2011 GPN/Nexus Intern of the Year - Nexus Corporation

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2011 GPN/Nexus Intern of the Year - Nexus Corporation

VOLUME 21 • NUMBER 1 | Scranton Gillette communications | january 2011 www.gpnmag.comInside:Research at NorthCarolina State UniversityPerennial Plant of theYear: Amsonia hubrichtiiThis Month in Diseases:Asiatic LilyAmy Hinkle, the2011 GPN/NexusIntern of the Year


intern of the yearPlans toSucceedSince growing and selling her own cutflowers at the age of 11, our GPN/Nexus2011 Intern of the Year, Amy Hinkle hasproven to her family, professors andemployers she has what it takes tomake a positive difference in thehorticulture industry.By Jasmina RadjevicWhile many collegestudents oftenneglect to take fulladvantage of theirbreaks from school, Amy Hinklespent this past summer in Stillwater,Okla., working for a cut flowergrower. The Pennsylvania State Universityjunior majoring in HorticultureScience was just as focused onher future career in horticulture asa child as she is today. An “entrepreneur”by the age of 11, Amy begantaking charge at a young age. Shecurrently plays multiple roles at PennState, within and outside of the horticulturerealm.An Early EntrepreneurLike many students in horticulture,Amy was first introduced tothe industry at a very young age. Herfamily has had a produce farm in BelleCenter, Ohio, since Amy was 9 yearsold. During a trip to a local farmersmarket at age 11, Amy noticed therewas only one person selling flowers atthe market.Her immediatereaction was to givethe florist some competition.“I asked my dad if I could have asmall piece of land to grow flowers,”she shares. “He gave me space to grow100 zinnias, and I sold those for oneyear. Then it kind of boomed intoalmost an acre of cut flowers that I wasgrowing for the family market.”After one year growing and sellingflowers, Amy had made $1,000 forthe family business. It was such a successthat her father encouraged her tostick with it. Amy continued sellingthe flowers all the way through highschool.Leading by ExampleOnce she enrolled at Penn State,she was sure she wanted to majorin a horticultural study but shehadn’t decided which discipline shewould focus on specifically. Amy’splan was to get as much of a wellroundedexperience as possible toprepare for her future horticulturalcareer.Her academic advisor KathleenKelley says, “Amy is always on topof things.” No matter what area sheeventually goes into, she wants to haveher bases covered.Having known Amy since shebegan taking classes at Penn State,Kelley recalls Amy’s willingness totake on responsibilities that evenupperclassmen decline to oversee. Inher letter of recommendation, Kelleyshares that Amy “has been involvedin creating weekly floral arrangementsfor the College of AgriculturalSciences’ Ag. AdministrationBuilding and the Penn State NittanyLion Inn.”As vice president of PSU’s HorticultureClub, Amy assists with orcoordinates various fundraising activitiessuch as the annual Hort Show

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