AZ EGY BÁN GYA HOW TO PUT EQUALITY INTO PRACTICE? - MEK

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AZ EGY BÁN GYA HOW TO PUT EQUALITY INTO PRACTICE? - MEK

IV. Putting equality into practicebodily autonomy, institutional inclusion, and spatial themes are allpertinent to the concept of sexual citizenship. […] [It] draws our attentionto all kinds of social exclusions that the various sexual communitiesexperience. These exclusions inhibit their political, social, cultural, andeconomic participation. The various constraints point to the necessity ofqueering all kinds of institutions. Simply allowing sexual minorities intothese organizations on an individual basis does not challenge theheterosexist assumptions that govern most societies” (Hekma, 2004).For example, according to Evans the parameters of homosexualcitizenship in Britain in the mid 1990s could be described in thefollowing way:(i) The existence of a status-group defined by homosexual orientationand/or activity, its sexual difference being predominantly ascribed toinnate factors by those within and supporters without, whilst, albeitinconsistently, to social factors by conservative opposition without;(ii) This sexual status group is increasingly defined by distinctconstellations of civil, political and social rights, which incorporate itscontinuing immorality and stigma;(iii) which normally consigns the group’s ‘open’ or ‘out’ presence todistinct formally and informally defined and policed territories set apartfrom the ‘moral community’;(iv) territories concerned with a range of ‘community’ social, sexual andpolitical services of increasingly leisure and life-style commodified form;(v) These territories play host to other less developed but growing‘immoral’ sexual status groups: lesbians, bisexuals, transvestites,transsexuals etc;(vi) Most group ‘members’, participate in these territories ‘part- (that is,leisure/consumption) time’, the territories themselves are dispersed anddiverse, idiosyncratic structural characteristics which make the oft-usedterm ‘gay community’ at least problematic;(vii) From these territories specific political ‘parties’ develop, but the‘politicisation’ […] is effected more by routine commercial leisure andlife-style than by explicit political discourses, leaving(viii) political campaigns over issues such as the age of consent, rare, andattracting minority active support despite attempted mobilisation by useof the rhetoric of ‘equality’. (Evans, 1995: 177-8).Here homosexual men are pictured as constituting a sexual statusgroup characterised by heterogeneousness from inside, andstigmatisation from outside, who are not enjoying full membership inthe – ‘moral’ – community and therefore being deprived of legitimategrounds for their equality claims in society. Consequently, it can be85

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