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April 16, 2007 - Columbia News - Columbia University

April 16, 2007 - Columbia News - Columbia University

April 16, 2007 - Columbia News - Columbia

CAMPUS TALKA historyof comics | 3SPECIAL INSERTColumbia and theenvironmentSCRAPBOOKThere’s somethingabout Farrelly | 8VOL. 32, NO. 11ColumbiaUnderConstructionBy Dan RiveroMortarboards won’t be theonly headgear in vogueon campus this spring.Prepare to see manyhard hats starting next month.Excavation for the NorthwestScience Building is officially underway,marking the last frontier ofColumbia’s Morningside campus.The building, slated to open in thefall of 2010, is one of over 20 constructionprojects that will kickinto full gear this summer.Between renovations, repairsand additions, much of theMorningside campus will be underconstruction. For instance, JeromeGreene Hall, home of the lawschool, will add a new floor of facultyoffices atop its structure inJune. The Journalism school willbegin building a new student centeron its first and second levels.There will be roof repairs in Avery,Buell, Chandler, Fayerweather,Havermeyer, Kent, Mathematics,Philosophy, and Schermerhornhalls over the next few months.Additionally, renovations toMcVickar Hall—including façaderestorations and installations ofnew offices—will begin in June, toNew building willprovide bridge amongscience disciplinesaccommodate the planned relocationthere of the Office of UniversityDevelopment and Alumni Relations.At the site of the NorthwestScience Building, constructioncrews will remove topsoil over thenext few weeks and remove 40feet of rock for the foundation followingCommencement. Designedby Spanish architect José RafaelMoneo, the building will be locatedat the corner of Broadway andWest 120th St., north of the LevienGymnasium and betweenChandler and Pupin Halls. Knownas Pupin Plaza, the space is consideredto be the last significantundeveloped plot on the originalMcKim, Mead & White layout ofMorningside campus. The buildingwill provide a new entrance to thecampus at 120th and Broadway.In a March e-mail to theUniversity, Joe Ienuso, executivevice president for facilities, saidthat the new science building willprovide both an intellectual andphysical bridge among differentdepartments and disciplines. Thebuilding will connect to Chandlercontinued on page 8NEWS AND IDEAS FOR THE COLUMBIA COMMUNITY APRIL 16, 2007By Record StaffIn 1933, when 18-year-old John Kluge (CC’37) wasaccepted into Columbia College, he was offered financialaid. Not enough, he told the school; if Columbia reallywanted him to attend, he needed more money. Theschool reconsidered, then upped his scholarship amount.Now 92, Kluge is providing Columbia with a historicpledge of $400 million, the largest-ever gift to a universityearmarked specificallyfor financial aid. Half that“I would like this gift to be a tokenof what alumni can and should do.”GIFT OF ALIFETIMEamount will go for scholarshipsfor Columbia College;the remainder will be distributedto various schoolsthroughout the University ina manner still under discussion. The money will be distributedfrom his estate.Kluge is the principal general partner, chair andpresident of Metromedia, a privately held firm withholdings in telecommunications, information technology,and medical and research technology firms. Listedon the 2006 Forbes 400 list as the 25th wealthiestAmerican, he has already donated more than $110 millionto Columbia in a series of gifts that established theKluge Scholars program, Kluge Presidential Scholarsand Kluge Faculty Endowment. More than 500 studentshave benefited from the scholarships, which areearmarked for those from socio-economically disadvantagedbackgrounds.In an April 11 ceremony in Low Library, Kluge wasjoined by University President Lee C. Bollinger, NewYork City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, U.S. Rep. CharlesRangel, Columbia CollegeDean Austin E. Quigley andtwo Kluge Scholars. As Klugetook the stage, the morethan 600 people crowdedinto the Rotunda gave him aprolonged standing ovation.“My gift is a drop in the bucket. I wish it werelarger,” Kluge told the audience. “The needs of the universityare so great.”In his remarks Bollinger said Kluge’s gift “will helpgenerations of Columbians.” He added that Kluge’s generosityis both a testament to his personal history and amark of his abiding faith in the future. Kluge, Bollingersaid, is “the only 92-year-old with a 30-year business hori-EILEEN BARROSOThe Birthof EarthDayBy Bridget O’BrianIn 1970, when green was justanother color and some consideredthe notion of clean airand water utopian, a group ofvolunteers and citizen activistsstunned the nation by getting 20million Americans out into theirneighborhood parks and onto thestreets one April afternoon to celebratethe first-ever Earth Day.That first April 22 is widelyconsidered the populist kickoff ofthe environmental movement. TheEnvironmental Action Coalition wasfounded later that year, Congresscreated the Environmental ProtectionAgency, and within a few yearspassed the Clean Air, Clean Waterand Endangered Species acts.Few who worked on that firstEarth Day, however, imagined whatmight come of their efforts.“Absolutely not!” exclaimed MarilynLaurie, one of the organizers inNew York in 1970. “We wereEarth Day, New York City, April 22, 1970.infused with the certainty that wewould wake up the world, and loand behold, we did,” she said in arecent interview.Laurie, now retired from acareer as a top executive at AT&Tand a trustee of the University, hadnot set out to be an environmentalactivist. A 1959 graduate ofBarnard College, she had two smallchildren in the 1960s, and hadworked as an advertising copywriter.As the civil rights movementswirled around her, “I startedto feel guilty, as if I was missing animportant action in history.”One day in 1969, while lookingthrough the classifieds in theVillage Voice, she spied an ad seekingvolunteers to help organizesomething called Earth Day. “I said,’Honey, watch the kids, this is callingme.’” More volunteer meetingsfollowed, with fewer attendeeseach time. The five remaining stalwarts,Laurie included, went on torun the New York region’s effortson Earth Day. “Leadership goes tothose who stick around,” she said.“We were nobodies. This is whatthey mean by grass roots.”continued on page 4 continued on page 8www.columbia.edu/news

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