during a learning activity in a class, course, orprogram that demonstrates or monitors student learning at different stages and guides theeffectiveness <strong>of</strong> the instruction while learning is in progress.Goal – Broad, long-range statement that establishes an intended outcome <strong>of</strong> a program, curriculum,division, or institution.Health Sciences – programs <strong>of</strong> study that prepare students with set skills and knowledge that enablesthem to develop expertise in a health related careerHealthcare – the prevention, treatment, and management <strong>of</strong> illness and the preservation <strong>of</strong> mental andphysical well-being through the services <strong>of</strong>fered by the medical and allied health pr<strong>of</strong>essions.Healthcare Pr<strong>of</strong>essional – a person who by education, training, certification, or licensure is qualified toand is engaged in providing health careHealthcare Science – the applied science dealing with the application <strong>of</strong> science, technology,engineering or mathematics to the delivery <strong>of</strong> healthcarePage 77


78Indirect Assessment – gathering in<strong>for</strong>mation from participants or stakeholders on their thoughts,attitudes, perceptions in relation to their own learningLongitudinal – the comparison <strong>of</strong> student per<strong>for</strong>mance or scores against peers in prior years.Objective – the description <strong>of</strong> skills or knowledge a student will attain and what is expected <strong>of</strong> a studentthrough participation in a program, course, or activity.Occupational instruction – prepares students to enter the work<strong>for</strong>ce in a specific type <strong>of</strong> position with arecognized career path.Occupational applications- activities specific to a particular pr<strong>of</strong>ession or careerProgram-specific – Associated with a particular program <strong>of</strong> studyReliability – the extent to which an experiment, test, or any measuring procedure yields the same resulton repeated trials.Scoring Rubric – a determined set <strong>of</strong> criteria that describes the characteristic(s) <strong>of</strong> a learning outcomeand the level <strong>of</strong> achievement in each characteristic(s).Student Learning Outcome – is a statement to identify or describe specific measurable knowledge, skills,behaviors, and values or attitudes <strong>of</strong> the student as an outcome from the student’s participation in thelearning activity.Student Success/Program Completion – students who complete a program <strong>of</strong> studySummative Assessment – assessment per<strong>for</strong>med to check the level <strong>of</strong> learning at the end <strong>of</strong> the learningprocess and provides a comprehensive assessment <strong>of</strong> student learning.Triangulation – the use <strong>of</strong> a combination <strong>of</strong> assessment methods in a study.Use <strong>of</strong> results/Analysis – utilizing assessment results to improve a program or courseValidity – refers to the degree to which a study accurately reflects or assesses the specific concept thatthe researcher is attempting to measure. Validity has three components: relevance (directmeasurement), accuracy (how precise are the measurements), and utility (how clear are theimplications <strong>for</strong> improvement).Page 78


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