AZ EGY BÁN GYA HOW TO PUT EQUALITY INTO PRACTICE? - MEK

oszk.hu
  • No tags were found...

AZ EGY BÁN GYA HOW TO PUT EQUALITY INTO PRACTICE? - MEK

JUDIT TAKÁCS: How to put equality into practice?LGBT media content is typically produced by sexual minoritygroups: mainly gays and lesbians. These minority groups usually share acommon “mainstream media fate” with other relatively powerless – forexample, ethnic – minority groups, which can be characterised by lowvisibility and stereotypical representation. Therefore sexual minoritymedia products can be seen as means of creating a symbolicenvironment where people belonging to these groups can feel at home(cf. Gross, 1991). It is also important to emphasise that the position ofsexual minorities differs from that of “traditional” minorities in twoaspects: they are usually not marked by their bodies – for example, bytheir skin colour –, thus they are not recognisable at first sight; and theirexistence challenges the “natural order of things”, thus their mediaappearances can become problematic. Still, their media products can beperceived to be documents of, as well as tools for promoting thesuccessful social integration of relatively powerless social groups, and –in some cases – struggling against social intolerance.LGBT media is usually made for and by members of sexualminorities but it does not have to be exclusively so. According to aleading Hungarian gay activist “of course, it helps if you are gay, but[…] I don’t think that just because you are gay you are able to creategood quality gay media”. 27 The peripheral of the target audiencenecessarily interfaces with mainstream society – through, for example,parents, friends and colleagues – and some sexual minority mediaproducers take this into account.As LGBT media productivity matures there appears to be a trendtowards specialisation: mixed media – i.e. media produced by gays andlesbians working together, for an aggregate gay and lesbian public –tend to become more homogenous: either lesbian or gay only. Mások,the only Hungarian gay magazine targeted lesbians, too when it started,but it has now become – according to its editors – “98% gay”.Specialisation is an indicator of development. However, it does notnecessarily imply that cooperative networks stop functioning: jointevents, like pride and film festivals, will continue to be organised by abroad spectrum of LGBT activists working together – as this could beobserved in he case of organising the Hungarian Gay and LesbianCultural festivals during the last nine years.There can be cultural indicators for including erotic material,particularly in gay specialised magazines. Additionally there can becommercial reasons for doing so. On the other hand, there can be30

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines