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2003-2005 Catalog - University of Arkansas at Monticello

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for more informationThe University of Arkansas-Monticello is located south of the city of Monticello on U.S. Highway425. Office hours are from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday during the fall and springsemesters and from 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. during the first and second summer terms.Visitors are welcome at any time. To arrange a campus tour, contact the Office of Admissions at(800) 844-1826 or (870) 460-1026.FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT:General information, admission of students, scholarship information, publications for prospectivestudents, freshman student registration and orientation, transfer, advanced placement, and campustours contact................................................................................................................................ The Office of AdmissionsHarris Hall(800) 844-1826 or (870) 460-1026Registration, transcripts, class schedules .................................................................. The Office of the RegistrarHarris Hall(870) 460-1034Residence halls and on-campus housing ........................................................... The Office of Student ServicesHarris Hall(870) 460-1045Financial assistance, scholarships, loans, work-study ........................................... The Office of Financial AidHarris Hall(800) 226-2643 or (870) 460-1050Academic policies and programs, academic advising and assistance, graduate programs....................................................................................................................... The Office of Academic AffairsAdministration Building 108(870) 460-1033Tuition, fees, expenses, and payment plans ............................................................................... Cashier’s OfficeHarris Hall(870) 460-1043The University of Arkansas-Monticello is committed to the policy of providing educationalopportunities to all qualified students and employment opportunities to all persons, regardless of theireconomic or social status, and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, creed, gender,ethnic or national origin, disability, age or any legally protected class. The Office of Special StudentServices has been designated to coordinate efforts to comply with all laws and regulations applicable toqualified disabled individuals, as required by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and theAmericans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Inquiries concerning the applications of all federal laws andregulations regarding discrimination should be directed to the Human Relations Officer, AdministrationBuilding, UAM, telephone (870) 460-1021.The University releases information on the quality of its teacher preparation program according tothe requirements of Section 207 of Title II of the Higher Education Act as amended in 1998. Official TitleII data will be published in appropriate University publications. Inquiries concerning Title II datashould be directed to the Dean of the School of Education (870) 4601062.2


table of contentsGeneral Information ...................................................................................................7Everything you want to know about UAM’s history, tradition and mission.Undergraduate Admission ..................................................................................13How, when and where to apply as well as admission requirementsFees and Expenses ................................................................................................. 19A breakdown of fees and expenses for resident and non-resident studentsFinancial Assistance ..............................................................................................25A description of grants, loans, scholarships and work-study jobs, and how to applyStudent Services ....................................................................................................41Residence life, student activities, athletics, intramurals, testing and support servicesAcademic Regulations ..........................................................................................55Academic terms, credit classification, grading, schedule changes, and academic standingGraduation Requirements ................................................................................... 67What you need to receive a degreeAcademic Units ......................................................................................................75Agriculture (75), Arts and Humanities (83), Business (93), Computer Information Systems(99), Education (103), Forest Resources (115), General Studies (129), Mathematical andNatural Sciences (133), Music (141), Nursing (147) , Social and Behavioral Sciences (155).Course Descriptions .........................................................................................161The master list of all UAM courses. Check your class schedule for dates and times.Graduate Programs ...........................................................................................219Programs of study, graduation requirements and admission requirementsFaculty and Staff ...............................................................................................245Faculty, administration, professional staff and board of trustees3


university calendar 2003-06(Note: UAM’s distance education classes, regardless of theirlocation, follow the UAM calendar below)Summer I 2003May 26 (Mon) - Memorial Day Holiday. Offices/classesclosed.May 27 (Tues) - Application deadline for regularregistration.June 2 (Mon) - Registration for undergraduate and graduateclasses. First day of classes. Deadline to file forAugust graduation.June 4 (Wed) - Last day to register or add classes.June 17 (Tues) - Last day to drop a graduate class. Gradewill be W.June 20 (Fri) - Last day of 3-week graduate classes. Finalexams for graduate classes.June 26 (Thurs) - Last day to drop an undergraduate class.Grade will be W.July 1 (Tues) - Last day of undergraduate classes. Finalexams.Summer II 2003June 30 (Mon) - Application deadline for regularregistration.July 4 (Fri) - Independence Day Holiday. Offices/classesclosed.July 7 (Mon) - Registration for undergraduate and graduateclasses. First day of classes.July 9 (Wed) - Last day to register or add classes.July 22 (Tues) - Last day to drop a graduate class. Gradewill be W.July 25 (Fri) - Last day of 3-week graduate classes. Finalexams for graduate classes.July 31 (Thurs) - Last day to drop an undergraduate class.Grade will be W.August 5 (Tues) - Last day of undergraduate classes. Finalexams.August 11 (Mon) - Summer conferral of degrees.Fall 2003August 11 (Mon) - Application deadline for regularregistration. Tuition and fees due for preregisteredstudents.August 18 (Mon) - Schedule changes. Night registration.August 19 (Tues) - Open registration.August 20 (Wed) - First day of classes.August 26 (Tues) - Last day to register or add classes.September 1 (Mon) - Labor Day Holiday. Offices/classesclosed.October 3 (Fri) - Deadline to file for December graduation.October 27 (Mon) - Preregistration for Spring 2004 begins.November 5 (Wed) - Last day to drop with a W.November 14 (Fri) - Preregistration for Spring 2004 ends.November 27-28 (Thurs-Fri) - Thanksgiving Holiday.Offices/classes closed.December 2 (Tues) - Last day to withdraw from class.December 5 (Fri) - Last day of classes.December 8-12 (Mon-Fri) - Final exam period.December 17 (Wed) - Fall conferral of degrees.Spring 2004January 5 (Mon) - Application deadline for regularregistration. Tuition and fees due for preregisteredstudents.January 12 (Mon) - Schedule changes. Night registration.January 13 (Tues) - Open registration.January 14 (Wed) - First day of classes.January 19 (Mon) - Martin Luther King Holiday. Officesclasses closed.January 21 (Wed) - Last day to register or add classes.February 20 (Fri) - Deadline to file for May graduation.March 15-19 (Mon-Fri) - Spring Break.March 29 (Mon) - Preregistration for summer and fallbegins.April 7 (Wed) - Last day to drop with a W.April 16 (Fri) - Preregistration for summer and fall ends.April 30 (Fri) - Last day to withdraw from class.May 5 (Wed) - Last day of classes.May 6-12 (Thurs-Wed) - Final exam period.May 14 (Fri) - Commencement.Summer I 2004May 24 (Mon) - Application deadline for regularregistration.May 31 (Mon) - Memorial Day Holiday. Offices/classesclosed.June 1 (Tues) - Registration for undergraduate and graduateclasses. First day of classes. Deadline to file forAugust graduation.June 3 (Thurs) - Last day to register or add classes.June 16 (Wed) - Last day to drop a graduate class. Gradewill be W.June 21 (Mon) - Last day of 3-week graduate classes. Finalexams for graduate classes.June 25 (Fri) - Last day to drop an undergraduate class.Grade will be W.June 30 (Wed) - Last day of undergraduate classes. Finalexams.Summer II 2004June 28 (Mon) - Application deadline for regularregistration.July 5 (Mon) - Registration for undergraduate and graduateclasses. First day of classes.July 7 (Wed) - Last day to register or add classes.July 20 (Tues) - Last day to drop a graduate class. Gradewill be W.July 23 (Fri) - Last day of 3-week graduate classes. Finalexams for graduate classes.July 29 (Thurs) - Last day to drop an undergraduate class.Grade will be W.August 3 (Tues) - Last day of undergraduate classes. Finalexams.August 9 (Mon) - Summer conferral of degrees.Fall 2004August 16 (Mon) - Application deadline for regularregistration. Tuition and fees due for preregisteredstudents.August 23 (Mon) - Schedule changes. Night registration.August 24 (Tues) - Open registration.August 25 (Wed) - First day of classes.August 31 (Tues) - Last day to register or add classes.4


university calendar 2003-06September 6 (Mon) - Labor Day Holiday. Offices/classesclosed.September 30 (Thur) - Deadline to file for Decembergraduation.November 1 (Mon) - Preregistration for Spring 2005 begins.November 10 (Wed) - Last day to drop with a W.November 19 (Fri) - Preregistration for Spring 2005 ends.November 25-26 (Thurs-Fri) - Thanksgiving Holiday.Offices/classes closed.December 7 (Tues) - Last day to withdraw from class.December 10 (Fri) - Last day of classes.December 13-17 (Mon-Fri) - Final exam period.December 22 (Wed) - Fall conferral of degrees.Spring 2005January 3 (Mon) - Application deadline for regularregistration. Tuition and fees due for preregisteredstudents.January 10 (Mon) - Schedule changes. Night registration.January 11 (Tues) - Open registration.January 12 (Wed) - First day of classes.January 17 (Mon) - Martin Luther King Holiday. Officesclasses closed.January 19 (Wed) - Last day to register or add classes.February 18 (Fri) - Deadline to file for May graduation.March 14-18 (Mon-Fri) - Spring Break.March 28 (Mon) - Preregistration for summer and fallbegins.April 6 (Wed) - Last day to drop with W.April 15 (Fri) - Preregistration for summer and fall ends.April 29 (Fri) - Last day to withdraw from class.May 4 (Wed) - Last day of classes.May 5-11 (Thurs-Wed) - Final exam period.May 13 (Fri) - Commencement.Summer I 2005May 23 (Mon) - Application deadline for regularregistration.May 30 (Mon) - Memorial Day Holiday. Offices/classesclosed.May 31 (Tues) - Registration for undergraduate andgraduate classes. First day of classes. Deadline to filefor August graduation.June 2 (Thurs) - Last day to register or add classes.June 15 (Wed) - Last day to drop a graduate class. Gradewill be W.June 20 (Mon) - Last day of 3-week graduate classes. Finalexams for graduate classes.June 24 (Fri) - Last day to drop an undergraduate class.Grade will be W.June 29 (Wed) - Last day of undergraduate classes. Finalexams.July 25 (Mon) - Last day of 3-week graduate classes. Finalexams for graduate classes.July 29 (Fri) - Last day to drop an undergraduate class.Grade will be W.August 3 (Wed) - Last day of undergraduate classes. Finalexams.August 8 (Mon) - Summer conferral of degrees.Fall 2005August 15 (Mon) - Application deadline for regularregistration. Tuition and fees due for preregisteredstudents.August 22 (Mon) - Schedule changes. Night registration.August 23 (Tues) - Open registration.August 24 (Wed) - First day of classes.August 30 (Tues) - Last day to register or add classes.September 5 (Mon) - Labor Day Holiday. Offices/classesclosed.September 30 (Fri) - Deadline to file for Decembergraduation.October 31 (Mon) - Preregistration for Spring 2006 begins.November 9 (Wed) - Last day to drop with W.November 18 (Fri) - Preregistration for Spring 2006 ends.November 24-25 (Thurs-Fri) - Thanksgiving Holiday.Offices/classes closed.December 6 (Tues) - Last day to withdraw from class.December 9 (Fri) - Last day of classes.December 12-16 (Mon-Fri) - Final exam period.December 21 (Wed) - Fall conferral of degrees.Spring 2006January 2 (Mon) - Application deadline for regularregistration. Tuition and fees due for preregisteredstudents.January 9 (Mon) - Schedule changes. Night registration.January 10 (Tues) - Open registration.January 11 (Wed) - First day of classes.January 16 (Mon) - Martin Luther King Holiday. Officesclasses closed.January 18 (Wed) - Last day to register or add classes.February 17 (Fri) - Deadline to file for May graduation.March 13-17 (Mon-Fri) - Spring Break.April 3 (Mon) - Preregistration for summer and fall begins.April 5 (Wed) - Last day to drop with W.April 21 (Fri) - Preregistration for summer and fall ends.April 28 (Fri) - Last day to withdraw from class.May 3 (Wed) - Last day of classes.May 4-10 (Thurs-Wed) - Final exam period.May 12 (Fri) - Commencement.The University calendar is subject to change.Summer II 2005June 27 (Mon) - Application deadline for regularregistration.July 4 (Mon) - Independence Day Holiday. Offices/classesclosed.July 5 (Tues) - Registration for undergraduate and graduateclasses. First day of classes.July 7 (Thurs) - Last day to register or add classes.July 20 (Wed) - Last day to drop a graduate class. Gradewill be W.5


GENERALinformationThe University of Arkansas-Monticello is located threemiles south of the city of Monticello on a woodedcampus adjacent to United States Highway 425.Monticello, the county seat of Drew County, is located 100 miles southeast of LittleRock and 85 miles north of Monroe, Louisiana. Situated in the pine forests of SoutheastArkansas on the edge of the rich Mississippi delta, the University is ideally located to servethe state’s educational needs and provides an excellent setting for the state’s only School ofForest Resources. Included in the University’s 1,600 acres are 1,036 acres of forest landused for research, management and instruction, and 300 acres devoted to agriculturalteaching and research. To the west and south are vast forest lands managed by a rapidlygrowing private forest industry to produce wood and paper products. To the east, farmersraise cotton, rice and soybeans in the fertile Mississippi delta.Our History and MissionThe history of the University and the mission statement of the University are enduringand used by the campus community as the foundation for the daily operation of theUniversity and for strategic planning. The mission statement of the University is used as abenchmark to measure UAM’s success.History of the UniversityThe University of Arkansas-Monticello was established in 1909 by an act of theGeneral Assembly of the State of Arkansas to serve the educational needs of SoutheastArkansas. Originally called the Fourth District Agricultural School, the University openedits doors September 14, 1910. In 1925, the General Assembly authorized the school’s nameto be changed to Arkansas Agricultural and Mechanical College. A & M received accreditationas a junior college in 1928 and as a four-year institution in 1940.Arkansas A & M became part of the University of Arkansas system July 1, 1971. TheUniversity is governed by the University of Arkansas Board of Trustees, which alsooversees the operation of institutions in Batesville, DeQueen, Fayetteville, Fort Smith,Helena, Hope, Little Rock, Morrilton, and Pine Bluff.On July 1, 2003, UAM expanded its mission to include vocational and technicaleducation when the UAM College of Technology-Crossett and the UAM College ofTechnology-McGehee became part of UAM to create a comprehensive system ofpostsecondary education in Southeast Arkansas.AccreditationThe University of Arkansas-Monticello is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission(a Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools), the NationalGeneral Information7


Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, the National Association of Schools ofMusic, the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission, the Society of AmericanForesters, and the Council on Social Work Education. The University offers Certificates,Associate, Baccalaureate, and Master’s degree programs.Documents concerning accreditation are available for review upon request to the ViceChancellor for Academic Affairs.MissionThe mission of the University of Arkansas-Monticello is to prepare learners forsuccessful careers, successful lives, and to become meaningful and productive citizens insociety. UAM’s mission includes preparing students for the changing needs of business,industry, education, and society. Recognizing the importance of knowledge, values, andaesthetic enrichment, the University of Arkansas-Monticello is committed to teachingstudents to think critically, act ethically, and communicate effectively. The Universityfosters scholarly inquiry, and an integrative and interdisciplinary approach to learning.The University provides opportunities for continuing personal growth, and professionaldevelopment, intellectual discovery, social awareness, and cultural enrichment. TheUniversity offers a broad array of academic, professional, and technical programs,including certificates, bachelor’s and select master’s degrees. These programs are enrichedby faculty scholarship, research, creative activities and service. The University serves thepost-secondary needs of area citizens, business, industry, and government.Academic Degrees and MajorsDegrees and majors are listed below. Consult the Programs of Study section of thecatalog for course requirements of individual programs of study.Associate of Applied ScienceAgriculture Production ManagementIndustrial TechnologyNursingPaper/Pulp TechnologyAssociate of ArtsAssociate of ScienceLand Surveying TechnologyBachelor of ArtsArtEarly Childhood Special EducationEnglishHistoryHistory and Social StudiesJournalismMiddle Level EducationMusicPolitical ScienceSpeech CommunicationBachelor of Business AdministrationAccountingBusiness AdministrationBachelor of Music EducationBachelor of ScienceAgricultureBiologyBusiness Technology Education(Note: No new students are beingadmitted to this major)ChemistryComputer Information SystemsCriminal JusticeForestryHealth and Physical EducationMathematicsNatural SciencePsychologySpatial Information SystemsWildlife ManagementBachelor of Science in NursingBachelor of Social WorkMaster of Arts in TeachingMaster of EducationMaster of Education in EducationalLeadershipMaster of ScienceForest Resources8General Information


Pre-Professional StudiesThe University’s faculty provide courses to prepare students in numerous professionalprograms. These programs include:Pre-VeterinarySee the Division of Agriculture sectionPre-EngineeringSee the School of Mathematical and Natural Sciences sectionAllied Health, Pre-Dentistry, Pre-Medicine, Pre-PharmacySee the School of Mathematical and Natural Sciences sectionPre-LawSee the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences sectionStudents may not have decided upon an academic major during their first two yearsof enrollment. The University provides a program of general studies for such students.Students may complete the Associate of Arts degree without deciding upon a major.Alternatively, students may earn the Associate of Arts degree while completing freshmanand sophomore course requirements for a chosen major.Academic StructureThe University’s academic structure consists of eleven academic units, which are morefully described in the Academic Units section of this catalog. Please refer to the followinglisting to find further information about particular academic programs.Associate of Applied ScienceSee the Division of General Studies section for Agriculture Production Management,Industrial Technology, and Paper/Pulp Technology. See the Division of Nursing section forthe Associate of Applied Science in Nursing.Associate of ArtsSee the Division of General Studies sectionAssociate of ScienceSee the School of Forest Resources sectionGraduate EducationSee the Graduate sectionAgricultureSee the Division of Agriculture sectionAccounting, Business Administration, and Business EducationSee the School of Business sectionArt, English, Journalism, Speech CommunicationSee the School of Arts and Humanities sectionComputer Information SystemsSee the Division of Computer Information Systems sectionEarly Childhood Special Education, Middle Level Education, Health and PhysicalEducation, and all teacher education programsSee the School of Education sectionMusic, Music EducationSee the Division of Music sectionForestry, Land Surveying Technology, Spatial Information Systems, Wildlife ManagementSee the School of Forest Resources sectionBiology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Natural ScienceSee the School of Mathematical and Natural Sciences sectionNursingSee the Division of Nursing sectionCriminal Justice, History, History and Social Studies, Political Science, Psychology, Social WorkSee the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences sectionGeneral Information9


Academic Support UnitsThe LibraryLOCATION: Campus quadrangleCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1080HOME PAGE: http://uamont.edu/libraryMAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3599, Monticello, AR 71656The University Library and Technology Center occupies a new $7.4 million facilitycentrally located on the campus. The Library collections comprise over 500,000 itemsincluding books, bound periodicals, microforms, government documents, and over 1,200serial subscriptions. An online catalog provides access to all library collections from manycampus locations and nationwide through the Internet. The UAM Library home pagefurnishes access to extensive periodical databases as well as links to web sites of interest tothe graduate and undergraduate student.The Library participates in a reciprocal borrowing agreement with the University ofArkansas System libraries and other academic libraries in Arkansas. Memberships inregional and national computer networks provide extensive opportunities for research andpromote resource sharing.The Writing CenterLOCATION: Memorial Classroom Building Room 113CAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1378E-MAIL: writing@uamont.eduMAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3460, Monticello, AR 71656The Writing Center is staffed by senior-level English majors who can assist studentsduring all stages of the writing process. Writing is recognized as a recursive, overlappingactivity which involves pre-writing, drafting, revising, proofreading, and publishing.Whatever the academic discipline or class assignment, the peer tutors provide feedbackand suggestions which will help students understand the essential elements of academicwriting.Writing Center tutors can help students generate ideas, develop a thesis, organizematerial, and revise early drafts. Students are also assisted in learning about grammar,style, and clarity; learning about their own writing process; and learning how to improveproofreading skills. The Center’s staff and tutors work one-on-one with students on avariety of writing projects: compositions, reports, outlines, business letters, research, andfiction.Additionally, the Writing Center has 25 networked computers with Internet capability.Tutors can also assist students with World Wide Web research and word processing.Services of the Writing Center are free to university students. For further information,visit the Writing Center’s home page at http://www.uamont.edu/Arts_and_Humanities/writingcenter.htmInformation TechnologyLOCATION: Sorrells HallCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1036FAX: (870) 460-1920HOME PAGE: http://www.uamont.edu/~compserv/infotech.htmE-MAIL: compserv@uamont.eduMAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3626, Monticello, AR 71656The University provides an opportunity for students and other members of the UAMcommunity to enhance their educational experiences and expand their academic knowledgeby making available to them access to computer facilities and resources, including theInternet. Computing and networking resources have been allocated for academic activitiesthat are consistent with the mission and goals of the University; i.e., to support teaching,research, administrative processes, UAM-sponsored community service, and other10General Information


legitimate pursuits. Each faculty and staff member is eligible for an e-mail account andInternet access, as is any student who is enrolled in three or more hours (credit or audit).The Department of Information Technology is responsible for administering and/oroverseeing the campus computer network, including all network connections in campusoffices, labs, and residence halls, as well as the campus’s public computer labs andfacilities. The Information Technology Department also provides support for DistanceEducation services, which include interactive video conferencing, satellite downlink, andweb-based instruction. Workshops covering the UAM computer network options areoffered to faculty/staff and students.Distance EducationLOCATION: Technology CenterCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1663FAX: (870) 460-1920HOME PAGE: http://www.uamont.edu/~dist/index.htmMAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3490, Monticello, AR 71656One of the ways in which the University is addressing the needs of the population itserves is through distance education.The University provides several interactive video classrooms for on- and off-campusinstruction and for teleconferencing for business and industry. All of the conferencing/classroom facilities are professionally staffed and maintained. The University also providessatellite downlink and viewing facilities with the capability to seat large audiences. Otherdistance education services include web-based instruction and computer labs for individualsneeding public access to equipment and the Internet.Registrar’s OfficeLOCATION: Harris HallCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1034FAX: (870) 460-1935E-MAIL: registrar@uamont.eduMAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3598, Monticello, AR 71656This office supervises registration for classes, maintains academic records, and issuestranscripts. This office also provides certification information for Department of VeteransAffairs programs.Continuing EducationLOCATION: Academic Affairs, Administration BuildingCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1032FAX: (870) 460-1933E-MAIL: acad_affairs@uamont.eduMAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3478, Monticello, AR 71656The University seeks to meet the educational needs of the working adult, and lifeenrichmentand skill development needs of children and adults of all ages. Programsoffered through the Continuing Education Office range from full-semester courses to oneortwo-month mini-courses or workshops lasting from one day to a week or more. Someprograms are offered in partnership with professional, business, and public serviceorganizations. Most programs are initiated by and taught by UAM faculty.General Information11


ADMISSIONfor undergraduatesAny person wishing to register for a single courseor a full schedule of classes must first be admittedto the University. Required documents are to besent to:Office of AdmissionsHarris HallUAM P.O. Box 3600Monticello, AR 71656Telephone: (870) 460-1026 or 1-800-844-1826 (toll free within Arkansas)Fax: (870) 460-1926Applicants are encouraged to submit all documents at least thirty days prior to thebeginning of the semester or term of intended enrollment. Applicants who completerequirements later than seven days prior to registration for a term may have to register lateand pay an additional late registration fee.A fax of an official document is not acceptable, and academic records in the student’spossession will not be considered official transcripts. While copies such as these may beused for information or advising purposes, they will not satisfy admission requirements.Any student who falsifies admission materials or misrepresents eligibility foradmission will be subject to immediate dismissal from the University.Admission RequirementsUniversity requirements include (1) a completed application for admission, (2) collegeentrance exam scores, and (3) official academic transcripts. Requirements mandated bystate law include (1) proof of immunization against measles and rubella for applicants bornon or after January 1, 1957, and (2) selective service statement. Students who are requiredto register with selective service must sign a statement attesting that they have done so orare exempt from doing so. This statement appears on the application for admission andmust be completed by all male applicants.All first-time freshmen graduating from high school after May 1, 2002, will beadmitted unconditionally if they have successfully completed, with a minimum cumulativegrade point average of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale), the Arkansas high school core curriculum forunconditional admission to public colleges and universities. Out of state high schoolgraduates will have their transcripts evaluated individually for meeting the core curriculumand the grade point requirement. Students who receive a GED or are graduates ofhome schooling or private high schools must make a composite of 19 on the ACT or theequivalent score on the SAT or ASSET in order to be unconditionally admitted.Undergraduate Admission13


Students not meeting the standards as stated above will be admitted with conditions,as directed by the Office of Academic Affairs.College Entrance Exam ScoresThe ACT is preferred; however, SAT scores will be accepted. Scores should beprovided from an exam within the previous five years. Test scores must be sent by thetesting agency or be recorded on an official transcript. The Office of Admissions willprovide testing information to students who have not taken a college entrance examinationwithin the previous five years. The institutional codes are ACT 0110 and SAT 6008.High school students are advised to take college entrance exams no later than the firsthalf of their senior year. Students should request that the scores be forwarded to theUniversity of Arkansas-Monticello by the testing agency.Transfer students: Students who have not completed general education mathematicsand/or English requirements with a grade of “C” or higher must provide college entranceexam scores.TranscriptsEach freshman student must submit an official copy of his/her transcript from anaccredited high school showing a diploma has been earned. The GED certificate and scoreswill be accepted in lieu of the high school transcript. Transfer students must request thatofficial transcripts be mailed directly to the Office of Admissions from each institutionattended.Readmission of Former StudentsA student who has attended UAM in previous years but has not attended for onesemester or more is required to complete an application for admission and submit officialtranscripts of college work from all institutions attended since the last enrollment at theUniversity. Because admission requirements are subject to change, additional documentsmay be required.Former University students who have attempted fewer than 30 hours of credit andwho have not attended a college or university during the last two years (24 months) will beplaced under the catalog in effect when they re-enroll at UAM. The catalog chosen and thestudent’s graduation may not span a period of more than six years.Freshman Early AdmissionStudents who submit an application for admission, ACT scores, proof of immunizationagainst measles and rubella, and a six- or seven-semester transcript may be admittedduring the senior year. Following graduation, the student will need to request that a finaltranscript reflecting all credits, grades, and graduation date be sent to the University. Thesestudents will be invited to preregistration opportunities.Transfer AdmissionIn addition to general admission requirements, the student who has attended othercolleges must assure that transcripts of all work attempted from all colleges attended besent from those institutions directly to the UAM Office of Admissions.Transfer students must be eligible to return to the institution previously attended. Ifeither the cumulative or previous semester’s grade point is less than a 2.00, then thestudent will be admitted on Conditional Academic Standing as described in the AcademicRegulations section in this catalog. Transfer students are also subject to the Transfer Policyin the Academic Regulations section.14Undergraduate Admission


Pre-Freshman AdmissionAcademically capable students may register for college courses at the University priorto high school graduation. As a pre-freshman, a student must provide the Office ofAdmissions with documents required for admission, including a current school transcriptand a letter from the superintendent, principal, or counselor indicating that the student hasthe ability to succeed in college-level work. College entrance test scores are required if thestudent wishes to enroll in an English or mathematics class.Students who take college courses at UAM while they are still in high school will berequired to meet all admission requirements for beginning freshmen upon graduation fromhigh school. Courses taken while a prefreshman will then apply toward a degree programat UAM, or they may be transferred to other colleges or universities. The Office of theRegistrar will report credits and grades earned to high school officials when the studentprovides a written request.Whether or not courses taken at the University satisfy graduation requirements fromhigh school is a determination made exclusively by high school administrators where thestudent is in attendance.Special Student AdmissionAn individual who does not wish to pursue an academic degree but would like toenroll for a limited number of courses for enrichment or job enhancement may enroll as aspecial student. A student may be admitted to this category with an application foradmission and proof of immunization against measles and rubella. To enroll in an Englishor mathematics course, the student must provide college entrance test scores.A special student may not normally attempt more than six hours in any single termand may not declare a major. Credits earned from other institutions may not be transferreduntil the student meets all admission requirements to the University. A student onsuspension from any college or university will not be allowed to receive special studentstatus. After completing 18 hours, the special student may be required to complete alladmission requirements and undertake a program leading to a degree.Admission of Visiting StudentsStudents who are enrolled in another institution of higher education (to which theyintend to return) and who wish to take courses at the University of Arkansas-Monticellomust file an application for admission, supply proof of immunization against measles andrubella, and provide a letter of good standing from the institution they are attending.Visiting student status is limited in duration and the number of hours that can beaccumulated. The visiting student who subsequently decides to pursue a degree at UAMmust submit all documentation required of transfer students and request a change of statusin the Office of the Registrar.Post-Baccalaureate AdmissionThose who have already attained at least a bachelor’s degree and who wish to takeadditional undergraduate courses toward an additional degree are required to complete anapplication for admission, provide an official transcript from the institution granting thehighest degree earned, and provide proof of immunization. Students who wish to takeonly limited additional courses may enter as a special student. (See Special StudentAdmission)Graduate AdmissionAll interested students must file a graduate application for admission, supply proofof immunization against measles and rubella, and provide an official transcript verifyingthe baccalaureate degree. Selective service status must be completed on the application foradmission.Undergraduate Admission15


International students must comply with other requirements as outlined inAdmission of International Students. However, the Test of English as a Foreign Language(TOEFL) required is a minimum score of 550 (paperbased) or 213 (computer-based).Students must contact the School of Education or the School of Forest Resources foradditional unit requirements. (See Graduate Programs)Provisional AdmissionProvisional admission may be extended to the student who has not completed theadmission process at the time of registration. The admission requirements must be met nolater than 15 class days after the first class day of the fall or spring semester or not laterthan 5 class days after the first class day of a summer term. Students who do not meet thedeadline may be administratively withdrawn from classes by the Registrar with no refundof tuition or fees, and they will be ineligible to register provisionally for a future semester.Admission of International StudentsUAM is authorized under federal law to enroll non-immigrant alien students onstudent visas. Citizens of foreign countries who wish to attend UAM should requestadmission information from the Office of Admissions. The application for admissionshould be completed and submitted no later than six months prior to the beginning of thesemester of registration. All supporting documentation must be received at least threemonths prior to the beginning of the semester of registration to be fully admitted to theUniversity. There is a $30 non-refundable application fee for international students.International applicants must meet the followingrequirements:1. Submit a completed application for admission.2. Submit college entrance exam scores (ACT orSAT).3. Submit certified copies of all of the student’sacademic records. The applicant’s academicbackground must be at least equivalent to the U.S.high school graduation, as determined by theUniversity. All documents submitted must be theoriginal or a certified copy of the original documentand must be translated into the English language.4. If the applicant’s native language is other thanEnglish, an official transcript of the score for the Testof English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) must besubmitted directly from the Educational TestingService. For undergraduate applicants, the requiredscore for the paper-based test is 500, and therequired score for the computer-based test is 173.For graduate applicants, the required score for thepaper-based test is 550, and the required score forthe computer-based test is 213.5. The applicant must submit a certified statementfrom a financial institution certifying that theapplicant has on deposit a minimum amount thatwill cover the cost of attending UAM for at least oneacademic year. The current budget for one year isapproximately $10,000. An additional financialstatement will be required on a yearly basis, whileattending UAM.6. The applicant must be in good physical health,as certified by a licensed physician. An internationalapplicant must purchase health insurance and16Undergraduate Admission


present evidence before enrollment. Proof of immunization against measles and rubella arerequired by the state of Arkansas.7. The INS Form I-20A, “Certificate of Eligibility for Non-Immigrant F-1 StudentStatus,” will be issued only after eligibility for admission has been established. Thedetermination will be made after all documentation has been received and processed, atleast three months prior to the beginning of classes.8. International students who are seeking admission as transfers from another collegeor university in the U.S. must also submit to UAM an appropriate form, which must beapproved by the U.S. Department of Justice, Immigration, and Naturalization Service fortransfer purposes. Transfer students must be in good standing at the institution fromwhich they are transferring, and they must have a minimum grade point average of 2.00.9. It is the responsibility of the international student to become familiar with theregulations of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) and to assume responsibilityfor complying with these regulations. It is the University’s intent to follow all regulationsrequired by the INS. Students must meet with the campus International Officer uponarrival to review comprehensive guidelines, and will be held responsible for adherence tothese.10. All graduate applicants will be required to submit scores for the GRE. Graduatestudents should consult the Graduate Programs of this catalog for details.Undergraduate Admission17


THE COSTfees and expensesTuition and fees for all campuses in the Universityof Arkansas System are established by the UABoard of Trustees and are subject to change.Tuition and FeesArkansas Resident—Fall/SpringType Per Hour **Per SemesterTuition ........................................................................... $90.00/hour $1,350.00Activity Fee ................................................................... $3.00/hour $45.00Instructional Equipment Fee ...................................... $5.00/hour $75.00Athletic Fee ................................................................... $3.00/hour $45.00Facilities Fee ................................................................. $5.00/hour $75.00Student Services Fee .................................................... $1.00/hour $15.00Library Enhancement Fee ........................................... $1.50/hour $22.50Technology Infrastructure Fee ................................... $4.00/hour $60.00Assessment Fee ............................................................ $5.00/semester $5.00**Based on 15 hours.Out-of-State Resident—Fall/SpringAn “out-of-state resident” is one who is not a bonafide resident of the State ofArkansas. The out-of-state tuition may be waived for students from the contiguous statesof Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana.Type Cost per Hour **Per SemesterTuition ........................................................................... $83.00/hour $1,350.00Out-of-State Tuition ..................................................... $114.00/hour $1,710.00Total Tuition .................................................................. $204.00/hour $3,060.00Activity Fee ................................................................... $3.00/hour $45.00Instructional Equipment Fee ...................................... $5.00/hour $75.00Athletic Fee ................................................................... $3.00/hour $45.00Facilities Fee ................................................................. $5.00/hour $75.00Student Services Fee .................................................... $1.00/hour $15.00Library Enhancement Fee ........................................... $1.50/hour $22.50Technology Infrastructure Fee ................................... $4.00/hour $60.00Assessment Fee ............................................................ $5.00/semester $5.00**Based on 15 hours.Fees and Expenses19


Tuition and Fees (Cont.)Arkansas Resident—SummerTypePer TermTuition .................................................... $90.00/hourActivity Fee .............................................. $3.00/hourInstructional Equipment Fee ................. $5.00/hourAthletic Fee .............................................. $3.00/hourFacilities Fee ............................................ $5.00/hourStudent Services Fee ............................... $1.00/hourLibrary Enhancement Fee ..................... $1.50/hourTechnology Infrastructure Fee .............. $4.00/hourAssessment Fee ....................................... $2.50/termOut-of-State Resident—SummerAn “out-of-state resident” is one who is nota bonafide resident of the State of Arkansas.The out-of-state tuition may be waived forstudents from the contiguous states ofTexas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Tennessee,Mississippi, and Louisiana.TypePer TermTuition .................................................... $90.00/hourOut-of-State Tuition ............................ $114.00/hourTotal Tuition ......................................... $204.00/hourActivity Fee .............................................. $3.00/hourInstructional Equipment Fee ................. $5.00/hourAthletic Fee .............................................. $3.00/hourFacilities Fee ............................................ $5.00/hourStudent Services Fee ............................... $1.00/hourLibrary Enhancement Fee ..................... $1.50/hourTechnology Infrastructure Fee .............. $4.00/hourAssessment Fee ....................................... $2.50/termGraduate Students—Fall, Spring, & SummerTypePer SemesterTuition/Arkansas resident ................ $122.00/hourTuition/Out-of-State* ......................... $162.00/hourTotal Tuition ......................................... $284.00/hourActivity Fee .............................................. $3.00/hourInstructional Equipment Fee ................. $5.00/hourAthletic Fee .............................................. $3.00/hourFacilities Fee ............................................ $5.00/hourStudent Services Fee ............................... $1.00/hourTechnology Infrastructure Fee .............. $4.00/hourLibrary Enhancement Fee ..................... $1.50/hour*The additional out-of-state charge of$153.00 per hour may be waived for studentsfrom the contiguous states of Texas, Oklahoma,Missouri, Tennessee, Mississippi, andLouisiana.Senior Citizen Fee WaiverTuition and fees for adults age 60 orolder are waived. Individuals under thispolicy must pay all miscellaneous fees thatmay be required. Enrollment in a class forthis group is contingent on available space.Residence Hall FeesBoard:7-day/19-Meal Plan .................... $960.00/semester7-day/Any 15 meals .................... $910.00/semester7-day/Any 10 meals .................... $845.00/semesterStudent Apartment Meal Plan ... $400.00/semesterRoom:Bankston Hall .............................. $560.00/semester*Royer Hall .................................... $642.00/semester*Maxwell Hall Suite ..................... $750.00/semester*Horsfall Hall ................................ $642.00/semester*Family Housing ............................... $160.00/monthStudent Apartments . ...................... $350.00/monthResidence Hall Damage Deposit ................... $60.00Family Housing Damage Deposit ............... $100.00Student Apartment Damage Deposit ......... $100.00*These rates are for double occupancy. Theprivate room fee is an additional $246/semester forRoyer, Maxwell or Horsfall and an additional $190/semester for Bankston. Single occupancy iscontingent upon availability.Miscellaneous FeesAuto Registration ............................ $15.00 per year(see Office of Public Safety, page 23))Late Registration .............................................. $25.00Dropping and Adding Classes ....... $10.00 per visitWithdrawal Fee ............................................... $45.00I.D. Replacement Fee ........................................ $5.00Vocal and Instrumental Private InstructionFor one credit hour (per course) ......... $40.00For two or three credit hours (per course) ...................................................................... $55.00Internship Fee .................................................. $25.00Internship Fee - Out of Service Area ........... $450.00Undergraduate Distance Education FeePer semester credit hour for remotelocation CIV course ............................... $30.00(*in lieu of other mandatory fees)Graduate Distance Education FeePer semester credit hour for remotelocation CIV course ............................... $50.00(*in lieu of other mandatory fees)Student Nursing Insurance .................. $15.00/yearForestry Summer Camp Fee ........................ $300.00International Graduate Registration Fee ...... $30.00MS Thesis Binding Fee .................................... $50.00Transcripts .......................................... $4.00 per copyNursing students are required topurchase special laboratory equipment,supplies, and/or uniforms.LPN to RN Assessment Fee ........................ $90/semesterBSN Assessment Fee ............................................ $90/yearRN to BSN Assessment Fee ................................. $20/year20Fees and Expenses


Estimate of ExpensesThe following figures represent estimated costs that a full-time Arkansas residentstudent taking 15 hours will incur while attending the University of Arkansas-Monticello.Regular Term Semester YearTuition ........................................................................... $1,350.00 $2,700.00Activity Fee ................................................................... $45.00 $90.00Instructional Equipment Fee ...................................... $75.00 $150.00Athletic Fee ................................................................... $45.00 $90.00Facilities Fee ................................................................. $75.00 $150.00Student Services Fee .................................................... $15.00 $30.00Library Enhancement Fee ........................................... $22.50 $45.00Technology Infrastructure Fee ................................... $60.00 $120.00Assessment Fee ............................................................ $5.00 $10.00Books and Supplies ..................................................... $400.00 $800.00Room and Board (Double Room,7-day/19-Meal Plan) .......................................... $1,602.00 $3,204.00Transportation .............................................................. $562.50 $1,125.00Personal Expenses ....................................................... $450.00 $900.00Totals .............................................................................. $4,707.00 $9,414.00Summer TermTuition ........................................................................... $90.00/hourActivity Fee ................................................................... $3.00/hourInstructional Equipment Fee ...................................... $5.00/hourAthletic Fee ................................................................... $3.00/hourFacilities Fee ................................................................. $5.00/hourStudent Services Fee .................................................... $1.00/hourLibrary Enhancement Fee ........................................... $1.50/hourTechnology Infrastructure Fee ................................... $4.00/hourAssessment Fee ............................................................ $2.50/termBooks and Supplies ..................................................... $150.00Room and Board .......................................................... $395.00Transportation .............................................................. $187.50Personal Expenses ....................................................... $150.00Students who do not live in residence halls should subtract the room and board figure.Transportation, books and supplies, and personal expenses will vary according toindividual student needs.NOTE: All tuition and fees are subject to change upon approval by the UA Board ofTrustees.Residency For Fee PurposesA student’s residency status for fee purposes is determined at the time of admissionaccording to the policy established by the University of Arkansas Board of Trustees. Copiesof the residency policy and petitions for change of residency status are available on requestfrom the Registrar’s Office. Petitions are reviewed by the Registrar and must be submittedat the Registrar’s Office at least two weeks prior to the beginning of the semester for whichthe change is desired.Payment of AccountsAll charges are due and payable in advance to the Cashier’s Office. Cashier’s Officehours are 8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Tuition and fees must be paid in fullat the time of registration. The University offers the FACTS plan as a convenient budgetplan. FACTS is a tuition management plan that provides you with a low cost option forbudgeting tuition and other educational expenses. Students with unpaid accounts will notbe eligible for transcripts or re-admission to any term until their accounts are paid in full.Fees and Expenses21


Personal checks will be accepted from students with no record of returned checks. A chargeof $25 will be assessed for returned checks, and the student will be subject to revocation ofregistration.REMINDER: By enrolling in classes, either at early registration or regular registration,the student creates a financial liability in the amount of the fees, tuition, and other chargespertinent to the enrollment process. This financial liability can be eliminated only by thefollowing: 1) payment from the student or his/her agent; 2) formal cancellation of theenrollment by the student before the semester begins. Failure to attend class(es) does notreduce the liability. Failure to receive financial aid does not reduce the liability. Studentsmust withdraw in person or by written communication. (See withdrawal process.)Refunds — Tuition and FeesWithdrawal & Dropping Courses/Fall or Spring TermsAny student who officially withdraws from the University of ArkansasMonticelloduring a fall or spring semester shall be entitled to a refund as follows:Registration, Tuition, and Fees1. Up to and including five class days ............. 100%2. From the sixth class day through the 10th class day 50%3. The 11th class day and after .......................... NO REFUNDAny student who drops one or more courses and continues to be enrolled at theUniversity during a fall or spring semester shall be entitled to individual course refunds asfollows:Registration, Tuition, and Fees1. Up to and including five class days ............. 100%2. The sixth class day and after ......................... NO REFUNDWithdrawal & Dropping Courses/Summer TermAny student who officially withdraws from the University of ArkansasMonticelloduring a summer school session shall be entitled to a refund as follows:Registration, Tuition, and Fees1. Two- to four-week sessions:(a) Prior to start of classes ......................... 100%(b) After classes have begun .................... NO REFUND2. Five- or six-week sessions:(a) Prior to start of classes ......................... 100%(b) Up to and including five class days .. 50%(c) The sixth class day and after .............. NO REFUND3. Seven and one-half- to nine-week sessions:(a) Prior to start of classes ......................... 100%(b) Up to and including seven class days 50%(c) The eighth class day and after ............ NO REFUND4. Ten- or twelve-week sessions:(a) Prior to start of classes ......................... 100%(b) Up to and including ten class days ... 50%(c) The eleventh class day and after ........ NO REFUNDNOTE: The University will follow the refund policy for “Five- or six-week sessions”when the summer session is more than four weeks but less than five weeks.During any summer school session, a refund shall not be made when one ormore courses are dropped if the student continues to be enrolled at the University.NOTE: The University of Arkansas-Monticello refund policy is subject to change ifrequired by federal regulation or the UA Board of Trustees. Appeals of the refund policymust be submitted in writing to the UAM Executive Council.22Fees and Expenses


Refunds — BookstoreAny student who officially withdraws or drops and adds a class at the University ofArkansas-Monticello during the fall or spring semester is entitled to a refund at theBookstore as follows:1. Up to and including five class days ........ 100%2. From the sixth class day through the 10th class day 50%3. The 11th class day and after ..................... NO REFUNDAny student who officially withdraws or drops and adds a class at the University ofArkansas-Monticello during a summer semester is entitled to a refund at the Bookstore asfollows:1. Up to and including first class day ......... 100%2. From the second class day through the fifth class day 50%3. The sixth class day and after .................... NO REFUNDStudents need to furnish a receipt from the purchase of books and a student ID whenreturning a book. The book must be in the same condition as when purchased.Refunds — Residence HallsCancellations of applications must be submitted in writing to the Residence LifeOffice, UAM Box 3466, Monticello, AR 71656-3466. Notifications submitted to other officesdo not comply with the requirement, and requested official action cannot be assured.Students canceling after August 15 (for the academic year), December 22 (for springsemester only) and the first day of class for summer terms, will forfeit the $60 damagedeposit. Students who occupy a room (i.e., sign check-in forms and accept room keys) andlater choose to move out of the residence hall will forfeit the $60 damage deposit and willbe responsible for board charges through the date of official checkout with residence hallstaff. They will also forfeit room charges for the remainder of the semester.Cash For BooksIf any student misses the refund deadline, the Bookstore will have “Buy Backs” at theend of each semester. This service will pay cash for textbooks directly to the student.Office of Public SafetyLOCATION: 284 University DriveCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1083EMERGENCY TELEPHONE: Ext. 1000 or (870) 460-1000FAX: (870) 460-1983MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 2041, Monticello, AR 71656E-MAIL: publicsafety@uamont.eduMotor vehicle operations on campus are defined by the Campus Parking and TrafficCommittee and are set forth in a brochure available to all persons on campus or visiting thecampus. The Parking Brochure is available from the Office of Public Safety and duringregistration of students and vehicles. These regulations are in accordance with campusrequirements and state motor vehicle laws.All vehicles used on campus must be currently registered for the academic period inwhich they are used. Fines and fees are assessed by the Cashier’s Office located in HarrisHall. Vehicles being used for only a short period of time on campus may receive atemporary parking sticker at the Office of Public Safety. All faculty, staff, and students arerequired to register their vehicles. Visitors to the campus should identify themselves to theDepartment of Public Safety upon their arrival on campus to receive a temporary visitor’spass.Fees and Expenses23


FINANCIALassistanceThe Office of Financial Aid is located on the thirdfloor of Harris Hall. To contact Financial Aid, write toUAM Box 3470, Monticello, AR 71656 or call (870)460-1050. Our toll-free number is 1-800-226-2643.A variety of financial assistance packages is available to University students. The fourcategories of aid are: grants, loans, part-time employment, and scholarships.The Financial Aid Office, located in Harris Hall, administers Federal grants, loans, andpart-time employment, which are described below.Grants are the first type of aid awarded to eligible students. If eligibility for assistancestill exists, students may be awarded part-time employment or loans to meet theirindividual needs.Students may apply for all Federal aid programs and the Arkansas Student AssistanceGrant by completing one application. The application packet can be obtained from theUAM Financial Aid Office, P.O. Box 3470, Monticello, AR, 71656 or by calling (870) 460-1050. Students are encouraged to apply early, as some types of aid are limited in funding.Verification of applicant data may be required. The Financial Aid Office will requestany required verification documentation. This documentation must be submitted withintwo weeks of the request. No financial assistance will be awarded until the documentationis received and the applicant data is determined to be correct.Federal financial assistance will be awarded and the student notified when theapplication for assistance is complete. Disbursements will be made by crediting thestudent’s account for the Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational OpportunityGrant (FSEOG), Arkansas Student Assistance Grant, and Federal Perkins Loan awardseach term the student is eligible. Earnings from federal and institutional work-study arepaid to students once each month by check. Students may have financial awards whichexceed their institutional expenses. Students should refer to the “Schedule of Classes” foreach term to determine when refunds will be issued. Federal Stafford Student Loan andFederal PLUS Loan funds must be applied, in full, to the student’s account.GrantsThe FEDERAL PELL GRANT is designed to provide financial assistance to studentsseeking postsecondary education. Federal Pell Grants are intended to be the “ground floor”of the financial aid package and may be combined with other forms of aid in order to meetthe needs of students. Student eligibility is primarily based on a “financial need formula”developed by the U.S. Department of Education. Since the Federal Pell Grant is a grantaward, it is not to be repaid.The FEDERAL SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANT (FSEOG)Financial Assistance25


is designed to provide financial assistance to students who have exceptional financial need.These awards do not have to be repaid.The ARKANSAS STATE STUDENT ASSISTANCE GRANT is available to studentswhose financial need has been determined by the application for financial aid. This grant ismade available only to residents of the State of Arkansas and does not have to be repaid.LoansThe FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN PROGRAM assists students by providing a lowinteresteducation loan to students qualifying on the basis of “financial need.” Repaymentof this loan may extend over a ten-year period beginning nine months after the borrowerceases to be enrolled at least half-time. Interest (5%) starts at the beginning of the repaymentperiod and is charged on the unpaid balance of the loan principal. For borrowers whobecome teachers in certain types of schools (or teach in fields of expertise that have ashortage of qualified teachers), there are cancellation provisions. Cancellation provisionsmay also be extended to full-time nurses, medical technicians, law enforcement orcorrections officers, providers of early childhood intervention services, and child/familyservice agency workers. Also, borrowers who serve in specified military duty may beeligible for cancellation provisions.The FEDERAL STAFFORD LOAN PROGRAM can provide either subsidized orunsubsidized low interest loans to students enrolled at least half-time. Subsidized loanfunds can be awarded to students who have “unmet need” remaining when all other typesof aid have been awarded. The Federal government pays the interest on these subsidizedloans while the student is enrolled and through the grace period. Unsubsidized loan fundsmight be awarded to students who have no “unmet need” remaining after all other types ofaid have been awarded. The Federal government does not pay the interest onunsubsidized loans while the student is enrolled. The student can choose to pay theinterest or the interest can be capitalized. Some students might be awarded a combinationof subsidized and unsubsidized loan funds. Repayment of these loans may extend over a10-year period beginning six months after the borrower ceases to be enrolled at leasthalftime.The FEDERAL PLUS LOAN PROGRAM makes loans available to the parents ofdependent undergraduate students. Each borrower must use the loan funds to pay for thestudent’s educational costs. Unlike other Federal Family Education Loan Programs, PLUSborrowers are not required to show financial need, but must complete the Free Applicationfor Federal Student Aid. The amount borrowed cannot exceed the cost of education.Part-Time EmploymentMoney is also available in the form of part-time employment. Employment opportunityis made available to those students who qualify and who need an income supplementto partially defray college expenses. Student employment generally falls into two categories:Federal College Work-Study, which is determined on the basis of financial need; andInstitutional WorkStudy, which is determined principally by the degree of work skillspossessed and availability of jobs. Types of employment opportunities at the Universityinclude secretarial, clerical, custodial, resident assistants, library, maintenance, and labassistants.Return of Title IV FundsThe return of Title IV funds is based on requirements of the Higher EducationAmendments of 1998 and assumes that a student earns his/her aid based on the period oftime he/she remains enrolled. If a student withdraws from the University during the first60% of the enrollment period, the University and/or the student may be required to returnsome of the Title IV funds awarded to the student. Title IV funds include Federal StaffordLoans, Federal Perkins Loans, Federal Pell Grants, Federal Supplemental EducationalOpportunity Grants, and Arkansas Student Assistance Grants. During the first 60% of the26Financial Assistance


enrollment period, a student earns Title IV funds in direct proportion to the length of timehe/she remains enrolled. A student who remains enrolled beyond the 60% point earns allaid for which he/she is eligible and will not be required to return any funds. Examples ofactual Return of Title IV Funds calculations are available in the Office of Financial Aid.ScholarshipsAll scholarships awarded by the University of Arkansas-Monticello are competitive,and awards are based upon demonstrated academic ability or performance skills. Renewablescholarships require the student to meet and maintain specific criteria. The Universityoffers a variety of scholarships including academic, athletic, departmental, and privatelyfunded awards. For additional information, contact Scholarship Committee Chair, UAMPO Box 3600, Monticello, Arkansas 71656. E-mail whitingm@uamont.edu or telephone 870-460-1026 (toll free 1-800-844-1826).Types of ScholarshipsI. Institutional ScholarshipsScholarships funded by the University are awarded as funds are available. Eligibilityfor institutional academic scholarships requires the student to1) apply for admission,2) apply for scholarship,3) achieve the designated ACT score, and4) achieve a minimum 3.00 GPA for all high school courses.Students may receive only one institutional academic scholarship in any semester. Inaddition to the renewal criteria given for each scholarship, no scholarship will be continuedif the student’s semester GPA is below 2.00, or if the student does not successfully completeat least 12 hours of course work at the 1000-level or above each semester. Students whomeet scholarship eligibility requirements by March 1 will receive priority. After March 1,consideration for scholarship awards will be based upon availability of funds. Scholarshipcandidates are encouraged to begin the process early in their senior year.The term “academic year” is mentioned in some of the following scholarship renewaldescriptions. An academic year includes the fall, spring, Summer I, and Summer II terms;however, scholarship funds are not available for summer terms.A. Chancellor’s ScholarshipAward: Tuition, fees for up to 18 credit hours, residence assignment and board for amaximum of eight semesters of continuous enrollment. Out-ofstate tuition is waived.Eligibility Requirements: 30 or above ACT composite and rank in the top 10% of thegraduating class with a minimum 3.00 high school GPA, or achieve National Merit Finalistor Achievement Finalist.Renewal Criteria: Minimum completion of 12 hours of college-level work eachsemester and minimum of 3.25 GPA following 24 hours of college-level work in anacademic year.Application: No scholarship application required. Awarded when the student appliesfor admission and ACT scores, class rank, and high school GPA are verified.B. Achievement ScholarshipAward: Tuition, fees for up to 18 credit hours, and residence assignment for amaximum of eight semesters of continuous enrollment. Out-of-state tuition is waived.Eligibility Requirements: 27-29 ACT composite and minimum 3.00 high school GPA.Renewal Criteria: Minimum completion of 12 hours of college-level work eachsemester and minimum of 3.00 GPA following 24 hours of college-level work in anacademic year.Application: No scholarship application required. Awarded when the student appliesfor admission, and ACT scores and high school GPA are verified.Financial Assistance27


C. Academic ScholarshipAward: Tuition and fees for up to 15 credit hours for a maximum of eight semesters ofcontinuous enrollment. Out-of-state tuition is waived.Eligibility Requirements: 24-26 ACT composite and minimum 3.00 high school GPA.Renewal Criteria: Minimum completion of 12 hours of college-level work eachsemester and minimum of 3.00 GPA following 24 hours of college-level work in anacademic year.Application: No scholarship application required. Awarded when the student appliesfor admission, and ACT scores and high school GPA are verified.D. Weevil Excellence ScholarshipAward: $750 tuition award per semester for a maximum of eight semesters ofcontinuous enrollment. Out of state tuition is waived.Eligibility Requirements: 22-23 ACT composite, with at least a 19 ACT score inEnglish and mathematics, minimum 3.00 GPA, and evidence of school leadership.Renewal Criteria: Minimum completion of 12 hours of college-level work eachsemester and minimum of 3.00 GPA following 24 hours of college-level work in anacademic year.Application: Admission and scholarship applications required with counselorverification of ACT scores and high school GPA.E. Leadership ScholarshipAward: $500 tuition award per semester for a maximum of eight semesters ofcontinuous enrollment. Out of state tuition is waived.Eligibility Requirements: 19-21 ACT composite, with at least a 19 ACT score inEnglish and mathematics, minimum 3.00 high school GPA, and evidence of schoolleadership.Renewal Criteria: Minimum completion of 12 hours of college-level work eachsemester and minimum of 3.00 GPA following 24 hours of college-level work in anacademic year.Application: Admission and scholarship applications required with counselorverification of ACT scores and high school GPA.F. Valedictorian ScholarshipAward: Tuition for up to 15 credit hours per semester for a maximum of eightsemesters of continuous enrollment. Out of state tuition is waived.Eligibility Requirements: 21 ACT composite, with at least a 19 ACT score in Englishand mathematics, and minimum 3.00 high school GPA, as well as school confirmation ofvaledictorian status.Renewal Criteria: Minimum completion of 12 hours of college-level work eachsemester and minimum of 3.00 GPA following 24 hours of college-level work in anacademic year.Application: Admission and scholarship applications required with counselorverification of ACT scores, high school GPA, and rank.G. Community College Transfer ScholarshipAward: Tuition for up to 15 hours per semester for a maximum of four semesters ofcontinuous enrollment, excluding summer terms. Our of state tuition is waived.Eligibility Requirements: Students attending accredited community colleges whohave completed at least 60 hours and/or an associate degree with a minimum 3.00cumulative GPA.Renewal Criteria: Minimum completion of 12 hours of college-level work eachsemester and minimum of 3.00 GPA following 24 hours of college-level work in anacademic year.Application: Admission and scholarship application required, and a final (or partial)transcript. A final transcript must be on file to receive the actual award.28Financial Assistance


H. Regional ScholarshipAward: Award not to exceed the cost of out-of-state fee for a maximum of eightsemesters.Eligibility Requirements: Residents of Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Oklahoma,Missouri, or Tennessee.Application: No application is required. Scholarship is awarded when the studentenrolls for classes.II. Performance Scholarships/Grants in AidTo qualify for a grant-in-aid at the University of ArkansasMonticello, enteringfreshmen must meet two of the following three criteria:1. Have a minimum composite ACT of 18.2. Have a minimum high school grade point average of 2.00.3. Rank in the upper 50% of their high school graduating class.An upperclassman or transfer student must be in good academic standing to receive agrant-in-aid.A. Band, Choir, Keyboard ScholarshipsAward amount will vary according to the student’s ability. Maximum award amountis individually determined each semester. Award based upon talent, skill, and performanceaudition. Contact the Chair, UAM Division of Music, at (870) 460-1060.B. Debate/Competitive Speaking ScholarshipAward amount will vary according to the student’s ability. Maximum award amountequal to the cost of tuition each semester. The application process includes letters ofrecommendation and written application to the program. Contact the Director, UAMDebate Team, at (870) 460-1078.C. Cheerleader/Mascot ScholarshipMaximum award amount equal to one-half the cost of tuition each semester. Try-outrequired. Contact Student Programs and Activities at (870) 460-1396 for information.III. Athletic ScholarshipsThe University awards a limited number of athletic scholarships in accordance withthe regulations of the N.C.A.A. and Gulf South Conference. The amount varies with thesport and the player’s ability. These scholarships are based on skill. For information,contact the Athletic Director, University of Arkansas-Monticello, Monticello, AR 71656,(870) 460-1058 and/or your high school coach.IV. Privately Funded ScholarshipsSeveral scholarships, funded by individual and corporate donors, are awarded by theinstitution and/or the UAM Foundation Fund. The donor of the funds for each scholarshiprestricts the award by specifying criteria for selection of each recipient. Some scholarshipsrequire the applicant to meet qualifications of test scores, grade point, skill, or major. Othersare based upon proven financial need, place of residence, or chosen major of the applicant.These scholarships are usually awarded to persons in specific academic majors.Scholarship amounts and eligibility requirements vary. Contact the dean or chair of theacademic major for information and application materials.The following is a listing of private scholarships that are awarded by the institution.A. Endowed ScholarshipsAn endowed scholarship is funded by interest from a principal amount donated to theinstitution. The institution does not award a scholarship from the endowed principal, andtherefore, the scholarship continues for as long as the institution retains the principaldonation.Financial Assistance29


Weldon B. Abbott Scholarship. Established by Mrs. Betty S. Abbott and children tohonor her husband and their father, Mr. Weldon B. Abbott of Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Thisscholarship is awarded to students majoring in agriculture and may be renewed.Governor Homer M. Adkins Scholarship. Established in recognition of outstandingservice of former governors to the state of Arkansas by Judge William J. Smith. Thescholarship is awarded on an alternate basis among Fayetteville, Pine Bluff, and Monticellocampuses. The award is made to students majoring in agriculture.Alumni Achievement & Merit Award Scholarship. Established by the recipients ofthe UAM Alumni Achievement & Merit Awards for deserving students.Alumni Association Scholarship. Established by the UAM Alumni Association Boardof Directors and awarded to a deserving student at Homecoming each year. This is ageneral scholarship; recipients are chosen by the Board from nominations from eachacademic unit. This scholarship is reserved for junior and senior level students.William R. Austin, Jr. Scholarship. Established by Mr. & Mrs. William Austin, Jr. ofMagnolia, Arkansas. The recipient(s) must be a Computer Information Systems major,preferably, and enrolled in a minimum of 15 hours of college course work.Dr. Claude H. Babin Scholarship. Established by Mr. & Mrs. Hunter Babin, formerstudents, faculty and friends of Dr. Claude H. Babin. The recipient(s) of this scholarshipmust be a history and/or political science major. The UAM Scholarship Committee willchoose the recipient.Marvin and Edna Moseley Bankston Scholarship. Established by Bob and LouineSelman Leech of Monticello in honor of Mrs. Leech’s aunt and uncle. Mr. Bankston wasPresident of Arkansas A&M from 1936 to 1946. This scholarship is awarded annually to astudent majoring in forestry.Robert Orum and Fernande Vicknair Barrett Scholarship. Established by the familyof Mr. and Mrs. Barrett in honor of their parents. Each of the nine children attended collegeat UAM. The scholarship is awarded annually by the UAM scholarship committee.Earl and Kathleen Baxter Scholarship. Established by Earl and Kathleen Baxter ofMonticello. The scholarship is awarded annually to a deserving student and can berenewed. The recipient must be a resident of Drew County.Leslie and Faye Beard Scholarship. Established by Paul and June Webb Carter tohonor Leslie and Faye Beard. Recipient(s) must be an incoming freshman with firstpreference given to student(s) from southeast Arkansas; second preference from the state ofArkansas. The student must be a teacher education major and committed to teaching insoutheast Arkansas for at least five years after college graduation. The UAM School ofEducation may submit names of incoming freshmen to the Scholarship Committee forconsideration.Beard Nursing Scholarship. Established by Bettie Beard Pate of Loveland, Ohio. Thescholarship is awarded to a student majoring in nursing, with first preference given to astudent from Warren, Arkansas.Major Thomas E. Bell, Jr. Scholarship. Established by Dr. & Mrs. Jesse Coker. Therecipient must have a strong academic background and will be chosen by the ScholarshipCommittee. There are no restrictions on this scholarship regarding the major or classificationof the student.Henry (Mike) Berg Scholarship. Established in honor of, and as a memorial to, Mr.Berg by his wife, Mrs. Helen D. Berg. The scholarship is awarded annually to a studentwho is pursuing an education leading to a degree in forestry and/or forestry management.Recipients must be residents of Ouachita, Union, Dallas, or Columbia counties in the stateof Arkansas.Dr. Van C. Binns Scholarship. Established by the Estate of Mrs. Evelyn Binns. Therecipient(s) must be a pre-medicine or nursing major and will be chosen by the UAMScholarship Committee.John Falls Bowen Scholarship. Established by friends and relatives to honor the lateJohn Falls Bowen, who died during World War II in the Aleutian Islands. He was a part ofBattery “B” of the 206th Coast Artillery which was composed of Arkansas A&M studentsand staff. Contributions for the scholarship were also donated by surviving members of30Financial Assistance


Battery “B” of the 206th Coast Artillery to honor Bowen and other members of the 206thwho lost their lives during the war. This scholarship is to be used for program support inthe Music department.C. Alton Boyd, Jr. Scholarship. Established in memory of C. Alton Boyd, Jr. by hiswife, Barbara Boyd. The recipient(s) must be an Education major.Ruth G. Boyd Scholarship. Established in memory of Ruth G. Boyd by her husbandDr. Scott Boyd. The scholarship is given to a junior or senior student who is a health andphysical education major admitted to the professional student teaching block. The recipientcannot be an athlete on a varsity team or a student working in the CVR fitness program.Scott Boyd Scholarship. Established by family, friends, and former students of Dr.Boyd. Dr. Boyd was a former head of the Health and Physical Education Department and afaculty member from 1956-1978. The recipient must be a health and physical educationmajor who has been accepted into the teacher education program.B. R. “Bobby” Brown Scholarship. Established by Mr. and Mrs. B. R. “Bobby” Brownof Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Mr. Brown is a native of Hamburg, Arkansas and a graduateof UAM. This scholarship may be renewed.Joe Brown Scholarship. Established by family and friends of Joe Brown. Mr. Brownwas a long-time employee of the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission. The scholarship isawarded to a student athlete in football, with first preference given to a student fromMonticello, Arkansas.Mary Claire Randolph Buffalo Scholarship. Established by Mr. Harvey A. Buffalo ofVenice, Florida in memory of his wife, Mary Claire Randolph Buffalo. Mrs. Buffalo taughtat Arkansas A&M College from 193134 in the English department.Jeff Busby Endowed Scholarship. Established in memory of Jeff Busby by familymembers. The recipient(s) must be a Business major in the field of Accounting.G. William & Verna Cahoon Scholarship. Established by the family of G. William &Verna Cahoon. A minimum of two recipients will be chosen; one must be a history majorand the other an English major. Recipients must be a Southeast Arkansas resident.Recommendations will be made to the Scholarship Committee by the School of Social &Behavorial Sciences and the School of Arts & Humanities.UAM Campus Scholarship. Established by faculty and staff of UAM to honordeserving students.Alvin and Raye Carter Scholarship. This scholarship is awarded to an Educationmajor, first preference given to Elementary Education and second preference given toSecondary Education.Paul and June Webb Carter Scholarship. Established by Paul and June Carter ofBentonville, Arkansas. Both are alumni of the University and former residents of DrewCounty. The scholarship is awarded to students majoring in business and/or education.H.H. (Hank) Chamberlin Forestry Scholarship. Established in the name of Mr. HankChamberlin, who served as head of the Department of Forestry from 1945 to 1970. Theaward is made annually to a student majoring in forestry.H.H. (Hank) Chamberlin Wildlife Scholarship. Established in the name of Mr. HankChamberlin, who served as head of the Department of Forestry from 1945 to 1970. Theaward is made annually to a student majoring in wildlife management.Marjorie Chamberlin Scholarship. Established in memory of Marjorie Chamberlin byfamily and friends. Mrs. Chamberlin was a member of the Arkansas A&M Music Departmentfaculty from 1942-45. The scholarship is awarded to students majoring in music.George H. Clippert Scholarship. Established by George and Maxine Clippert insupport of UAM’s School of Forest Resources. Mr. Clippert is the president of SouthernPulpwood Co., Inc., in Camden, Arkansas. The scholarship is awarded to studentsmajoring in forestry.Coker Alumni Scholarship. Established by Dr. and Mrs. Jesse M. Coker of Monticello,Arkansas, in honor of Arkansas A&M/University of Arkansas-Monticello alumni. Dr. andMrs. Coker are former students of Arkansas A&M College. Dr. Coker served on the facultyand as an administrator at the University from 1965-86. The scholarship is awarded tostudents chosen by the Scholarship Committee.Financial Assistance31


Jesse and Ernestine Coker Scholarship. Established by Dr. and Mrs. Coker to provideannual scholarships to graduates of Drew Central High School, Monticello, Arkansas. Mrs.Coker was a student at Arkansas A&M. Dr. Coker is a former student of Arkansas A&M,and he served on the faculty and as an administrator at the University from 1965-86. Ascholarship is awarded to a student majoring in agriculture and to a student majoring ineducation.Dr. Jesse M. Coker Distinguished Service Scholarship. Established by UAMFoundation Fund Board, honoring Dr. Jesse Coker. Recipient must be a member of theUAM band or choir ensemble and will be chosen by the Scholarship Committee.Thomas C. and Julia Hobson Coleman Scholarship. Established by the family ofThomas C. and Julia Hobson Coleman. A minimum of two recipients are to be chosen.They must be English majors and a Southeast Arkansas resident. The School of Arts &Humanities will make recommendations to the Scholarship Committee.Suzanne Cooke Memorial. Awarded in memory of Suzanne Cooke, a 1971 graduateof Arkansas A&M College. Awarded to a student who has a declared major in education ormusic, and has a specific interest in special education or in working with handicappedchildren.Steve Crowley Memorial Scholarship. Established by Mr. J. H. Hamlen of LittleRock, Arkansas in honor of a former employee. This scholarship is awarded to a forestrymajor.Van and Eula Mae Cruce Scholarship. Established by Dan and Charlotte Hornaday ofSpring, Texas, to honor the parents of Mrs. Hornaday. The late Van and Eula Mae Crucewere long-time proprietors of Cruce Grocery, a Monticello landmark. The original CruceGrocery was located on the south side of the UAM campus and served as a gathering placefor Arkansas A&M students during the 1940s and 50s.Gordon Culpepper Scholarship. Established by alumni and former students of theDepartment of Natural Sciences. Dr. Culpepper was a faculty member in the Department ofNatural Sciences from 1962-89, and the scholarship is awarded to a student in thatdepartment.O. H. “Doogie” and Patsy Darling Scholarship. Established by O. H. “Doogie” andPatsy Darling of Crossett. This scholarship is awarded annually to a student majoring inforestry.C. W. Day Scholarship. Established by the Danny Day, Sr. family, Raymond Dayfamily, William Day family, Rickey Day family and Sue Day Wood family of Day Farms,Inc., Winchester, Arkansas, in honor of C. W. Day. The scholarship is awarded to studentschosen by the Scholarship Committee.Gregory A. Devine Scholarship. Established in memory of Gregory Alan Devine byhis parents, Marion and Fern Devine. Greg was a natural science major at the University in1980-82. The scholarship is awarded to a student majoring in natural sciences with prioritygiven to a geology major.Vance W. Edmondson Scholarship. Established by Vance W. Edmondson, whograduated from Arkansas A&M in 1938. Dr. Edmondson was a Professor of AgricultureEconomics at Texas A&M. The scholarship is awarded to a student who is majoring inagriculture.Albert Etheridge Scholarship. Established by alumni and former students of theDepartment of Natural Sciences. Dr. Etheridge was a department head in the Departmentof Natural Sciences and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. He served at the Universityfrom 1971-89. The scholarship is awarded to a student in the Natural Sciences Department.Hampton and Minnie Etheridge Scholarship. Established by the children and theirspouses in honor and in memory of their parents. The scholarship is awarded to a needystudent from Southeast Arkansas, excluding Pine Bluff.Harold J. Green Scholarship. Established by Harold J. Green of Sun Lakes, Arizona.Mr. Green is an Arkansas A&M alumnus. He attended school here from 1949-52. Thescholarship is awarded to students chosen by the Scholarship Committee.Bill Groce, Jr. Scholarship. Established by family, friends, and former teammates ofBill Groce, Jr. Mr. Groce was all-AIC for the UAM football team. The scholarship is32Financial Assistance


Daniel & Charlotte Hornaday Music Excellence Scholarship. Established by Dan &Charlotte Hornaday. Scholarship is for support of the UAM Band and Choral programs, orthe award of a band or choral grant-inaid. The recipient must be a music major withpreference given to student participating in Band or Choir. The recipient will be recommendedby the Chair of the Division of Music to the UAM Scholarship Committee.James A. Hudson Scholarship. Established by the James A. Hudson Memorial,Incorporated of Pine Bluff, Arkansas. The recipient of this scholarship must be a forestry orwildlife management major. The scholarship may be renewed.Henry B. Humphry Memorial Scholarship. Established by his family and friends ofUAM in memory of Henry Brandon Humphry. Henry died in an automobile accident inthe spring of 1997. He was a senior with a double major in forestry and wildlife managementand was president of the UAM Student Government Association at the time of hisdeath. Students majoring in forestry and/or wildlife management are eligible for thisscholarship.Lamar Hunter Scholarship. Established by the Richard Reinhart family of Monticello,Arkansas in honor of Mr. Hunter. Mr. Hunter was killed in action during World War II.The scholarship is awarded to a senior at Monticello High School.Lamar Hunter Scholarship for Veterans and Arkansas National Guard Members.Established by the Coker book account and Dr. and Mrs. Jesse Coker in memory of LamarHunter. Dr. Coker served with Mr. Hunter during World War II. The scholarship isawarded with preference given to a veteran or a member of the Arkansas National Guardor their dependents.James H. and Elva B. Hutchinson Scholarship. Established by the estate of the lateDr. James H. Hutchinson, Jr. to honor his parents. Dr. Hutchinson’s father, James H.Hutchinson, Sr., served as academic dean of the college for 34 years, retiring in 1961. Dr.James H. Hutchinson, Jr. was a 1942 graduate of Arkansas A&M. The scholarship isawarded to high school graduates in Arkansas with preference given to graduates ofMonticello and Drew Central high schools.Brigadier General Wesley V. Jacobs Scholarship. Established by Dr. and Mrs. JesseM. Coker with proceeds from book sales of My Unforgettable Memories of World War IIwritten by Dr. Coker. Dr. and Mrs. Coker are both former students of Arkansas A&M. Dr.Coker served on the faculty and as an administrator at the University from 1965-86. Thescholarship is awarded with first preference given to active members of the Arkansas Armyor Air National Guard and second preference given to their immediate family members.Grady and Myrtle Burks Knowles Scholarship. Established by Myrtle BurksKnowles and her husband, the late Grady Knowles of Monticello, Arkansas. GradyKnowles attended Arkansas A&M in 1927 and Myrtle Knowles attended 1929-31. This is ageneral scholarship for deserving students who may not have other scholarship opportunities.Victoria Ku Scholarship. Established by the School of Mathematical and NaturalSciences, Drs. Tim and Victoria Ku, and family, friends and former students of Victoria Ku.Victoria Ku was an associate professor of chemistry at UAM from 1964-1992. The scholarshipis awarded to students majoring in chemistry.Timothy Ku Scholarship. Established by his family to honor Dr. Timothy Ku ofMonticello, Arkansas. Dr. Ku taught at UAM for 37 years in the forestry unit before hisretirement in 1997. The scholarship is for students majoring in forestry.Curtis Kyle Family Scholarship. Established by Curtis W. Kyle, an insuranceexecutive, of Yazoo, Mississippi. Mr. Kyle graduated from Arkansas A&M College in 1958with a bachelor’s degree in business administration. The scholarship is awarded tostudents enrolled in the School of Business.Governor Ben T. Laney Scholarship. Established in recognition of outstanding serviceof former governors to the state of Arkansas by Judge William J. Smith. The scholarship isawarded on a rotating basis among the Fayetteville, Little Rock, Pine Bluff, and Monticellocampuses. The award is made to a student majoring in business administration.Fred H. Lang Scholarship. Established in memory of Fred H. Lang by his wife,Elizabeth S. Lang. Mr. Lang was the former Director of the Arkansas Forestry Commission.34Financial Assistance


The scholarship is awarded to a student majoring in forestry.Randall Leister Scholarship. Established by friends of Randall Leister. Mr. Leistergraduated with a degree in forestry from Arkansas A&M in 1958 and retired from theArkansas Forestry Commission in 1997. The recipient(s) of this scholarship must be aforestry major and a resident of Arkansas.Willis “Convoy” Leslie Scholarship. Established by friends, former players, formerteammates, and members of the Arkansas National Guard in honor of Willis Leslie. Mr.Leslie was a graduate of Arkansas A&M and a former Head Football Coach at theUniversity from 1954-58. The scholarship is awarded to a student athlete in football.Robert W. D. Marsh Scholarship. Established in honor of Robert W. D. Marsh by hiswife, DeMaris Marsh. Mr. Marsh is a 1955 graduate of Arkansas A&M College and a retiredbusinessman from Monticello. The scholarship is awarded to a student majoring inbusiness administration.Mathematics and Physics Endowed Scholarship. Established by the School ofMathematical and Natural Sciences with contributions from alumni, former students andfaculty. This scholarship is awarded to students majoring in mathematics, physics orphysical science.J. M. & Annie Mae Matthews Scholarship. Established in memory of J. M. Matthewsby his wife, Annie Mae Matthews; son, James Madison Matthews, Jr.; and daughter, JaneMatthews Evans. Mr. Matthews was a 1935 graduate of Arkansas A&M College and abusinessman in Dumas, Arkansas. The scholarship is awarded to a student majoring inbusiness administration.Zach & Pauline McClendon, Sr. Scholarship. Awarded in memory of ZachMcClendon, Sr., a prominent businessman of Monticello. The scholarship was establishedby his wife, Pauline McClendon, and is awarded to a student from Drew County.Elizabeth Culbertson McDaniel Scholarship. Established by Mr. Noel WaymonMcDaniel and Mr. Noel A. McDaniel in memory of their wife and mother, ElizabethCulbertson McDaniel. This scholarship is awarded to students majoring in education.Noel Waymon and LaFran McDaniel Scholarship. Established by Mr. & Mrs. NoelW. McDaniel. This scholarship is awarded to students majoring in Elementary Education.James and Nellie McDonald Scholarship in Memory of David Michael Stapp.Established by Chicot Irrigation, Inc., Lake Village, Arkansas, and James and NellieMcDonald, Glen and Beverly Rowe, Rick and Linda Rowe, and Mike and Cindy McDonaldin honor and memory of David Michael Stapp. The scholarship is awarded to a resident ofChicot County by the Scholarship Committee.Paul C. McDonald Memorial Scholarship and Fund for Academic Excellence.Established by the family of Paul C. McDonald in his memory. This scholarship is awardedto deserving students and may be renewed.Thomas McGill Scholarship. Established by Thomas McGill of Camden, Arkansas.The recipient(s) of this scholarship must be a forestry major and will be chosen by theScholarship Committee at UAM.Mears Estate Scholarship. Established by the estate and trust of Mr. Willard G.Mears. This is a general scholarship to support needy UAM students. The recipient(s) willbe chosen by the UAM Scholarship Committee.Miller Sisters Scholarship. Established in memory of Mary Estelle (Mamie), Duane,and Rubye Miller by their sister, Jessie Miller. Ms. Miller graduated from Arkansas A&M in1936 with a degree in education. Each of her three sisters were also graduates of ArkansasA&M. The scholarship is awarded to students majoring in education or science.Ruth and Wells Moffatt Forestry Scholarship. Established by Ruth and Wells Moffattof Monticello, Arkansas to honor a deserving student majoring in forestry.Walter A. and Myrtle Wells Moffatt Scholarship. Established by the children of Mr.and Mrs. Moffatt to honor their parents. The parents of Myrtle Wells Moffatt (Judge andMrs. William Wells) donated the land on which UAM is now located. The scholarship isawarded to a graduate of Monticello High School.P. E. and Melba Munnerlyn Scholarship. Established by P. E. and Melba Munnerlynof North Little Rock, Arkansas. Mr. Munnerlyn is a 1942 graduate of Arkansas A&M. TheFinancial Assistance35


scholarship is awarded to a student majoring in education.Charles H. Murphy Scholarship. Established by Deltic Timber, Inc. This scholarshipis awarded to a student majoring in forestry.Jim Neeley Scholarship. Established by Jim and Rachel Neeley in support of theUAM School of Forest Resources. Mr. Neeley is a 1956 graduate of Arkansas A&M Collegewith a degree in forestry. Mr. Neeley is president of Neeley Forestry Service in Camden,Arkansas. The scholarship is awarded to a student majoring in forestry.D. John Nichols Scholarship. Established by Mississippi Marine Corporation ofGreenville, Mississippi to honor Mr. D. John Nichols. The scholarship, which may berenewed, is awarded to students chosen by the Scholarship Committee.Loyal V. Norman Scholarship. Established by Sam and Martha Norman Sowell inmemory of Mrs. Sowell’s father, Loyal V. Norman. The scholarship is awarded to a forestrymajor and may be renewed.Velma Ashcraft Norman Scholarship. Established by Sam and Martha NormanSowell in memory of Mrs. Sowell’s mother, Velma Ashcraft Norman. The scholarship isawarded to an education major and may be renewed.Dale Oliver Forestry Scholarship. Established by Mr. J. H. Hamlen of Little Rock inhonor of a former employee. The recipient(s) of this scholarship must be a forestry major.Merle and Deloris Peterson Scholarships. Established by Merle and Deloris Peterson,and friends and associates of the Petersons. Mr. Peterson is a former Arkansas senator. Heand Mrs. Peterson are active in the development of the Dumas community. The scholarshipsare awarded to students chosen by the Scholarship Committee.B. C. Pickens Scholarship. Established by the trustees of the B. C. Pickens Trust. Thescholarship is awarded to a student with ties to Pickens, Arkansas and second considerationgiven to a student majoring in agriculture.Emeline Killiam Pope, Sallie Pope Wood, and Velma Wood Powell Scholarship.Established from the estate of Velma Wood Powell for deserving students in education.John Porter and Mary Sue Price Scholarship. Established by John Porter and MarySue Price of Monticello, Arkansas for a deserving student in forestry.Russell R. Reynolds Scholarship. Established in memory of Russell R. Reynolds byfamily and friends. Mr. Reynolds was the developer and director of the Crossett ExperimentalForest. The scholarship is awarded to a student majoring in forestry.Ross Foundation Forestry Scholarship. Established by the Ross Foundation ofArkadelphia, Arkansas and friends of the University. The Ross Foundation is a strongsupporter of the University and higher education. Sixty percent of this fund is a generalscholarship that is awarded to deserving students by the UAM Scholarship Committee. Theremaining 40 percent is awarded to students majoring in forestry.Bennie Ryburn, Sr. Scholarship. Established in memory of Mr. Ryburn by family andfriends. Mr. Ryburn was a businessman from Monticello, a leader in South Arkansas, and astrong supporter of the University. He was a graduate of this University and served on theBoard of Trustees of Arkansas A&M. The scholarship(s) are awarded to residents of Drew,Bradley, Lincoln, Cleveland, Calhoun, or Jefferson counties.Cecil R. Scaife Scholarship. Established in honor of Cecil R. Scaife by his wife andfour children. Mr. Scaife is a 1951 graduate of Arkansas A&M College and a successfulbusinessman in the recording and music publishing business. The award is made to astudent chosen by the Scholarship Committee.Simmons First Bank of South Arkansas Scholarship. Established by Simmons FirstBank of South Arkansas, Lake Village. This is a general scholarship for students fromAshley, Chicot, Desha or Drew counties.Herman C. Steelman Scholarship. Established by family, friends, and former studentsof Mr. Steelman to honor his contributions to predental and pre-medical education. Mr.Steelman taught at UAM from 19471980. The scholarship is awarded to qualified studentsin the areas of predental, pre-medical, biology, or chemistry.Fred and Janice Taylor Scholarship. Established by the UAM Foundation Board ofDirectors and friends of UAM. This scholarship, which is to honor Dr. and Mrs. FredTaylor for their many years of service to UAM, is awarded to students participating in the36Financial Assistance


University’s forensics program.Jack H. Tharp Math/Science Scholarship. Established by Mr. and Mrs. Jack H. Tharpfor deserving students majoring in mathematics or science. The scholarship may berenewed.Horace E. Thompson Scholarship. Established by United Commercial TravelersCouncil 752 in honor of Mr. Thompson. He was a past president of Arkansas A&M Collegeand a Supreme Counselor with UCT. This scholarship is presented to a student fromArkansas majoring in special education.UAM Forestry Alumni Scholarship. Established from contributions of UAM forestrygraduates. This scholarship is awarded annually to a student majoring in forestry orwildlife with preference to a student majoring in forestry.U of A Division of Agriculture Scholarship. Formerly named the John RustAgriculture scholarship. The recipient(s) of this scholarship must be an agriculture major.Lee Wallick Band Scholarship. Established by Dr. Paul Wallick, Sr. and formermembers of the Collegians Dance Orchestra, former band students and friends of LeeWallick. Lee Wallick was the Arkansas A&M band director from 1934-50. The scholarship isawarded to members of the UAM Band.Peggy Wallick Scholarship. Established by Dr. Paul Wallick, Sr. and former studentsand friends of Peggy Wallick. Peggy Wallick was an associate professor emeritus in theDepartment of Health and Physical Education. She taught at Arkansas A&M/UAM from1936-74. The scholarship is awarded to a senior in the area of physical education.Webb/Carter Scholarship. Established by Paul R. and June Webb Carter ofBentonville, Arkansas in honor of their parents, Moten and the late Willean Carter andBessie Webb Horton and the late Ray Webb. The scholarship is awarded to a studentmajoring in agriculture.Maurice and Minnie Chambers Webb Scholarship. Established by family membersin honor of their parents Maurice and Minnie Chambers Webb. The recipient(s) of thisscholarship is to be an Elementary Education major.James M. White Scholarship. Established in memory of James M. White by friends,Deltic Farm & Timber Co., Inc., and Murphy Oil, USA, Inc. Mr. White was a 1953 forestrygraduate of Arkansas A&M College. Awarded annually to one or more undergraduatestudents enrolled in the curriculum leading to a degree in forestry and/or forest management.Recipients must be residents of the state of Arkansas.John W. White Award. Established by Trannye O. White in memory of Mr. White.This award is given to a student majoring in forestry.R. Larry Willett Scholarship. Established in honor of Dr. Willett by friends, colleagues,and alumni. Dr. Willett was associated with the School of Forest Resources asextension forester from 1978 to 1995. This scholarship is awarded to a student in the Schoolof Forest Resources.Samuel A. Williams Scholarship. Established by Sam Denison in honor of hisgrandfather, Samuel Williams, and in memory of his sister Katie C. Denison. Mr. Williamswas a prominent forester in South Arkansas. The scholarship is awarded to a student fromthe following counties with preference given to 1) Dallas, 2) Cleveland/Calhoun/Bradley,3) Drew. The student must be a forestry major.Anne Wilson Scholarship. Established in memory of Anne Wilson by family andfriends. Mrs. Wilson was Director of Nursing at Bradley County Memorial Hospital inWarren, Arkansas. The scholarship is awarded to a student majoring in nursing.Verna Hobson Cahoon, Elizabeth Coleman Cochran, and Cornelia Coleman WrightScholarship. Established by the family of Verna Cahoon, Elizabeth Cochran, and CorneliaWright. A minimum of two recipients are to be chosen; one must be a music major and theother a nursing major. Recipients must be a resident in Southeast Arkansas. Recommendationswill be made from the Division of Music and Division of Nursing to the ScholarshipCommittee.George F. Wynne Scholarship. Established by Mrs. Matilda Wynne of Warren,Arkansas in honor of her husband, Dr. George F. Wynne. This scholarship is awarded todeserving students majoring in forestry.Financial Assistance37


Dr. David M. Yocum Family Endowed Scholarship. Established by Dr. David M.Yocum and family. This is a general scholarship and may be awarded to any major.Madge Youree Scholarship. Established by family and friends in memory of MadgeYouree. She received her BA degree in language and literature at Arkansas A&M College in1937. She was a teacher in several Arkansas schools and was superintendent of ArkansasCity Schools for 21 years before she retired in 1982. The scholarship is awarded to studentsmajoring in education.B. Endowed AwardsAn endowed award is funded by interest from a principal amount donated to theinstitution. The institution does not make an award from the endowed principal, andtherefore, the award continues for as long as the institution retains the principal donation.Fay Brann Award. Awarded in memory of Mr. Fay Brann to a student from DrewCounty who is majoring in accounting.Jeff Busby Memorial Award. Awarded in memory of Jeff Busby, a business administrationmajor at the University. Awarded to a junior who has a declared major in accounting.C. Annual AwardsAn annual award is made from funds received on a regular basis from a donor. Theaward continues only as long as the donor funds the scholarship.Allied Poultry. A one-year award in agriculture that is funded by money receivedfrom Allied Poultry Industries and matched by funds from individual donors.Alumni Association Scholarship. These scholarships are funded by the Alumni whopay yearly dues to the Alumni Association. The Alumni Board of Directors award thescholarships at Homecoming. Recipient(s) of the award must be either a junior or seniorand have a 2.75 GPA. Recipients are nominated to the Alumni Board by each academicdepartment and selected by the Alumni Association Board.Arkansas Bankers Association (Group V). Awarded on an alternate basis betweenthe University of Arkansas-Monticello and the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff.Recipient must be a business major or express an interest in a banking career.Dallas County Conservation District Scholarship. Established by the Dallas CountyConservation District for the winner of the Future Farmers of America District ForestryContest help in Dallas County.Farmer’s Grain Terminal Award. Established by Farmer’s Grain Terminal, Inc. ofGreenville, Mississippi. The recipient of this award must be from Drew, Desha, Ashley, orChicot counties. The donors will initially fund only one student at a time for four years ofcollege work. The UAM Scholarship Committee will select the recipient.James A. Hudson Memorial. Funded by the James A. Hudson Memorial, Inc., andawarded to a junior or senior student with a declared major in forestry.W. W. and Anne Jones. Funded in honor of Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Jones by the JonesTrust and awarded to a student with a declared major in forestry.Jewell Minnis Scholarship. Established by the Jewell Minnis Trust on each campus ofthe University of Arkansas system. The scholarships are awarded to students with less than30 hours of college credit. Several awards are made to new students 25 years of age or olderfrom this fund.Paula O’Briant Non-traditional Business Award. Funded by a UAM graduate, Ms.Paula O’Briant of DeWitt, Arkansas. This award is given to a non-traditional single parentpursuing a degree in business.Potlatch Foundation Scholarship. Funded by the Potlatch Foundation. Thisscholarship provides full tuition, fees, room and board for a superior student. The studentis employed as an intern during the summers working with Potlatch foresters.Randy Risher Wellness Award. Funded by Mr. Randy Risher, a UAM graduate, ofHouston, Texas. This award is presented to a student with a declared major in wellness.James A. Ross, Sr., Memorial. Funded in memory of James A. Ross, Sr. by his family.38Financial Assistance


Awarded to a student who has a declared major in pre-law.Saline-Ouachita Valley Livestock. Awarded by Saline-Ouachita Valley LivestockAssociation to an agriculture major from Ashley, Bradley, Cleveland, Dallas, or LincolnCounties.D. Children of Law Enforcement Officers and FiremenAct 521 of 1973, as amended, provides for scholarships to children of qualifying lawenforcement officers and full-time or volunteer firemen who suffer fatal injuries or wounds,or who become permanently and totally disabled in the performance of their employmentduties.Students who are eligible to receive this scholarship should contact the Registrar at thetime of registration.Department of Veterans Affairs BenefitsVeterans of recent military service and the dependents of certain other servicemen andservicewomen may be entitled to educational assistance payments from the Department ofVeterans Affairs. The University is an approved institution in veteran and veteran’sbeneficiary training.Veterans of recent military service, widows, or children of those who lost their lives inservice or who are now totally disabled as a result of service should contact the nearestDepartment of Veterans Affairs Regional Office for assistance in securing benefits.Veterans attending the University as an undergraduate under the G.I. Bill mustmaintain full-time status (12 semester hours or more) to be eligible for full benefits.Veterans should be aware that dropping a class during the term may affect benefits.Veterans may not repeat a course in which a passing grade was made and receive benefitsfor that course.Veterans should contact the VA Clerk in the Office of the Registrar at (870) 460-1034 forassistance in filing for benefits.MIA/KIA DependentsAct 188 of 1973 provides for free tuition and fees at state-supported institutions ofhigher learning and vocational/technical schools for the dependents of certain qualifyingArkansas citizens who are prisoners of war or are missing in action or have been killed inaction.Students who are eligible to receive this scholarship should contact the Registrar at thetime of registration.Financial Assistance39


STUDENTaffairs / servicesThe following pages provide a brief overview ofStudent Affairs offices which serve students. Studentsseeking additional information are encouraged tocontact the particular office of interest.Career Services OfficeLOCATION: Harris HallCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1453 / FAX: (870) 460-1354MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3458, Monticello, AR 71656E-MAIL: hughesl@uamont.eduThe central purpose of Career Services is to help students prepare for academic andcareer success. Freshmen and sophomores are assisted with career assessment, valuesclarification, and occupational data to help them make informed choices of academicmajors. Juniors are provided opportunities for experiential learning (internships) anddiscovering the relationship of skills acquired to the broader work world. Career Serviceshelps prepare graduating seniors to be successful candidates by helping them translatetheir academic and co-curricular experiences into successful job campaigns or graduateschool applications.Specific services include:• FOCUS - A computerized career exploration program• The Self-Directed Search - an interest inventory• The MBTI - a personality assessment• JOBTRAK - a web resume registration and job search service•Credential Files• Internship resources• Workshops on a wide range of topics from choosing an academic major to job searchstrategies• A career resource library• Job listings for both part-time and full-time positions and internships• On-campus recruiting• Annual Career Fair• A home page on the World Wide Web with a directory of helpful career andemployment sites.Students can also receive assistance with developing their career goals, writingresumes and cover letters, learning job search strategies, and developing their interviewskills.Student Services41


Counseling & TestingLOCATION: Harris HallCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1453 / FAX: (870) 460-1810MAILING ADDRESS: P. O. Box 3459, Monticello, AR 71656EMAIL: hughesl@uamont.eduThe Counseling and Testing Services Office, located on the second floor of Harris Hall,provides a wide variety of specialized counseling and testing services to prospective andcurrent UAM students. All services are free and confidential in nature. Appointments canbe made in person during the hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday or bytelephone at (870) 460-1453. Drop-in counseling is also generally available to accommodatestudents in crisis or emergency situations, or for short consultations.Educational CounselingEducational counseling is available to help students plan and make decisionsconcerning their college education. The Counseling and Testing Services office providesworkshops and individual assistance each semester to assist students with study skills, testanxiety, time management and stress management, as well as other student success skills.Personal CounselingThe Counseling and Testing Services office provides a full range of personal andsupport services, which promotes the personal, academic, and psychological well-being ofstudents. A trained full-time counselor is available to any UAM student to discuss issuesranging from test anxiety to emotional adjustment. The office also provides referrals tolocal mental health agencies for crisis situations and long-term treatment.Testing ServicesStudents are offered the opportunity to take many national tests such as CLEP,PRAXIS, ACT, and SAT. Testing arrangements for entrance exams, correspondence andonline exams are scheduled through the Testing Services Office. Applications and registrationbulletins are available from the testing office. A brochure listing tests, dates, and costsis available in the Counseling and Testing Office.Food ServiceLOCATION: Gibson University CenterCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1076 / FAX: (870) 367-6071MAILING ADDRESS: P .0. Box 3064, Monticello, AR 71656E-MAIL: williams-ben@aramark.comThe food service contracted by the University provides meals for campus residentsand other students, faculty, and guests. The Cafeteria, located on the upper floor of theUniversity Center, is open for every meal while school is in session except breakfast onSaturday and Sunday. At each noon and evening meal, students are provided a variety ofentrees and can enjoy a salad bar that includes a wide selection of vegetables. Additionally,“special meals” such as steak or shrimp dinners are served periodically to break theroutine. The adjacent Patio Café in the University Center is available for lighter meals orsnacks. Java City, located on the first floor of the Library/Technology Center, offers avariety of flavored coffees and pastries and often serves as a gathering place for students.John F. Gibson University CenterCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1053 / FAX: (870) 460-1653MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3459, Monticello, AR 71656The Gibson University Center is a multipurpose building with a variety of facilitiesthat include meeting spaces, eating places, and recreation areas. Specifically, the buildinghouses the university dining hall, the Patio Café, a gymnasium, racquetball courts, and anexercise center complete with free weights, circuit training equipment, and cardiovascularmachines. In addition, the building is home to the Student Health Office, the Office of42Student Services


Student Programs and Activities, and the Office of Intramurals and Recreation. The Officeof Student Affairs, an integral part of the University administration, is also located in theUniversity Center. Conference facilities such as the Capitol Room, Caucus Room, HouseRoom, and Green Room are open to the campus community.Intramurals and RecreationLOCATION: Gibson University CenterCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1046 / FAX: (870) 460-1653MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3459, Montice1lo, AR 71656E-MAIL: gentry@uamont.eduThe Intramural and Recreation Program is a vital part of campus life at the University.Individuals and teams participate in a wide variety of competitive sports and special events.Intramurals encourage cooperation, good sportsmanship, and physical fitness.For those students, faculty, and staff interested in pursuing less organized recreational activities,the University Center recreation areas (multipurpose gymnasium, free weight room, and racquetball/wallyball courts) and the University swimming pool maintain open recreation hours for drop-in use.Sand volleyball courts, horseshoe pits, disc golf course, basketball goals, and intramural playingfields provide ample opportunity for outdoor recreation. Participation in intramural sports andrecreation programs is completely voluntary. It is strongly recommended that all participants have acomplete physical examination and accident insurance prior to participation.The Intramural and Recreation Program employs a large number of students through the workstudy program.Learning Support Services / TutoringLOCATION: Harris HallCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1154 / FAX: (870) 460-1810MAILING ADDRESS: UAM Box 3094, Monticello, AR 71656EMAIL: eubanksr@uamont.eduLearning Support Services provides fundamental enrichment skills for students’educational growth. This area houses the College Skills curriculum and peer tutoringservices. College Skills is offered in a classroom setting and teaches study skills, notetaking, test taking, time management, and other learning skills that may increase thechances of a successful college experience. Peer tutoring in general education academicsubjects, as well as math and science subjects, is available free of charge to any student.Office of Residence LifeLOCATION: Harris HallCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1045 / FAX: (870) 460-1810MAILING ADDRESS: UAM BOX 3466, Monticello, Arkansas 71656-3466E-MAIL: rook@uamont.edu / WEBSITE: www.uamont.edu/studentaffairsThe Residence Life program at the University strives to provide more than just a roomin its residence halls. Today’s residence halls are places where life experiences areintegrated with the total University educational program. High-speed Internet connectionsare available in all residence halls and University apartments.Students spend a great deal of time in their residence hall. Their experiences in theresidence halls can have a major impact on academic performance and overall personalgrowth. Through hall governments, intramural sports, educational workshops, and otheractivities, the University strives to meet students’ diverse needs by making the residencehall a living-learning experience. Resident Assistants (RA’s) are upperclassmen, who underthe direction of the Area Coordinator (AC), help residents to adjust to the college environmentand their college life. RA’s are available as sources of information about the Universityand its policies, as community builders to insure that the hall provides an atmosphereconducive to study, and to provide a listening ear to those who just need to talk tosomeone. RA’s also strive to involve their residents in residence hall and campus communityprograms.Student Services43


Bankston HallAn all-male residence hall, Bankston houses both freshmen and upperclassmen. Singleoccupancy rooms are available to students, who reside on the 2nd and 3rd floors. Inaddition, the 3rd floor is provided as a quiet floor for students interested in a morestructured living and learning environment. Lounges and game rooms are also providedfor students’ recreation and enjoyment. Laundry facilities are available on the second andthird floors. A limited vending area is located in the first floor lobby. Each room is providedwith local phone service, internet access, monthly pest control and basic cable.Royer HallAn all-female residence hall, Royer Hall houses both freshmen and upperclassmen.Royer Hall is home to 143 women who live on campus. Single occupancy rooms may beavailable to students, on a first-come, first-serve basis, depending on availability. A largelobby/study area is available for students’ use on each floor. A laundry facility andvending area is located on the first floor. Each room is provided with local phone service,internet access, monthly pest control and basic cable.Maxwell HallAn all-male residence hall, Maxwell houses both freshmen and upperclassmen. Thetwo-story building, which houses 124 students, offers suite-style living with a bathroomshared by two rooms. A study room and television lounge are provided for all Maxwellresidents. A laundry facility and vending area is located on the first floor. Each room isprovided with internet access, local phone service, and basic cable.Horsfall HallThis three-story female residence hall houses both freshmen and upperclassmen. Alounge with microwave is provided for the students living in Horsfall Hall. Laundryfacilities are available in the basement. A vending area is located adjacent to the first floorlobby. Other amenities available to residents include: lounges, study rooms, andin-hall tutoring. Each room is provided with local phone service, Internet access, monthlypest control, and basic cable. The 3rd floor is designated as a quiet study floor.University ApartmentsCompleted in 1999, University Apartments comprise two co-residential buildings housingapproximately 48 students each and offering an independent living environment. Bothfreshmen and upperclassmen are eligible to live in the University Apartments. The twobedroomapartments are completely furnished and are a short walk from major classroombuildings. The University Apartments provide students with a comfortable living transitionfrom living in the residence halls to independent living after graduation. Laundry facilities arecentrally located in each building. The following amenities are included in the rent: utilities,garbage pick-up, basic cable, Internet access, local phone service, and water.Family HousingThe University also provides housing for full-time students with families. Theseapartments are available to married couples and to single parents who have dependentchildren living with them. Pets are not allowed, and there is a maximum of three peopleper apartment. The 23 unfurnished apartments are located north of the SteelmanFieldhouse. These apartments have a living room, kitchen-dining area, bath, and onebedroom. Refrigerators and stoves are not provided. Either electric or gas ranges can beused in the apartments.Eligibility for HousingA student living in a residence hall must be enrolled in a minimum of nine hours perfall or spring semester or three hours per summer term. Exceptions to this policy may begranted through the Director of Residence Life. Applications/contracts for housing andmore specific information are available by writing or calling the Office of Residence Life.44Student Services


Office of Student AffairsLOCATION: Gibson University CenterCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1053 / FAX: (870) 460-1653MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3459, Monticello, AR 71656EMAIL: dossp@uamont.eduThe Office of Student Affairs is one of twelve areas designed to assist students fromtheir first year through graduation. The Student Affairs staff is committed to buildingcommunity among the students who have chosen to study at the University of Arkansas-Monticello.The primary function of the Office of Student Affairs is to provide information aboutuniversity policies that affect students, administer the student judicial system, and makereferrals to campus services. The office serves as a liaison with faculty and other administrativeoffices on behalf of students. Additionally, the Office of Student Affairs is responsiblefor reserving selected facilities for campus and community groups.Student Health ProgramLOCATION: Gibson University CenterCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1051 / FAX: (870) 460-1653MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3459, Monticello, AR 71656EMAIL: richardson@uamont.eduThe Student Health Nurse is directly responsible for the administration of the StudentHealth Program at the University of Arkansas-Monticello. This program includes first aid,a variety of non-prescription medications, emergency services, and general health advice.In addition, referrals may be made to local agencies as necessary. The Student HealthProgram also features an Exercise Center available for students, faculty, and staff.Student Programs & ActivitiesLOCATION: Gibson University CenterCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1396 / FAX: (870) 460-1653MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3459, Monticello, AR 71656E-MAIL: waltermire@uamont.eduThe co-curricular experience plays a critical role in the development of students atthe University. With a wide variety of programs, activities, and over fifty student organizationsavailable to them, UAM students are able to take an active, hands-on approach tolearning life skills. These opportunities are provided to encourage student participation, toexperience various cultures and entertainment events, and to promote the maturation ofstudents. In addition, the University offers a series of special events and programs tostudents. These include Homecoming, Spirit Week, Greek Week, cultural awareness anddiversity programs, concerts, comedians, leadership development, and community serviceprojects. Many of these activities are planned and coordinated by the Student ActivitiesBoard (SAB) and Student Government Association (SGA).Special Student ServicesLOCATION: Harris HallCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1154 / TDD: (870) 460-1251 / FAX: (870) 460-1354MAILING ADDRESS: UAM Box 3094, Montice11o, AR 71656EMAIL: eubanksr@uamont.eduThe University ensures that students with disabilities are given the same rights andservices as other students at the University. Campus classrooms, administrative, andrecreational facilities are accessible. Further information regarding disability accommodationsmay be obtained by contacting the Director of Special Student Services.Student Services45


Student Support ServicesLOCATION: Harris HallCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1154 / FAX: (870) 460-1354MAILING ADDRESS: UAM Box 3458, Monticello, AR 71656E-MAIL: gateway@uamont.eduGateway Student Support Services (SSS) is a federally funded program sponsored bythe U.S. Department of Education. The Gateway Student Support Services program isdesigned to provide first generation, low income, and disabled students with additionalsupport to encourage collegiate success as they earn their baccalaureate degree whilegaining the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a full range of academic and careeroptions. Gateway SSS offers tutoring, study skills instruction, advising/counseling, peermentoring, computer literacy, career and educational planning instruction, culturalenrichment and graduate school preparation at no cost to eligible students. The AcademicResource Lab located within the Student Support Services center offers educationaltechnology such as internet access and interactive tutorials for reading, writing, and mathskills development.Upward BoundLOCATION: Old Student Union BuildingCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1010MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3629, Monticello, AR 71656EMAIL:jamesr@uamont.eduThe Upward Bound Program is a federally funded program sponsored by the U.S.Department of Education. The Upward Bound Program is designed to increase motivation,raise educational aspirations, and provide basic academic skills which will enable programparticipants to enter and succeed in a post-secondary institution. High school studentsfrom five counties in southeast Arkansas come to the University campus 26 times duringthe academic school year and live on campus for six weeks during the summer. Theprogram provides the students with basic skills instruction in the areas of English, science,mathematics, reading, and study skills. Upward Bound also offers the students counselingin personal, academic, and career areas and provides cultural and recreational activities.Youth Opportunities Unlimited (Y.O.U.)(Summer Program for at-risk Youth)LOCATION: Harris HallCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1154 / FAX: (870) 460-1354MAILING ADDRESS: P .0. Box 3094, Monticello, AR 71656EMAIL: you@uamont.edu / WEB: www.uamont.edu/youY.O.U. is a residential summer school and work program for youth aged1416. Theprogram is designed to encourage students to graduate from high school. For additionalinformation, please contact the Y.O.U. Coordinator at (870) 460-1154.Conduct CodeAs a public institution of higher learning, the University of Arkansas-Monticello hasas part of its mission to search for truth and understanding, and to strengthen students’capabilities as thoughtful contributors to society. This mission is partially fulfilled byencouraging and assisting students to take personal responsibility for their actions and tolearn to be productive members of society. It is the purpose of the University JudicialSystem to foster a supportive climate by protecting the community from behavior that isdestructive to the living, learning, and teaching environment of the University.The code of conduct has been established to ensure the rights and privileges of allmembers of the University community, to communicate the expectations of the communityto its members, and to provide a basis for orderly conduct of the affairs of the University.As such, each student must act in a manner consistent with the mission of the University,46Student Services


including off-campus conduct that is likely to have an adverse effect on the UAM educationalprocess.Thus, each student is expected to be fully acquainted with and comply with allpolicies, rules, and regulations of the University published in this document, the UniversityCatalog, and any other university sponsored publication. In addition, all studentsare expected to comply with all local, state and federal laws. No person or group ofpersons acting in concert may willfully violate the rules provided below. Specific examplesof misconduct for which a student may be subject to disciplinary action include, but are notlimited to, the following:1. Cheating: The possession, receipt, use, solicitation, or furnishing of unauthorizedaid in an academic endeavor. Cheating is considered an academic violation and isadjudicated under the provisions for Academic Conduct Code Violations.2. Plagiarism: The use of ideas or thoughts of another, which are not commonknowledge, without acknowledging the source(s), or, when applicable, identifying directquotations. Plagiarism is considered an academic violation and is adjudicated under theprovisions for Academic Conduct Code Violations.3. Misuse of Documents:Forgery, alteration, unauthorizedpossession of Universitydocuments, records, or studentidentification cards.4. Stealing: Unauthorizedappropriation or possession of theproperty of another. Theft ofUniversity signage, furniture,equipment, or any other Universityproperty is considered aserious offense and can result inimmediate expulsion.5. Damage to property:Damage to property of theUniversity or property of anymember of the Universitycommunity.6. Alcohol and Illicit Drugs:Possession, use, manufacture, ordistribution of alcohol ordrugs is prohibited. Any studentpossessing a felony amount ofdrugs, selling drugs or having theintent to sell drugs on Universityor University controlled propertywill be expelled from the University.7. Disorderly Conduct: Anybehavior which disrupts theregular or normal functions of theUniversity community, includingbehavior that breaches the peace orviolates the rights of others.Disorderly conduct includes, but isnot limited to, violent, noisy, ordrunken behavior, and/or the useof abusive or obscene language onuniversity controlled property orwhile representing the University,Student Services47


or attending a university function. Any verbal abuse, physical abuse or endangerment mayresult in expulsion from the University of Arkansas-Monticello.8. Disrupting the peace and good order of the University including, but not limitedto, fighting quarreling, inciting to riot, or other disruptive behaviors.9. Failure to Comply with Directions of a University Official (including thoseappointed or elected to act on behalf of the University acting under the provisions of theStudent Conduct Code or in the performance of their duties.)10. Infringements on the rights of students, faculty, staff, or other authorizedpersonnel to gain access to any university facility for the purpose of attending class,participating in an interview, university conference, or any other university activities.11. Threats: Terroristic threats, false alarms or reports where the person initiates,communicates, or circulates a report of a present, past, or future bombing, fire, offense, orother emergency that is known as false or baseless and could result in required action by anofficial or volunteer agency organized to address such emergencies; or interrupts theoccupation of a building, office, classroom or residence hall room. A terroristic threat ofany nature is considered a severe offense and may result in expulsion from the Universityof Arkansas-Monticello.12. Misuse of Fire Equipment: Misuse of fire extinguishers or any other fire or safetyequipment including disabling or removing smoke detectors or fire alarms in anyUniversity facility including residence hall rooms, University Apartments, and familyhousing.13. Lewd, Indecent or Obscene Behavior: Behavior that is lewd, indecent or obscenewill not be permitted in University buildings including, but not limited to, privatebehavior in residence hall room/apartments/common spaces, student organization spaces,or public behavior in public performances in any University or University controlledfacility.14. Failure to Meet Financial Obligations to the University: Knowingly presenting aninsufficient check or forging a document in payment to the University or to a member ofthe University community acting in an official capacity, or failure to make satisfactoryarrangements for the settling of accounts with the University.15. Furnishing False Information: To tender information which is false or untrue tothe University for its official use including, but not limited to: misrepresentation of mailingaddress, test scores, citizenship, and transcript work.16. Responsibility for Student Guests: Students are responsible for informing theirguests, student and non student, of University policies and will be held responsible for thebehavior of their guests. A guest is defined as (1) any person who is present at theinvitation of a student, or (2) any person who is received by a student, or (3) any invited oruninvited individual who is accompanied by a student. All guests must be registered withthe appropriate University office and official.17. Weapons, Firearms, and Explosives: The unauthorized use, possession, ordistribution of fireworks, firearms, ammunition, dangerous chemicals, explosive materials,or devices capable of casting a projectile (e.g., bows) or other lethal weapons is strictlyprohibited and constitutes a federal offense. The Department of Public Safety will storefirearms, bows, and other weapons specifically designed for hunting purposes.18. Verbal Abuse: Verbal abuse is the use of obscene, profane or derogatory languagewhich abuses or defames another. Verbal abuse of any UAM faculty/staff member, or anycampus visitor, may result in immediate expulsion from the University of Arkansas-Monticello.19. Harassment: Harassment is the act of an individual or group of individualsthreatening, in person, by telephone, in writing, electronically, or by other means, to take anunlawful action against any person. Harassment includes any reckless action that annoysor alarms the recipient or is intended to annoy or alarm the recipient. Harassment includes,but is not limited to, racial and sexual harassment, attempting or threatening to strike, kickor otherwise subject another person to physical contact; making an offensive coarseutterance, gesture or display; addressing abusive language to any person, following aperson in or about a public place or places or engaging in a course of conduct or repeatedly48Student Services


committing acts that alarm or seriously annoy another person.20. Threat of Physical Abuse or Endangerment: A threat of physical abuse is theexpression of intent to endanger the health or safety of any person on the UAM Campus.The threat of physical abuse or endangerment made towards any UAM faculty/staffmember, or any campus visitor may result in immediate expulsion from the University ofArkansas-Monticello.21. Physical Abuse or Endangerment: Physical abuse or endangerment is any actwhich imperils or jeopardizes the health or safety of any student, faculty, staff or visitor onthe Campus. Physical abuse or endangerment of any UAM faculty/staff member, orany campus visitor will result in immediate expulsion for the University of Arkansas-Monticello.22. Climbing on University Structures: Climbing, repelling or any related activity isprohibited on University structures. Accesses to roofs and activity on roofs of Universitystructures are permitted only if approval for such activity is received from the AssistantVice Chancellor for Student Affairs/Dean of Students.23. Violation of policy relating to electronic network facilities such as local areanetworks, e-mail, and the Internet.24. Unauthorized use or entry into any University facility and/or unauthorizedpossession of keys to any University facility including, but not limited to, allowing anyunauthorized individual into a building or the sharing of keys to a University facility.25. Violations of Other University Regulations: Violations of University regulationscontained in official publications or notices are prohibited.26. Violations of Local, State and/or Federal Laws on the University Campus isprohibited. Violations of such laws at an off campus location that results in damage to orimposes possible endangerment to the institution, its property, faculty, staff or students,may be subject to the University Judicial Code.Disciplinary Sanctions for Violations of Codes of ConductDisciplinary sanctions within the UAM Judicial System to which students will besubjected to include, but are not limited to, the following:1. Warning: Notice, oral or written, that a specific behavior or a series of actions isunacceptable to the point that repetition would most likely result in more serious disciplinaryaction, such as probation or suspension. The student is officially warned that furtherunacceptable behavior will result in more serious action.2. Counseling: Establish a series of private conferences between the student and acounselor in order to assist the student in meeting behavioral expectations of the Universityand to meet his/her individual needs in academic and/or personal development;3. Educational Sanction: A task or service that benefits the individual, campus orcommunity;4. Reprimand: A written notice to the student that continuation or repetition ofspecified conduct may be cause for additional disciplinary action;5. Restitution: Compensating the University or other injured parties includingfaculty, staff, of students for damaged, lost or destroyed property;6. Conduct Probation: Disciplinary actions taken as a result of conduct conflictingwith University regulations that could include a reprimand, suspension from residence hallactivities and/or loss of visiting privileges to other halls or the right to receive guests. Thisprobation is to be for a specific period of time;7. Residential Housing Sanctions: Penalty involving: (a) housing relocation, (b)restriction of hall privileges, (c) removal from University Housing.8. Disciplinary Probation: Loss of specifically designated privileges, which couldinclude, but not limited to: holding any elected or appointed student office, appointment toa University Committee, pledging or being initiated into a campus organization, participatingin any intercollegiate event or contest, denial of campus recreation facilities, participationin intramurals, use of a motor vehicle on campus and/or living in University housing.9. Fine: A monetary fine levied against the student;Student Services49


10. Suspension: When a student’s behavior is unacceptable to the extent that it reflectsunfavorably upon character, judgment, and maturity, and/or harmful to the well-being ofthe student body and the University, the student may be suspended from the University.a. Active Suspension: The student is separated from the University and mustleave the campus for a specified period of time after which the student is eligible topetition for readmission. The Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs is to benotified when a student requests readmission.b. Immediate suspension: A student is subject to instantaneous suspensionpending an official disciplinary hearing when conduct jeopardizes the safety of thestudent, other members of the university community, and/or institutional property. Ahearing will be scheduled as soon as possible, but no later than five (5) calendardays after the immediate suspension.11. Expulsion: Permanent severance of the student’s relationship with the Universitywhereby the student may not return and his/her enrollment is canceled. If a student isexpelled, he/she must leave campus immediately and is required to fulfill his/her financialresponsibility to the University and may forfeit any deposits and/or refunds.12. Loss of Access: Any student who has been separated from the University bysuspension or expulsion as a result of disciplinary action shall be denied the privileges ofthe University and of university organizations during the period of such expulsion orsuspension. Such students shall not be permitted to participate in any university recognizedfunction or stay in any residence hall or other university housing.13. Ban from Campus or Facilities: A non-student may be banned from campus for anindefinite or specified period of time. A student may be banned from specified campusfacilities, including residence halls, and is subject to arrest and/or further disciplinaryaction if the ban is violated.Judicial Authority/ProceduresThe University reserves the right to take necessary and appropriate action for on andoff campus behaviors, to protect the safety and well-being of the campus community. Suchaction may include, but is not limited to, the immediate removal of a student from thecampus premises. The authority for such decisions rests with the Vice Chancellor forStudent Affairs or the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs/Dean of Students..The rules and regulations described within this catalog apply to all conduct onUniversity owned, controlled or operated property, and at all Universitysponsoredfunctions. Charges or conflicts resulting from off-campus violations of local, state, orfederal law will not result in disciplinary action by the University unless the violationoccurred at a University sponsored function or it is determined that full disciplinary actionis essential to the protection of other members of the University community or to thesafeguarding of the educational process. For violations originating within the residencehalls, the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs/Dean of Students will determine(upon initial investigation of the offense) if the appropriate sanction might be harsher thanConduct Probation. If not, then the Residence Hall Judicial Board hearing option is used.If so, the case is referred to the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs/Dean ofStudents for adjudication.For a violation occurring outside the residence halls, the Assistant Vice Chancellor forStudent Affairs/Dean of Students or University Judicial Board has jurisdiction.The University of Arkansas-Monticello reserves the right to record all judicial boardhearings in order to provide an accurate review of the case should an appeal be granted orverification of facts are needed.If criminal authorities are considering a case, UAM discipline procedures continue asusual, since criminal proceedings and UAM procedures are unrelated events.50Student Services


Discipline System StructureCharges of student misconduct may be brought to the attention of any Residence LifeStaff Member (if the violation occurred in a residence hall) or the Assistant Vice Chancellorfor Student Affairs/Dean of Students. A preliminary investigation will be conducted todetermine if judicial action is required or appropriate. The Assistant Vice Chancellor forStudent Affairs/Dean of Students will also determine the severity of the offense. If theoffense is likely to result in a sanction beyond the scope of the Residence Hall JudicialBoard, then the case is referred to the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs/Dean ofStudents.If judicial action is deemed appropriate, the Assistant Vice Chancellor for StudentAffairs/Dean of Students or a professional staff member of the Office of Residence Life willnotify the student within fifteen (15) class days after the alleged violation, or fifteen (15)class days after the individual has been identified as the alleged violator, that he or she hasthe option of an administrative hearing or a judicial board hearing. After this decision ismade, the student is given notice of the hearing at least 48 hours (24 hours for residencehall cases) prior to the hearing.Administrative Hearing ProceduresStudents may choose the option of being heard by an appointed judicial officer on theresidence hall professional staff rather than the Residence Hall Judicial Board or by theAssistant Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs/Dean of Students rather than the UniversityJudicial Board.The Hearing Officer may use less formal proceedings than judicial boards, but noticeand recording procedures must be observed and the accused student must be given a fairopportunity to present his/her case.Judicial Board CompositionResidence Hall Judicial Board:The Residence Hall Judicial Board consists of four students and one professional staffmember of the Office of Residence Life. The student members are recommended by theResidence Hall Association (RHA) and approved by the Assistant Vice Chancellor forStudent Affairs/Dean of Students. One student serving on the Residence Hall JudicialBoard may be a Resident Assistant. However, the Resident Assistant serving on the boardmay not be a staff member in the building where the violation allegedly occurred.The Assistant Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs/Dean of Students appoints theresidence life professional staff member to serve on the Residence Hall Judicial Board. Thequorum for the Residence Life Judicial Board will be two students and the one professionalstaff member. More limited quorums may be assembled in special circumstances with theagreement of the accused.University Judicial Board:The University Judicial Board consists of thirteen persons who are to be as representativeof the University community as possible. Two members serve as chairpersons. Sevenare to be faculty or staff members. Six are to be students. Faculty or professional staffmembers are appointed by the Chancellor of the University and serve a one-year term.Student members are appointed by the Student Government Association in conjunctionwith the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs/Dean of Students and approvedby the Chancellor of the University. Student members also serve a one-year term.The quorum for the University Judicial Board will be four board members. These fourmembers will include a minimum of two (2) faculty/staff members and (2) students. Morelimited quorums may be assembled in special circumstances with the agreement of theaccused.Student Services51


University RelationsThe following areas describe the offices which serve prospective and present studentsas well as alumni of the University.Office of AdmissionsLOCATION: Harris HallCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1026, outside Drew County toll free 1-800844-1826FAX: (870) 460-1926HOME PAGE: http://cotton.uamont.edu/ admissions/default.htmlMAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3600, Monticello, AR 71656E-MAIL: whitingm@uamont.eduAny student seeking information regarding admission to the University of Arkansas-Monticello should contact the Office of Admissions. Required documentation should besubmitted well before the semester begins.The Office of Admissions also provides services that will guide new students as theybegin their transition to higher education. This process begins with summer pre-registrationwhen students receive academic advising, register for classes, and are introduced tocampus services. Parents are invited to attend summer pre-registration sessions andparticipate in special programs designed for them.Fall orientation promotes the development of positive relationships with faculty, staff,and peers while simultaneously providing information about academic policies, procedures,student services, and student life.Prospective students are encouraged to visit campus when the University is in session.Campus tours and meetings with academic units, financial aid, or residence life are easilyarranged through the Office of Admissions.Alumni AffairsLOCATION: Administration Building 104CAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1028 / FAX: (870) 460-1324MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3519, Monticello, AR 71656E-MAIL: dossp@uamont.eduIt is the purpose of the Alumni Office to maintain contact with alumni and formerstudents and to enhance the growth and development of individuals as well as theinstitution through a positive relationship. The Alumni Office is vigilant in the maintenanceof its alumni/former student records, thereby enhancing the opportunity to establish along-term, mutually beneficial rapport. The Alumni Office seeks to create a spirit ofgoodwill with former students that will endure. This clearly provides a service to alumni/former students in general, but more specifically the Alumni Office works to serve ourcurrently enrolled students as they seek ways and opportunities to benefit from theexperience and wisdom of our University constituency.Development OfficeLOCATION: Administration Building 104-ECAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1027FAX: (870) 460-1324MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3520, Monticello, AR 71656E-MAIL: dossp@uamont.eduThe Development Office has as its purpose the goal of continuing to increase thequality of education offered at the University through private fund raising. The major focusof this office is toward endowed scholarships with a secondary focus on facilities, research,and other endowment programs. The solicitation process includes contact with alumni andformer students, friends of the University, businesses and corporations, and privatefoundations. This office works closely with the University Foundation Fund.52Student Services


Intercollegiate AthleticsLOCATION: Steelman FieldhouseCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1058 / FAX: (870) 460-1458MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3066, Monticello, AR 71656INTERNET: http://www.uamont.edu/athleticsIntercollegiate athletics provide additional experience for those with special interestand skills in competitive sports. Objectives of the programs are in keeping with the totaleducation program. The University of ArkansasMonticello offers sports for men (football,basketball, baseball, golf, and rodeo) and sports for women (basketball, softball, tennis,cross-country, and rodeo).The University is a member of the Gulf South Conference, the National CollegiateAthletic Association, and the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association and adheres to therules and regulations of those organizations.Media ServicesLOCATION: Student Services CenterCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1074 / FAX: (870) 460-1174MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3589, Monticello, AR 71656E-MAIL: brewer@uamont.eduThe Office of Media Services serves as the official campus liaison with the news mediaand general public. All news releases, feature articles, and photographs concerning allfacets of campus life are produced by the media services office. This office also produces allpublications, brochures, and newsletters for the various offices and academic units.University Relations OfficeLOCATION: Administration Building 104CAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1027 / FAX: (870) 460-1324MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3520, Monticello, AR 71656E-MAIL: dossp@uamont.eduThe Office of University Relations serves as a liaison between the University and thecommunity. Responsibilities include university development, alumni relations, andseeking additional funding through acquisition of grants.Student Services53


ACADEMICregulationsThe University of Arkansas-Monticello reservesthe right to change the fees, rules, and calendar thatregulate admission and registration, instruction,and graduation from the University.The University further reserves the right to change any other regulations affecting thestudent body. Changes shall become effective whenever the proper authorities so determine,and shall apply not only to prospective students, but also to those currently enrolledin the University.Academic SessionsThe academic year includes two regular semesters in the fall and spring and asummer session of two terms. The fall semester begins in late August and concludes priorto the Christmas holiday. The spring semester begins in early January and concludes inmid-May. The two summer terms are normally scheduled between June 1 and August 15.Academic CreditThe University operates on a semester calendar. One hour of credit represents anamount of work equivalent to one 50-minute lecture each week for a minimum of 15 weeks.From two to three hours of laboratory work constitute the equivalent of one hour of lecture.ClassificationStudents are classified at the beginning of each semester based upon accumulatedsemester-hours of credit earned. Students who have earned fewer than 30 credits are classifiedas freshmen; sophomores have earned at least 30 credits, juniors 60 credits, and seniors 90 credits.Grading SystemGrade Meaning of Grades Value in Grade PointsA Outstanding 4B Good 3C Average 2D Passing 1*F Unsatisfactory Work, or Withdrew - Failing 0W Withdrew - Passing (no grade points)AU Course Audited (no degree credit; no grade points)I Required Work Incomplete (no grade points)CR Credit (no grade points)*A grade of “C” or better must be earned in some courses in order to progress to the nexthigher course level, or to graduate in some majors.Academic Regulations55


A student may receive an incomplete, “I,” when, due to unusual circumstancesacceptable to the instructor, the student is unable to complete course requirements prior tothe end of a term. When possible, the option should be discussed by the instructor andstudent, concluding in a written agreement outlining the remaining requirements to besatisfied for the course (use the Incomplete Grade Form available in the academic unitoffice). One copy of this form must be filed at the time final grades for the term aresubmitted with each of the following signatures: course instructor, head of academic unitoffering the course, and the student. A notation of “I” will be posted to the grade report forthe term in which the incomplete is granted and on the academic transcript. An “I” willnot affect term and cumulative credits and grade point averages for the term in which theincomplete is granted and subsequent enrollment terms during the time limit. A studentmay not re-enroll in an incomplete course within the time limit allotted for completing thecourse.The student will have a maximum of one calendar year to satisfy the requirements forthe course. Failure to complete course requirements within one year will automaticallyreplace the incomplete with a grade of “F” with the credits and grade point averagesrecalculated to reflect this change.Except for the grade of “I,” no course grade will be changed unless an error has beenmade. All grades earned will remain on the permanent record. A grade of “D” or “F,” forexample, will remain on a student’s permanent record, even though a higher grade may berecorded for the course in question, after it has been repeated.Grading criteria for specific courses, outlining the basis on which grades are assigned,can be found in course syllabi.Academic ClemencyIn order to provide a second opportunity for undergraduate students who performedpoorly at some point in their studies, the University of Arkansas-Monticello has a policy onacademic clemency. The policy is designed to help former students who have gained a newrespect and commitment to higher education and the career opportunities that come from acollege degree.To be eligible for academic clemency, the student must not have been enrolled in anyinstitution of higher education for a period of five years or more. The student must beenrolled at UAM. The request for clemency must be made within the first semester of thestudent’s enrollment at UAM or the first semester the student is returning to UAM afterbeing absent for a period of five years or more.To be considered for academic clemency, the student must agree in writing to thefollowing stipulations:1. All grades and credits earned in all semesters for which clemency is granted will beforfeited.2. All grades and credits for which clemency is granted will not count in computingGPA or in meeting requirements for graduation.3. The transcript will continue to contain the entire academic record, including thegrade earned for each course. However, a notation will be made showing the semesters forwhich clemency was granted. The credit hours will become zero.4. Academic clemency can be granted only once in an individual’s academic career,and such declaration and granting is final and irreversible.5. In regard to financial history, state and federal regulations take precedence over theinstitutional policy of academic clemency.6. The academic clemency at UAM pertains only to UAM, and other institutions mayor may not honor this policy.In the case of transfer students who have received academic clemency at anotheraccredited college or university, UAM will honor the clemency established at the previousinstitution. UAM will allow academic clemency for work taken at UAM or at anotherinstitution.Students interested in pursuing academic clemency should contact the Office of theRegistrar for the appropriate form and instructions.56Academic Regulations


Dean’s ListAfter each fall and spring term, the University publishes the Dean’s list of all studentswhose semester grade point average is 3.50 or higher for 12 or more hours of course workat the 1000-4000 level.Course Prerequisites and CorequisitiesNo student may enroll in a course until successfully completing all prerequisites orconcurrently enrolling in the corequisite. The instructor may withdraw any student whodoes not comply with this regulation. The head of the academic unit in which the course istaught may approve exceptions to this policy.Course Symbols and NumbersThe numbers of the regular university courses contain four digits: the first indicates,in general, the university year; the second and third the particular course; and the fourththe number of hours of credit.Developmental courses are numbered 0001-0999, freshmen-level courses 1001-1999;sophomore-level courses 2001-2999; junior-level courses 3001-3999; senior-level courses4001-4999; and graduate-level courses 5000-5999.Enrollment in Developmental CoursesThe UAM developmental education program is designed to identify academicallyunderprepared students and assist in developing their abilities to successfully meet therequirements of college-level courses. Based on ACT or SAT scores, students withdevelopmental education needs are placed in one or more courses in reading, English,mathematics, and basic college skills.Students whose enhanced ACT scores in reading, mathematics, or English fall below19 must enroll in appropriate developmental courses: a reading laboratory, a 0-levelmathematics course, or ENGL 0133 Fundamentals of English. Students with low collegeentrance scores in both mathematics and English will be restricted in their first semester toenrolling in a maximum of 14 credit hours which will include the appropriate 0-levelmathematics course, ENGL 0133 Fundamentals of English, and DEV 0101 College Skills.Students should consult their academic advisors to make appropriate course selections tocomplete their class schedule and stay within the 14-hour maximum. Students who havecompleted a college-level course in mathematics or English with a “C” or above may notenroll for credit in a 0-level course in that subject. NOTE: Part-time students will berequired to complete these specified courses during their first 30 hours of course work atthe University.Repetition of CoursesCourses may be repeated a maximum of two times. Students may not repeat a coursein which a “B” or “A” was earned. A “W” or “F” received for courses will be considered ascourses attempted. All courses attempted (including repeats) will remain on the transcript.The last grade earned will be used in computing grade point average. NOTE: If a studentrepeats a course in which a passing grade was earned and receives an “F,” the creditpreviously earned will be invalidated; the grade of “F” will be used in computing the gradepoint average.Students must appeal to the Office of Academic Affairs for permission to repeatcourses for the third time. If permission is granted, then the student is limited to amaximum enrollment of fourteen hours for the semester. Students who wish to enroll morethan three times in a specific mathematics course other than MATH 0143, Introduction toAlgebra, must take and/or repeat the prerequisite for the course. Exceptions to this mustbe approved by the Mathematics Review Committee.Academic Regulations57


Independent Study Courses for UndergraduatesIt is sometimes desirable, and in the best interest of students’ academic growth, thatthey be allowed to engage in independent study or research. Independent study or researchcourses will carry a course number of 479V in each discipline, and are open only tostudents who meet the following criteria:1) completion of 60 hours;2) completion of a minimum of 12 hours of course work in the discipline of theindependent study or research;3) a 3.00 cumulative grade point average in the discipline in which the research isconducted.Independent study and research courses will require extensive independent study andresearch, formal written reports, and regular conferences with the instructor. A detaileddescription of the proposal and its requirements must be submitted for approval to theacademic unit head and the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. Students may completeonly one independent study/research project per semester. Independent study/researchproposals should not duplicate existing courses in the academic catalog.Undergraduates Enrolled in Graduate CoursesQualified undergraduate students may be permitted to enroll in graduate courseseither for undergraduate or graduate credit within the following guidelines. Undergraduatestudents within 30 hours of graduation may petition to enroll in graduate courses bycontacting the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. A minimum cumulative grade pointaverage of 3.00, approval by the course instructor, and consent of the dean or chair of theoffering unit must be presented as part of the petition. Normally, undergraduate studentswill not receive graduate credit, but when circumstances warrant, the Graduate Councilmay authorize awarding graduate credit. However, students enrolling in graduate coursesfor graduate credit (not undergraduate credit) may not apply such credits to undergraduatedegree requirements.AuditStudents who audit a course do not receive credit for the course, and the instructordoes not evaluate the progress of the student. After the deadline for registration haspassed, students may not change from audit to credit status.Types of Non-Classroom CreditRecognizing the fact that individuals are often able to learn concepts, skills, andinformation essentially equivalent to college-level learning, yet acquired outside thetraditional college classroom setting, the University offers students the opportunity to earncollege credit through special examination, evaluation, and other procedures. Students mayearn academic credit without letter grades through these procedures by satisfactorilycompleting:1) requirements and examinations in approved correspondence courses;2) approved examinations in the College Entrance Examination Board’s AdvancedPlacement program;3) approved examinations in the College Level Examination Program (CLEP);4) examinations prepared by the appropriate academic unit; and5) assessment of prior military training.A maximum of 60 hours of academic credit may be earned through any combinationof the above programs. Specific information regarding each is printed below. Granting ofcredit, however, does not guarantee applicability to every major, minor, or program ofstudy. Interested students should consult individual academic units for this information.Students should also be aware that some graduate and professional schools will not acceptcredit by examination or learning experience. Non-classroom credit will be posted only forcurrently enrolled students.58Academic Regulations


I. Correspondence CoursesThe maximum correspondence credit accepted is 15 semester hours. All studentsenrolled in the University of Arkansas-Monticello who pursue correspondence work musthave prior approval of their academic advisor, academic unit head, and the Vice Chancellorfor Academic Affairs. The test must be taken either at the University of Arkansas-Monticello Testing Center or at the institution offering the correspondence. If this procedureis not followed, the University may refuse to accept the hours for credit.Correspondence credit may not be taken when the same course is offered on campus,except in the case of absolute conflicts and with the permission of the Vice Chancellor forAcademic Affairs.Correspondence courses will not be used to satisfy General Education requirements,and some specific courses must be taken in residence. These include Speech 1013 (Voiceand Diction) and Speech 1023 (Public Speaking), Art 1103 (Art for Elementary Teachers),and all methods courses.The institution sponsoring the correspondence course must provide the Universitywith a transcript or notification of completion. Credit will not be granted unless the gradefor the correspondence work is a “C” or better.II. Advanced Placement CreditUAM will grant college credit for courses successfully completed in the AdvancedPlacement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board by an entering freshmanwhile in high school. The semester hours of credit permitted will be that allowed for thecorresponding course or sequence of courses at UAM, but no grade will be assigned.Students receiving Advanced Placement Credit for a course may not earn CLEP credit for aprerequisite to this course.The tests and scores accepted by the University are:Advanced Placement UAM Equivalent MinimumCourse Course(s) Score(School of Business)MacroeconomicsPrinciples of Macroeconomics(ECON 2203) ............................................................... 3MicroeconomicsPrinciples of Microeconomics(ECON 2213) ............................................................... 3(School of Arts and Humanities)English Language/CompositionFrench LanguageSpanish LanguageStudio ArtArt HistoryComposition(ENGL 1013) ............................................................... 3(ENGL 1013 & 1023) .................................................. 4Elementary French(FREN 1003) ................................................................ 3(FREN 1003 & 1013) ................................................... 4Elementary Spanish(SPAN 1003) ................................................................ 3(SPAN 1003 & 1013) ................................................... 4Drawing(ART 1013) .................................................................. 3Art Appreciation(ART 1053) .................................................................. 3(School of Mathematical and Natural Sciences)Computer ScienceComputer Science(PASCAL)PASCAL Programming(CS 2213) ..................................................................... 3Calculus ABCalculus I(MATH 2255) .............................................................. 4Academic Regulations59


Calculus BCCalculus I & II(MATH 2255) .............................................................. 4(MATH 3495) .............................................................. 4Physics BGeneral Physics I & II(PHYS 2203) ................................................................ 3(PHYS 2213) ................................................................ 3Physics C, MechanicsUniversity Physics I(PHYS 2313) ................................................................ 3Physics C, ElectricityUniversity Physics II& Magnetism (PHYS 2323) ................................................................ 3Biology Biological Science ....................................................... 3(BIOL 1063) andBiological Science Lab(BIOL 1071)Chemistry Introductory Chemistry ............................................ 3(CHEM 1023) andIntroductory Chemistry Lab(CHEM 1031)(Division of Music)Music TheoryMusic Theory(MUS 1023) ................................................................. 3Music Theory(MUS 1033) ................................................................. 3(School of Social and Behavioral Sciences)Government and Politics/UnitedStatesAmerican National Government(PSCI 2213) .................................................................. 3United States HistoryAmerican History(HIST 2213) ................................................................. 3(HIST 2223) ................................................................. 3European HistorySurvey of Civilization(HIST 1013) ................................................................. 3(HIST 1023) ................................................................. 3This listing is frequently updated to reflect changes in the Advanced Placementprogram. For current information contact the Office of Academic Affairs at (870) 460-1032.III. Credit by ExaminationStudents may gain college credit in a number of subjects through some nationallysponsored examination programs such as the College Level Examination Program (CLEP).Specific information about what tests can be taken for course credit can be obtainedthrough the Testing Office located in the University Center, (870) 460-1010.IV. Credit by Academic Unit ExaminationStudents may challenge and earn credit for 1000-4000 level courses currently listed inthe University’s catalog for which no approved CLEP examinations exist by satisfactorilycompleting specially prepared examinations. Students wishing to take these unit challengeexaminations must complete a form available in the Registrar’s Office and obtain thepermission of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, the dean or chair of the unitoffering the course, and the professor of record (who must be a full-time faculty member).Challenge examinations will be available only during the regular academic year.Students may not attempt credit by examination in a course in the following instances:1) for courses where an approved CLEP examination is currently available;2) when the student has already attempted the course;60Academic Regulations


3) when the student has completed a more advanced course for which the credit byexamination course is a prerequisite.Credit by unit examination is not available for courses below the 1000 level. Amaximum of nine credit hours may be earned through credit by unit examination.V. Credit for Prior Military TrainingThe University may award up to 12 credit hours for prior military training courseslisted in the latest edition of the American Council on Education’s A Guide to the Evaluationof Educational Experiences in the Armed Service. For further information, contact the Office ofthe Registrar.Student Load and Definition of Full/Part-Time StudentsFull-time undergraduate student status requires registration in at least 12 semesterhours of courses. Students registered in less than 12 semester hours will be consideredpart-time status. A normal load is considered 15 semester hours.The maximum number of semester hours in which a student with less than a GPA of3.00 may enroll is 18. A student who has a cumulative GPA of 3.00, or who has applied forgraduation, may register for a maximum of 21 hours for the current semester. Studentswho do not meet the GPA requirement or graduation criteria must have approval of theVice Chancellor for Academic Affairs before registering for more than 18 hours. Allstudents wishing to register for more than 18 semester hours must pay tuition and fees forthe additional registration.Students may register for a total of 7 semester hours per summer term, not to exceed14 semester hours during the combined summer terms. Students enrolled in at least sixhours during the summer term will be considered full-time status. Less than six hours willbe considered part-time status during the summer.Changes (Drop/Add) and WithdrawalStudents may add courses to their schedules, with the approval of their assignedadvisor, only during the first through fifth class days of the semester. Students may drop acourse, or withdraw from all courses, through the first 11 days of classes with no grade orcourse listed. In the summer term, these periods are shorter; specific deadline dates arelisted in the University Calendar. A processing fee will be charged for each change ofschedule, except during the registration period. During a fall or spring semester, coursesdropped and withdrawals accomplished will be recorded on a student’s transcript asfollows:First 11 class days - no course listed;12th class day through 55th class day- grade of “W” only;56th class day through final deadline - “W” if passing, “F” if failing;Last three class days - no drop or withdrawal allowed.To drop a course, a student should begin at the office of his/her academic advisor. Tocomplete withdrawal from the University, a student should begin at the Registrar’s Office,return any library books, laboratory keys, and University equipment, and check out of theresidence hall.When an emergency or other special circumstance makes it impossible for a student towithdraw in person, the student may correspond with the Registrar’s Office to make otherarrangements.Students who stop attending a course (or all courses) without dropping or withdrawingofficially will receive failing grades.Attendance RegulationsRegular class attendance is considered an essential part of the students’ educationalexperience and a requirement for adequate evaluation of academic progress. The facultyconsiders that college students, as mature individuals, will recognize the need for regularattendance and will comply with this requirement. Faculty may establish specific attenAcademic Regulations61


dance requirements which will be stated in the course syllabus. Students who violateattendance requirements may be removed from the course with a grade of “W” or “F.” Inthe case of a 0-level course, students who miss six hours of lecture may be withdrawn bythe instructor.Student Absences Due to Participation in University-Sponsored EventsAt times, a student may participate in a University-sponsored activity which causesthe student to miss one or more class meetings. When this occurs, the sponsor of theactivity will provide the student with a memo which includes the event, dates and times ofthe event, and the student’s name. The student will individually contact each of his/herinstructors to discuss the class(es) to be missed. This discussion should occur at least oneweek prior to the anticipated absence. The student is responsible for all material coveredand any class activities during the absence. The sponsor of the activity will also provide allacademic unit heads and Academic Affairs a description of the activity which includes thelocation, dates, and a list of campus participants.Policy on VisitorsAll visitors to a class are required to have the permission of the instructor. Visitors toany classroom or University facility must not be disruptive or present a safety hazard.Anyone planning to visit a class for more than four sessions will be required to enroll in theclass as an auditor.Grade Point AverageA student’s cumulative grade point average represents only those grades earned inresidence at the University. Grades earned in courses at other institutions and transferredto the University will not be used in calculating cumulative grade point averages. Additionally,correspondence courses will not be included in cumulative grade point averages.The grade point average of a student who takes a course at UAM and then repeats thecourse at another institution will not be affected by the grade earned at the transferinstitution, even if the grade earned there is sufficient (“C” or better) to allow the credit tobe accepted at UAM.NOTE: Except for repeats, a minimum 2.00 grade point average (GPA) is required toenroll in a junior (3000) or senior (4000) level course. Any exceptions to this policy must beapproved by the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs or designee.Conditional Admission of First-Time Freshmen andAcademic ProgressAll first-time freshmen graduating from high school after May 1, 2002, will beadmitted either “unconditionally” or “with conditions.” The Office of Admission Recordsand the Office of the Registrar will be jointly responsible for determining the admissionstatus of each first-time freshman.Students will be admitted unconditionally if they have successfully completed, with aminimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale), the Arkansas highschool core curriculum for unconditional admission to public colleges and universities.Students not meeting the standards as noted above will be admitted with conditions.First-time freshmen who are admitted with conditions and are seeking an associate ofarts degree or baccalaureate degree must, within their first 30 hours of University enrollment,complete at least 12 hours of the General Education Curriculum and any necessarydevelopmental courses with at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average.First-time freshmen who are admitted with conditions and who are seeking anassociate of applied science degree must, within their first 30 hours of University enrollment,complete at least 6 hours of General Education Curriculum and at least 6 hours oftechnical courses required for the associate of applied science degree and any necessary62Academic Regulations


developmental courses with at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average.The progress of all students admitted with conditions will be monitored followingeach semester. Students will maintain good academic standing when their semester andcumulative grade point averages are at 2.00 or higher. If either the cumulative or semestergrade point average falls below 2.00, the student will be placed on Conditional AcademicStanding. The University will continue a student on Conditional Academic Standing untilboth the cumulative and semester grade point averages are 2.00 or higher. When a studentwho is on Conditional Academic Standing has both the cumulative and semester gradepoint averages fall below 2.00, the student will be suspended from the University.The records of students admitted with conditions will be reviewed following thecompletion of 30 semester credit hours. Those who have not completed the required corecourses, technical courses (if applicable), and developmental course (if applicable) with aminimum cumulative grade point average if 2.00 will be required to enroll in the appropriatecourses and will be restricted to a maximum of 14 credit hours per semester until thecourse requirement is satisfied.Academic Standing and SuspensionAt the end of each term, the University reviews the academic standing of all students.Students will maintain good academic standing when both their semester and cumulativegrade point averages are at 2.00 or higher. If either the cumulative or semester grade pointaverage falls below 2.00, the student will be placed on conditional standing. The Universitymay continue a student on conditional standing until both the cumulative andsemester grade point averages are 2.00 or higher. When both the cumulative and semestergrade point averages are 2.00 or higher, the student is removed from conditional standing.Students on conditional standing whose semester and cumulative grade pointaverages both fall below 2.00 will be suspended from the University. The first suspensionwill be for one semester, the second suspension will last for one year, and the thirdsuspension will extend for three years. The suspension may be appealed to the AcademicAppeals Committee. Suspended students who are eligible to continue their studies at theUniversity must contact the Office of Admissions for readmission.Students receiving a one-semester suspension at the end of the spring semester will beallowed to enroll in the fall semester if, during the summer, they earn at least six hours ofcourse work at UAM with a minimum 2.00 grade point average.The academic standing of all students enrolled in the summer will be evaluated at theend of the second summer term. Students whose cumulative grade point average meetsthe appropriate standard at the end of the summer will be removed from suspension orconditional academic standing. Students will not be suspended or placed on conditionalacademic standing based on their performance during the summer.Any credit earned from another institution while a student is suspended will not beaccepted by UAM.Continuous Enrollment in Required CoursesAll full-time students must be continuously enrolled in the appropriate Englishcomposition and mathematics courses until their general education requirements in theseareas have been met. A student enrolled in the College Skills course, developmentalmathematics, and/or developmental English composition, and/or Composition I, mustcomplete the course with a grade of “C” or higher. Part-time degree seeking students mustcomplete the mathematics and English composition requirements in the first 30 credithours attempted.Arkansas Assessment of General EducationPursuant to Act 874 of 1993, a “rising junior test” must be taken by all Arkansas publiccollege and university students who have earned 45 to 60 credit hours (excluding developmentalcourses) to measure learning in the general education curriculum. The “risingAcademic Regulations63


junior exam” is referred to as the AAGE. Students who have earned enough hours to beeligible for the assessment will be notified. Students must register for the test and musttake it on the day and time specified. There is no additional cost for taking the AAGE.UAM strictly enforces the AAGE law. Students who do not take the AAGE as directed willhave their enrollment interrupted. Students who have questions should direct them to theAssistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Administration Building 108-B, (870) 460-1032.Alpha Chi Honor SocietyAlpha Chi is a national scholarship recognition society with approximately 300chapters nationwide. Its purpose is to promote academic excellence and exemplarycharacter among college and university students and to honor those who achieve suchdistinction. As a general honor society, Alpha Chi admits to membership students from allacademic disciplines. UAM’s chapter, Arkansas Zeta, was chartered in 1956. Membershipis by invitation and is limited to students actively seeking a degree who: have completed atleast 62 hours; academically rank in the upper ten percent of the Junior and Senior classesand have compiled a GPA of 3.60 or above. Transfer students must have completed at least24 hours at UAM. Accumulated “W”s may affect eligibility.Transfer PolicyTransfer applicants must meet the minimum academic standing requirements asoutlined on page 14 and be admissible to the institution from which they are transferring.To simplify transfers, the University has formed articulation agreements with several areaschools. Students should contact the Office of the Registrar (870-460-1034) for additionalinformation.Transfer students must submit ACT scores when they have not completed a transferablecourse in mathematics which will satisfy the general education mathematics requirement,or when they have not completed one semester of a transferable course in Englishcomposition. Course credit for acceptable work is transferred, but grades are not transferred.Transfer work does not affect the UAM grade point average of a student.Students on suspension from UAM may not transfer hours taken at any otherinstitution during the suspension period. Other regulations affecting transfer credit are:1. Transferring students may receive credit for course work completed at an accreditedpost-secondary institution where a grade of “C” or higher has been earned. Credit isnot awarded for course work completed at educational institutions judged not to becollegiate level.2. No more than six credit hours of religion will count toward the degree requirementsof a major.3. A maximum of 68 credit hours may be transferred from a community, technical, orjunior college. Exceptions may be made in instances where UAM has entered intoarticulation agreements with community, technical, or junior colleges.4. The final decision regarding transfer course equivalents to University courses willbe made by the University.5. Military service, CLEP examination scores, and Advanced Placement scores may beevaluated for credit but will not be accepted as posted on another institution’s academictranscript. Original documentation must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office forevaluation.6. Students with less than a 2.00 cumulative grade point average or less than a 2.00semester average for their last semester will be admitted on conditional academic standing.Major Field of StudyAny student can declare a major field of study, at which time he/she will be assignedto an academic advisor in the academic unit offering the major. Students who are undecidedabout their major are advised by “General Studies” faculty advisors. Regardless ofwhether or not a major has been declared, students are encouraged to complete the general64Academic Regulations


education requirements within their first 60 hours.Some major programs have specific course work, grade point, or other requirementswhich must be met to continue in the field of study. Students should contact theiracademic advisor or the unit head of the appropriate school or division for informationabout specific major requirements.Students can change their major by completing a “Change of Major” form in theacademic office of the desired major.Academic Appeals CommitteeThe Academic Appeals Committee is composed of seven full-time faculty members.This committee is responsible for hearing student appeals of academic probation, suspension,and other academic matters. It shall also hear appeals of grades if mediation by theschool dean/division chair or Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs cannot resolve adispute. The Student Handbook includes a detailed description of the appeals process.Appeals should be addressed to the Academic Appeals Committee, c/o the Office ofAcademic Affairs, P.O. Box 3478, Monticello, AR 71656.Academic Code ViolationsCheating and plagiarism are considered academic violations. These violations areadjudicated through the Academic Violation Process listed below:1. An instructor who suspects a student is guilty of cheating or plagiarism within theinstructor’s class must inform the student of this suspicion and provide the student with anopportunity to respond to the accusation.2. An instructor who believes a student is guilty of cheating or plagiarism within theinstructor’s class may take any of the following actions: 1) issue a warning to the student;2) lower the grade awarded to the student for the paper or test; 3) require the student toretake the test or rewrite the paper; 4) award no credit for the paper or test; 5) withdraw thestudent from the course; 6) award the student a failing grade for the course.3. A student who receives any of the above actions who feels this action is unjust mayappeal the instructor’s decision as addressed in the academic appeals process. This appealprocedure must begin within ten class days of receiving written or oral notice of the action.TranscriptsThe University charges $4 for each transcript issued. No transcript will be issued untilall financial records have been cleared and the transcript fee is paid.Only the student may request his/her transcript. Requests must contain the fullname, social security number, and signature of the student. Transcripts may be requestedas follows:1. By mail. Students should send the request and transcript fee of $4 to the Cashier’sOffice, P.O. Box 3597 UAM, Monticello, AR 71656.2. In person. Students may to go the Cashier’s Office (2nd Floor, Harris Hall) duringCashier’s office hours and make payment for the transcript. The request and the receiptshould be submitted to the Office of the Registrar in Harris Hall for pickup. Arrangementscan also be made to have the transcript mailed directly from the University.3. By fax. A signed request may be sent to the Office of the Registrar at (870) 460-1935.The fax request will be honored if the sender’s ID and telephone number are listed on thefax header line. It is also recommended that the requestor include a contact telephonenumber along with the other required information (see above) and signature. Paymentmust be made before the request will be processed.Upon specific request, transcripts may be faxed directly from the Office of theRegistrar. However, students should be aware that recipients of such transcripts might notaccept them as official. The cost for a faxed transcript is $4. Faxing a transcript and mailingan official transcript are considered two separate transactions, and two separate fees will becharged.Academic Regulations65


GRADUATIONrequirementsThis section provides graduation requirements andregulations applicable to all degrees offered by theUniversity of Arkansas-Monticello.Regulations Applicable to All DegreesGeneral EducationThe mission of General Education is to provide a foundation for sustained lifelonglearning. The program is designed to help the student develop the abilities to reasoncritically, analyze objectively, think creatively, perceive assumptions, make judgments onthe basis of values, construct arguments, use evidence, and communicate and observeeffectively. Through General Education, the specific skills of reading, writing, computation,comprehension, listening, and speaking will be enhanced. The program also strives toinstill an appreciation and understanding of the creative, intellectual, social, and scientificforces which shape our history and guide our lives. When General Education is successfullycompleted, the student should be prepared to perform effectively and responsibly insociety and should have the base of knowledge necessary for the pursuit of advancedstudies.The following General Education requirements apply to all baccalaureate degrees.These requirements exist to ensure that each student’s program contains a significantliberal arts emphasis. It is expected that students will complete the General Educationrequirements within their first 60 hours.Humanities and Social Sciences ...................................................................................... (30 hours)Composition ................................................................................................................................................... 6 hoursENGL 1013 Composition I orENGL 1033 Honors Composition I andENGL 1023 Composition II orENGL 1043 Honors Composition IIFine Arts .......................................................................................................................................................... 3 hoursOne of the following:ART 1053 Art AppreciationMUS 1113 Music AppreciationSpeech ............................................................................................................................................................. 3 hoursOne of the following:SPCH 1023 Public SpeakingSPCH 1043 Honors Speech CommunicationSPCH 2203 Interpersonal CommunicationSPCH 2283 Business and Professional SpeechGraduation Requirements67


Humanities Cluster ....................................................................................................................................... 6 hoursHIST 1013 Survey of Civilization I and ENGL 2283 Survey of World Literature I orHIST 1023 Survey of Civilization II and ENGL 2293 Survey of World Literature IIHumanities Elective ...................................................................................................................................... 3 hoursTo be chosen from the disciplines of Art, Music, Foreign Language, English, or PhilosophyU.S. History or Government ........................................................................................................................ 3 hoursOne of the following:HIST 2213 American History IHIST 2223 American History IIPSCI 2213 American National GovernmentPsychology or Sociology ............................................................................................................................... 3 hoursOne of the following:PSY 1013 Introduction to PsychologySOC 2213 Introduction to SociologySocial Science Elective ................................................................................................................................... 3 hoursTo be chosen from the disciplines of Anthropology, Criminal Justice, Economics, Geography,Political Science, Psychology, Social Work, or SociologyMathematics and Natural Sciences (11 hours)Mathematics ................................................................................................................................................... 3 hoursAll students must pass a mathematics course at the 1000 level or above.Basic Sciences ................................................................................................................................................. 8 hoursEight hours from two 3-hour lecture courses with associated 1-hour labs, or two 4-hour courseswith integrated labs chosen from two of the following groups:(1) Astronomy, Earth Science(2) Biology(3) Chemistry, PhysicsMathematics, Science, or Technology Elective (3 hours)To be chosen from the disciplines of Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Computer InformationSystems, Computer Science, Earth Science, Mathematics, Physics, or Physical ScienceTOTAL HOURS .............................................................................................................................. 44Honors Program (HONR) courses may be used to satisfy certain General Educationrequirements. Please consult with your advisor.RestrictionsThe following restrictions apply to the General Education program:1. Courses designed for specific audiences will NOT be counted for General Educationcredit. These courses include the following:AGEC 2273 Agricultural EconomicsART 1103 Art for Elementary TeachersMATH 2243 Fundamental Geometric ConceptsMATH 3553 Number SystemsAll discipline-related teaching seminars (e.g., SCED 4663 Secondary Science TeachingMethods)2. Courses from the major of a student will be counted for General Education electivecredit only in the Speech and Humanities Cluster categories under Humanities and SocialSciences, and the Mathematics category under Mathematics and Natural Sciences. Whensupportive requirements exist for a given major, but are drawn from a discipline other thanthe major, they may be used to meet the general education requirements, provided thatthey do not violate the restrictions listed in the previous paragraph.3. In addition to the courses in the major curriculum and its supportive requirements,a major may require specific courses within the General Education elective options.Senior Credit RequirementA total of 40 semester hours must be earned in courses numbered at the 3000-4000level. At least 15 hours in the major and at least nine hours in the minor must be at the3000-4000 level unless otherwise specified.68Graduation Requirements


Residency RequirementFor a bachelor’s degree, candidates must have earned at least 30 semester hours inresidence at the University of Arkansas-Monticello, 24 of which must be taken afterattaining senior class standing, and a portion of which must be in the major and/or minorfield. Special permission to deviate from the senior residence requirement may be grantedin individual cases where a proposal has merit relative to the student’s academic objectives.Such requests must be presented in writing by the student to the Vice Chancellor forAcademic Affairs and must have the approval of the student’s major advisor and theAcademic Appeals Committee. The requirement that 24 hours be taken after achievingsenior standing may be waived for students in programs at institutions that have enteredinto specific articulation agreements with UAM.For an associate degree, candidates must earn no fewer than 15 semester hours ofcredit from the University of Arkansas-Monticello.Second Baccalaureate DegreeOccasionally, students may wish to pursue a second baccalaureate degree. In suchcases, students must meet all major and degree identity requirements for the seconddegree, earn at least 30 semester hours of credit in residence beyond the first degreerequirements, and satisfy all grade point average requirements.Second MajorA student may complete a second major. All requirements for both majors must befulfilled; however, only the degree identity requirements for the first major must befulfilled. Students who have already earned a baccalaureate degree are not eligible forseeking a second major except by earning a second, separate degree.Graduation under a Particular CatalogStudents have a maximum of six years to graduate under the catalog in effect at thetime of their original enrollment.Students have the following two options: (1) abiding by the requirements of the UAMcatalog in effect at the time of their original enrollment, or (2) abiding by a more currentactive UAM catalog, as long as they were enrolled at UAM during the period that thecatalog was in effect. Changes in academic programs or actions taken by authoritiesexternal to the University (e.g., accrediting agencies or state agencies) may make itnecessary for a student to move to a more recent catalog.The present catalog is in force from Summer II 2003 through Summer I 2005. Candidatesfor graduate degrees should refer to the graduate section of the catalog.Grade Point Requirement for GraduationA minimum grade point average of 2.00 is required in: 1) major field, 2) minor field, and 3)overall. Some majors require all major courses to be completed with a minimum grade of “C.”Degree Audit RequirementFollowing completion of 70 hours and prior to the completion of 90 hours, baccalaureatestudents must have a degree audit on file in the Registrar’s Office. This audit mustinclude the signature of the student, advisor, dean/chair, and registrar. Students seekingan associate degree must file a degree audit between 35 and 45 hours.Students who have completed 90 or more hours must have a signed audit on file toregister for the next semester. The signed degree audit is used by the Registrar’s Office as achecklist to assist with the verification of the student’s graduation requirements.Lack of knowledge or incorrect interpretation of University policies and regulationsdoes not remove the student from the obligation to satisfy all requirements for a degree.The student bears the ultimate responsibility for completing a degree program.Graduation Requirements69


Specific Degree RequirementsAssociate DegreesFor information on the requirements for these degrees, please refer to the academicunit offering the associate degree of interest:School of Forest Resources - Associate of Science in Land Surveying TechnologyDivision of General Studies - Associate of Arts, Associate of Applied Science in FarmProduction Management, Associate of Applied Science in Industrial Technology, Associateof Applied Science in Paper/Pulp TechnologyDivision of Nursing - Associate of Applied Science in NursingBaccalaureate DegreesCandidates for any baccalaureate degrees must complete the following four requirements:1. At least 124 hours of course work at or above the 1000 level in addition to anyrequired courses below the 1000 level. At least 40 hours must be earned in coursesnumbered at the 3000-4000 level;2. The General Education Program as listed on page 67;3. A comprehensive major or a major of at least 30 hours and a minor of at least 24hours. Students planning to teach must complete the Professional Education Core, whichmay be substituted for the 24 hours subject matter minor.4. The residency requirements as described on page 22 of the Catalog.Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) DegreeStudents receiving a Bachelor of Arts degree will be exposed to a diversity of thoughtand communication.Candidate for a Bachelor of Arts degree must complete six hours of one foreignlanguage and at least six hours chosen from the following list. Students may not usecourses within their major.Any foreign language coursesART 3403 Art History: Prehistoric - GothicART 3413 Art History: Renaissance-BaroqueART 4663 Art History: Modern ArtHIST 3423 BritainHIST 3503 Middle East and North AfricaHIST 3553 AfricaHIST 3563 RussiaHIST 4623 East AsiaMUS 3563 History of Music IMUS 3573 History of Music IIENGL 3343 Bible as LiteratureENGL 3423 British Literature IENGL 3433 British Literature IIENGL 3553 Introduction to Language StudyENGL 3583 Critical Theory and Approaches to LiteratureENGL 4613 British NovelENGL 4623 ShakespearePHIL 2223 Introduction to PhilosophyPHIL 3523 LogicPHIL 3623 EthicsPHIL 4603 History of PhilosophyPSCI 3443 Middle East PoliticsPSCI 3563 Russian PolitiesPSCI 4683 Western Political Thought70Graduation Requirements


SPCH 3413 Intercultural CommunicationStudents whose major is Early Childhood Special Education or Middle Level Education areexempt for this requirement.MajorsArtEarly Childhood Special EducationEnglishHistoryHistory and Social StudiesJournalismMiddle Level EducationMusicPolitical ScienceSpeech CommunicationThe Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.) DegreeRefer to the School of Business section of the Catalog beginning on page 93.MajorsAccountingBusiness AdministrationThe Bachelor of Science (B.S.) DegreeStudents receiving a Bachelor of Science degree must exhibit a breadth of knowledgein science and mathematics.Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree must complete at least seventeen hoursof mathematics, natural sciences, or technology. At least fourteen of the hours must comefrom the area of mathematics and natural sciences as defined under the “Mathematics andNatural Sciences” General Education requirements on page 68. Three of the hours maycome from the disciplines included under the general education “Math, Science, orTechnology Elective” area.MajorsAgricultureBiologyBusiness Technology Education (Note: No new students are being admitted to this major.)ChemistryComputer Information SystemsCriminal JusticeExercise ScienceForestryHealth and Physical EducationMathematicsPhysical SciencePsychologySpatial Information SystemsWildlife ManagementMinors and CollateralsAll minor programs approved by the University are eligible under the Bachelor ofScience and Bachelor of Arts degree programs. When approved by the major advisor andthe Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, an individualized, interdisciplinary and/orcollateral area of study of not less than 24 hours may be offered in lieu of a minor. Bothminors and collaterals must include at least nine hours of 3000-4000 level course work.An interdisciplinary international studies collateral can be designed in consultationwith the student’s advisor and the unit head for the major field. Courses such as thefollowing might be included: International Business; General Geography; ConversationalGraduation Requirements71


Spanish; French Civilization and Culture; history courses in Britain, Europe, the MiddleEast and North Africa, Russia, or Latin America; the English Seminar in Recent InternationalFiction; or the political science courses in International Relations, Russian Politics,Middle East Politics, or Comparative Politics. Survey of World Literature I and II,Civilization I and II, Elementary French, and Elementary Spanish courses cannot becounted toward the requirements for a collateral. In every case, the courses planned for acollateral must show a good distribution among areas of study.The Bachelor of Music Education (B.M.E.) DegreeRefer to the Division of Music section of the Catalog beginning on page 141.The Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) DegreeRefer to the Division of Nursing section of the Catalog beginning on page 147.The Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.)Refer to the School of Social & Behavioral Sciences section of the Catalog beginning onpage 155.Graduate DegreesFor information on the requirements for these degrees, please refer to the GraduatePrograms section of this catalog beginning on page 217.Requirements for Admission to Teacher EducationIn compliance with State of Arkansas law, the University requires that each studentpursuing a degree in a program leading to licensure as a teacher meet certain requirements foradmission to the teacher education program. One of the requirements for admission to theteacher education program is the achievement of passing scores on all parts of the Praxis I(reading, writing, and mathematics). Among the requirements for admission to the internshipyear, student must earn passing scores on the appropriate Praxis II specialty area examination intheir teaching area. Prior to graduation, students are required to have passing scores on thePraxis II Principles of Learning and Teaching (PLT) test. Specific admission requirements areavailable from the School of Education office located in Willard Hall.Degree Requirements for Professional School Candidates(Veterinary, Medical, Dental, Law, etc.)Students who enter accredited professional programs before actually completing alldegree requirements may be granted the baccalaureate degree under the followingcircumstances: students must have completed 93 hours of undergraduate course workincluding the state core curriculum of general education requirements, at least 12 hours atthe 3000-4000 level, and at least 30 hours completed in residence at the University ofArkansas-Monticello. After completion of the course work at the accredited professionalschool deemed appropriate to satisfy all graduation requirements including those of aspecific major, the student may then be awarded the degree upon request. Degrees will beawarded only for programs of study that are offered by the University at that time.Graduation With HonorsThe University recognizes graduates of baccalaureate degree programs who have excelled intheir studies. At the baccalaureate degree level, students must have a cumulative grade point averageof at least 3.50 to graduate cum laude. To graduate magna cum laude, students must have acumulative grade point average of at least 3.70. The highest recognition is summa cum laude, whichrequires a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.90.To graduate with honors, baccalaureate students must have at least sixty hours in residence atUAM. Only 1000-level courses and above are used to compute the hours in residence and the gradepoint average.72Graduation Requirements


CommencementDegrees are conferred in May, August, and December. Students must file an “Applicationfor Graduation” form with the Registrar at least ten weeks prior to graduation. Theofficial graduation date is three business days following the last examination of the term.A commencement ceremony is conducted only in May. Undergraduate students wholack six or fewer hours to complete their degree may participate in the May ceremony.Students may only participate in one commencement ceremony for each degree earned.Arkansas Core CurriculumThe Arkansas Board of Higher Education, by legislative direction, establishes at eachpublic college and university a 35-credit core curriculum. This 35-credit block is fullytransferable among Arkansas public institutions and will satisfy corresponding degreerequirements at each institution. The University maintains a current list of the 35-creditcore from other Arkansas public institutions.The University’s 35-credit core is listed below. It is fully contained within the 44-creditGeneral Education program required for all baccalaureate degrees, within the 38-creditgeneral education program for the Associate of Arts degree, and within the requirementsfor the Associate of Science in Land Surveying Technology degree.State Core Curriculum ......................................................................................................... 35 hoursEnglish Composition .......................................................................................................................... 6 hoursENGL 1013 Composition I orENGL 1033 Honors Composition IENGL 1023 Composition II orENGL 1043 Honors Composition IIMathematics ......................................................................................................................................... 3 hoursOne of the following:MATH 1003 Survey of MathematicsMATH 1043 College AlgebraOr any higher-level mathematics course except MATH 2243 or MATH 3553.Basic Sciences ....................................................................................................................................... 8 hoursEight hours from two 3-hour lecture courses with associated 1hour labs, or two 4hour courses with integrated labs chosen from two of the following groups:(1) Astronomy, Earth Science(2) Biology(3) Chemistry, PhysicsFine Arts/Humanities ........................................................................................................................ 9 hoursHumanities Cluster (6 hours)HIST 1013 Survey of Civilization I andENGL 2283 Survey of World Literature I orHIST 1023 Survey of Civilization II andENGL 2293 Survey of World Literature IIHumanities Elective (3 hours)To be chosen from the disciplines of Art, Music, Foreign Language, English, or PhilosophySocial Sciences ...................................................................................................................................... 9 hoursU.S. History or Government (3 hours)One of the following:HIST 2213 American History IHIST 2223 American History IIPSCI 2213 American National GovernmentPsychology or Sociology (3 hours)One of the following:PSY 1013 Introduction to PsychologySOC 2213 Introduction to SociologySocial Science Elective (3 hours)To be chosen from the disciplines of Anthropology, Criminal Justice, Economics, Geography, PoliticalScience, Psychology, Social Work, or SociologyGraduation Requirements73


division ofAGRICULTURELOCATION: Agriculture BuildingCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1014 / FAX: (870) 460-1415MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3508, Monticello, AR 71656Faculty/MissionProfessors: Colburn (Chair) and Francis; Associate Professors K. Bryant and Stark;Assistant Professor Whitworth; Adjunct Faculty: Coker, Greene, S. McConnell, Shanklinand K. Smith.It is the mission of the Division of Agriculture to provide educational programs onboth the theory and practice of agricultural science enabling the graduate to competewithin and contribute to this diverse field at the producer, industry, and graduate studentlevel. This mission is accomplished through degree options in Agribusiness, AnimalScience, Plant and Soil Science, and General Agriculture. An agriculture minor is alsooffered. Those desiring agricultural degree programs not offered at the University ofArkansas-Monticello are provided introductory course work and advising designed tofacilitate transfer to another institution. In addition, students desiring to enter veterinaryschool are provided course work and advising aimed at meeting the requirements ofinstitutions offering a degree in veterinary medicine.Cooperative AgreementsAgricultural EducationAgreements with the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (UAF) and Southern ArkansasUniversity (SAU), allow students who wish to become vocational agriculture teachers tocomplete approximately 60 hours at the University of Arkansas-Monticello and transfer toUAF or SAU. Students must have a 2.50 cumulative grade point average to be acceptedinto the teacher education program. Specifics regarding these additional institutionalrequirements are maintained in the Division of Agriculture offices and will be availableupon request to interested students.Veterinary MedicineStudents are provided course work and advising to meet the entrance requirements ofthe veterinary school of their choice and may simultaneously complete the requirementsfor a Bachelor of Science degree in agriculture or biology.Other ProgramsThose desiring an agriculture degree program not offered at the University of Arkansas-Monticello are provided course work and advising designed to facilitate transfer to anotherinstitution after one to two years at the University of Arkansas-Monticello.Agriculture75


Acceptance to the Upper Division of the UndergraduateAgriculture MajorConditions of AcceptanceTo be accepted into upper division agriculture courses, Agriculture majors must meetthese conditions:1. Using the courses designated for a Bachelor of Science degree with an Agriculturemajor, complete the following university General Education requirements: (35 hours)a) Composition ...................................................................... 6 hours(ENGL 1013 or 1033 and ENGL 1023 or 1043)b) Fine Arts ............................................................................. 3 hours(ART 1053 or MUS 1113)c) Speech ................................................................................. 3 hours(SPCH 1023, 1043, 2203, or 2283)d) Humanities Cluster .......................................................... 6 hours(HIST 1013 and ENGL 2283 or HIST 1023 and ENGL 2293)e) U.S. History or Government .......................................... 3 hours(HIST 2213, HIST 2223, or PSCI 2213)f) Psychology or Sociology .................................................. 3 hours(PSY 1013 or SOC 2213)g) Mathematics ...................................................................... 3 hours(MATH 1043)h) Basic Sciences .................................................................... 8 hours(CHEM 1103 and CHEM 1113) and one of the following course pairs:(BIOL 1063 and BIOL 1071)(BIOL 1153 and BIOL 1161)(BIOL 1143 and BIOL 1171)2. Complete the following major course requirements in agriculture: (10 hours)a) AGEC 2273 Agriculture Economicsb) AGRI 1101 Agriculture Orientationc) ANSC 1003 Principles of Animal Scienced) AGRO 1033 Principles of Field Crops3. Achieve a GPA of at least 2.00 for all courses listed in condition 2.4. Achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 2.00 for all courses taken.Application Instructions1. Submit an application for admission to the Chair of the Division of Agriculture forfaculty approval including a one-page, well-written (rational and grammatically correct)statement expressing the student’s reasons for seeking a baccalaureate degree in Agricultureand outlining goals for the future, including their career.2. Deadlines for application are March 15 into fall courses and October 15 into springcourses.3. Conditional acceptance may be granted to students in spring classes who expect tocomplete conditions 1-4 by the end of the spring and/or summer terms and to students infall classes who expect to complete conditions 1-4 by the end of the fall term. Conditionalstatus will be lifted upon meeting those requirements. Conditionally accepted studentswho fail to complete conditions 1-4 during the semester that they have applied foracceptance will be dropped from all pre-registered upper level agriculture classes.4. Students will be notified by the Division Chair whether they are accepted into upperlevelcourses. Students applying by March 15 will be notified prior to Spring Semesterpreregistration and students applying by October 15 will be notified prior to Fall Semesterpreregistration. Students receiving conditional status will be notified of their acceptance ordenial by May 22 for spring applicants and December 22 for fall applicants. Notification ofcompliance for students taking summer classes will be made no later than August 15.Students taking courses at other schools must have their official transcripts sent to theDivision Chair if notification of final acceptance is desired for the subsequent semester.76Agriculture


5. Students denied acceptance for a particular semester may reapply by the deadlinefor the subsequent semester.6. Entering Fall and Spring transfer students who have completed almost all of theirGeneral Education and Supportive Requirements must also apply for admission to upperlevelcourses. They may be granted admission if taking upper-level courses is deemednecessary for normal progression toward graduation.7. The appeal process for students denied admission includes in sequence: Chair ofthe Division of Agriculture, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, UAM Academic AppealsCommittee, UAM Assembly, and Chancellor.Major and Minor RequirementsAll baccalaureate degrees require at least 124 hours of college credit, courses at the1000-level or above. These courses must include the General Education requirements foundon page 67 and at least 40 hours of 3000-4000 level courses. The following courses arerequired for this major.Major Course Requirements For All Options: ................................................................. 21 hoursANSC 1003 Prin. of Animal ScienceAGRO 1033 Prin. of Field CropsAGRI 1101 Agriculture OrientationAGRO 2244 SoilsAGEC 2273 Agricultural EconomicsENTO 2283 Applied EntomologyAGRI 4771 SeminarOne of the following courses:AGEC 4623 Farm ManagementAGEC 4803 Agribusiness Firm ManagementAgri-Business OptionOption and Supportive Requirements: ......................................................................... 73/75 hoursCHEM 1103 General Chemistry ICHEM 1113 General Chemistry IICHEM 1121 General Chemistry I LabCHEM 1131 General Chemistry II LabMATH 1043 College AlgebraOne of the following:BIOL 1153 General Zoology andBIOL 1161 General Zoology LaborBIOL 1143 General Botany andBIOL 1171 General Botany LabBIOL 1063 Biological ScienceBIOL 1071 Biological Science labCIS 2223 Microcomputer ApplicationsECON 2203 Principles of MacroeconomicsACCT 2213 Principles of AccountingENGL 3253 Technical WritingG B 3533 Legal Environment of BusinessAGEC 4683 Commodity MarketingAGEC 4713 Agricultural FinanceOne of the following:AGEC 4703 Contract Marketing & Futures TradingAGEC 4813 Agricultural Price AnalysisAgriculture77


Three of the following:AGEC 4613 Agricultural PolicyAGEC 4823 Economics of Environ. ManagementAGEC 4803 Agribusiness Firm Management*AGEC 4623 Farm Management*AGRI 4783 Internship(*Cannot also satisfy core requirement)One of the following:FIN 3413 General InsuranceMGMT 3473 Principles of ManagementFIN 3483 Real Estate PrinciplesMKT 3403 Principles of MarketingFIN 4683 Real Estate FinanceOne of the following:ANSC 2213 Feeds and FeedingAGEN 2263 Soil & Water ConservationAGRO 2053 Applied Plant PathologyHORT 2443 Principles of HorticultureOne of the following:G B 3713 Business StatisticsPSY 2203 Statistical MethodsTwo of the following:ANSC 3314 AquacultureANSC 3463 Poultry ProductionANSC 3474 Beef ProductionANSC 3493 Swine ProductionANSC 3523 Horse ProductionTwo of the following:AGRO 3453 Forage CropsAGRO 3503 Cereal CropsAGRO 3513 Fiber & Oilseed CropsAGRO 3533 Introduction to Weed ScienceAnimal Science OptionOption and Supportive Requirements: ......................................................................... 69/70 hoursBIOL 1063 Biological ScienceBIOL 1071 Biological Science LabBIOL 1153 General ZoologyBIOL 1161 General Zoology LabBIOL 3553 MicrobiologyBIOL 3561 Microbiology LabCHEM 1103 General Chemistry ICHEM 1121 General Chemistry I LabCHEM 1113 General Chemistry IICHEM 1131 General Chemistry II LabCHEM 2203 Introduction to Organic and BiochemistryCIS 2223 Microcomputer ApplicationsENGL 3253 Technical WritingMATH 1043 College AlgebraOne of the following:PSY 2203 Statistical MethodsGB 3713 Business StatisticsAGRO 3453 Forage CropsANSC 2213 Feeds and FeedingANSC 2223 Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals78Agriculture


ANSC 3413 Livestock Breeding and GeneticsANSC 3474 Beef ProductionTwo of the following:ANSC 3314 AquacultureANSC 3463 Poultry ProductionANSC 3493 Swine ProductionANSC 3523 Horse ProductionANSC 4633 Animal Metabolism and NutritionANSC 4643 Diseases of Domestic AnimalsANSC 4653 Reproduction of Farm AnimalsOne of the following:AGEC 4703 Contract Marketing & Futures TradingAGEC 4683 Commodity MarketingPlant & Soil Science OptionOption and Supportive Requirements: .............................................................................. 71 hoursCHEM 1103 General Chemistry ICHEM 1121 General Chemistry I LabCHEM 1113 General Chemistry IICHEM 1131 General Chemistry II LabBIOL 1063 Biological ScienceBIOL 1071 Biological Science LabESCI 1063 Elements of GeologyBIOL 1143 General BotanyBIOL 1171 General Botany LabAGRO 2053 Applied Plant PathologyCIS 2223 Microcomputer ApplicationsMATH 1043 College AlgebraCHEM 2203 Intro. Organic & BiochemistryPSY 2203 Statistical MethodsENGL 3253 Technical WritingHORT 2443 Principles of HorticultureAGEN 2263 Soil & Water ConservationAGRO 3453 Forage CropsAGRO 3503 Cereal CropsAGRO 3513 Fiber & Oilseed CropsAGRO 3533 Introduction to Weed ScienceBIOL 3553 MicrobiologyBIOL 3561 Microbiology LabAGEC 4613 Agricultural PolicyOne of the following:AGEC 4683 Commodity MarketingAGEC 4703 Contract Marketing & Futures TradingAGRO 4743 Soil FertilityAGRO 4753 Crop PhysiologyGeneral Agriculture OptionOption and Supportive Requirements: ......................................................................... 76/77 hoursCHEM 1103 General Chemistry ICHEM 1121 General Chemistry I LabCHEM 1113 General Chemistry IICHEM 1131 General Chemistry II LabAgriculture79


One of the following:BIOL 1153 General Zoology andBIOL 1161 General Zoology LaborBIOL 1143 General Botany andBIOL 1171 General Botany LabPSY 2203 Statistical MethodsBIOL 1063 Biological ScienceBIOL 1071 Biological Science LabENGL 3253 Technical WritingCIS 2223 Microcomputer ApplicationsMATH 1043 College AlgebraFour of the following:ANSC 2213 Feeds & FeedingAGEN 2263 Soil & Water ConservationHORT 2443 Principles of HorticultureANSC 2223 Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic AnimalsAGRO 2053 Applied Plant PathologyFour of the following:AGRO 3453 Forage CropsAGRO 3503 Cereal CropsAGRO 3513 Fiber & Oilseed CropsAGRO 3533 Introduction to Weed ScienceAGRO 4743 Soil FertilityAGRO 4753 Crop PhysiologyFour of the following:ANSC 3314 AquacultureANSC 3463 Poultry Production80Agriculture


ANSC 3474 Beef ProductionANSC 3493 Swine ProductionANSC 3523 Horse ProductionANSC 4633 Advanced Animal NutritionANSC 4653 Reproduction of Farm AnimalsFour of the following:AGEC 4683 Commodity MarketingAGEC 4703 Contract Marketing & Futures TradingAGEC 4713 Agricultural FinanceAGEC 4613 Agricultural PolicyAGEC 4813 Agricultural Price AnalysisAGEC 4823 Economics of Environmental MgmtAGEC 4803 Agribusiness Firm ManagementAgriculture MinorMinor Requirements: ....................................................................................................... 25/26 hoursAGEC 2273 Agricultural EconomicsAGRO 1033 Principles of Field CropsAGRO 2244 SoilsANSC 1003 Principles of Animal ScienceHORT 2443 Principles of HorticultureOne of the following:AGEN 2263 Soil and Water ConservationAGRO 2053 Applied Plant PathologyANSC 2213 Feeds and FeedingENTO 2283 Applied EntomologyOne of the following:AGRO 3453 Forage CropsAGRO 3503 Cereal CropsAGRO 3513 Fiber and Oilseed CropsOne of the following:ANSC 3314 AquacultureANSC 3463 Poultry ProductionANSC 3474 Beef ProductionANSC 3493 Swine ProductionAgriculture81


school of Arts andHUMANITIESLOCATION: Memorial Classroom BuildingCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1078FAX: (870) 460-1961MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3460, Monticello, AR 71656Faculty/MissionProfessors Matthews, Stewart, and Webster; Associate Professors Marshall, Moore,Ray (Dean), Richard and Schmidt; Assistant Professor Sparks; Instructors I. Bacon, Fleis,Hartness, Hendricks, Long, Payne, Watson and Wegley.The mission of the School of Arts and Humanities is to offer significant exposure tolanguage, literature and writing, communication, and artistic expression, providingstudents with the knowledge and experience necessary to develop personal and professionalskills in these areas. The School’s dual function is to provide courses for its ownbaccalaureate programs and for the general education program in the fields of writing,speaking, and art.The School of Arts and Humanities offers four Bachelor of Arts alternatives ofspecialization in Art, English, Journalism and Speech Communication. An English majorwith a concentration in writing is also offered. The School also offers minors in Art,English, French, Journalism, Spanish, and Speech Communication. The School of Arts andHumanities program offerings are available to all campus disciplines through servicecourses.Support Goals1. To provide a foundation in fundamentals of writing, reading, speaking, andlistening as essential preparation for any career.2. To provide support in program offerings for major/minor students in the School ofArts and Humanities seeking careers in teaching, business, and media.3. To provide service support in a variety of program offerings for students selectingcareers in other disciplines.4. To promote campus-wide application of writing fundamentals through a writingcenter.5. To provide opportunities for aesthetic experiences in art.Major And Minor RequirementsNOTES:(1) All baccalaureate degrees require at least 124 hours of college credit courses at the1000-level or above. These courses must include the General Education requirements foundon page 67 and at least 40 hours of 3000-4000 level courses. Students planning to teachshould review the certification requirements provided by the School of Education.(2) All majors in the School of Arts and Humanities must also complete a minor, anapproved collateral, or the requirements for teacher certification.Arts and Humanities83


(3) A grade of “C” or better must be earned in ENGL 0133 and ENGL 1013 before astudent may enroll in the next higher composition course.Art MajorMajor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 34 hoursART 1013 DrawingART 1023 Design and ColorART 1053 Art AppreciationART 3403 Art History: Prehistoric - Gothic ArtART 3413 Art History: Renaissance - Baroque ArtART 4663 Art History: Modern ArtART 4671 Senior ThesisFifteen hours from the following studio coursesART 2203 Water ColorART 2223 Ceramics IART 2233 Figure DrawingART 2253 SculptureART 3313 Advanced DrawingART 3423 Advanced WatercolorART 3443 Painting IART 3453 PrintmakingART 3463 MetalsART 3473 Ceramics IIART 4603 Advanced PrintmakingART 4613 Painting IIART 4633 Ceramics IIIART 4643 Painting IIIART 468V Art PracticumART 479V Independent Study in ArtNOTE: At least six hours of art electives must be at the 3000-4000 level.NOTE: Art majors are required to prepare and display a senior art exhibit and enroll inART 4671 Senior Thesis during the last semester of course work in order to completerequirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree.NOTE: Art students desiring teacher certification must complete ART 4903 Seminar inTeaching Art; and the requirements for secondary teacher certification found in the Schoolof Education section of the catalog.Art MinorMinor Requirements ............................................................................................................ 24 HoursART 1013 DrawingART 1023 Design and ColorART 1053 Art AppreciationThree hours from the following:ART 3403 Art History: Prehistoric - Gothic ArtART 3413 Art History: Renaissance - Baroque ArtART 4663 Art History: Modern ArtTwelve hours from the following studio courses:ART 2203 Water ColorART 2223 Ceramics IART 2233 Figure DrawingART 2253 SculptureART 3313 Advanced DrawingART 3423 Advanced WatercolorART 3443 Painting IART 3453 Printmaking84Arts and Humanities


ART 3463 MetalsART 3473 Ceramics IIART 4603 Advanced PrintmakingART 4613 Painting IIART 4633 Ceramics IIIART 4643 Painting IIIART 468V Art PracticumART 479V Independent Study in Art(At least six hours of Art electives must be at the 3000-4000 level.)NOTE: Students desiring teacher certification must complete ART 4903 Seminar inTeaching Art; and the requirements for secondary teacher certification found in the Schoolof Education section of the catalog.English MajorMajor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 36 hoursENGL 2273 Advanced CompositionENGL 3403 American Literature IENGL 3413 American Literature IIENGL 3423 British Literature IENGL 3433 British Literature IIENGL 3533 Intro to Language StudyENGL 4623 ShakespeareOne of the following:ENGL 4613 The British Novel orENGL 4633 The American Novel orENGL 4703 Contemporary WritersEnglish Major Electives ....................................................................................................... 12 hoursChoose from the following:ENGL 2283 World Literature I orENGL 2293 World Literature II*ENGL 3253 Technical WritingENGL 3343 The Bible as LiteratureENGL 3453 The Short StoryENGL 3463 Advanced GrammarENGL 3543 Creative WritingENGL 4743 Film and LiteratureENGL 4613 The British NovelENGL 4633 The American NovelENGL 4663 Modern PoetryENGL 4733 Minority WritersENGL 4703 Contemporary WritersENGL 4713 Literature of the SouthENGL 4723 Seminar in EnglishENGL 479V Independent Study in English*Course not used to satisfy Humanities cluster may be taken as an elective.Supportive Requirement ...................................................................................................... 12 hoursTwelve hours of one language other than English.English MinorMinor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 27 hoursENGL 2273 Advanced CompositionENGL 3403 American Literature IENGL 3413 American Literature IIENGL 3423 British Literature IENGL 3433 British Literature IIArts and Humanities85


ENGL 3533 Intro to Language StudyNine hours of electives selected from English courses other than ENGL 2263, ENGL 4903.English Major for Prospective TeachersMajor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 36 hoursENGL 2273 Advanced CompositionENGL 3403 American Literature IENGL 3413 American Literature IIENGL 3423 British Literature IENGL 3433 British Literature IIENGL 3463 Advanced GrammarENGL 3533 Intro to Language StudyENGL 3573 Literature for AdolescentsENGL 4623 ShakespeareENGL 4703 Contemporary WritersENGL 4733 Minority WritersEnglish Major Electives3 hours from the following:ENGL 3253 Technical WritingENGL 3543 Creative WritingENGL 4683 Seminar in WritingJOUR 2203 Introduction to JournalismSupportive RequirementSPCH 3413 Intercultural CommunicationTwelve hours of one language other than English.NOTE: English majors and minors preparing for public school certification must takeENGL 4903, Seminar in Teaching English. All prospective teachers should consult the Deanof the School of Education for additional requirements.English Minor for Prospective TeachersMinor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 30 hoursENGL 2273 Advanced CompositionENGL 3403 American Literature IENGL 3413 American Literature IIENGL 3423 British Literature IENGL 3433 British Literature IIENGL 3463 Advanced GrammarENGL 3533 Intro to Language StudyENGL 3573 Literature for AdolescentsSix hours of electives selected from English courses other than ENGL 2263, ENGL 4903.NOTE: English majors and minors preparing for public school certification must takeENGL 4903, Seminar in Teaching English. All prospective teachers should consult the Deanof the School of Education for additional requirements.English Major with a Concentration in WritingMajor Requirements ............................................................................................................ 39 HoursA minimum of 39 semester hours must be earned in the School of Arts and Humanities,including a senior project (3 credit hours).WRITING: Select four of the following courses (12 credit hours). (It is strongly recommendedthat “writing concentration” majors take all five writing courses. Further, as longas the topic varies, three additional credit hours of ENGL 4683 may be taken to partiallysatisfy elective requirements.)ENGL 2273 Advanced Composition (required)ENGL 3253 Technical Writing86Arts and Humanities


ENGL 3543 Creative WritingJOUR 2203 Introduction to JournalismENGL 4683 Seminar in Writing: Special Topics (required)LITERATURE SURVEYS: Select three of the following courses (9 credit hours).ENGL 3403 American Literature IENGL 3413 American Literature IIENGL 3423 British Literature IENGL 3433 British Literature IIENGL 4703 Contemporary WritersCRITICAL APPROACHES: The following courses (6 credit hours) are required.ENGL 3533 Introduction to Language StudyENGL 3583 Critical Theory and Approaches to LiteraturesGENDER/CULTURE/ETHNIC LITERATURES: One of the following courses (3 credit hours)is required.ENGL 4723 Seminar in English (topics will vary)ENGL 4733 Minority WritersENGL 4743 Film and LiteratureELECTIVES: Six total credit hours. Select two English courses at the 3000-4000 level otherthan ENGL 4903. One course in Philosophy (3 credit hours) or Journalism (3 credit hours)may be substituted for one elective course in English.SENIOR PROJECT: Select one of the following courses (3 credit hours). JOUR 479V maynot be repeated.ENGL 479V Independent Study in English — Senior Writing ProjectJOUR 479V Independent Study in Journalism — Senior Journalism ProjectSupportive Requirement12 hours of one foreign language.Arts and Humanities87


English Minor with a Concentration in WritingMinor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 24 hoursA minimum of 24 semester hours must be earned in the School of Arts and Humanities.WRITING: Select four of the following courses (12 credit hours). (It is strongly recommendedthat “writing concentration” minors take all five writing courses. Further, as longas the topic varies, three additional credit hours of ENGL 4683 may be taken to partiallysatisfy elective requirements.)ENGL 2273 Advanced Composition (required)ENGL 3253 Technical WritingENGL 3543 Creative WritingJOUR 2203 Introduction to JournalismENGL 4683 Seminar in Writing: Special Topics (required)CRITICAL APPROACHES: Select one of the following courses (3 credit hours).ENGL 3533 Introduction to Language StudyENGL 3583 Critical Theory and Approaches to LiteratureELECTIVES: Nine total credit hours. Select three English courses at the 3000 or 4000 levelother than ENGL 4903. One course in Philosophy (3 credit hours) or Journalism (3 credithours) may be substituted for one elective course in English.English Modified Major with a Required Collateral(For those not desiring admission to the Teacher Education Program.)Major Requirements ............................................................................................................. 36 hoursENGL 2273 Advanced CompositionENGL 3253 Technical WritingENGL 3403 American Literature IENGL 3413 American Literature IIENGL 3423 British Literature IENGL 3433 British Literature IIENGL 3533 Intro to Language StudyENGL 4623 ShakespeareOne of the following:ENGL 4613 The British Novel orENGL 4633 The American Novel orENGL 4703 Contemporary WritersOne of the following:SPCH 2283 Business and Professional Speech orSPCH 3533 Communication in OrganizationsSix hours of electives selected from English courses other than ENGL 2263, ENGL 4903.Collateral ............................................................................................................................... 24 hoursFrench MinorFrench Minor Requirements (consult Dean) ..................................................................... 24 hoursFREN 1003 Elementary French IFREN 1013 Elementary French IIFREN 2203 Intermediate French IFREN 2213 Intermediate French IIFREN 3223 Intermediate ReadingFREN 3403 Intermediate ConversationFREN 3413 French & Francophone Civilization and CultureFREN 3423 Intermediate Grammar and Composition*A 3000 level course may be substituted for another three hours of French electives at the 3000-4000level. Advanced level courses may be taken as Independent Study to complete French minor requirements.**A summer session abroad will be a mandatory part of the French Minor program. Students arerequired to complete 6-9 hours of French in study abroad at an approved college or university.88Arts and Humanities


NOTE: French minors preparing for public school certification must take MODL 4903,Seminar in Teaching Foreign Language. All prospective teachers should consult the Deanof the School of Education for additional requirements.Journalism MajorMajor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 36 hoursJOUR 2203 Introduction to JournalismJOUR 2223 Mass CommunicationJOUR 2211 Journalism Lab (1 credit)(3 hours required)JOUR 3013 NewswritingJOUR 4033 News EditingJOUR 4243 Seminar in JournalismJournalism Major Electives ................................................................................................ 18 hoursChoose from the following:JOUR 2211 Journalism Lab (1 credit)(up to 3 additional hours)JOUR 3023 Introduction to Public RelationsENGL 3253 Technical WritingSPCH 3453 PersuasionSPCH 3533 Communication in OrganizationsJOUR 3043 Feature WritingJOUR 4243 Seminar in Journalism (up to 3 additional hours)JOUR 425V Journalism Internship (up to 6 hours credit toward major)JOUR 479V Independent Study in Journalism (up to 6 hours credit toward major)Supportive Requirement ........................................................................................................ 3 hoursSPCH 1023 Public Speaking orSPCH 1043 Honors Speech CommunicationJournalism MinorJournalism Minor Requirements ........................................................................................ 24 hoursJOUR 2203 Introduction to JournalismJOUR 2223 Mass CommunicationJOUR 2211 Journalism Lab (1 credit)(3 hours required)JOUR 3013 NewswritingTwelve hours from the following courses:JOUR 2211 Journalism Lab (1 credit)(up to 3 additional hours)JOUR 3023 Introduction to Public RelationsJOUR 3043 Feature WritingENGL 3253 Technical WritingJOUR 4033 News EditingJOUR 4243 Seminar in Journalism (up to 6 hours credit toward minor)JOUR 479V Independent Study in Journalism (up to 6 hours credit toward minor)JOUR 425V Journalism Internship (up to 3 hours credit toward minor)Spanish MinorSpanish Minor Requirements ............................................................................................. 24 hoursSPAN 1013 Elementary Spanish IISPAN 2203 Intermediate Spanish ISPAN 2213 Intermediate Spanish IISPAN 3503 Conversational Spanish ISPAN 3603 Advanced Modern Spanish Grammar and CompositionSPAN 3613 Cultures and Civilizations of Spain and Spanish AmericaSPAN 3623 Survey of Major Hispanic LiteraturesSPAN 4633 Seminar in Spanish StudiesNOTE: Spanish minors preparing for public school certification must take MODL4903, Seminar in Teaching Foreign Language. Prospective teachers should consult theDean of the School of Education for additional requirements.Arts and Humanities89


Spanish Study Abroad Program3 - 6 Credit HoursPrerequisite: SPAN 1003 or consent of the Director of Study Abroad Program.Students may earn up to six semester credit hours (two courses) per summer sessionin a Spanish-speaking country. Students will register and pay fees at UAM for one or twocourses selected from the Spanish courses listed in the catalog. The program requires dailyattendance and participation from Monday through Friday, a minimum of three culturalfield trips as designated by UAM’s director of the program and the institution of higherlearning abroad, daily journal entries written in Spanish, a midterm examination, and afinal examination graded by the Director of Study Abroad Program from the University ofArkansas-Monticello. The evaluation of the student’s grade is decided by the professorsteaching the students and the UAM Director of Study Abroad. Grades are based on dailyparticipation and performance, oral proficiency, journals, and two examinations. Studentslive with a family of the host country and are required to speak Spanish at all times.Objectives of the Study Abroad Program:To develop oral proficiency in Spanish through a total immersion program.To develop an awareness and understanding of the culture of the host countrythrough family life, field trips, cultural activities, and daily life in the host country.Speech Communication MajorMajor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 36 hoursSPCH 2203 Interpersonal CommunicationSPCH 2223 Mass CommunicationSPCH 2273 Argumentation and DebateSPCH 3533 Communication in OrganizationsSPCH 3513 Intro to Oral InterpretationSPCH 4653 Theories of Human Communication90Arts and Humanities


Eighteen hours of electives from the following:SPCH 2283 Business and Professional SpeechSPCH 340V Intercollegiate Debate/ForensicsSPCH 3483 Communication in Small GroupsSPCH 3413 Intercultural CommunicationSPCH 3453 PersuasionSPCH 395V Communication PracticumSPCH 4623 Seminar in SpeechSPCH 4663 Performance StudiesSPCH 468V Communication InternshipSPCH 479V Independent Study in Speech CommunicationNOTE: A maximum of six hours credit may be earned in SPCH 340V (only three hoursmay be used toward a Speech Communication major or minor.)Supportive RequirementOne of the following:SPCH 1023 Public Speaking orSPCH 1043* Honors Speech Communication*NOTE: Students may not take both SPCH 1023 and SPCH 1043 for credit.Speech Communication MinorMinor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 24 hoursSPCH 2223 Mass CommunicationSPCH 2273 Argumentation and DebateSPCH 3513 Intro to Oral InterpretationMinor Electives ..................................................................................................................... 15 hoursElectives may be chosen from any Speech course at the 2000 or above level. Six (6)hours of elective credit must be at the 3000-4000 level. See the Speech Communicationmajor electives list.NOTE: A maximum of six credits may be earned in SPCH 340V(only three hours maybe used toward a Speech Communication major or minor.)Arts and Humanities91


school ofBUSINESSLOCATION: Babin Business CenterCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1041 / FAX: (870) 460-1784MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3616, Monticello, AR 71656Faculty/MissionProfessors Gulledge, and Rhee; Associate Professors Cabaniss, Clayton, Hammett,Patterson, and Wallace; Assistant Professors Bryant, Graber; Instructor Nixon.The mission of the School of Business is to serve the undergraduate educational needsof business students in southeast Arkansas and the region. Teaching and student learningare the highest priorities of a faculty dedicated to effective classroom instruction andadvising. The School of Business faculty are also dedicated to providing service to theUniversity, the profession, and the community; and they are actively engaged in scholarshipthat strengthens classroom instruction and assists the business community and theprofession. The School of Business is firmly committed to continuous improvement in allthree areas: teaching, service, and scholarship. The programs in Accounting and BusinessAdministration share the common goal of preparing students to participate effectively inthe complex business environment of the future.The School offers a Bachelor of Business Administration degree with majors inAccounting and Business Administration; in the Business Administration major, concentrationsare offered in Finance, Management, Marketing, Entrepreneurship, BusinessAdministration and Administrative Support Systems. The School also offers a Bachelor ofScience Degree in Business Technology Education. The major program course requirementsare listed under each program offered by the School of Business. (Note: No new studentsare being admitted to the Bachelor of Science Degree program in Business TechnologyEducation or Administrative Support Systems concentration under the Business Administrationmajor).All major programs with the exception of Business Technology Education arecomprehensive, requiring a minimum of 57 credit hours of course work in approvedbusiness subjects and requiring no minors.The Bachelor of Business Administration DegreeThe Bachelor of Business Administration degree requires 124 hours which includes theUniversity’s General Education program, the Business Core, and major requirements. Thenumber of elective hours will depend on the major chosen and the General Educationcourses selected. In the 124 hour B.B.A. degree program, a minimum of 53 credit hoursmust be taken outside the School of Business*. Students who use more than 71 credit hoursfrom the School of Business to fulfill the 124 hour requirement for the B.B.A. may increasethe number of credit hours required for the degree beyond 124 hours. For further information,consult your academic advisor.Students transferring from another university must complete at least 50 percent of thebusiness credit hours required for the B.B.A. degree at the University of Arkansas -Monticello. In addition, students must meet the University residency requirements.Business93


*The 53 credit hours outside the School of Business includes the general education programand non-business electives. Students who pursue a double concentration or double major in theSchool of Business may increase the hours required for the degree beyond 124 hours.Business Core : ...................................................................................................................... 36 hoursACCT 2213 Principles of Accounting IACCT 2223 Principles of Accounting IIG B 3353 International BusinessG B 3713 Business StatisticsG B 3533 Legal Environment of BusinessG B 3043 Business CommunicationsFIN 3473 Principles of FinanceMGMT 3473 Principles of Management and Organizational BehaviorMKT 3403 Principles of MarketingMGMT 4643 Production/Operations ManagementMGMT 4653 Strategic ManagementMGMT 4613 Management Information Systems (Business Administration Major)orACCT 4323 Accounting Information Systems (Accounting Major)Supportive Requirements: ..................................................................................................... 9 hoursCIS 2223 Microcomputer ApplicationsECON 2203 Principles of MacroeconomicsECON 2213 Principles of MicroeconomicsAccountingBachelor of Business AdministrationBusiness Core : ...................................................................................................................... 36 hoursSupportive Requirements: ..................................................................................................... 9 hoursAccounting majors must take ACCT 4323 Accounting Information Systems in place ofMGMT 4613 - Management Information SystemsMajor Requirements: ............................................................................................................ 30 hoursACCT 3403 Intermediate Accounting IACCT 3413 Intermediate Accounting IIACCT 3523 Intermediate Accounting IIIACCT 3433 Cost Accounting IACCT 4613 Advanced AccountingACCT 4683 Federal Tax IACCT 4693 Federal Tax IIACCT 4773 AuditingSix (6) hours from the following:ACCT 4673 Cost Accounting IIACCT 4633* Governmental Accounting (required for CPA exam)ACCT 4333 Fraud ExaminationACCT 4643 International AccountingACCT 4653* CPA Law Review (required for CPA exam)*Required in order to be eligible to sit for the CPA exam. In addition, a student must completea minimum of 150 hours of college credit. Please see your academic advisor for details.94Business


Business AdministrationBachelor of Business AdministrationBusiness Core : ...................................................................................................................... 36 hoursSupportive Requirements: ..................................................................................................... 9 hoursBusiness Administration majors must select a concentration from the areas ofAdministrative Support Systems, Business Administration, Entrepreneurship, Finance,Management, or Marketing. Each must complete all Business Core and supportiverequirements in addition to those in the concentration. (Note: No new students are beingadmitted to the Administrative Support Systems concentration under the BusinessAdministration major.)Business Administration Concentration: ......................................................................... 18 hoursACCT 3433 Cost Accounting IFIN 4603 Financial Policy and PlanningGB 4363 Topics in E-CommerceMGMT 3433 EntrepreneurshipMGMT 4633 Human Resource ManagementMKT 3463 Consumer BehaviorAdministrative Support Systems Concentration: ........................................................... 15 hoursCIS 3103 Advanced Microcomputer ApplicationsG B 2103 Administrative Support ProceduresG B 2273 Word ProcessingG B 3203 Desktop PublishingMGMT 3413 Office Management(NOTE: No new students are being admitted to the Administrative Support SystemsConcentration.)Business95


Entrepreneurship Concentration: ....................................................................................... 15 hoursMGMT 3433 EntrepreneurshipMGMT 4693 New Venture DevelopmentMGMT 4703 Senior Entrepreneurship PracticumSix hours from the following:FIN 4603 Financial Policy and PlanningG B 4363 Topics in E-CommerceMGMT 4663 Advanced Organizational Behavior and Organization TheoryMKT 4623 Marketing ResearchMKT 4663 Marketing ManagementFinance Concentration: ..................................................................................................... 15 hoursFIN 4603 Financial Policy and PlanningFIN 4613 InvestmentsECON 3453 Money and BankingTwo of the following:FIN 3413 General InsuranceFIN 3483 Real Estate PrinciplesFIN 4623 Topics in International FinanceManagement Concentration: .............................................................................................. 15 hoursMGMT 3453 Industrial RelationsMGMT 4663 Advanced Organizational Behavior and Organization TheoryMGMT 4633 Human Resource ManagementSix hours from the following:G B 4363 Topics in E-CommerceMGMT 3433 EntrepreneurshipMGMT 4673 Organizational Behavior and Theory in a Global ContextMGMT 4683 Strategic Management of the Multinational Enterprise96Business


Marketing Concentration: ................................................................................................... 15 hoursMKT 3463 Consumer BehaviorMKT 4623 Marketing ResearchMKT 4663 Marketing ManagementSix hours from the following, three of which must be either MKT 3453 or MKT 3483MKT 3453 Marketing CommunicationsMKT 3443 Selling and Sales ManagementMKT 3483 Channels of DistributionMKT 4473 Special Topics in MarketingGB 4363 Topics in E-CommerceBusiness Technology EducationBachelor of ScienceMajor Requirements: ............................................................................................................ 37 hoursACCT 2213 Principles of Accounting IACCT 2223 Principles of Accounting IICIS 1013 Introduction to Computer SystemsCIS 2223 Microcomputer ApplicationsOne of the following:ECON 2203 Principles of MacroeconomicsorECON 2213 Principles of MicroeconomicsGB 2273 Word ProcessingGB 2553 Advanced Computer KeyboardingGB 3043 Business CommunicationsOne of the following:GB 3533 Legal Environment of BusinessorGB 3543 Business LawGB 3203 Desktop PublishingGB 4001 Methods of Teaching Business SubjectsMGMT 3413 Office ManagementMKT 3403 Principles of MarketingSupportive Requirement:CIS 3103 Advanced Microcomputer Applications(NOTE: No new students are being admitted to the Business Technology Education major.)Business97


division of computer informationSYSTEMSLOCATION: Babin Business Center, Rm. 101CAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1031 / FAX: (870) 460-1831MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3467, Monticello, AR 71656E-MAIL: CIS@uamont.eduWEBSITE: http://cotton.uamont.edu/~cis/Faculty/MissionAssociate Professors Hendrix, Marsh, Roiger (Chair), and Selby; InstructorsDombrowski, and Hopkins.The mission of the Division of Computer Information Systems is to support themission of the University of Arkansas at Monticello by focusing on the undergraduateeducational needs of computer information system students in southeast Arkansas and theregion. The Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Information Systems is designed toprepare students to assume dynamic roles as analysts and designers who will provide theprofessional insight required for building the information systems of the future.The goal of the program in Computer Information Systems is to advance the developmentof those intellectual, personal, and professional attributes that prepare students toshape the complex computer software environment of the future. Graduates are preparedto begin careers as computer programmers, rapidly progress to systems analysis responsibilities,and ultimately to occupy positions in management of information systems.Students augment their Computer Information Systems learning with selected courses inbusiness and communication. This comprehensive program allows graduates to confidentlyadvance in the complex business environment of the future.The Division of Computer Information Systems offers a Bachelor of Science degreewith a major in Computer Information Systems. A minor in Computer InformationSystems is also available.The major program is comprehensive, requiring a minimum of 60 credit hours ofcourse work in Computer Information Systems and approved courses in business, English,and oral communication.The Bachelor of Science Degree in ComputerInformation SystemsThe Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Information Systems requires 124 hourswhich includes the University’s General Education program, the University’s Bachelor ofScience mathematics and/or science requirements, major requirements, and supportiverequirements. The number of elective hours will depend on the General Education and theBachelor of Science mathematics and/or science required courses selected.A total of 40 semester hours must be earned in courses numbered at the 3000-4000level. ACCT 2213 and ECON 2213 must be taken prior to or concurrently with any junioror senior business course.NOTE: Since keyboarding skills are needed to efficiently operate computers, anystudent lacking these skills should enroll in G B 1033 Elementary Computer KeyboardingComputer Information Systems99


early in her/his college career. Keyboarding ability will be especially helpful in manyComputer Information Systems and business courses.All baccalaureate degrees require at least 124 hours of college credit, courses at the1000-level or above. These courses must include the General Education requirementsfound on pages 67-68, the Bachelor of Science mathematics and/or science requirementsfound on page 71, and at least 40 hours of 3000-4000 level courses.Major Requirements ..................................................................................................... 36 hoursCIS 1013 Introduction to Computer-Based SystemsCIS 2203 Programming Microcomputer SystemsCIS 2223 Microcomputer ApplicationsCIS 3103 Advanced Microcomputer ApplicationsCIS 3423 COBOLCIS 3443 Object-Oriented Programming LanguagesCIS 3523 Structured System Analysis and DesignCIS 3553 Advanced COBOLCIS 4503 Business Data CommunicationsCIS 4623 Database Management SystemsCIS 4633 Application Software Development ProjectThree credit hours of CIS electives at the 3000-4000 level100Computer Information Systems


Supportive Requirements .................................................................................................... 24 hoursACCT 2213 Principles of Accounting IACCT 2223 Principles of Accounting IIECON 2213 Principles of MicroeconomicsENGL 3253 Technical WritingGB 3713 Business StatisticsOne of the followingMGMT 3473 Principles of Management orMGMT 4613 Management Information SystemsMKT 3403 Principles of MarketingOne of the followingSPCH 3483 Communication in Small Groups orSPCH 3533 Communication in OrganizationsNOTE: Computer Information Systems majors are limited to a maximum of 30 hoursof course work in the School of Business.Minor in Computer Information Systems ........................................................................ 24 hoursCIS 2203 Programming Microcomputer SystemsChoose one:CIS 3423 COBOL orCIS 3443 Object-Oriented Programming LanguageCIS 3523 Structured System Analysis and DesignCIS 4503 Business Data Communications12 additional hours of Computer Information Systems coursesComputer Information Systems101


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school ofEDUCATIONLOCATION: Willard HallCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1062 /FAX: (870) 460-1563WWW: http://cotton.uamont.edu/~education/main.htmMAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Drawer 3608, Monticello, AR 71656Faculty/MissionProfessors Dillard, Jones, O’Connor, and Terrell; Associate Professors King, Lang,and Richards (Dean); Assistant Professors Hector and C. Smith; Instructors Brackin, Frazer,Garner, and Samons.The University of Arkansas-Monticello School of Education is committed to thedevelopment of high quality teacher leaders who are caring, competent professionalsdedicated to meeting the needs of a changing, diverse society. The UAM School ofEducation faculty and teacher education students serve their communities through activeparticipation in academic studies and field experiences that develop high-level competenciesin content knowledge, pedagogy, professionalism, and equity. The UAM School ofEducation, in close partnership and collaboration with partnering schools and the arts andsciences, is dedicated to providing the highest level of teacher training and excellence insoutheast Arkansas.Title II - Higher Education Act of 1998The University releases information on the quality of its teacher preparation programaccording to the requirements of Section 207 of Title II of the Higher Education Act asamended in 1998. The institutional pass rate on Praxis I and II examinations for candidatesin the teacher preparation program at UAM was 100% for all program completers in the2000-2001 cohort.Conceptual FrameworkThe Conceptual Framework of the School of Education is organized around fourstrands which promote the following in teacher candidates: acquisition of a knowledgebase; development of pedagogical skills; demonstration of equity and social justice; andattainment of professionalism. Because programs within the School of Education targetP-12 student achievement and learning as its critical mission, the academic needs of thelearner are placed at the core of the four strands of the Conceptual Framework. Eachstrand represents an essential component of the teacher education program that is furtherrefined through the identification of indicators of competence within each strand. Realizingthat the acquisition of skills to become an exemplary teacher are developmental andcumulative, the School of Education faculty have identified three stages through whichcandidates progress—Stage One, which is the pre-admission stage of teacher candidacy;Stage Two, during which teacher candidates are admitted to the teacher preparationprogram; and Stage Three, the internship phase of teacher preparation.Education103


Program OfferingsPrograms offered in the School of Education include those leading to teacher licensureand those that do not. Those that do not lead to licensure are Health and PhysicalEducation - Exercise Science Option and a non-licensure program in Health and PhysicalEducation. Both are described later in this section.Programs Leading to Teacher LicensureThe School of Education offers quality programs leading to teacher licensure in earlychildhood special education, middle level education, and health and physical education.Students interested in teaching at the secondary level combine their majors with theSchool’s professional education program to prepare for careers as secondary teachers.Areas of preparation for secondary teaching include English, mathematics, science, socialstudies, and speech. Additionally, students majoring in P-12 art, music, or physicaleducation complete the professional education core courses in the School of Education.Programs leading to licensure:P-4 Early childhood special education4-8 Middle level education7-12 Secondary education (English, mathematics, science, and social studies)P-12 Art, music, and physical educationTeacher Education Admission RequirementsStage I is the pre-admission stage of teacher education. Students who plan to becometeachers should complete the following courses and experiences:1. C or better in EDUC 1143;2. C or better in the following: ENGL 1013, ENGL 1023, SPCH 1023 or 2283, MATH1003 or 1043;3. Completion of Portfolio Competencies for Stage I.Stage II begins after students have been admitted to the Teacher Education Program.To be admitted to the program, students must meet all the standards listed below:1. Satisfactory completion of all pre-admission criteria of Stage I;2. B or better in EDUC 2223 and 2253;3. Cumulative GPA of 2.75 or better;4. Completion of Application for Admission to Teacher Education;5. Letters of recommendation from two sources;6. Passing scores on Praxis I reading, mathematics, and writing;7. Completion of Portfolio Competencies for entry into Stage II;8. Successful interview.Stage III begins with the admission to the Clinical Internship. Only when standardsbelow are met may students proceed to Stage III of the internship phase. Please note thatpassing scores on the Praxis II are expected.Internship I1. B or better in EDUC 3203 and 3563;2. Passing score on Praxis II specialty test for each area of licensure;3. Completion of Application for Admission to Internship;4. Cumulative GPA of 2.75 or better;5. FBI background check;6. Completion of Portfolio Competencies for entry into Stage III.Internship II1. Cumulative GPA of 2.75 or better;2. Passing score on Praxis II Principles of Learning and Teaching.NOTE: These admission requirements are subject to change as required by theArkansas Department of Education or as approved by the UAM Teacher EducationCommittee.104Education


GraduationStudents are considered program completers of the teacher education program onlyafter ALL criteria listed above are met. Students may not graduate unless they havecompleted all components of the program, including successfully passing all parts of thePraxis I, Praxis II Specialty area examination, and Praxis II Principles of Learning andTeaching.Teacher Education Field Experiences and InternshipsThe teacher education program at the University of Arkansas-Monticello supports theearly involvement of its candidates in field experiences with P-12 students. Field experiencesare sequenced, developmental, and focused on the practical application of contentcovered in education classes. Most students complete approximately 180 hours offieldwork prior to their year-long senior year internship. During the internship, studentscomplete 600 hours of clinical, supervised teaching, for a total of approximately 780 hoursacross the total teacher preparation program.Matriculating Through the Teacher Preparation ProgramThe teacher preparation program is comprised of three important components. Thefirst component is general education. All students at UAM complete the general educationrequirements which provide a solid foundation for study that will occur in later courses.These courses are usually completed in the first two years. Secondly, all teacher educationstudents complete the professional education core, regardless of their major. These coursesare completed throughout the program, beginning in the first year of enrollment, andprepare the student for the basics of teaching and learning. Thirdly, students preparing tobecome teachers will complete specific course work in their major area that will preparethem for teacher licensure.The teacher preparation program at UAM is subject to Arkansas Department ofEducation requirements. Please check with the School of Education for specific, updatedcourses needed to meet state licensure requirements for teaching.General Education Requirements for Prospective TeachersStudents majoring or minoring in education and seeking teacher licensure mustcomplete the following general education requirements with noted exceptions.Total hours: ...................................................................................................................... 50-53 hoursENGL 1013 Composition IENGL 1023 Composition IIOne of the following:SPCH 1023 Public Speaking orSPCH 2283 Business and Professional SpeechOne of the following:ART 1053 Art Appreciation orMUS 1113 Music AppreciationOne of the following pairs of courses:HIST 1013 Survey of Civilization I andENGL 2283 Survey of World Literature IorHIST 1023 Survey of Civilization II andENGL 2293 Survey of World Literature IIHumanities Elective:To be chosen from ART, MUS, ENGL, PHIL, or foreign language (3 hours)PSY 1013 Introduction to PsychologySOC 3453 Race and Ethnic RelationsPSCI 2213 American National GovernmentEducation105


One of the following:HIST 2213 American History I orHIST 2223 American History IIHIST 3593 Arkansas History**P E 2203 Health and Wellness Promotion*(*Course not required for students majoring in middle-level education.)(**Required for students majoring in P-4 early childhood special education, 4-8 middle-leveleducation, or 7-12 history and social studies.)One of the following:MATH 1003 Survey of Mathematics orMATH 1043 College Algebra orHigher level mathematics courseBasic Sciences ....................................................................................................................... (8 hours)BIOL course with associated laboratoryPhysical science course with associated laboratory (must be from chemistry, earthscience, or astronomy)Mathematics/Science/Technology Elective ...................................................................... (3 hours)Professional Education Core CoursesAll students majoring or minoring in education must complete the professionaleducation core courses below unless otherwise indicated.Total hours: ...................................................................................................................... 33-36 hoursEDUC 1143 Education for Schools and Society: Developing Teacher LeadersEDUC 2223 Developing Critical Literacy SkillsEDUC 2253 Needs of Diverse Learners in Inclusive SettingsEDUC 3203 Educational Psychology: Developing LearnersEDUC 3563 Effective Instructional and Management Strategies*(*Course not required for students majoring in middle level education.)EDUC 460V Clinical Internship I (must be taken as co-requisite with the appropriatecontent methods course offered in the major)EDUC 463V Clinical Internship II - Supervised TeachingBachelor of Arts - Early Childhood Special EducationStudents must take: 1) the general education requirements for prospective teachers, 2)the professional education core, and 3) the following major courses.Total hours: ............................................................................................................................ 33 hoursECED 2103 Characteristics of ExceptionalityECED 2203 Child DevelopmentECED 3303 Strategies for Teaching Special StudentsECED 3323 Assessing Young ChildrenECED 3353 Early Childhood Education: Planning, Curriculum, and ProgrammingECED 3383 Language DevelopmentECED 3403 Family and Community RelationshipsECED 4609 Early Childhood and Special Education MethodsElectives ................................................................................................................................... 3 hoursBachelor of Arts - Middle Level EducationStudents must take: 1) the general education requirements for prospective teachers, 2)the professional education core, 3) the middle level education core courses, and 4) thefollowing prescribed major courses either in English/social studies or mathematics/science.106Education


Middle Core Courses: ........................................................................................................... 12 hoursMLED 2103 Programs and Practices for Middle SchoolsMLED 2113 Physical Development of Early AdolescentsMLED 3493 Middle Level Content-Based MethodsMLED 4513 Teaching and Learning in the Middle Grades*(*Taken concurrently with EDUC 460V Clinical Internship I)Content Major Course Requirements: ......................................................................... 45-48 hoursStudents must select either English/social studies concentration or mathematics/science concentration.English/Social Studies ConcentrationENGL 2273 Advanced CompositionOne of the following:*ENGL 2283 Survey of World Literature I orENGL 2293 Survey of World Literature IIENGL 3413 American Literature IIENGL 3433 British Literature IIENGL 3463 Advanced GrammarENGL 3533 Introduction to Language StudyENGL 3573 Literature for AdolescentsOne of the following:ENGL 3543 Creative Writing orENGL 3403 American Literature I orSPCH 3513 Introduction to Oral InterpretationOne of the following:*HIST 1013 Survey of Civilization I orHIST 1023 Survey of Civilization IIOne of the following:*HIST 2213 American History I orHIST 2223 American History IIGEOG 2213 General Geography IGEOG 2223 General Geography IIPSCI 2213 American National GovernmentHIST 3593 Arkansas HistoryPSCI 2223 State Government of ArkansasECON 2203 Principles of Macroeconomics*Courses not taken to fulfill the general education requirement must be taken to fulfill therequirements of the English/social studies concentration and to meet the BA identity requirements.Mathematics/Science Concentration (includes 14 hours which will count toward generaleducation)NOTE: Students who opt for this concentration will have their general educationrequirements in basic sciences, mathematics, and math/science/technology electivefulfilled by the requirements below.ASTR 1033 Elements of AstronomyASTR 1041 Elements of Astronomy LaboratoryBIOL 1063 Biological ScienceBIOL 1071 Biological Science LaboratoryBIOL 1143 General BotanyBIOL 1171 General Botany LaboratoryBIOL 1153 General ZoologyBIOL 1161 General Zoology LaboratoryCHEM 1023 Introductory ChemistryCHEM 1031 Introductory Chemistry LaboratoryCHEM 2203 Introductory Organic and BiochemistryESCI 1063 Elements of GeologyEducation107


ESCI 1051 Elements of Geology LaboratoryESCI 1073 Earth and AtmosphereESCI 1081 Earth and Atmosphere LaboratoryMATH 1003 Survey of MathematicsOne of the following:MATH 1033 Trigonometry andMATH 1043 College AlgebraorMATH 1175 PrecalculusMATH 1073 Compact CalculusMATH 2243 Fundamental Geometric ConceptsMATH 3553 Number SystemsMAED 4663 Methods of Teaching MathematicsPHYS 1003 Elements of PhysicsPHYS 1021 Elements of Physics LaboratoryPHSC 3433 Science for Middle Level TeachersBachelor of Science in Health and Physical EducationGrades P-12Students must take the general education requirements for prospective teachers andthe professional education core. In addition, students must take the following majorcourses and supportive requirements. The BS identity requirements are met through thiscoursework.General Education Requirements ...................................................................................... 45 hoursENGL 1013 Composition IENGL 1023 Composition IIPSY 1013 Introduction to PsychologyHIST 3593 Arkansas HistoryBIOL 2233 Anatomy and Physiology IBIOL 2291 Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory IOne of the following:SPCH 1023 Public Speaking orSPCH 2283 Business and Professional SpeechOne of the following:MATH 1003 Survey of Math orMATH 1043 College AlgebraOne of the following:ART 1053 Art Appreciation orMUS 1113 Music AppreciationOne of the following:HIST 2213 American History I orHIST 2223 American History IIOne of the following pairs of courses:HIST 1013 Survey of Civilization I andENGL 2283 Survey of World Literature IorHIST 1023 Survey of Civilization II andENGL 2293 Survey of World Literature IIHumanities Elective ............................................................................................................... 3 hoursTo be chosen from ART, ENGL, MUS, PHIL, or foreign languagePhysical Science General Education RequirementCHEM 1023 and CHEM 1031orCHEM 1103 and CHEM 1121108Education


Math/Science/Technology Elective:BIOL 2243 Anatomy and Physiology IIBIOL 2301 Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory IIMajor Requirements: ............................................................................................................ 55 hoursP E 1443 Team SportsP E 1453 Individual SportsP E 1051 SwimmingP E 1103 History & Principles of Health & Physical EducationP E 2213 Gymnastics and Rhythmic ActivitiesP E 2273 First Aid and CPRAT 2313 Care and Prevention of Athletic InjuriesP E 2203 Health & Wellness PromotionP E 2143 Principles and Theory of CoachingP E 3553 Growth and Motor DevelopmentP E 3413 NutritionP E 3433 Organization and Administration of Health and Physical EducationOne course chosen from the following:P E 3373 Coaching of Baseball/SoftballP E 3383 Coaching of VolleyballP E 3393 Coaching of TrackP E 3423 Coaching of BasketballP E 3473 Coaching of FootballP E 3503 Adaptive Physical EducationP E 3523 Exercise PhysiologyP E 4603 Physical Education Tests and MeasurementsP E 4643 Anatomical KinesiologyP E 4663 Methods and Materials of PEP E 4683 Health Psychology and MethodsProfessional Education Core Courses ............................................................................... 36 hoursEDUC 1143 Education for Schools and Society: Developing Teacher LeadersEDUC 2223 Developing Critical Literacy SkillsEDUC 2253 Needs of Diverse Learners in Inclusive SettingsEDUC 3203 Educational Psychology: Developing LearnersEDUC 3563 Effective Instructional and Management StrategiesEDUC 460V Clinical Internship I (6 hours)EDUC 463V Clinical Internship II - Supervised Teaching (15 hours)Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science in Health andPhysical Education (nonlicensure)The Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science in Health and Physical Education (nonlicensure)is administratively located in the School of Education. The purposes of theHealth and Physical Education (non-licensure) program are to: 1) give students the contentknowledge needed for health, physical education, a minor content area, and coaching, and2) prepare students for jobs in non-teaching sports and recreational settings or preparethem to enter a master’s degree program of teacher certification.General Education Requirements: ............................................................................... 45-48 hoursENGL 1013 Composition IENGL 1023 Composition IIPSY 1013 Introduction to PsychologyHIST 3593 Arkansas HistoryBIOL 2233 Anatomy and Physiology IBIOL 2291 Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory IEducation109


One of the following:SPCH 1023 Public Speaking orSPCH 2283 Business and Professional SpeechOne of the following:MATH 1003 Survey of Math orMATH 1043 College AlgebraOne of the following:ART 1053 Art Appreciation orMUS 1113 Music AppreciationOne of the following:HIST 2213 American History I orHIST 2223 American History IIOne of the following pairs of courses:HIST 1013 Survey of Civilization I andENGL 2283 Survey of World Literature IorHIST 1023 Survey of Civilization II andENGL 2293 Survey of World Literature IIHumanities Elective ............................................................................................................... 3 hoursTo be chosen from ART, ENGL, MUS, PHIL, or foreign language. Students seeking aBA degree in Health and Physical Education (nonlicensure) must select a foreign language.Physical Science General Education RequirementCHEM 1023 and CHEM 1031orCHEM 1103 and CHEM 1121Math/Science/Technology Elective:BIOL 2243 Anatomy and Physiology IIBIOL 2301 Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory IIElective for BA Majors: ....................................................................................................... 3 hoursStudents seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree must choose a foreign language.Major Requirements: ..................................................................................................... 55 hoursP E 1443 Team SportsP E 1453 Individual SportsP E 1051 SwimmingP E 1103 History & Principles of Health & Physical EducationP E 2213 Gymnastics and Rhythmic ActivitiesP E 2273 First Aid and CPRAT 2313 Care and Prevention of Athletic InjuriesP E 2203 Health & Wellness PromotionP E 2143 Principles and Theory of CoachingP E 3553 Growth and Motor DevelopmentP E 3413 NutritionP E 3433 Organization and Administration of Health and Physical EducationOne course chosen from the following:P E 3373 Coaching of Baseball/SoftballP E 3383 Coaching of VolleyballP E 3393 Coaching of TrackP E 3423 Coaching of BasketballP E 3473 Coaching of FootballP E 3503 Adaptive Physical EducationP E 3523 Exercise PhysiologyP E 4603 Physical Education Tests and MeasurementsP E 4643 Anatomical KinesiologyP E 4663 Methods and Materials of PEP E 4683 Health Psychology and Methods110Education


Minor: ............................................................................................................................... 24-30 hoursChoose from any of the approved minor areas. At least 9 hours must be at the 3000-level or above.*For the Bachelor of Arts Degree, choose one of the following minors:ArtEnglishHistoryJournalismMusicSpanishSpeech*Students seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree must choose six additional hours offoreign language or six hours from the approved list of BA identity courses.*For the Bachelor of Science Degree, choose one of the following minors:BiologyBusiness Collateral - three additional hours of math or science will be requiredChemistryMathematicsNatural SciencePhysics*For those students seeking a Bachelor of Science degree, all BS identity requirementsare fulfilled within the minor, except for the business collateral.Bachelor of Science in Health and Physical Education,Exercise Science OptionStudents who are admitted to the Exercise Science Program are required to enroll inPE 1081 CVR Fitness and pass a minimum standard fitness test each semester of enrollment.Records of admission and of the fitness test will be kept in the office of the administratorof the Exercise Science program. All Exercise Science students are expected to takePE 1081 once as part of the degree program.General Education Requirements: ..................................................................................... 51 hoursENGL 1013 Composition IENGL 1023 Composition IIPSY 1013 Introduction to PsychologyPSCI 2213 American National GovernmentSOC 2213 Introduction to SociologyBIOL 1063 Biological ScienceBIOL 2233 Anatomy and Physiology IBIOL 2291 Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory IPhysical Science General Education requirement:CHEM 1023 and CHEM 1031 orCHEM 1103 and CHEM 1121One of the following:SPCH 1023 Public Speaking orSPCH 2283 Business and Professional SpeechOne of the following:MATH 1003 Survey of Math orMATH 1043 College AlgebraOne of the following:ART 1053 Art Appreciation orMUS 1113 Music AppreciationEducation111


One of the following:HIST 2213 American History I orHIST 2223 American History IIOne of the following pairs of courses:HIST 1013 Survey of Civilization I andENGL 2283 Survey of World Literature IorHIST 1023 Survey of Civilization II andENGL 2293 Survey of World Literature IIHumanities Elective ............................................................................................................... 3 hoursTo be chosen from ART, ENGL, MUS, PHIL, or foreign languageMath/Science/Technology Elective:BIOL 2243 Anatomy and Physiology IIBIOL 2301 Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory IIMajor Requirements: ............................................................................................................ 58 hoursP E 1081 CVR FitnessP E 1051 SwimmingP E 1011 Weight Training for Men and WomenEXSC 1012 Concepts of FitnessP E 1131 Fitness through Aerobic DanceEXSC 2151 Methods of Teaching Water Exercise and Aerobic DanceP E 2273 First Aid and CPREXSC 2163 Sport EntrepreneurshipP E 2203 Health and Wellness PromotionEXSC 3323 Strength and ConditioningP E 3413 NutritionEXSC 3311 PACE CertificationP E 3523 Exercise PhysiologyP E 3461 Exercise Physiology LaboratoryP E 4683 Health Psychology and MethodsP E 4603 Physical Education Tests and MeasurementsEXSC 4623 Community Recreation InternshipEXSC 4523 Geriatric/Therapeutic InternshipEXSC 4683 Methods and Technology for Exercise ScienceP E 4643 Anatomical KinesiologyP E 4401 Anatomical Kinesiology LaboratoryEXSC 4503 Exercise PrescriptionEXSC 4513 Exercise Certification PreparationEXSC 4806 Internship—Wellness FacilitySupportive Requirements: ................................................................................................... 15 hoursCIS 2223 Microcomputer ApplicationsA T 2313 Care and Prevention of Athletic InjuriesBIOL 4673 PharmacologyElectives:Elective at 1000-4000 level (3 hours)Elective at 3000-4000 level (3 hours)Physical Education Minor .................................................................................................. 24 hoursBIOL 2233 Anatomy and Physiology IP E 1103 History & Principles of Health and Physical EducationOne of the following:P E 2273 First Aid and CPR orAT 2313 Care and Prevention of Athletic InjuriesP E 3433 Organization & Administration of Health & Physical EducationP E 3503 Adaptive Physical EducationP E 3523 Exercise Physiology112Education


P E 4643 Anatomical KinesiologyP E 4663 Methods and Materials of PECoaching Minor .................................................................................................................... 24 hoursP E 2143 Principles and Theory of CoachingAT 2313 Care and Prevention of Athletic InjuriesP E 2263 OfficiatingP E 3433 Organization and Administration of Health and Physical EducationP E 4643 Anatomical KinesiologyNine hours from the following:P E 3373 Coaching of Baseball/SoftballP E 3383 Coaching of VolleyballP E 3393 Coaching of TrackP E 3423 Coaching of BasketballP E 3473 Coaching of FootballEducation113


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school ofFOREST RESOURCESLOCATION: Henry H. Chamberlin Forest Resources ComplexCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1052FAX: (870) 460-1092MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3468, Monticello, AR 71656Faculty/MissionProfessors Kluender (Dean), Sundell, Thompson, and Zeide; Research Professor D.Patterson; Visiting Emeritus Professor McCoy; Associate Professors Liechty, Pelkki, Tappe,and Weih; Assistant Professors Doruska, Ficklin, Heitzman, Kissell, Mehmood, StephensWilliams, and White; Instructor Warwick; Extension Forester Walkingstick; AdjunctProfessor Guldin; Adjunct Associate Professor Shelton; Adjunct Assistant Professor Bragg;University Forest Manager Webb; Research Specialists Earl, Grell, Hartshorn, Montgomery,Tackett, and Watt; Director of Continuing Education Guffey.The mission of the School of Forest Resources is to educate professional naturalresource managers, to enlarge the body of knowledge in renewable forest resources and todisseminate new ideas and technology. Successful accomplishment of this mission willpromote and enhance management, conservation and appreciation of public and privateforests, thereby providing for continuous production and optimum attainment of a varietyof forest resources for the people of Arkansas, the South and the nation. These resourcebenefits include the production of wood and fiber, wildlife, and clean water, as well asprovision for recreation, aesthetic and other important values.Accordingly, the School’s educational objectives are:1. To educate baccalaureate-level professionals in forestry, spatial informationsystems, and wildlife management, with both the professional competence and diversity ofbackground to assume positions with a variety of resource management organizations,such as private industry, private consulting firms, or public agencies; furthermore, toprovide an educational and professional basis for successful work performance and forassuming increasing administrative and managerial responsibilities to the middlemanagement level and beyond.2. To afford students the option of a two-year degree in land surveying technology.3. To provide graduate-level educational opportunities in natural resources management.4. To provide students the opportunity to acquire the professional and academiccompetence in forestry, spatial information systems, or wildlife necessary to be nationallycompetitive in graduate studies.5. To foster general education, a professional curriculum, and a collegiate environmentthat attracts and retains academically strong and professionally motivated students.6. To promote an educational environment in which a strong orientation towardacademic performance is encouraged, and where a dedication to the profession and itsethics is developed.Forest Resources115


In addition, the School’s other professional objectives are:1. To support research programs at both the basic and applied levels that contribute tothe body of knowledge in forestry, wildlife management, related natural resources, andspatial information systems, and which address the professional, scientific, and socialneeds of the forestry and natural resources communities in the state, the region, and thenation.2. To maintain a program of extension and public service that transmits new andestablished knowledge and technology to appropriate clientele through workshops,seminars, symposia, continuing education programs, and publications.The School offers three baccalaureate (B.A.) programs: Forestry, Spatial InformationSystems (SIS), and Wildlife Management. No minor is required in these majors. In all threemajors the first two years of course work emphasize general education in the sciences andhumanities. Courses in the junior and senior years emphasize various aspects of professionaleducation. In addition, the School offers a two-year Associate of Science (A.S.)degree track in Land Surveying Technology. Surveying licensure is available to both SISand Land Surveying graduates.MajorsIn the Forestry major, students are given a balance of general and professional coursework. General course work includes both the General Education sequence and 12 hours offree electives. The professional sequence consists of a forestry core curriculum and a blockof supportive requirements. A major component of the forestry core curriculum is therequired 8-week Forestry Summer Camp, an outdoor experience that enhances thestudent’s leadership skills, decision-making abilities, and other professional expertise. TheForestry major is accredited by the Society of American Foresters.The Spatial Information Systems (SIS) major is designed to provide students with amix of general education, geographic information systems, remote sensing, globalpositioning systems, photogrammetry, and land surveying. Students who graduate withthe SIS degree are well prepared to enter professions in the rapidly emerging SIS field or tofurther their graduate education. In addition to natural resources management, SISprovides students the opportunity to apply their skills in a broad range of professions suchas municipal planning, agriculture, and aerospace.The Wildlife Management major is a professional program designed to give students abroad scientific background for management and perpetuation of wildlife resources. Thecurriculum emphasizes basic and applied sciences, the social sciences, and development ofcommunication skills. This educational foundation serves students who plan to enter thewildlife profession with the baccalaureate degree, or those who plan to continue theireducation at the graduate level. Through appropriate selection of courses in consultationwith their advisor, students can satisfy course work requirements for professionalcertification by The Wildlife Society.MinorsMinors in forestry, geographic information systems (GIS), natural resources, landsurveying, and wildlife management are available to UAM students, including those in theSchool of Forest Resources. Students may also choose to apply their 10 to 17 hours of freeelectives toward developing additional professional and/or personal interests. Thestudent, in consultation with his or her advisor, selects these courses.Associate of Science DegreeThe Associate of Science Degree in Land Surveying Technology requires 65 semesterhours and two academic years for completion. The associate degree includes courses ingeneral education, SIS, and land surveying. Graduates of the A.S. in Land SurveyingTechnology have the opportunity to pass the state licensure exam, which enables them tobecome a licensed professional land surveyor.116Forest Resources


Acceptance to the Upper Division of theUndergraduate MajorsConditions of AcceptanceTo be accepted into upper division courses, Forestry, Spatial Information Systems, andWildlife Management majors must meet these conditions:Forestry Major1. Complete at least 41 hours of General Education courses (page 67 in the UAMcatalog).2. Complete 12 of 15 hours of the Supportive Requirements included in this list:CIS 2223 Microcomputer ApplicationsECON 2213 Principles of MicroeconomicsENGL 3253 Technical WritingSPCH 2283 Business & Professional SpeechMATH 1073 Compact CalculusNOTE: A complete list of supportive requirements is given on page 120.3. Complete all of the following:FOR 2231 Dendrology Lab IFOR 2291 Dendrology Lab IIFOR 2022 Financial Analysis in Natural ResourcesFOR 2273, 2071 Forest Mensuration lecture and labFOR 2264 Forest SoilsFOR 2342 Natural Resource Recreation4. Receive a course grade of “C” or better in all courses listed in conditions 1 - 3.5. Achieve a total GPA of at least 2.25 for all courses listed in conditions 1 - 3.6. Courses placed into the Free Electives pool are not covered under conditions 1, 2,and 4.Spatial Information Systems Major1. Achieve a total GPA of at least 2.25 for all UAM courses taken.2. Achieve a grade of “C” or better in all lower division (1000-2000) courses.Wildlife Management Major1. Complete at least 41 hours of General Education courses (page 67 in the UAMcatalog).2. Complete 14 of 17 hours of the Supportive Requirements included in this list:CIS 2223 Microcomputer ApplicationsECON 2213 Principles of MicroeconomicsENGL 3253 Technical WritingCHEM 1103, 1121 General Chemistry I lecture and labBIOL 1153, 1161 General Zoology lecture and labNOTE: A complete list of supportive requirements is given on page 124.3. Complete all of the following:FOR 2231 Dendrology Lab IFOR 2291 Dendrology Lab IIFOR 2273, 2071 Forest Mensuration lecture and labFOR 2264 Forest SoilsWL F 2112 Introduction to Wildlife ConservationWL F 2121 Wildlife Laboratory4. Receive a course grade of “C” or better in all courses listed in conditions 1 - 3.5. Achieve a total GPA of at least 2.25 for all courses listed in conditions 1 - 3.6. Courses placed into the Free Electives pool are not covered under conditions 1, 2,and 4.Forest Resources117


Application Instructions1. Submit an application for admission to the Dean of the School of Forest Resourcesdocumenting accomplishments of conditions above, AND including a one-page, wellwritten(rational and grammatically correct) handwritten statement expressing reasons forseeking a baccalaureate degree in Forestry, Spatial Information Systems, or WildlifeManagement and outlining goals for the future, including career.2. Deadline for application into fall courses is March 15.3. Conditional acceptance will be granted to students in spring classes who expect tocomplete conditions 1 - 6 by the end of the spring and/or summer terms. Conditionalstatus will be lifted upon meeting these requirements.4. Students will be notified by the Dean no later than April 1 whether they areaccepted into upper-division courses. Students applying under conditional status will benotified of their acceptance or denial by May 15. Notification of compliance for studentstaking summer classes will be made no later than August 15. Students taking courses atother schools must have their official transcripts sent to the Dean if notification of finalacceptance is desired for the fall semester.5. Students denied acceptance for the fall may reapply by October 15 for acceptance intothe spring semester.6. Entering Fall and Spring transfer students who have completed almost all theirGeneral Education and Supportive Requirements must also apply for admission to upperlevelcourses. They will likely be granted admission if taking upper-level courses is deemedadvantageous for movement toward graduation.7. Students taking one upper division course need not apply for admission.8. The appeal process for students denied admission includes in sequence: Dean ofthe School and School Faculty-Student Relations Committee.Requirements for GraduationTo graduate from the undergraduate programs of the School of Forest Resources,students must have an accumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 with no grade lowerthan “C” in all major requirements, supportive requirements, and general educationcourses.All baccalaureate degrees require at least 124 hours of college credit in courses at the1000-level or above.Student OrganizationsStudents are encouraged to cultivate their academic, social, and career intereststhrough membership in the Student Chapter of the Society of American Foresters, theStudent Chapter of The Wildlife Society, the Forestry Club, and Xi Sigma Pi, the nationalforest management honor society.SafetyAll students must purchase and wear leather work boots and ANSI approved hardhats and eyewear during field laboratories and field trips.Graduate WorkThe School also offers graduate education leading to the Master of Science degree.Areas in which students may pursue thesis research include biometrics/inventory, forestecology, forest management/economics, geographic information systems/remote sensing,hydrology/water quality, operations/harvesting, policy/social issues, silviculture, andwildlife ecology/management. Thirty hours of graduate credit, including 3-6 hours ofresearch and thesis credit, are required. For additional information on graduate studies, seethe Graduate Programs section of this catalog, page 217.118Forest Resources


ForestryBachelor of ScienceTotal Credit Hours: ............................................................................................................. 132 hoursUniversity General Education Requirements .................................................................. 44 hoursCompositionENGL 1013 Composition I orENGL 1033 Honors Composition IandENGL 1023 Composition II orENGL 1043 Honors Composition IIFine ArtsART 1053 Art Appreciation orMUS 1113 Music AppreciationSpeechSPCH 2283 Business and Professional Speech orSPCH 1043 Honors Speech CommunicationHumanities ClusterHIST 1013 Survey of Civilization I andENGL 2283 Survey of World Literature IorHIST 1023 Survey of Civilization II andENGL 2293 Survey of World Literature IIHumanities ElectiveENGL 3253 Technical WritingU.S. History or GovernmentPSCI 2213 American National GovernmentPsychology or SociologyPSY 1013 Introduction to Psychology orSOC 2213 Introduction to SociologySocial Science ElectiveECON 2213 Principles of MicroeconomicsMathematicsMATH 1043 College AlgebraBasic SciencesBIOL 1143 General Botany andBIOL 1171 General Botany LabandCHEM 1023 Introductory Chemistry andCHEM 1031 Introductory Chemistry LaboratoryorCHEM 1103 General Chemistry I andCHEM 1121 General Chemistry I LaboratoryMathematics, Science, or Technology ElectiveCIS 2223 Microcomputer ApplicationsMajor Requirements: ............................................................................................................ 53 hoursFOR 2231 Dendrology Laboratory IFOR 2273 Forest MensurationFOR 2071 Forest Mensuration LaboratoryFOR 2291 Dendrology Laboratory IIFOR 2304 Forest InventoryFOR 3123 Human Dimensions in Natural ResourcesFOR 3333 Contemporary Forest Resource IssuesFOR 3371 SilvicsForest Resources119


FOR 3434 SilvicultureFOR 3513 Forest EcologyFOR 3523 Tree Ecophysiology and HerbicidesFOR 3804 Forest Operations and FireFOR 4003 Natural Resource PolicyFOR 4362 Wood Structure and Forest ProductsFOR 4673 Forest Resource EconomicsFOR 4691 SeminarFOR 4723 Natural Resource ManagementFOR 4733 Forest Pest ManagementFOR 4823 Integrated Resource Planning and ManagementSIS 3814 Introduction to GIS, GPS and Remote SensingSupportive Requirements: ................................................................................................... 23 hoursFOR 1061 Introduction to ForestryFOR 2022 Financial Analysis in Natural ResourcesFOR 2264 Forest SoilsFOR 2342 Natural Resource RecreationFOR 3592 Forest HydrologyGB 3713 Business StatisticsMATH 1033 TrigonometryMATH 1073 Compact CalculusChoose one of the following:WLF 3831 Wildlife Techniques I orWLF 3841 Wildlife Techniques IIChoose one of the following:WL F 4702 Wildlife Ecology and Management orWL F 4612 Wildlife Habitat ManagementFree Electives: ........................................................................................................................ 12 hoursSpatial Information Systems (GIS option)Bachelor of ScienceTotal Credit Hours: ............................................................................................................. 124 hoursUniversity General Education Requirements .................................................................. 44 hoursCompositionENGL 1013 Composition I orENGL 1033 Honors Composition IandENGL 1023 Composition II orENGL 1043 Honors Composition IIFine ArtsART 1053 Art Appreciation orMUS 1113 Music AppreciationSpeechSPCH 2283 Business and Professional Speech orSPCH 1043 Honors Speech CommunicationHumanities ClusterHIST 1013 Survey of Civilization I andENGL 2283 Survey of World Literature IorHIST 1023 Survey of Civilization II andENGL 2293 Survey of World Literature II120Forest Resources


Humanities ElectiveENGL 3253 Technical WritingU.S. History or GovernmentPSCI 2213 American National GovernmentPsychology or SociologyPSY 1013 Introduction to Psychology orSOC 2213 Introduction to SociologySocial Science ElectiveGEOG 2213 General Geography IMathematicsMATH 1043 College AlgebraBasic SciencesESCI 1073 Earth and Atmosphere andESCI 1081 Earth and Atmosphere LaboratoryorESCI 1063 Elements of Geology andESCI 1051 Elements of Geology LaboratoryandPHYS 1003 Elements of Physics andPHYS 1021 Elements of Physics LaboratoryorPHYS 2203 General Physics I andPHYS 2231 General & University Physics Lab IMathematics, Science, or Technology ElectiveCIS 2223 Microcomputer ApplicationsMajor Requirements: ...................................................................................................... 54-56 hoursCIS 2203 Programming Microcomputer SystemsCIS 3443 Object-Oriented Programming LanguagesGEOG 2223 General Geography IIGB 3713 Business StatisticsChoose one of the following:MATH 1073 Compact Calculus orMATH 2255 Calculus ISIS 1001 Introduction to Spatial Information Systems (SIS)SIS 2014 Boundary SurveyingSIS 2023 Computer Assisted CartographySIS 3814 Introduction to GIS, GPS and Remote SensingSIS 3843 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (GIS) ISIS 3913 Database Design and ManagementSIS 3923 Remote SensingSIS 3933 Spatial StatisticsSIS 4183 Mapping Law and ProfessionalismSIS 4633 Digital PhotogrammetrySIS 4713 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (GIS) IISIS 4886 SIS PracticumSupportive Requirements: ..................................................................................................... 9 hoursMATH 1033 TrigonometryMGMT 3473 Principles of Management and Organizational BehaviorChoose one of the following:PHIL 3523 Logic orPHIL 3623 EthicsFree Electives: .................................................................................................................. 15-17 hoursForest Resources121


Spatial Information Systems (Surveying Option)Bachelor of ScienceTotal Credit Hours: ............................................................................................................. 124 hoursUniversity General Education Requirements .................................................................. 44 hoursCompositionENGL 1013 Composition I orENGL 1033 Honors Composition IandENGL 1023 Composition II orENGL 1043 Honors Composition IIFine ArtsART 1053 Art Appreciation orMUS 1113 Music AppreciationSpeechSPCH 2283 Business and Professional Speech orSPCH 1043 Honors Speech CommunicationHumanities ClusterHIST 1013 Survey of Civilization I andENGL 2283 Survey of World Literature IorHIST 1023 Survey of Civilization II andENGL 2293 Survey of World Literature IIHumanities ElectiveENGL 3253 Technical WritingU.S. History or GovernmentPSCI 2213 American National GovernmentPsychology or SociologyPSY 1013 Introduction to Psychology orSOC 2213 Introduction to SociologySocial Science ElectiveGEOG 2213 General Geography IMathematicsMATH 1043 College AlgebraBasic SciencesESCI 1073 Earth and Atmosphere andESCI 1081 Earth and Atmosphere LaboratoryorESCI 1063 Elements of Geology andESCI 1051 Elements of Geology LaboratoryandPHYS 1003 Elements of Physics andPHYS 1021 Elements of Physics LaboratoryorPHYS 2203 General Physics I andPHYS 2231 General & University Physics Lab IMathematics, Science, or Technology ElectiveCIS 2223 Microcomputer ApplicationsMajor Requirements: ............................................................................................................ 54 hoursCIS 2203 Programming Microcomputer SystemsGB 3713 Business StatisticsMATH 2255 Calculus ISIS 1001 Introduction to Spatial Information Systems (SIS)SIS 2014 Boundary Surveying122Forest Resources


SIS 2023 Computer Assisted CartographySIS 2114 Plane Surveying ISIS 3153 Survey Plats and DeedsSIS 3264 Route and Construction SurveyingSIS 3814 Introduction to GIS, GPS and Remote SensingSIS 3843 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (GIS) ISIS 3913 Database Design and ManagementSIS 4183 Mapping Law and ProfessionalismSIS 4454 Plane Surveying IISIS 4886 SIS PracticumSupportive Requirements: ................................................................................................... 11 hoursFOR 2231 Dendrology Laboratory IFOR 2291 Dendrology Laboratory IIMATH 1033 TrigonometryMGMT 3473 Principles of Management and Organizational BehaviorChoose one of the following:PHIL 3523 Logic orPHIL 3623 EthicsFree Electives: ........................................................................................................................ 15 hoursWildlife ManagementBachelor of ScienceTotal Credit Hours: ............................................................................................................. 128 hoursUniversity General Education Requirements .................................................................. 44 hoursCompositionENGL 1013 Composition I orENGL 1033 Honors Composition IandENGL 1023 Composition II orENGL 1043 Honors Composition IIFine ArtsART 1053 Art Appreciation orMUS 1113 Music AppreciationSpeechSPCH 2283 Business and Professional Speech orSPCH 1043 Honors Speech CommunicationHumanities ClusterHIST 1013 Survey of Civilization I andENGL 2283 Survey of World Literature IorHIST 1023 Survey of Civilization II andENGL 2293 Survey of World Literature IIHumanities ElectiveENGL 3253 Technical WritingU.S. History or GovernmentPSCI 2213 American National GovernmentPsychology or SociologyPSY 1013 Introduction to Psychology orSOC 2213 Introduction to SociologySocial Science ElectiveECON 2213 Principles of MicroeconomicsForest Resources123


MathematicsMATH 1043 College AlgebraBasic SciencesBIOL 1143 General Botany andBIOL 1171 General Botany LabCHEM 1103 General Chemistry I andCHEM 1121 General Chemistry I LaboratoryMathematics, Science, or Technology ElectiveCIS 2223 Microcomputer ApplicationsMajor Requirements: ...................................................................................................... 59-60 hoursBIOL 3434 Regional FloraBIOL 3484 General EcologyChoose one of the following:BIOL 3594 Invertebrate Zoology orFOR 4733 Forest Pest ManagementBIOL 3801 Mammalian Anatomy LaboratoryChoose one of the following:BIOL 4634 Vertebrate Physiology orBIOL 3354 GeneticsFOR 2071 Forest Mensuration LaboratoryFOR 2273 Forest MensurationFOR 3371 SilvicsFOR 3434 SilvicultureSIS 3814 Introduction to GIS, GPS and Remote SensingWL F 2112 Introduction to Wildlife ConservationWL F 2121 Wildlife LaboratoryWL F 3313 MammalogyWL F 3314 Icthyology/HerpetologyWL F 3333 Contemporary Forest Resource IssuesWL F 3343 Human Dimensions in Natural ResourcesWL F 3451 Mammalogy LabWL F 3831 Wildlife Techniques IWL F 3841 Wildlife Techniques IIWL F 4003 Natural Resource PolicyWL F 4612 Wildlife Habitat ManagementWL F 4702 Wildlife Ecology and ManagementWL F 4691 SeminarWL F 4823 Integrated Resource Planning and ManagementSupportive Requirements: ................................................................................................... 19 hoursBIOL 1153 General ZoologyBIOL 1161 General Zoology LaboratoryCHEM 2203 Introductory Organic and BiochemistryFOR 2231 Dendrology Laboratory IFOR 2291 Dendrology Laboratory IIFOR 2264 Forest SoilsG B 3713 Business StatisticsMATH 1033 TrigonometryFree Electives: ...................................................................................................................... 5-6 hours124Forest Resources


Land Surveying TechnologyAssociate of ScienceTotal Credit Hours: .................................................................................................................... 66-68CIS 2223 Microcomputer ApplicationsChoose one of the following:ENGL 1013 Composition I orENGL 1033 Honors Composition IChoose one of the following:ENGL 1023 Composition II orENGL 1043 Honors Composition IIENGL 3253 Technical WritingChoose one of the following pairs of courses:ESCI 1073 Earth and Atmosphere andESCI 1081 Earth and Atmosphere LaboratoryorESCI 1063 Elements of Geology andESCI 1051 Elements of Geology LaboratoryGEOG 2213 General Geography IChoose one of the following pairs of courses:HIST 1013 Survey of Civilization I andENGL 2283 Survey of World Literature IorHIST 1023 Survey of Civilization II andENGL 2293 Survey of World Literature IIMATH 1043 College AlgebraMATH 1033 TrigonometryChoose one of the following:MATH 1073 Compact Calculus orMATH 2255 Calculus IChoose one of the following pairs of courses:PHYS 1003 Elements of Physics andPHYS 1021 Elements of Physics LaboratoryorPHYS 2203 General Physics I andPHYS 2231 General & University Physics Lab IPSCI 2213 American National GovernmentChoose one of the following:PSY 1013 Introduction to Psychology orSOC 2213 Introduction to SociologySIS 1001 Introduction to Spatial Information Systems (SIS)SIS 2014 Boundary SurveyingSIS 2023 Computer Assisted CartographySIS 2114 Plane Surveying ISIS 3814 Introduction to GIS, GPS and Remote SensingSIS 3264 Route and Construction SurveyingSIS 3153 Survey Plats and DeedsMinorsForestry Minor: ..................................................................................................................... 24 hoursFOR 2342 Natural Resource RecreationFOR 2231 Dendrology Lab IFOR 3513 Forest EcologyFOR 3592 Forest HydrologyForest Resources125


Choose one of the following:FOR 2264 Forest Soils orAGRO 2244 SoilsChoose one the following pairs of courses:CHEM 1023 Introductory Chemistry andCHEM 1031 Introductory Chemistry LaboratoryorCHEM 1103 General Chemistry I andCHEM 1121 General Chemistry I LaboratoryOne of the following course groups:FOR 4003 Natural Resource Policy andFOR 3123 Human Dimensions in Natural Resources andWL F 4702 Wildlife Ecology and ManagementorFOR 2304 Forest Inventory andFOR 3333 Contemporary Forest Resource Issues andFOR 3371 SilvicsGeographic Information Systems (GIS) Minor: .............................................................. 24 hoursStudents must take 24 hours of course work from the list below in addition to anyrequired courses for their major. The minor must include at least nine hours of 3000-4000level course work.CIS 2203 Programming Microcomputer SystemsCIS 3443 Object-Oriented Programming LanguagesGB 3713 Business StatisticsSIS 1001 Introduction to Spatial Information Systems (SIS)SIS 2014 Boundary SurveyingSIS 3814 Introduction to GIS, GPS and Remote SensingSIS 3843 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (GIS) ISIS 3913 Database Design and ManagementSIS 3923 Remote SensingSIS 3933 Spatial StatisticsSIS 4633 Digital PhotogrammetrySIS 4713 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (GIS) IINatural Resources Minor: ............................................................................................. 25-26 hoursOne of the following courses:FOR 3123 / WLF 3343 Humen Dimensions in Natural Resources orSOC 2213 Introduction to SociologyOne of the following courses:FOR 2264 Forest Soils orAGRO 2244 SoilsOne of the following course groups:FOR 2231 Dendrology Laboratory I andFOR 2291 Dendrology Laboratory IIorBIOL 3434 Regional FloraOne of the following courses:FOR 3592 Forest Hydrology orAGEN 2263 Soil and Water Conservation6 hours from these three courses:FOR/WLF 4003 Natural Resource PolicyAGEC 4823 Economics of Environmental ManagementPSCI 3423 Legislative Process126Forest Resources


6-7 hours from these three course groups:BIOL 3493 Environmental ScienceOne of the following courses:BIOL 3484 General Ecology orFOR 3513 Forest EcologyOne of the following courses:WL F 4702 Wildlife Ecology and Management orWL F 4612 Wildlife Habitat Management3 hours from this list (if needed):AGRO 4743 Soil FertilityANTH 2233 Arkansas Regional ArcheologyCHEM 2203 Introductory Organic & BiochemistryESCI 1073 Earth and AtmosphereESCI 3473 Earth ResourcesSIS 3814 Introduction to GIS, GPS and Remote SensingGB 3713 Business StatisticsMGMT 3473 Principles of Management and Organizational BehaviorPHIL 2223 Introduction to PhilosophyPSCI 2213 American National GovernmentPSCI 4613 Public ManagementSOC 4643 Population ProblemsSPCH 3483 Communication in Small GroupsSurveying Minor: ..................................................................................................... 24 hoursStudents must take 24 hours of course work from the list below in addition to anyrequired courses for their major. The minor must include at least nine hours of 3000-4000level course work.GB 3713 Business StatisticsOne of the following:MATH 1073 Compact Calculus orMATH 2255 Calculus ISIS 1001 Introduction to Spatial Information Systems (SIS)SIS 2014 Boundary SurveyingSIS 2023 Computer Assisted CartographySIS 2114 Plane Surveying ISIS 3153 Survey Plats and DeedsSIS 3264 Route and Construction SurveyingSIS 3814 Introduction to GIS, GPS and Remote SensingSIS 3843 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (GIS) ISIS 3913 Database Design and ManagementSIS 4454 Plane Surveying IISIS 4183 Mapping Law and ProfessionalismWildlife Management Minor: ............................................................................................. 25 hoursBIOL 3493 Environmental ScienceBIOL 3434 Regional FloraBIOL 3484 General EcologyWL F 2112 Introduction to Wildlife ConservationWL F 2121 Wildlife LaboratoryWL F 3831 Wildlife Techniques IWL F 3841 Wildlife Techniques IIWL F 4612 Wildlife Habitat ManagementWL F 4702 Wildlife Ecology and ManagementOne of the following courses:BIOL/WLF 3324 Ornithology/Mammalogy orBIOL/WLF 3314 Ichthyology/HerpetologyForest Resources127


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division ofGENERAL STUDIESLOCATION: Academic Advising Center (Administration Building)CAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1032 / FAX: (870) 460-1933MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3478, Monticello, AR 71656E-MAIL: www.uamont.edu/academicaffairs/Faculty / MissionProfessors Edson and Webster; Associate Professors Abedi, Becker, Clubb, Marshall,Poniewaz, and Schmidt; Assistant Professors Everts, J. Guenter, Huston, Lobitz, Lynde,Moore, and H. Sayyar; Instructors Chapman, Chappell, Efird, Hartness, Nelson, K. Sayyar,Watson, and E. Zeide; Director Terry.The mission of the Division of General Studies is to serve as the academic andadministrative unit for all students who are undecided about a major field as described onpage 64. The Director and faculty advisors assist students in satisfying the generaleducation requirements, the requirements for admission into a major, and/or requirementsfor the Associate of Arts Degree or one of the three Associate of Applied Science Degrees inthe Division of General Studies. (Note: Students interested in the Associate of Science inLand Surveying Technology should consult the School of Forest Resources chapter;students interested in the Associate of Applied Science in Nursing should refer to theDivision of Nursing chapter.)Associate of Arts DegreeThe Associate of Arts Degree consists of 38 hours of General Education courses and 24elective hours. This degree may serve as a terminal degree for students or as an intermediatedegree for students enrolled in a baccalaureate program. All hours earned in satisfyingthe Associate of Arts Degree may also be used toward a baccalaureate degree. Therequirements for the Associate of Arts Degree are:Total Hours ............................................................................................................................ 62 hoursRequired Courses .................................................................................................................. 38 hoursFreshman CompositionOne of the following:ENGL 1013 Composition I orENGL 1033 Honors Composition IOne of the following:ENGL 1023 Composition II orENGL 1043 Honors Composition IISpeechOne of the following:SPCH 1023 Public SpeakingSPCH 1043 Honors Speech CommunicationSPCH 2203 Interpersonal CommunicationSPCH 2283 Business & Professional SpeechGeneral Studies129


Humanities ClusterOne of the following pairs of courses:HIST 1013 Survey of Civilization I andENGL 2283 Survey of World Lit. IorHIST 1023 Survey of Civilization II andENGL 2293 Survey of World Lit. IIPsychology/SociologyOne of the following:PSY 1013 Introduction to Psychology orSOC 2213 Introduction to SociologyAmerican History or GovernmentOne of the following:HIST 2213 American History I orHIST 2223 American History II orPSCI 2213 American National GovernmentSocial Science ElectiveA three-hour course chosen from the areas of Anthropology, Criminal Justice,Economics, Geography, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Social WorkFine Arts AppreciationOne of the following:ART 1053 Art Appreciation orMUS 1113 Music AppreciationMathematicsA three-hour 1000-level (or above) mathematics courseLaboratory SciencesEight hours from two 3-hour lecture courses with associated 1-hour labs, or two 4-hour courses with integrated labs chosen from two of the following groups:(1) Astronomy, Earth Science(2) Biology(3) Chemistry, PhysicsElectives ................................................................................................................................. 24 hoursAll elective courses must be at the 1000 level or above.Associate of Applied Science DegreeThe Division of General Studies offers the Associate of Applied Science Degree in thefollowing areas:Agriculture Production Management (in cooperation with the UAM College ofTechnology - McGehee)Industrial Technology (in cooperation with the UAM College of Technology - Crossett)Pulp and Paper Technology (in cooperation with the UAM College of Technology -Crossett)Students complete vocational-technical courses at the technical school. This coursework is then transferred as a block of courses to UAM. Students also complete a minimumof fifteen hours of UAM courses, which must include the following:Required Courses .................................................................................................................. 15 hoursCIS 2223 Microcomputer ApplicationsOne of the following:ENGL 1013 Composition I orENGL 1033 Honors Composition I130General Studies


One of the following:ENGL 1023 Composition II orENGL 1043 Honors Composition IIOne of the following:MATH 0183 Intermediate Algebra orMATH 1043 College AlgebraOne of the following:HIST 1013 Survey of Civilization IHIST 1023 Survey of Civilization IIHIST 2213 American History IHIST 2223 American History IIPSY 1013 Introduction to PsychologySOC 2213 Introduction to SociologyPSCI 2213 American National GovernmentAll of the UAM courses, with the exception of MATH 0183, may be applied toward abaccalaureate degree at UAM or transferred to another university. The student shouldcontact the technical school for a listing and description of the technical courses requiredfor the degree.General Studies131


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school of mathematical and naturalSCIENCESLOCATION: Science CenterCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1016, (870) 460-1066 / FAX: (870) 460-1316MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3480, Monticello, AR 71656E-MAIL: math_sci@uamont.eduFaculty / MissionProfessors J. Annulis (Dean), E. Bacon, Edson, Godwin, R. McConnell, and Sundell;Associate Professors Abedi, Bramlett, Nordeen, and H. Sayyar; Assistant ProfessorsDolberry, J. Guenter, Lynde, and Sims; Instructors Chapman, Chappell, Efird, Nelson, K.Sayyar, and E. Zeide.The School of Mathematical and Natural Sciences comprises the disciplines of athletictraining, biology, chemistry, mathematics, physics, astronomy, and earth science.The mission of the School of Mathematical and Natural Sciences is to offer specializationin athletic training, biology, chemistry, mathematics, and natural science and toprovide opportunities for all students to enhance their understanding of science andmathematics. Curricula offered in the School prepare graduates for careers in industry andteaching, for graduate studies, and for admission to professional programs including alliedhealth, dentistry, medicine, optometry, and pharmacy. This mission is fulfilled through thefollowing goals:1. To provide academic programs which promote the development of professionalscientists and mathematicians and provide opportunities for all students to enhance theirunderstanding of the natural sciences and mathematics.2. To prepare individuals for successful careers in industry and teaching, and forgraduate studies in science and mathematics.3. To provide curricula for pre-professional studies in dentistry, medicine, optometry,pharmacy, and allied health (physical therapy, radiological technology, respiratory therapy,medical technology, occupational therapy, and dental hygiene).4. To provide technical and analytical courses to support studies in agriculture,forestry, nursing, physical education, pre-veterinary medicine, psychology, and wildlifemanagement.5. To serve the general education program through courses in astronomy, biology,chemistry, earth science, mathematics, physics, and physical science that provide a basicbackground for a baccalaureate degree.Major and Minor RequirementsAll baccalaureate degrees require at least 124 hours of college credit courses at the1000-level or above. These courses must include the General Education requirements foundon page 67 and at least 40 hours of 3000-4000 level courses.Mathematical and Natural Sciences133


Biology MajorBachelor of ScienceMajor Requirements: ............................................................................................................ 38 hoursBIOL 1063 Biological ScienceBIOL 1071 Biological Science LaboratoryBIOL 1153 General ZoologyBIOL 1161 General Zoology LaboratoryBIOL 1143 General BotanyBIOL 1171 General Botany LaboratoryBIOL 3354 GeneticsBIOL 3484 General EcologyBIOL 3553 MicrobiologyBIOL 3561 Microbiology LaboratoryBIOL 4602 Seminar in Evolutionary BiologyBIOL 4634 Vertebrate PhysiologyElectives:Eight hours of 3000-4000 level Biology coursesSupportive Requirements .............................................................................................. 29-30 hoursCHEM 1103 General Chemistry ICHEM 1113 General Chemistry IICHEM 1121 General Chemistry I LaboratoryCHEM 1131 General Chemistry II LaboratoryCHEM 3404 Organic Chemistry ICHEM 3414 Organic Chemistry IIChoose one of the following:MATH 1033 Trigonometry andMATH 1043 College AlgebraorMATH 1175 PrecalculusChoose one of the following course sequences:PHYS 2203 General Physics I andPHYS 2213 General Physics IIorPHYS 2313 University Physics I andPHYS 2323 University Physics IIPHYS 2231 Physics Laboratory IPHYS 2241 Physics Laboratory IIBiology MinorMinor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 24 hoursBIOL 1063 Biological ScienceBIOL 1071 Biological Science LaboratoryBIOL 1153 General ZoologyBIOL 1161 General Zoology LaboratoryBIOL 1143 General BotanyBIOL 1171 General Botany LaboratoryBIOL 3354 GeneticsBIOL 3484 General EcologyElectives:Four hours of 3000-4000 level Biology courses134Mathematical and Natural Sciences


Chemistry MajorBachelor of ScienceMajor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 36 hoursCHEM 1103 General Chemistry ICHEM 1113 General Chemistry IICHEM 1121 General Chemistry I LaboratoryCHEM 1131 General Chemistry II LaboratoryCHEM 3314 Quantitative AnalysisCHEM 3404 Organic Chemistry ICHEM 3414 Organic Chemistry IICHEM 3444 Instrumental AnalysisCHEM 4704 Physical Chemistry: ThermodynamicsCHEM 4714 Physical Chemistry: Kinetic & Quantum MechanicsChoose one of the following:CHEM 4611 Chemistry Seminar orCHEM 4691 Senior ResearchElectives:Three hours of 3000-4000 level Chemistry coursesSupportive Requirements .............................................................................................. 28-29 hoursChoose one of the following:MATH 1033 Trigonometry andMATH 1043 College AlgebraorMATH 1175 PrecalculusMATH 2255 Calculus IMATH 3495 Calculus IIMATH 3525 Differential Equations and Multi-Dimensional CalculusChoose one of the following:PHYS 2203 General Physics I andPHYS 2213 General Physics IIorPHYS 2313 University Physics I andPHYS 2323 University Physics IIPHYS 2231 Physics Laboratory IPHYS 2241 Physics Laboratory IIChemistry MinorMinor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 24 hoursCHEM 1103 General Chemistry ICHEM 1113 General Chemistry IICHEM 1121 General Chemistry I LaboratoryCHEM 1131 General Chemistry II LaboratoryCHEM 3314 Quantitative AnalysisCHEM 3404 Organic Chemistry ICHEM 3414 Organic Chemistry IIElectives:Four hours of 3000-4000 level Chemistry coursesMathematical and Natural Sciences135


Mathematics MajorBachelor of ScienceMajor Requirements ............................................................................................... 33-34 hoursMATH 2255 Calculus IMATH 3495 Calculus IIMATH 3525 Differential Equations and Multi-Dimensional CalculusMATH 3403 Probability & StatisticsMATH 3453 Abstract AlgebraMATH 3463 Linear AlgebraMathematics Electives:9 hours at the 2000-4000 level (except courses specifically excluded).All majors must complete MATH 4711, Mathematics Seminar, or the secondary educationinternship in mathematics.Supportive Requirements ...................................................................................................... 8 hoursEight hours from:CHEM 1103 General Chemistry ICHEM 1113 General Chemistry IICHEM 1121 General Chemistry I LaboratoryCHEM 1131 General Chemistry II LaboratoryPHYS 2203 General Physics IPHYS 2213 General Physics IIPHYS 2313 University Physics IPHYS 2323 University Physics IIPHYS 2231 Physics Laboratory IPHYS 2241 Physics Laboratory IIStudents may use General Physics or University Physics, but not both.Those planning to teach must use MATH 3233 History of Mathematics, MATH 3423College Geometry, and MATH 3513 Discrete Mathematics as their elective courses inmathematics. In addition to other required Education courses, those students must takeMAED 4663 Methods of Teaching Mathematics.MATHEMATICS MINORMinor Requirements 24 hoursMATH 2255 Calculus IMATH 3495 Calculus IIMATH 3525 Differential Equations and Multi-Dimensional CalculusMathematics Electives:9 hours at the 3000-4000 level (except courses specifically excluded).Natural Science MajorBachelor of ScienceCore Requirements ............................................................................................................... 16 hoursCHEM 1113 General Chemistry IICHEM 1131 General Chemistry II LaboratoryESCI 1073 Earth and AtmosphereESCI 1081 Earth and Atmosphere LaboratoryPHYS 2203 General Physics IPHYS 2231 Physics Laboratory IPHYS 2213 General Physics IIPHYS 2241 Physics Laboratory II136Mathematical and Natural Sciences


Supportive Requirements .............................................................................................. 17-18 hoursBIOL 1063 Biological ScienceBIOL 1071 Biological Science LaboratoryCHEM 1103 General Chemistry ICHEM 1121 General Chemistry I LaboratoryESCI 1063 Elements of GeologyESCI 1051 Elements of Geology LaboratoryChoose one of the following:MATH 1033 Trigonometry andMATH 1043 College AlgebraorMATH 1175 PrecalculusOptions: Choose the Life Science Option or the Physical Science Option.Life Science Option .............................................................................................................. 25 hoursBIOL 1153 General ZoologyBIOL 1161 General Zoology LaboratoryBIOL 1143 General BotanyBIOL 1171 General Botany LaboratoryBIOL 3484 General EcologyBIOL 3553 MicrobiologyBIOL 3561 Microbiology LaboratoryElectives:Nine hours of 3000-4000 level Biology coursesPhysical Science Option ..................................................................................................... 26 hoursASTR 1033 Elements of AstronomyASTR 1041 Elements of Astronomy LaboratoryCHEM 3314 Quantitative AnalysisCHEM 3404 Organic Chemistry ICHEM 3414 Organic Chemistry IIOne of the following:CHEM 4611 Chemistry Seminar orSCED 4671 Seminar in Classroom TeachingMATH 1073 Compact CalculusElectives:Six hours of 3000-4000 level Chemistry or Physics coursesMinor Requirement: A minor is required with the Natural Science major. Students inthe Life Science Option must choose a minor other than Biology. Students in the PhysicalScience Option must choose a minor other than Chemistry. Students planning to teachshould see the School of Education section beginning on page 103. Completion of theteaching licensure requirements will satisfy the requirement for a minor.Natural Science MinorMinor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 25 hoursTwo of the following three blocks of courses:(1) CHEM 1103 General Chemistry ICHEM 1121 General Chemistry I LaboratoryCHEM 1113 General Chemistry IICHEM 1131 General Chemistry II LaboratoryMathematical and Natural Sciences137


(2) PHYS 2203 General Physics IPHYS 2231 Physics Laboratory IPHYS 2213 General Physics IIPHYS 2241 Physics Laboratory II(3) BIOL 1143 General BotanyBIOL 1171 General Botany LaboratoryBIOL 1153 General ZoologyBIOL 1161 General Zoology LaboratoryElectives:Nine additional hours of 3000-4000 level courses chosen from Biology, Chemistry, orPhysics. All nine hours must be from the same discipline.Athletic Training MinorMinor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 24 hoursA T 2313 Care and PreventionA T 3423 Evaluation of Upper ExtremityA T 3433 Evaluation of Lower ExtremityA T 4623 Rehabilitation of Athletic InjuriesBIOL 4673 PharmacologyP E 3413 NutritionP E 3523 Exercise PhysiologyP E 4643 Anatomical KinesiologyThe Athletic Training program is NOT accredited by the NATABOC. Studentsgraduating from this program currently will not be eligible for the NATA certificationexamination.Physics MinorMinor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 24 hoursChoose one of the following:PHYS 2203 General Physics I andPHYS 2213 General Physics IIorPHYS 2313 University Physics I andPHYS 2323 University Physics IIPHYS 2231 Physics Laboratory IPHYS 2241 Physics Laboratory IIPHYS 3404 Modern PhysicsPHYS 3444 OpticsPHYS 4603 MechanicsElectives:Five hours from the following:PHYS 2354 Radiation PhysicsASTR 1033 Elements of AstronomyASTR 1041 Astronomy LabASTR 3503 Advanced Astronomy138Mathematical and Natural Sciences


Gulf Coast Research LaboratoryThe School of Mathematical and Natural Sciences is affiliated with the Gulf CoastResearch Laboratory (GCRL) at Ocean Springs, Mississippi. Students may take coursesthere and receive credit at UAM. The following courses are offered at GCRL:Course ................................................................................................................................... Sem. Hrs.300 Marine Science I: Oceanography ...................................................................... 3300L Marine Science I: Oceanography Lab .............................................................. 2301 Marine Science II: Marine Biology ................................................................... 3301L Marine Science II: Marine Biology Lab ............................................................ 2403/503 Marine Invertebrate Zoology ............................................................................. 3403L/503L Marine Invertebrate Zoology Lab ..................................................................... 3404/504 Parasites of Marine Animals .............................................................................. 3404L/504L Parasites of Marine Animals Lab ...................................................................... 3405/505 Marine Ecology .................................................................................................... 3405L/505L Marine Ecology Lab ............................................................................................ 2406/506 Fauna/Faunistic Ecology Tidal Marshes ......................................................... 2406L/506L Fauna/Faunistic Ecology Tidal Marshes Lab .................................................. 3407/507 Marine Aquaculture ............................................................................................ 3407L/507L Marine Aquaculture Lab .................................................................................... 3408/508 Marine Ichthyology ............................................................................................. 3408L/508L Marine Ichthyology Lab ..................................................................................... 3409/509 Marine Microbiology .......................................................................................... 3409L/509L Marine Microbiology Lab ................................................................................... 2410/510 Marine Fisheries Management .......................................................................... 2410L/510L Marine Fisheries Management Lab ................................................................... 2420/520 Marine Phycology ............................................................................................... 2420L/520L Marine Phycology Lab ........................................................................................ 2421/521 Coastal Vegetation ............................................................................................... 2421L/521L Coastal Vegetation Lab ....................................................................................... 1422/522 Salt Marsh Plant Ecology .................................................................................... 2422L/522L Salt Marsh Plant Ecology Lab ............................................................................ 2423/523 Marine Mammals ................................................................................................. 3423L/523L Marine Mammals Lab ......................................................................................... 3430/530 Comparative Histology of Marine Organisms ................................................ 3430L/530L Comparative Histology of Marine Organisms Lab3456/556 Marine Science for Teachers I2456L/556L Marine Science for Teachers I Lab ..................................................................... 1457/557 Marine Science for Teachers II ........................................................................... 2457L/557L Marine Science for Teachers II Lab ................................................................... 1458/558 Marine Science for Elementary Teachers ......................................................... 2458L/558L Marine Science for Elementary Teachers Lab .................................................. 1482/582 Coastal Marine Geology ..................................................................................... 2482L/582L Coastal Marine Geology Lab ............................................................................. 1490/590 Special Problems in Marine Science ............................................................ TBA491/591 Special Topics in Marine Science ................................................................. TBAMathematical and Natural Sciences139


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division ofMUSICLOCATION: Music BuildingCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1060 / FAX: (870) 460-1260MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3607, Monticello, AR 71656Faculty / MissionAssociate Professors Becker, Hall (Chair), Skinner, and Trana; Assistant ProfessorsKoskoski, and Lobitz; Instructor Meggs.The mission of the Division of Music is to offer quality educational opportunities inmusic that provide students with the technical skills and the theoretical and historicalknowledge necessary for competence in their chosen areas of concentration, and1. To prepare students at the baccalaureate level for successful careers in teaching andother musical occupations;2. To prepare students in music for successful graduate study;3. To provide students opportunities for cultural and aesthetic experiences throughactive participation in music;4. To offer general education course work in music for all students of the University;5. To provide cultural and aesthetic experiences for the University, the community,and southeast Arkansas through the presentation of recitals, concerts, musical theatreproductions, master classes, workshops, and seminars.Degrees OfferedThe Division of Music offers academic programs which lead to the Bachelor of Arts inMusic degree, a liberal arts degree with concentrations in voice, piano, or instrumental, andthe Bachelor of Music Education degree with concentrations in voice, piano, or instrumental.AccreditationThe University of Arkansas-Monticello is an accredited institutional member of theNational Association of Schools of Music.Ensemble RequirementsAll music majors are required to participate in a major ensemble (Concert Choir,Marching Band or Concert Band) within their concentration area each semester inresidence. Students with a concentration in Music Theatre must participate in ConcertChoir. Students with a piano concentration may participate in any major music ensemble.Piano Proficiency ExaminationAll candidates for the Bachelor of Arts in Music or the Bachelor of Music Educationdegree must pass a piano proficiency examination. The Music Student Handbook outlinesin detail the specific piano proficiency requirements.Music141


Applied Music CoursesAll music majors must enroll in applied music each semester until completion of theSenior Recital. Fees for private instruction are currently $40 for one credit hour and $55 fortwo credit hours.Jury ExaminationsAll students enrolled in applied lessons are evaluated at the end of each semesterbefore a jury composed of music faculty. An unexcused absence from the jury may result ina failing grade in the applied lesson. Seniors who have given a satisfactory Senior Recitalare exempt from the jury examination during that semester.Major RequirementsAll baccalaureate degrees require at least 124 hours of college credit courses at the1000-level or above. These courses must include the General Education requirements foundon page 67 and at least 40 hours of 3000-4000 level courses.Bachelor of Arts in Music(Concentrations in Voice, Piano, Instrumental, and Music Theatre)Core Requirements: .............................................................................................................. 52 hoursMUS 1040 Recitals, Concerts, Productions*MUS 1072 Music TechnologyMUS 1012 Introduction to TheoryMUS 1023 Theory IMUS 1033 Theory IIMUS 2213 Theory IIIMUS 2223 Theory IVMUS 1061 Ear Training/Sight Singing IMUS 1091 Ear Training/Sight Singing IIMUS 2231 Ear Training/Sight Singing IIIMUS 2241 Ear Training/Sight Singing IVMUS 3563 Music History IMUS 3573 Music History IIMUS 3413 Analysis and Music LiteratureMajor Area Applied Lessons (PMUS) ..................................................................................... 14 hoursMajor Area Senior Recital ........................................................................................................... 1 hourMajor Area Ensemble ................................................................................................................. 8 hours*MUS 1040 must be taken each semester in residence for a total of 8 semesters.In addition to the core requirements students must complete the requirements for aconcentration.Vocal Concentration Requirements: .................................................................................. 16 hoursMUS 4722 Choral Conducting3000-4000 level Music Electives .............................................................................................. 14 hoursPiano Concentration Requirements: ................................................................................. 16 hoursMUS 1051 Piano RepertoireOne of the following:MUS 4712 Instrumental Conducting orMUS 4722 Choral ConductingMUS 4632 Piano Pedagogy3000-4000 level Music Electives .............................................................................................. 11 hours142Music


Instrumental Concentration Requirements: ..................................................................... 16 hoursMUS 4712 Instrumental Conducting3000-4000 level Music Electives .............................................................................................. 14 hoursMusic Theatre Requirements: ............................................................................................. 17 hoursMUS 1253 Acting in Musical Theatre IMUS 2263 Acting in Musical Theatre IIMUS 3273 Acting in Musical Theatre IIIMUS 3333 History of the American Broadway MusicalMUS 428V Music Theatre Workshop (4 hours)PE 1071 Rhythms, Modern DanceStudents with a concentration in Music Theatre must audition for the musical eachspring they are in residency and accept any part offered.Students pursuing the B.A. in music degree must also satisfy all requirements for aBachelor of Arts degree as found on page 70.Music143


Bachelor of Music Education(Concentrations in Voice, Piano, and Instrumental)Core Requirements: .............................................................................................................. 56 hoursMUS 1040 Recitals, Concerts, Productions*MUS 1072 Music TechnologyMUS 1012 Introduction to TheoryMUS 1023 Theory IMUS 1033 Theory IIMUS 2213 Theory IIIMUS 2223 Theory IVMUS 1061 Ear Training/Sight Singing IMUS 1091 Ear Training/Sight Singing IIMUS 2231 Ear Training/Sight Singing IIIMUS 2241 Ear Training/Sight Singing IVMUS 3441 Woodwind ClassMUS 3481 Brass ClassMUS 3491 Percussion ClassMUS 3501 String ClassMUS 3563 Music History IMUS 3573 Music History IIMUS 3413 Analysis and Music LiteratureMUS 3583 Elementary Music MethodsMajor Area Applied Lessons (PMUS) ..................................................................................... 12 hoursMajor Area Senior Recital 1 hour(Must be presented the semester prior to enrolling in Internship II)Major Area Ensemble ................................................................................................................. 7 hours(The major area ensemble will satisfy the three hour PE elective requirement for teacherlicensure.)*MUS 1040 must be taken each semester in residence for a total of 8 semesters.Vocal Concentration Requirements ..................................................................................... 9 hoursApplied Piano .......................................................................................................................... (2 hours)MUS 4783 Secondary Vocal MethodsMUS 4722 Choral ConductingMUS 2292 Diction for SingersPiano Concentration Requirements: ................................................................................. 10 hoursApplied Voice (2 hours)MUS 1051 Piano RepertoireMUS 4632 Piano PedagogyMUS 4722 Choral ConductingMUS 4783 Secondary Vocal MethodsInstrumental Concentration Requirements: ....................................................................... 7 hoursApplied Voice (2 hours)MUS 4613 Secondary Instrumental MethodsMUS 4712 Instrumental ConductingProfessional Education Requirements: ....................................................................... 30-36 hoursEDUC 1143 Education for Schools and SocietyEDUC 2223 Developing Critical Literacy SkillsEDUC 2253 Needs of Diverse Learners in Inclusive SettingsEDUC 3203 Educational Psychology: Developing LearnersEDUC 3563 Effective Instructional and Management Strategies144Music


EDUC 460V Clinical Internship I/Seminar (4-6 hours)EDUC 463V Clinical Internship II—Supervised Teaching/Seminar (12-15 hours)Students must also complete all teacher licensure requirements of the Arkansas Department ofEducation. These requirements may be found in the School of Education section on page 104.Music MinorMinor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 24 hoursMUS 1072 Music TechnologyMUS 1012 Introduction to TheoryMUS 1023 Theory IMUS 1033 Theory IIMUS 1061 Ear Training/Sight Singing IMUS 1091 Ear Training/Sight Singing IIOne of the following:MUS 3563 History of Music I orMUS 3573 History of Music II orMUS 3413 Analysis and Music LiteratureApplied Music: 4 hours3000-4000 level Music Electives: 5 hoursMusic145


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division ofNURSINGLOCATION: Wells HallCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1069 / FAX: (870) 460-1969MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3606, Monticello, AR 71656Faculty / Mission / GoalsAssociate Professors Eustace (Chair), Foshee, Taylor; Assistant ProfessorsO’Fallon, Ruff, Shaw, Walters; Instructor Crow.The overall mission of the Division of Nursing is to strive for excellence inthe preparation of technical nurses and professional nurse generalists. Thismission is accomplished through the following goals:1. The preparation of graduates to provide nursing care for individuals, families, andfamilies in communities in structured settings;2. The preparation of graduates to provide nursing care for individuals, families, andcommunities within a variety of health care settings;3. The encouragement of critical thinking to guide nursing interventions whichpromote, maintain, and restore health; and4. The development of accountability through a commitment to professional nursingpractice and lifelong learning.Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) DegreeThe Division of Nursing offers a four-year curriculum of study leading to a Bachelorof Science in Nursing (BSN) Degree. The BSN program is accredited by the NationalLeague for Nursing Accrediting Commission and is also approved by the Arkansas StateBoard of Nursing.BSN Admission RequirementsUpon completion of the lower-division general education and nursing supportcourses, students are eligible to apply for admission to upper-division nursing courses. Inspecial circumstances, at the discretion of the Division of Nursing Chair, the student maylack up to 9 credits of general education or nursing support courses when entering upperdivisionnursing. Otherwise, the student must successfully complete general education ornursing support courses before taking NURS 444V Concepts in Nursing Care III. Applicationsmust be submitted to the Division of Nursing by April 1 for admission to the Fallsemester. Late applications will be considered on an individual basis if space is available.All applicants are required to:1. meet all University requirements;2. have a cumulative GPA of 2.50 in general education and nursing support courses.Students with a cumulative GPA between 2.00 and 2.49 in the general education andnursing support courses may be provisionally admitted to the upper division nursingcourses if space is available. Provisional admission will be removed when the studentsuccessfully completes 14 credit hours of upper division nursing courses;Nursing147


3. complete NURS 2003 Introduction to Nursing Concepts and Roles with a grade of“C” or better; and5. submit an application for admission to upper-division nursing with an attachedhandwritten one-page statement expressing reason(s) for seeking a baccalaureate degree innursing and outlining career goals.Associate of Applied Science in Nursing (AASN) DegreeThe Division of Nursing offers an LPN-RN Transition Program leading to theAssociate of Applied Science in Nursing (AASN) Degree. The AASN Program is approvedby the Arkansas State Board of Nursing.AASN Admission RequirementsApplications to the LPN-RN Transition Program must be received by April 1 foradmission into the program which begins each year in the Summer I semester. At thediscretion of the Chair of the Division of Nursing and when space is available, lateapplications will be considered on an individual basis until time for the program to begin.All applicants are required to:1. meet all University requirements;2. have a minimum GPA of 2.00 in all general education and nursing support coursescompleted. It is strongly recommended that all general education and nursing supportcourses be completed before starting the nursing portion of the LPN-RN TransitionProgram. However, up to 6 hours of general education or nursing support courses can becompleted during the time the student is completing required nursing courses with specialpermission from the division chair. All required general education and nursing supportcourses must be completed before the last semester of nursing courses. Any deviation fromrequirements will have to have prior approval from the division chair.3. have a letter of recommendation from the student’s practical nursing school withthe date of graduation;4. have a handwritten one-page letter indicating why he/she wishes to become aregistered nurse; and5. have a current Arkansas LPN license.Progression in the Nursing SequenceA minimum grade of “C” in each nursing course is required for progression in thenursing sequence.ReadmissionA student who discontinues the nursing sequence for any reason must petition theDivision of Nursing Admission Committee for readmission into the nursing program.Students are permitted only one readmission. Acceptance for readmission is based onavailability of space, documentation of corrected deficiencies, and approval of the nursingfaculty. Students who are readmitted are accountable for the degree requirements in forceat the time of readmission.Admission (Advanced Placement)Registered Nurses (RNs), Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs), and Licensed PracticalTechnical Nurses (LPTNs) may qualify for advanced placement within the BSN clinicalcourse sequence. Verification of a current valid, unrestricted Arkansas RN, LPN, or LPTNlicense is required.RNs with an Associate Degree or Diploma may apply for advanced placement in theBSN program. The RN will receive credit for 33 semester hours for NURS 311V Concepts inNursing Care I, NURS 332V Concepts in Nursing Care II, and NURS 444V Concepts inNursing Care III. The 33 hours of credit will be held in escrow. The student will receivecredit for these courses upon successful completion of the program. Additionally,148Nursing


applicants who have been out of school for more than 24 months will be required to takethe 1 credit hour Basic Skills Check-Off course to update clinical skills. RNs complete thesame general education and support courses as students enrolled in the BSN program buthave a specified program for completing theory and clinical nursing course requirements.A letter of recommendation from a current or most recent RN supervisor in a nursingposition is required of all applicants.LPNs/LPTNs may apply for advanced placement in the BSN program. LPNs/LTPNsmay receive credit for 11 semester hours for NURS 311V Concepts in Nursing Care I if theyhave graduated from LPN/LPTN school within 24 months. After 24 months, a validationexam must be passed with a score of 74 or better to obtain advanced placement credit forNURS 311V. The syllabus for NURS 311V may be purchased prior to the validating examfor purposes of studying independently for the examination. LPNs/LPTNs are required tosummit a letter of recommendation from their nursing school and from the most recent orpresent nursing position RN supervisor. The validating examination may be taken onlyonce. The application process for admission into UAM and the nursing program must becompleted before validating examinations may be taken.Applicants seeking admission to the nursing program through advanced placementshould meet with the Division Chair. All nursing faculty are included in the evaluation ofthe advanced placement student and make recommendations regarding advancedplacement to the Division Chair.Transfer CreditStudents seeking transfer credit from another institution must submit coursedescriptions and transcripts to the Division of Nursing and meet with the Division Chair.All faculty are included in the evaluation and placement of transfer students in the nursingsequence and make recommendations regarding transfer of nursing credit to the DivisionChair. Standardized testing and validation of skills may be required based on the evaluationof the transcript.Conviction of a CrimeThe Arkansas State Board of Nursing requires criminal background checks ongraduates of nursing schools and has the authority to deny application for licensure to anyperson who has ever been convicted of a crime. A student who has been convicted of acrime should schedule an appointment with the Division Chair.ExpensesIn addition to the usual student fees and expenses, nursing students can expect thefollowing additional costs: uniforms, professional equipment and supplies, professionalworkshop fees, standardized examinations, licensure examination review seminar, nationaland state licensing examination costs, criminal background checks, supplementary bookcosts, and travel. Use of multiple clinical sites within a 100-mile radius of the main campusmay require overnight travel by students. These trips are mandatory for completion of theprogram. All expenses for food, lodging, and travel are the responsibility of the individualstudent.Other InformationAll nursing students are assigned to care for persons with a wide variety of diagnosesincluding blood borne illnesses. Nursing students are NOT covered by the University orthe clinical facilities for injuries and exposures to illnesses which occur in the course ofclinical assignments. The UAM Division of Nursing strongly recommends that eachstudent be immunized against Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) prior to beginning clinical workand obtain personal health insurance.Information regarding tuition and fees may be found on page 19. The NLN AccreditingCommission (NLNAC) serves as an additional resource for this information.Nursing149


On an annual basis, The Division of Nursing provides the NLNAC with informationregarding tuition, fees, and the length of the nursing program. The NLNAC may becontacted at 61 Broadway, New York, NY 10006, telephone 212-363-5555.Exit Examination RequirementBachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) and Associate of Applied Science in Nursing(AASN: LPN-RN fast track) degree students are required to take a Division of Nursingfaculty selected, standardized exit examination to determine readiness to take the NationalCouncil Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). The score recommendedby the agency that prepares the exit examination will be required of students forsuccessful completion of degree requirements. If the recommended exit examination scoreis not achieved, the student will not receive a transcript or diploma signifying completionof degree requirements until the required score is achieved with subsequent testing(s) and/or remedial work is completed to the satisfaction of the Chair of the Division of Nursing. Ifthe student does not achieve the required score on the second attempt at taking the exitexamination, an NCLEX-RN review course designated by the Chair of the DON will berequired before a third or subsequent attempt at taking the exit exam will be allowed.Required retesting after the first attempt at taking the exit examination and/or remedialwork (including the NCLEX-RN review course) costs will be at the student’s expense. Theexit examination requirement does not apply to the RN to BSN advanced placementstudent.Major RequirementsAll baccalaureate degrees require at least 124 hours of college credit (courses at the1000-level or above). These courses must include the General Education and supportcourses cited below and must include at least 40 hours of 3000-4000 level courses.Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN)Major Requirements: ............................................................................................................ 63 hoursNURS 2003 Intro. to Nursing Concepts & RolesNURS 3103 Nursing SkillsNURS 311V Concepts in Nursing Care INURS 332V Concepts in Nursing Care IINURS 3333 Health AssessmentNURS 4153 Community Health NursingNURS 444V Concepts in Nursing Care IIINURS 4473 Nursing ResearchNURS 452V Concepts in Nursing Care IVNURS 4504 Leadership and Management in Prof. NursingSupportive Requirements: ................................................................................................... 37 hoursBIOL 2233 Anatomy and Physiology IBIOL 2291 Anatomy and Physiology I LaboratoryBIOL 2243 Anatomy and Physiology IIBIOL 2381 Anatomy and Physiology II LaboratoryBIOL 3553 MicrobiologyBIOL 3561 Microbiology LaboratoryBIOL 4683 PathophysiologyCHEM 1023 Introductory ChemistryCHEM 1031 Introductory Chemistry LaboratoryChoose one of the following:MATH 1043 College Algebra orMATH 1003 Survey of MathematicsP E 3413 Nutrition150Nursing


PSY 1013 Introduction to PsychologyPSY 2203 Statistical MethodsPSY 3443 Developmental PsychologyChoose one of the following:SOC 2213 Introduction to Sociology orSOC 3453 Race and Ethnic RelationsGeneral Education Requirements: ..................................................................................... 24 hoursENGL 1013 Composition IENGL 1023 Composition IISpeech(SPCH 2283 Business and Professional Speech preferred)One of the following:ART 1053 Art Appreciation orMUS 1113 Music AppreciationOne of the Following:HIST 2213 American History IHIST 2223 American History IIPSCI 2213 American National GovernmentHumanities Cluster:HIST 1013 Survey of Civilization I andENGL 2283 World Literature IorHIST 1023 Survey of Civilization II andENGL 2293 World Literature IIHumanities Elective (3 credits):Choose from art or music appreciation (not already required above), foreign language,English, or philosophy courses.Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN)(RN to BSN Advanced Placement Track)Advanced Placement Upper Division Credit Award: ..................................................... 33 hoursMajor Requirements: ............................................................................................ 33 (34*) hoursNURS 2211 Basic Skills Check Off (if graduated more than 24 months)*NURS 3073 Role TransitionNURS 3065 Healthy AgingNURS 3085 Ambulatory CareNURS 3333 Health AssessmentNURS 4473 Nursing ResearchNURS 4097 Community HealthNURS 4057 Professional Nursing LeadershipSupportive Requirements: ................................................................................................... 37 hoursBIOL 2233 Anatomy and Physiology IBIOL 2291 Anatomy and Physiology I LaboratoryBIOL 2243 Anatomy and Physiology IIBIOL 2381 Anatomy and Physiology II LaboratoryBIOL 3553 MicrobiologyBIOL 3561 Microbiology LaboratoryBIOL 4683 PathophysiologyCHEM 1023 Introductory ChemistryCHEM 1031 Introductory Chemistry LaboratoryNursing151


One of the following:MATH 1043 College AlgebraorMATH 1003 Survey of MathematicsP E 3413 NutritionPSY 1013 Introduction to PsychologyPSY 2203 Statistical MethodsPSY 3443 Developmental PsychologyOne of the following:SOC 2213 Introduction to Sociology orSOC 3453 Race and Ethnic RelationsGeneral Education Requirements: ..................................................................................... 24 hoursENGL 1013 Composition IENGL 1023 Composition IISpeech(SPCH 2283 Business and Professional Speech preferred)One of the following:ART 1053 Art Appreciation orMUS 1113 Music AppreciationOne of the Following:HIST 2213 American History IHIST 2223 American History IIPSCI 2213 American National GovernmentHumanities Cluster:HIST 1013 Survey of Civilization I andENGL 2283 World Literature IorHIST 1023 Survey of Civilization II andENGL 2293 World Literature IIHumanities Elective (3 credits):Choose from art or music appreciation (not already required above), foreign language,English, or philosophy courses.152Nursing


Associate of Applied Science in Nursing (AASN)(Fast Track LPN-RN Transition Program)Nursing Requirements: ..................................................................................................... 35 hoursNURS 2211 Basic Skills Check OffNURS 1034 LPN-RN TransitionNURS 1015 Principles of Nursing Care INURS 124V Principles of Nursing Care IINURS 225V Principles of Nursing Care IIIGeneral Education Requirements: ..................................................................................... 12 hoursENGL 1013 Composition IENGL 1023 Composition IIOne of the following:MATH 0183 Intermediate Algebra -or-MATH 1043 College AlgebraOne of the following:CIS 1013 Introduction to Computer-Based Systems -orCIS 2223 Microcomputer ApplicationsSupportive Requirements: ................................................................................................... 18 hoursBIOL 2233 Anatomy and Physiology IBIOL 2291 Anatomy and Physiology I LaboratoryBIOL 2243 Anatomy and Physiology IIBIOL 2381 Anatomy and Physiology II LaboratoryBIOL 3553 MicrobiologyBIOL 3561 Microbiology LaboratoryPSY 1013 Introduction to PsychologyPSY 3443 Developmental PsychologyNursing153


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school of social and behavioralSCIENCESLOCATION: Memorial Classroom BuildingCAMPUS TELEPHONE: (870) 460-1047 / FAX: (870) 460-1087MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3619, Monticello, AR 71656Faculty/MissionProfessors Corby, Holley, and Shea; Associate Professors Clubb and Poniewaz;Assistant Professors Duffy, Everts, Huston, and McKee; Instructors Ruegger, Vougas, andWright; Director of Social Work Moon; Arkansas Archeological Survey Station ArcheologistJeter; Dean CollinsThe School of Social and Behavioral Sciences offers courses and programs in the broadrange of social and behavioral sciences, designed to provide preparation for careers insocial services, government, and teaching, as well as preparation for graduate andprofessional studies. Primarily geared to baccalaureate degree programs, the School alsoplays a significant role in the general education program of all students and offers a socialstudies concentration as part of a master of education degree.This School offers a comprehensive teaching-related major in History and SocialStudies; a professional program leading to a degree in Social Work; majors and minors inCriminal Justice, History, Political Science, and Psychology; a Human Services minor that isdirectly related to the Psychology major; and course work in Anthropology, Geography,and Sociology.Major and Minor RequirementsAll baccalaureate degrees require at least 124 hours of college credit, courses at the1000-level or above. These courses must include the General Education requirements foundon page 67 and at least 40 hours of 3000-4000 level courses.Criminal Justice MajorMajor Requirements ..................................................................................................... 33 hoursC J 1013 Introduction to Criminal Justice(Note: Criminal Justice majors must complete CJ 1013 before completing any othercriminal justice courses.)C J 2113 Policing in AmericaC J 2123 CorrectionsC J 3233 Criminal LawC J 3243 Criminal ProcedureC J 3253 Juvenile JusticeC J 4363 Criminal Justice Research MethodsOne of the following:C J 4373 CriminologyC J 4383 Principles of Administration9 hours of Criminal Justice electivesSocial and Behavioral Sciences155


Supportive Requirements .................................................................................................... 18 hoursPSY 1013 Introduction to PsychologySOC 2213 Introduction to SociologySOC 3453 Race and Ethnic RelationsPSY 2263 Mental HealthPSCI 2213 American National GovernmentENGL 3253 Technical WritingMinor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 24 hoursCriminal Justice majors must select a minor.Criminal Justice MinorMinor Requirements ..................................................................................................... 24 hoursC J 1013 Introduction to Criminal Justice(NOTE: Criminal Justice majors must complete CJ 1013 before completing any other criminaljustice courses.)C J 3233 Criminal LawC J 3243 Criminal Procedure15 hours of Criminal Justice electivesHistory MajorMajor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 33 hoursHIST 1013 Survey of Civilization IHIST 1023 Survey of Civilization IIHIST 2213 American History IHIST 2223 American History IIHIST 3513 Historiography and Historical Methods9 hours of electives in American History at the 3000-4000 level9 hours of electives in History other than American at the 3000-4000 levelMinor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 24 hoursHistory majors must select a minor.History MinorMinor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 24 hoursHIST 1013 Survey of Civilization IHIST 1023 Survey of Civilization IIHIST 2213 American History IHIST 2223 American History II12 hours of History electives at the 3000-4000 level.Teacher Education Certification: Social StudiesIn addition to the secondary teaching certification requirements as outlined in theSchool of Education section of this catalog, students who plan to certify to teach socialstudies in Arkansas must complete a major or minor in History and meet other requirementsas well. For specific requirements, see the teacher education advisor in the School ofSocial and Behavioral Sciences.History and Social Studies(Comprehensive Major)In addition to the secondary teaching licensure requirements as outlined in the Schoolof Education section of this catalog, students who plan to seek licensure to teach socialstudies at the secondary level must also complete SOSC 4643 Teaching Secondary SocialStudies. Students seeking secondary level social studies licensure must also requestadvisors in both the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences and the School of Education.A student who wishes to follow the comprehensive major without going into teacher156Social and Behavioral Sciences


education must meet the requirements for a Bachelor of Arts Degree as listed on page 70 ofthis catalog.Major Requirements ............................................................................................................. 66 hoursHIST 1013 Survey of Civilization IHIST 1023 Survey of Civilization IIHIST 2213 American History IHIST 2223 American History IIHIST 3513 Historiography and Historical MethodsHIST 3593 Arkansas History9 hours of electives in American History at the 3000-4000 level9 hours of electives in History other than American at the 3000-4000 levelPSCI 2213 American National GovernmentPSCI 2223 State Government of ArkansasPSCI 2233 Comparative Politics6 hours of electives in Political Science at the 3000-4000 levelSOC 2213 Introduction to Sociology6 hours of electives in Geography3 hours of electives in Economics3 hours of electives in AnthropologyPolitical Science MajorMajor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 30 hoursPSCI 2213 American National GovernmentPSCI 2233 Comparative Politics24 hours of electives in Political ScienceSupportive requirements ....................................................................................................... 3 hoursOne of the following:PSCI 4653 Research Methods in the Social Sciences(if not taken as part of the electives required above)PSY 2203 Statistical MethodsHIST 3513 Historiography and Historical MethodsMinor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 24 hoursPolitical Science majors must select a minor.Political Science MinorMinor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 24 hoursPSCI 2213 American National GovernmentPSCI 2233 Comparative Politics18 hours of electives in Political SciencePre-Law ProgramPre-law students should plan a program of study in consultation with the Pre-Law advisor.Psychology MajorMajor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 35 hoursPSY 1013 Introduction to PsychologyPSY 1023 Advanced General PsychologyPSY 2203 Statistical MethodsPSY 2273 Experimental Methods in PsychologyPSY 2282 Experimental Methods LaboratoryOne of the following:PSY 3433 Child Development*PSY 3253 AdolescencePSY 4633 GerontologySocial and Behavioral Sciences157


One of the following:PSY 3463 Guidance and CounselingPSY 3493 Fundamentals of MeasurementPSY 4673 Abnormal PsychologyOne of the following:PSY 3413 Psychology of LearningPSY 3483 Physiological PsychologyPSY 4603 History and Systems in PsychologyOne of the following:PSY 3243 Social PsychologyPSY 3423 Industrial PsychologyPSY 4623 Psychology of Personality9 hours of Psychology electives*CLEP credit will not be awarded to psychology majors for PSY 3433.NOTE: A minimum of 15 hours must be taken at the 3000-4000 level to fulfill Universityrequirements for a major. This may require that a student choose only 3000-4000 levelcourses for electives.Minor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 24 hoursPsychology majors must select a minor.Psychology MinorMinor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 26 hoursPSY 1013 Introduction to PsychologyPSY 1023 Advanced General PsychologyPSY 2203 Statistical methodsPSY 2273 Experimental Methods in PsychologyPSY 2282 Experimental Methods Laboratory12 hours of electives in Psychology with at least 9 of these hours at the 3000-4000 level.Human Services Minor RequirementsMinor Requirements ............................................................................................................. 24 hoursSWK 1013 Introduction to Social WorkSOC 3453 Race & Ethnic RelationsPSY 4643 Applied Human Service SkillsPSY 4673 Abnormal PsychologyPSY 465V Practicum in Psychology (6 hours)6 hours of electives in sociology or social work (excluding SOC 2213)NOTE: The Human Services minor is designed primarily for Psychology majors to: 1)prepare students for human services careers across a wide range of settings, and 2) providea theoretical foundation and specific applied skills needed for Bachelor’s level employmentin the field. Students who choose to pursue the Human Services minor, particularly thosewith majors other than Psychology, may need to take additional Psychology courses tosatisfy the prerequisites of required courses. Consult your academic advisor for furtherinformation.Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) DegreeThe School of Social and Behavioral Sciences offers a four-year curriculum of studyleading to a Bachelor of Social Work Degree. The curriculum reflects the generalist methodof social work, with emphasis on the empowering approach. The principal educationalgoal of the Social Work Program is to prepare students for beginning generalist social workpractice. The Program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.Because social work is a profession, it requires its members to conduct themselveswithin an accepted code that is based on professional values and ethics. Persons seeking tobecome social workers must be willing to adhere to these professional values and ethics158Social and Behavioral Sciences


while they are students.The Social Work Program is committed to the policy of providing professional socialwork educational opportunities to all qualified persons, regardless of their economic orsocial status, and will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, creed, gender,sexual orientation, political orientation, ethnic or national origin, disability, age, or anyother individual or group characteristic.BSW Admission RequirementsStudents must be formally admitted to the Social Work Program prior to entering thepractice sequence. The procedure for formal admission to the Social Work Program is as follows:1. Students may apply for formal admission upon completion of a minimum of 30credits that count toward the degree. These credits must include Composition I and II,Speech, Introduction to Sociology, Introduction to Psychology, and Introduction to SocialWork; and students must maintain at least a 2.50 grade point average in these six courses.2. Students must have a minimum grade point average of 2.00 at the time of admission.3. Students must complete the application form and have a formal interview withsocial work faculty.Social work majors must receive a grade of “C” or better in each required social workcourse, maintain a 2.00 grade point average overall, and have a 2.50 grade point average inthe major.The Social Work Program does not give academic credit for life experience or previouswork experience toward the social work degree.Bachelor of Social Work (BSW)All Social Work majors are required to complete the following major requirementsincluding the B.S. identity and all required General Education courses.Major Requirements ............................................................................................................. 49 hoursSWK 1013 Introduction to Social WorkSWK 2133 Human Behavior in Social Environment ISWK 2233 Human Behavior in Social Environment IISWK 3113 Generalist Social Work Practice ISWK 3143 Social Welfare Policy ISWK 3213 Generalist Social Work Practice IISWK 3223 Social Welfare Policy IISWK 3243 Methods of Social Work ResearchSWK 4313 Generalist Social Work Practice IIISWK 4419 Generalist Social Work Field PracticumSWK 4421 Generalist Social Work Field Practicum SeminarSWK 4633 Generalist Social Work in Rural Environments9 hours of Social Work electivesSupportive Requirements .................................................................................................... 33 hoursECON 2203 Principles of MacroeconomicsPSY 1013 Introduction to PsychologyPSY 2203 Statistical MethodsPSY 4623 Psychology of PersonalityPSY 4673 Abnormal PsychologySOC 2213 Introduction to SociologySOC 3453 Race and Ethnic RelationsOne of the following:ANTH 2203 Cultural AnthropologyANTH 2213 North American IndiansOne of the following:SOC 2223 Social ProblemsSOC 3413 The Family6 hours of Psychology and/or Sociology electivesSocial and Behavioral Sciences159


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undergraduate courseDESCRIPTIONSThe Course Listings section of the catalog providesdescriptions of all courses approved by the faculty.Any of these courses may be scheduled during theUniversity’s academic terms.The listings follow a uniform pattern. The listing for CHEM 3404 can serve to explainthe course listings of this section.CHEM 3404 Organic Chemistry I4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: CHEM 1113, CHEM 1131A study of carbon compounds, including an introduction to organic nomenclature,reactions, reaction mechanisms, and structural and stereochemical problems.The first line of the listings entry consists of:Prefix: in this case CHEM, prefixes always consist of upper case letters, prefixes usedby particular divisions of the University are listed below;Number: in this case 3404, numbers always consist of four digits (or the letter V): thefirst number indicates the level of the course (1 for freshman level, 2 for sophomore level, 3for junior level, 4 for senior level, 5 for graduate level), the last digit indicates the numberof credits earned in the course (V means that credit may vary or that credits in the courseexceed 9);Title: The course’s full title which may be abbreviated in some course listings andschedules.The second line of the listing states the number of credits a student may earn in thecourse and indicates the number of weekly hours the course requires in classroom lectureor laboratories.The third line lists course prerequisites (courses) which must be passed beforeregistering for the course) and corequisites (courses which the student must either havepassed previously or be enrolled in concurrently).The course description follows the items identified above.Prefixes Used By University Academic UnitsAgriculture prefixes include: AGEC, AGEN, AGRI, AGRO, ANSC, ENTO, HORT;Arts and Humanities prefixes include: ART, ENGL, FREN, JOUR, MODL, PHIL,SPAN, SPCH;Business prefixes include: ACCT, ECON, FIN, G B, MGMT, MKT;Computer Information Systems courses have the prefix CIS.Education prefixes include: ECED, EDFD, EDLD, EDUC, EXSC, MLED, P E, READ,Course Descriptions161


Index To Course DescriptionsACCT Courses (Accounting) .................................... 162AGEC Courses (Agricultural Economics) .............. 164AGEN Courses (Agricultural Engineering) ........... 165AGRI Courses (Agriculture) ..................................... 165AGRO Courses (Agronomy) ..................................... 165ANSC Courses (Animal Science) ............................. 166ANTH Courses (Anthropology) ............................... 167ART Courses (Art) ...................................................... 167ASTR Courses (Astronomy) ..................................... 168A T Courses (Athletic Training) ................................ 169BIOL Courses (Biology) ............................................. 170CHEM Courses (Chemistry) ..................................... 172CIS Courses (Computer Information Systems) ...... 174C J Courses (Criminal Justice) .................................. 175DEV Courses (Developmental) ................................ 176ECED Courses (Early Childhood Spec. Ed.) .......... 176ECON Courses (Economics) ..................................... 177EDUC Courses (Education) ...................................... 178ENGL Courses (English) ........................................... 178ENGR Courses (Engineering) ................................... 180ENTO Courses (Entomology) ................................... 180ESCI Courses (Earth Science) .................................... 180EXSC Courses (Exercise Science) ............................. 181FIN Courses (Finance) ............................................... 182FOR Courses (Forestry Undergraduate) ................. 182FREN Courses (French) ............................................. 185G B Courses (General Business) ............................... 186GEOG Courses (Geography) .................................... 187HIST Courses (History) ............................................. 188HORT Courses (Horticulture) .................................. 189JOUR Courses (Journalism) ...................................... 189MAED Courses (Math Education) ........................... 190MATH Courses (Mathematics) ................................. 190MGMT Courses (Management) ............................... 192MKT Courses (Marketing) ........................................ 193MLED Courses (Middle Level Education) ............. 194MODL Courses (Modern Languages) ..................... 194MUS Courses (Music) ................................................ 194NURS Courses (Nursing) .......................................... 197P E Courses (Physical Education) ............................ 199PHIL Courses (Philosophy) ...................................... 202PHSC Courses (Physical Science) ............................ 202PHYS Courses (Physics) ............................................ 202PMUS Courses (Private Music Instruction) ............ 203PSCI Courses (Political Science) ............................... 206PSY Courses (Psychology) ........................................ 207SCED Courses (Science Education) ......................... 208SIS Courses (Spatial Information Systems) ............ 209SOC Courses (Sociology) ........................................... 211SOSC Courses (Social Science) ................................. 211SPAN Courses (Spanish) ........................................... 211SPCH Courses (Speech) ............................................. 212SWK Courses (Social Work) ...................................... 215U ST Courses (University Studies) .......................... 216WL F Courses (Wildlife) ............................................ 216SPED;Forest Resources prefixes include: FOR, FRS, SIS, WLF;Mathematical and Natural Sciences prefixes include: ASTR, A T, BIOL, C S, CHEM,ENGR, ESCI, GEOL, GSCI, MAED, MATH, PHSC, PHYS, SCED;Music prefixes include: MUS, PMUS;Social and Behavioral Sciences prefixes include: ANTH, C J, GEOG, HIST, PSCI, PSY,SOC, SOSC, SWK.All Nursing courses have the prefix NURS.The College Skills Course has the prefix DEV.Professional Development courses have the prefix: PDA prefix of U ST may designate a course taught by a faculty in any subdivision of theUniversity which is done experimentally or for a short period of time.ACCT Courses(Accounting)ACCT 2213 Principles of Accounting I3 credits: 3 hours lectureFundamental accounting issues and concepts,interpretation and classification of accounts, andcomposition and analysis of financial statements.Offered: Fall, Spring, SummerACCT 2223 Principles of Accounting II3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ACCT 2213Accounting information as it relates to the needsof business managers, product costing, standardcosts, budgeting and variance analysis, anddecision making.Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer162Course Descriptions


ACCT 3403 Intermediate Accounting I3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ACCT 2213Comprehensive overview of the conceptualframework of the American public companyreporting standards. Coverage includes financialreporting; review of the accounting cycle;extensive discussion of the elements of thebalance sheet; income statement and thestatement of cash flows. Also covered are therevenue/receivable/cash cycle and thecomplexities of revenue recognition.Offered: SpringACCT 3413 Intermediate Accounting II3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ACCT 2213Intensive coverage of current accounting practiceand reporting requirements related to identificationand valuation of cost of goods sold; inventoryidentification and inventory estimation andvaluation. Other topics covered includeaccounting problems associated with debtfinancing; equity financing; investments innoncurrent operating assets; and investments indebt and equity securities.Offered: FallACCT 3433 Cost Accounting I3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ACCT 2223Accounting for materials, labor, overhead; costrecords, summaries, statements; job order costsystems; process cost techniques; introduction tostandard costs, estimated costs, distribution costs.Offered: FallACCT 3523 Intermediate Accounting III3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ACCT 2213Intensive coverage of current accounting practiceand reporting requirements related to leases;income taxes; employee compensation issues;derivatives, contingencies, business segments andinterim reports; earnings per share; andaccounting changes and error corrections.Offered: SpringACCT 4323 Accounting Information Systems3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: ACCT 3413, ACCT 3433, Corequisite:ACCT 4773 - Auditing I or permission ofinstructor.Provides system criteria as it relates to theaccounting field. Includes participation in practicalsystem evaluation with primary emphasis placed onsystems controls and transaction processing in therevenue and purchase cycles. Additional work willfocus on design of a database to use in processingtransactions.Offered: Fall 2003 and every Spring beginning 2005.ACCT 4333 Fraud Examination3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ACCT 4773An overview of the fraud problem with adiscussion of fraud detection and preventionmethods. With a discussion of the options victimsof fraud have when deciding how to follow-up onfrauds they experience.Offered: SpringACCT 4613 Advanced Accounting3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ACCT 3413Application of accounting principles to accountingfor business combinations, foreign transactions,interim reporting, securities and exchange reporting,bankruptcy reporting and estates and trusts.Offered: FallACCT 4633 Governmental Accounting3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ACCT 3403, or ACCT 3413 or ACCT 3523.Fund accounting for governmental and not-forprofitentities. Financial and budgetary control, thebudgetary process in governments, specialaccounting and reporting problems of the public andnot-for-profit sector.Offered: FallACCT 4643 International Accounting3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: ACCT 2213, ACCT 2223Introduction to accounting regulations and practicesoutside of the U.S., comparison of accountingstandards in different countries and the drivingforces behind them; international accountingstandards and international management controlissues. Review of cultural frameworks, transferpricing methods, and international accountingstandards.Offered: SummerACCT 4653 CPA Law Review3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: G B 3533Study of legal principles relating to accounting andreview of business law in preparation for the CPAexam. Includes such areas as contracts, commercialpaper, debtor-creditor relationships, and theUniform Commercial Code.Offered: SummerACCT 4673 Cost Accounting II3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ACCT 3433A continuation of the study of cost accounting withemphasis on standard costs, analysis of cost forprofit decision-making purposes; comprehensiveprofit planning and control, cost/volume/profitanalysis, capital budgeting; responsibility reporting,performance measurement and transfer pricing in adecentralized organization. Offered: SpringCourse Descriptions163


ACCT 4683 Federal Tax Accounting I3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ACCT 2213Coverage of income tax concepts, principles andpractice. Instruction in tax planning, determination,research, and federal tax rules and regulations forindividuals.Offered: FallACCT 4693 Federal Tax Accounting II3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ACCT 4683Coverage of income tax concepts, principles andpractice. Instruction in tax planning, determination,research, and federal tax rules and regulations forbusinesses and fiduciaries.Offered: SpringACCT 4773 Auditing3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: ACCT 3403, 3413, 3523Basic functions/objectives of auditing, audit principlesand procedures application; internal controlpreparation of working papers; report writing; types ofaudits. Offered: FallACCT 479V Independent Study in AccountingVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.AGEC Courses(Agricultural Economics)AGEC 2273 Agricultural Economics3 credits: 3 hours lectureApplication of economic principles to agriculture andtheir effect on the incomes and living standards of farmpeople; present-day farm economics in the UnitedStates.AGEC 4613 Agricultural Policy3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: AGEC 2273 or ECON 2213A study of the effect of government agricultural policieson farm income, crop acreage, food supply, food prices,agricultural exports, trade barriers, world hunger, andeconomic development.AGEC 4623 Farm Management3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: AGEC 2273 or ECON 2213Decision-making in the organization and operation ofthe farm business involving the use of basic principlesof farm management.AGEC 4683 Commodity Marketing3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: AGEC 2273 or ECON 2213Economic aspects of the marketing of specificcommodities. Factors affecting supply, demand, prices,trends, marketing methods, and distribution channelswill be examined.AGEC 4703 Contract Marketing and Futures Trading3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: AGEC 2273 or ECON 2213Theory and practice of trading in commodity futures: 1)hedging, 2) speculator strategies, 3) mechanics of thefuture market.AGEC 4713 Agricultural Finance3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: AGEC 2273 or ECON 2213Methods and procedures of acquiring and utilizingfunds. Emphasis is placed upon financial planning andfinancial firms serving agriculture.AGEC 479V Independent Study in AgriculturalEconomicsVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.AGEC 4803 Agribusiness Firm Management3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: AGEC 2273 or ECON 2213.Application of economic decision-making processes asthey relate to the management of agriculturalbusinesses.AGEC 4813 Agricultural Price Analysis3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: AGEC 2273 or ECON 2213.An application of economic theory to solve problemsrelating to agricultural price analysis. Techniques forpredicting price behavior and the relationships betweenthe general economy and prices of agriculturalcommodities will be analyzed.AGEC 4823 Economics of Environmental Management3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: AGEC 2273 or ECON 2213An economic approach to problems of evaluating theprivate and social benefits and costs of altering theenvironment. Emphasis will be placed on the problemsassociated with determining and maintainingacceptable levels of environmental quality. Theseproblems will deal with the interactions betweenindividuals, institutions, technology and theenvironment.164Course Descriptions


AGEN Courses(Agricultural Engineering)AGEN 2263 Soil and Water Conservation3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratoryPrerequisite: Sophomore standingSoil and water conservation practices on agriculturallands involving surveying, leveling, terracing,drainage, irrigation, water supply, excavating,mapping, and farm pond measurements.AGEN 479V Independent Study in AgriculturalEngineeringVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.AGRI Courses(General Agriculture)AGRI 1101 Agriculture Orientation1 credit: 1 hour lectureNOTE: Required of all freshmen majoring inAgriculture and all transfer students with less than 30hours.An overview of agriculture with emphasis on its social,economic, and environmental importance.AGRI 472V Special TopicsVariable creditPrerequisite: Junior standing and 3.00 GPA or better inmajor area of interestSelected topics not covered in other courses or a moreintensive study of specific topics in agriculture. Topicsvary. Type of instruction depends on subject. Field tripsmay be required.AGRI 4771 Seminar1 credit: 1 hour lecturePrerequisite: Senior standing.NOTE: Maximum of 2 credit hours.Papers and assigned topics dealing with current issues.Participation includes oral presentation and writtenreports.AGRI 4783 Internship3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Junior standing; approval of projectproposal prior to enrollment; and 2.50 GPA or consentof instructor.Supervised work in agriculture to develop professionalcompetence. Written and oral reports are required at thecompletion of the project. A nonrepeatable course.AGRI 479V Independent Study in AgricultureVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.AGRO Courses(Agronomy)AGRO 1033 Principles of Field Crops3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratoryField crops, types of varieties relating to themanagement and environment and to their value ascash, grain, feed, and cover, or green manure crops.AGRO 2053 Applied Plant Pathology3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: BIOL 1143 and 1171NOTE: Extended field trips in addition to regular labhours may be required.Basic principles of plant pathology will be introduced.Lecture hours will deal with agronomic andhorticulture crops common to Arkansas.AGRO 2244 Soils4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: CHEM 1113, CHEM 1131NOTE: Extended field trips required in addition toregular lab hours.The study of soil as a natural body from the standpointof how to produce agronomic and horticulture plants.AGRO 2251 Soil Judging, Sophomore Level1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryEmphasis on soil morphology. Possible participation inintercollegiate judging competition. Field tripsrequired.AGRO 3421 Soil Judging, Junior Level1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryPrerequisite: AGRO 2251Emphasis on soil classification. Possible participation inintercollegiate judging competition. Field tripsrequired.AGRO 3453 Forage Crops3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: AGRO 1033NOTE: Extended field trips required in addition toregular lecture.Forage crops for pastures, hay, soiling, and silage, withreference to adaptation, production, utilization, andimprovement.AGRO 3503 Cereal Crops3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: AGRO 1033NOTE: Extended field trips required in addition tolecture.Soil and climatic adaptation, utilization, production,cultural practices, and improvement.Course Descriptions165


AGRO 3513 Fiber and Oilseed Crops3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: AGRO 1033NOTE: Extended field trips required in addition tolecture.Biological principles generally involved in field cropproduction with emphasis given to specific agronomicimplications as related to products of cotton andsoybeans.AGRO 3533 Introduction to Weed Science3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratoryPrerequisite: AGRO 1033 or BIOL 1143; CHEM 1113 andCHEM 1131Fundamental concepts of weed biology, ecology andidentification; overview of the chemistry and modes ofaction of major herbicide groups; contemporaryconcepts and technology for weed control in majoragronomic crops.AGRO 4733 Principles of Weed Control3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratoryPrerequisite: CHEM 1113, CHEM 1131Mechanical, biological, and chemical control measuresemployed in weed science. Herbicide usage relative toselectivity and control measures in specific crops arestressed.AGRO 4743 Soil Fertility3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: AGRO 2244NOTE: Extended field trips required in addition toregular lecture.Soil fertility principles, soil amendments, and culturalpractices for maintaining and increasing soilproductivity.AGRO 4753 Crop Physiology3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: BIOL 1143 and 1171Effects of various physiological and environmentalfactors on crop production and the effects of postharvesttreatments on crop quality.AGRO 4761 Soil Judging, Senior Level1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: AGRO 2244Emphasis on pedology and geomorphology. Possibleparticipation in intercollegiate judging competition.Field trips required.AGRO 479V Independent Study in AgronomyVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.ANSC Courses(Animal Science)ANSC 1003 Principles of Animal Science3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratoryBasic discussion of livestock. Topics covered includelivestock products, reproduction, breeding andgenetics, nutrition and health together with discussionsof the specific farm species.ANSC 2213 Feeds and Feeding3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ANSC 1003Basic animal nutrition, composition and value offeedstuffs and the application of this information inration formulation.ANSC 2223 Anatomy and Physiology of DomesticAnimals3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ANSC 1003Anatomy and physiology of domestic animals,including structure and function of body systems.ANSC 3314 Aquaculture4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: ANSC 1003, BIOL 1153 and 1161A study of the scientific principles of commercialaquaculture with emphasis on production systems.ANSC 3413 Livestock Breeding and Genetics3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ANSC 1003Fundamentals of livestock improvement with specialemphasis on heredity and selection.ANSC 3463 Poultry Production3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ANSC 1003All aspects of commercial poultry production,including genetics, nutrition and physiology of bothpoultry meat and eggs. Extended field trips may beheld in addition to regular lecture.ANSC 3474 Beef Production4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratoryPrerequisite: ANSC 1003Systems of commercial and purebred beef productionincluding genetics, reproduction, health and nutritionof beef cattle. Extended field trips may be held inaddition to regular lecture.ANSC 3493 Swine Production3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ANSC 1003Systems of commercial and purebred swine productionincluding genetics, reproduction, health and nutrition.Extended field trips may be held in addition to regularlecture.166Course Descriptions


ANSC 3523 Horse Production3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ANSC 1003Systems of horse production, including genetics,reproduction, training, health and nutrition.ANSC 4633 Animal Metabolism and Nutrition3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ANSC 1003, Corequisite: CHEM 2203Basic biochemistry of nutrients and metabolism andtheir application in livestock production.ANSC 4643 Diseases of Domestic Animals3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ANSC 1003Common disease identification, prevention, and cure,including the natural body defense functions. Classperiods may include laboratory experience.ANSC 4653 Reproduction of Farm Animals3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ANSC 1003The reproductive process which includes reproductiveendocrinology, anatomy and physiology of the maleand female, and specific characteristics of fertility andinfertility.ANSC 479V Independent Study in Animal ScienceVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.ANTH Courses(Anthropology)ANTH 2203 Cultural Anthropology3 credits: 3 hours lectureCulture and its influence on human behavior through acomparative study of a selected sample of worldcultures.ANTH 2213 North American Indians3 credits: 3 hours lectureA survey of the various Indian tribes of North Americaand the interaction of European and Indian cultures.May be taken for credit in either Anthropology orSociology.ANTH 2223 World Prehistory3 credits: 3 hours lectureBiological and cultural evolution of humankind;cultural ecology; surveys of hunter-gatherers,domestications of plants and animals, rise of complexagricultural societies and early civilizations in the oldand new worlds. May be taken for credit in eitherAnthropology or Sociology.ANTH 2233 Arkansas Regional Archeology3 credits: 3 hours lectureIntroduction to prehistoric and historic archeology ofsoutheast Arkansas and adjacent regions. Field and/orlaboratory component required.ANTH 479V Independent Study in AnthropologyVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.ART Courses(Art)ART 1013 Drawing3 credits: 6 hours lecture and studioStudy of proportion, perspective, light and shade, basicelements of pictorial composition.ART 1023 Design and Color3 credits: 6 hours lecture and studioA basic study of the use of line, shape, texture, value,and color and their relationships in composition.ART 1053 Art Appreciation3 credits: 3 hours lectureA basic introductory course in man’s cultural heritagethrough the visual arts.ART 1103 Art for Elementary Teachers3 credits: 3 hours lectureArt and handicrafts for children of various age levelswith instruction and practice in executing appropriateprojects on each level.ART 2203 Watercolor3 credits: 6 hours lecture and studioBasic techniques in handling transparent watercolorwith work in still life and landscape.ART 2223 Ceramics I3 credits: 6 hours lecture and studioIntroduction to design and production of pottery.Hand building, decorating, and glazing.ART 2233 Figure Drawing3 credits: 6 hours lecture and studioStudy of the human figure. Visual analysis through astudy of proportion, bone structure, and externalmusculature. Studio practice in drawing a live model.ART 2253 Sculpture3 credits: 6 hours lecture and studioIntroduction to the processes and media of sculpture toinclude both additive and subtractive processes.Course Descriptions167


ART 3303 Elementary Art Methods3 credits: 3 hours lectureA course designed for prospective teachers of art in theschools. Lecture, discussion, and appropriate projectsconcerning art theory, curriculum content, andstrategies for the teaching of art to elementary children.ART 3313 Advanced Drawing3 credits: 6 hours lecture and studioPrerequisite: ART 1013Continuation of ART 1013 with emphasis on theory andcontent.ART 3403 Art History: Prehistoric - Gothic Art3 credits: 3 hours lectureSurvey of the history and development of WesternWorld art from prehistoric through 1400 as shown inpainting, sculpture, architecture, and the minor arts.ART 3413 Art History: Renaissance - Baroque Art3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ART 1023.Survey of the history and development of WesternWorld art from 1400 to 1800.ART 3423 Advanced Watercolor3 credits: 6 hours lecture and studioPrerequisite: ART 2203.Continuation of ART 2203 with emphasis onexpression.ART 3443 Painting I3 credits: 6 hours lecture and studioAlla prima (direct) oil paintingART 3453 Printmaking3 credits: 6 hours lecture and studioPrerequisite: ART 1013, ART 1023.Introduction to the four processes in Printmaking:planographic, intaglio, relief, and stencil.ART 3463 Metals3 credits: 6 hours lecture and studioPrerequisite: ART 1023.Techniques in silver smithing and art metal. Designand construction of projects in silver.ART 3473 Ceramics II3 credits: 6 hours lecture and studioPrerequisites: ART 1023, ART 2223.A continuation of ART 2223 with special emphasis onthe potter’s wheel.ART 4603 Advanced Printmaking3 credits: 6 hours lecture and studioPrerequisite: ART 3453.Refinement and control of Printmaking processes withemphasis on individual expression.ART 4613 Painting II3 credits: 6 hours lecture and studioPrerequisites: ART 1013, 1023, and 3443.Continuation of ART 3443.ART 4633 Ceramics III3 credits: 6 hours lecture and studioPrerequisite: ART 3473.Recommended: CHEM 1004Continuation of ART 3473. Additional potter’s wheeltechniques. Study of glazes and glaze formulation.ART 4643 Painting III3 credits: 6 hours lecture and studioPrerequisites: ART 1013, ART 1023, ART 3443, ART 4613.Continuation of ART 4613. Experimentation withvarious techniques.ART 4663 Art History: Modern Art3 credits: 3 hours lectureSurvey of the history and development of WesternWorld art from 1800 to the present, and an introductionto Non-European art.ART 4671 Senior Thesis1 credit: 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisite: Advanced standing and permission ofDean and instructor.Preparation leading up to and including a Senior ArtExhibition. Course addresses finishing, publicity, andmarketing strategies.ART 468V Art PracticumVariable creditPrerequisite: Advanced standing and permission ofDean and Instructor.Selected topics not covered in other courses or a moreintensive study of specific topics in art, which willinclude practical application of these topics.ART 479V Independent Study in ArtVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.ART 4903 Seminar in Teaching Art3 credits: 3 hours lectureEvaluation and critique of micro classroom teaching,history of academic discipline, philosophicaldevelopment, test design and evaluation, and materialsfor on-site teaching.ASTR Courses(Astronomy)ASTR 1033 Elements of Astronomy3 credits: 3 hours lectureA study of astronomy from the past to the presentincluding examinations of the solar system, propertiesof stars, and characteristics of galaxies.ASTR 1041 Elements of Astronomy Laboratory1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryA laboratory course to supplement Astronomy 1033.168Course Descriptions


ASTR 3503 Advanced Astronomy3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ASTR 1033Analysis, makeup, and operation of planetary systems;star formation and types; classes and variations ofgalaxies; operation of the universe.ASTR 4652 Special Topics2 credits: 2 hours lectureSelected topics from the areas of astronomy designed tobe of particular interest and use to in-service teachers.May be taken by regular students only with permissionof the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. May berepeated for a total of six hours credit.A T Courses(Athletic Training)A T 1001 Introduction to Athletic Training1 credit: 1 hour lectureIntroduction to the profession of athletic trainingincluding certification requirements and employmentopportunities.A T 1012 Taping and Wrapping2 credits: 2 hours laboratoryTaping and wrapping techniques used in athletictraining including instruction in fabricating andapplying protective pads, splints, and supports.Hands-on practical experience emphasized inlaboratory sessions. One hundred twenty hours clinicalexperience.A T 2313 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: BIOL 2223 and 2261Provides the general knowledge and generalapplication of theory, principles, and skills used in theprevention, care, and rehabilitation of athletic injuriesrelated to participation in games, sports, and athletics.A T 3401 Evaluation of Upper Extremity InjuriesLaboratory1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryCorequisite: A T 3423Assigned specific laboratory experiences in evaluationof head, cervical spine, trunk, and upper extremityinjuries. Ten hours of clinical experience.A T 3413 Administration of Athletic Training3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: A T 2313Organizational/administrative procedures and legalaspects of athletic training and sports medicine. Onehundred twenty hours of clinical experience.A T 3423 Evaluation of Upper Extremity AthleticInjuries3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: A T 2313Evaluation of head, cervical spine, trunk, and upperextremity injuries. Ten hours of clinical experience.A T 3433 Evaluation of Lower Extremity Athletic Injuries3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: A T 3423Evaluation of specific injuries to the trunk, spine, andextremities and related anatomy, etiology, signs, andsymptoms.A T 4603 Therapeutic Modalities3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: PHYS 1003, BIOL 2273, BIOL 2281, A T 2313Corequisite: A T 4611Provides the student with the knowledge of currenttheory and application of therapeutic modalities usedin the treatment of athletic injuries.A T 4611 Therapeutic Modalities Laboratory1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryCorequisite: A T 4603Assigned specific laboratory experiences in therapeuticmodality application. Students must attain ten hours ofclinical experience as a part of the total hours neededto be eligible to sit for the NATA-BOC certificationexamination.A T 4623 Rehabilitation of Athletic Injuries3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: PHYS 1003, BIOL 2273, BIOL 2281, A T 2313Corequisite: A T 4631Provides general knowledge of rehabilitationtechniques for athletic injuries including goniometry,muscle testing, thereapeutic exercises, and use of SOAPnotes.A T 4631 Rehabilitation of Athletic InjuriesLaboratory1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryCorequisite: A T 4623Assigned specific laboratory experiences n rehabilitationof athletic injuries application. Must be taken withAT 4623 and serves as its laboratory. Students arerequired to attain ten hours of clinical experience as apart of the total hours needed for eligibility to sit for theNATA-BOC national examination.A T 4663 Seminar in Athletic Training3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Senior status and permission of programdirectorA seminar course to help prepare the student to take theNATABOC Certification exam.A T 4701 Clinical Internship1 credit: InternshipOpportunities for observing and gaining practicalexperience in the prevention, evaluation, treatment,management, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries/illness. Sixty hours of clinical experience with fallsports. Includes checkoffs for specific NATACompetencies and ROM flashcards.Course Descriptions169


A T 479V Independent Study in Athletic TrainingVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations chapter of this catalog forprerequisites and description.BIOL Courses(Biology)BIOL 1063 Biological Science3 credits: 3 hours lectureCorequisite: ENGL 1013Basic concepts of biology: cell and molecular biology,genetics, evolution, and ecology.BIOL 1071 Biological Science Laboratory1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryCorequisite: BIOL 1063Basic studies of plants and animals, cells, biochemistry,metabolism, and inheritance, designed to illustrate andcomplement concepts discussed in BIOL 1063.BIOL 1143 General Botany3 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryCorequisite: ENGL 1013Structure, physiology, and phylogeny of plants, fungi,and plant-like protista.BIOL 1153 General Zoology3 credits: 3 hours lectureCorequisite: ENGL 1013Animal kingdom; classification, phylogeneticrelationships, morphology, function, and life historiesof animals.BIOL 1161 General Zoology Laboratory1 credit: 3 hours laboratoryCorequisite: BIOL 1153Study and dissection of representative animals,emphasizing morphology, phylogeny, and life histories.BIOL 1171 General Botany Laboratory1 Credit: 3 hours laboratoryCorequisite: BIOL 1143Morphological survey of plants, fungi, and plant-likeprotista, including the anatomy of seed plants.BIOL 1403 Cell and Molecular Biology3 credits: 3 hours lectureCorequisite: ENGL 1013, MATH 0183, or equivalentsIntroduction to cell structure and function, withemphasis on chemistry, ultra-structure and cellorganelles.BIOL 2233 Anatomy and Physiology I3 credits: 3 hours lectureCo-requisites: ENGL 1013; BIOL 1063 recommendedA basic course in anatomy and physiology withemphasis on structure and function of cells, tissues,organs and systems in the human body.BIOL 2243 Anatomy and Physiology II3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: Biol 2233 and Chem 1023A continuation of the basic course in anatomy andphysiology with emphasis on structure and function ofcells, tissues, organs and systems in the human body.BIOL 2291 Anatomy and Physiology I Lab1 credit: 3 hours labCo-requisites: Biol 2233 Anatomy and Physiology IStructure and function of cells, tissues, organs andsystems in the human body.BIOL 2301 Anatomy and Physiology II Lab1 credit: 3 hours labCo-requisites: Biol 2243 Anatomy and Physiology IIStructure and function of cells, tissues, organs andsystems in the human bodyBIOL 3314 Ichthyology/Herpetology4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: BIOL 1153, 1161Taxonomy and natural history of fishes, amphibians,and reptiles, emphasizing the local fauna. Springoffering in odd-numbered years.BIOL 3324 Ornithology/Mammalogy4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: BIOL 1153, 1161Taxonomy and natural history of birds and mammals,emphasizing the local fauna. Spring offering in evennumberedyears.BIOL 3333 Molecular Biology3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: BIOL 3553 or BIOL 3354Study of genes and their activities at the molecular levelwith an emphasis on applications useful in the analysisof genomes and treatment of genetic diseases.BIOL 3354 Genetics4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: BIOL 3553, 3561; CHEM 1113, 1131Principal laws of heredity, including Mendelian,molecular, and cytogenetics. Annual Spring offering.BIOL 3413 Mammalogy3 Credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: BIOL 1153, 1161Taxonomy, morphology, physiology, behavior, ecology,and conservation of mammals; emphasizing mammalsthat occur in the central and southeastern United States.Fall odd years.BIOL 3423 Plant Morphology3 credits: 1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratoryPrerequisite: BIOL 1143, 1171Structure, reproduction, and life histories of thevascular plants: ferns and fern allies, gymnosperms,and flowering plants.170Course Descriptions


BIOL 3434 Regional Flora4 credits: 2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratoryPrerequisite: BIOL 1143, 1171Identification and classification of the vascular plants ofthe southeastern United States, emphasizing floweringplants. Spring offering in oddnumbered years.BIOL 3451 Mammalogy Lab1 credit: 3 hors laboratoryPrerequisites: BIOL 1153, 1161Corequisite: BIOL/WL F 3413Taxonomy and natural history of mammals,emphasizing Arkansas fauna. Fall odd years.BIOL 3484 General Ecology4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: BIOL 1143, 1153, 1161, 1171; Six hours ofchemistryPrinciples of ecology; study of environments and theircomponents, the flow of energy and materials,ecological succession, pollution, and radiation ecology.Annual Fall offering.BIOL 3493 Environmental Science3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: 3 hours of biology or earth scienceNOTE: Same as ESCI 3493A survey of the environment to provide an understandingof and respect for the ecosystems upon which thehuman species is dependent. Fall offering in evennumberedyears.BIOL 3503 Marine Biology3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: BIOL 1153, 1161Study of the structure and function of the marineenvironment with emphasis on the fauna and ecologyof the Gulf of Mexico. Optional field trip to the Gulf ofMexico.BIOL 3511 Marine Biology Laboratory1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: BIOL 1153, 1161Study of the structure and function of the marineenvironment with emphasis on the identification ofsome of the common organisms of the Gulf of Mexico.Optional field trip to the Gulf of Mexico.BIOL 3524 Ornithology4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: BIOL 1153, 1161Taxonomy and natural history of birds, emphasizingthe local fauna. Spring offering in even numberedyears.BIOL 3553 Microbiology3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: 6 hours of chemistry and 3 hours of biology;or BIOL 2243/2301, and 3 additional hours of BIOLThe biology of microorganisms including bacteria,viruses, fungi, and protozoans, with emphasis given totheir importance in health and disease.BIOL 3561 Microbiology Lab1 credit: 3 hours laboratoryA laboratory course designed to supplement the basiclecture course in microbiology with experimentationand demonstration.BIOL 3574 Comparative Anatomy4 credits:3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: BIOL 1153, 1161Structure, development, function, and evolution oforgans and organ systems in the different vertebrategroups with emphasis on basic principles. Annual Falloffering.BIOL 358V Natural HistoryVariable creditPrerequisite: 3 hours biology or 3 hours earth scienceNOTE: May be taken for a maximum of 3 hours credit.Same as ESCI 358V, FOR 358V and WL F 358V.A field course in earth science and biology of naturalecosystems, consisting of travel, study and/or researchin unique natural areas of North America.BIOL 3594 Invertebrate Zoology4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: BIOL 1153, 1161Classification, phylogenetic relationships, morphology,function, and life histories of invertebrates, emphasizingmarine invertebrates and the economic importanceof all invertebrate groups.BIOL 3801 Mammalian Anatomy Laboratory1 credit: 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: BIOL 1153, 1161Basic mammalian anatomy, with emphasis on thehuman skeleton and cat organ systems.BIOL 4602 Seminar in Evolutionary Biology2 credits: 2 hours lecturePrerequisite: 20 hours of biology, including BIOL 3354Evidence and mechanism for evolutionary change;Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species. Students presentdifferent topics each semester. Annual fall offering.BIOL 4624 Vertebrate Embryology4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: BIOL 1153, 1161, 3574Embryonic development of the chordates as applied toamphioxus, frog, chick, and pig. Spring offering ineven-numbered years.BIOL 4634 Vertebrate Physiology4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: 20 hours of biology and 8 hours ofchemistryFundamental concepts of vertebrate physiology,emphasizing function, mechanism, and controls of thevarious vertebrate organ systems. Spring offering inodd-numbered years.Course Descriptions171


BIOL 4664 Mammalian Histology4 credits: 2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: BIOL 1153, 1161A morphological study and identification ofmammalian tissues (human when available) and theirorganization within mammalian organs.BIOL 4673 Pharmacology3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Junior or senior standing and approval ofthe instructor and Dean of Mathematical and NaturalSciencesStudy of the response of living organisms to drugs.BIOL 4683 Pathophysiology3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: BIOL 3553; BIOL 2243/2301 or 4634Introduction to the physiological basis of the diseaseprocess. Annual spring offering.BIOL 469V Senior ResearchVariable creditPrerequisites: 20 hours of biology, 8 hours of chemistry,Senior standing, and approval of a project proposal bythe school dean.NOTE: Open only to biology majors and minors. Maybe repeated for a maximum of 6 hours of credit.Literature search, laboratory and/or field work onindividual research projects.BIOL 4711 Seminar in Classroom Teaching1 credit: 1 hour arranged conferencePrerequisites: 16 hours of biology.Evaluation and critique of classroom teaching includingtopic selection, instructional materials, and test designand evaluation.BIOL 4724 Aquatic Biology4 credits: 3 hours lecture and 3 hours of laboratoryPrerequisites: BIOL 1153, 1161; six hours of chemistryChemical and biological studies of aquatic environmentswith emphasis on the geological andhydrological features of lakes and streams.BIOL 4734 Animal Behavior4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: BIOL 1063Behavior of animals, focusing on evolutionary patternsand ecological significance. Topics include genetics ofbehavior, ethology, adaptation, fitness, reproductivetactics/mating systems, foraging, and social behavior.Fall offering in even numbered years.BIOL 4753 Selected Topics in Biology3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: Junior or senior standing and approvalof the instructor and Dean of Mathematical and NaturalSciences.Selected topics in biology.BIOL 479V Independent Study in BiologyVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.CHEM Courses(Chemistry)CHEM 1023 Introductory Chemistry3 credits: 3 hours lectureCorequisite: ENGL 1013, MATH 0183, or equivalentsIntroduction to the structure of matter, its classification,and the physical, chemical, and nuclear changes itundergoes.CHEM 1031 Introductory Chemistry Laboratory1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryCorequisite: CHEM 1023Basic studies in chemical experimentation includingmeasurements, properties of elements and compounds,and reactions of matter.CHEM 1103 General Chemistry I3 credits: 3 hours lectureCorequisite: CHEM 1121, ENGL 1013, MATH 1043The study of measurement systems, significant figures,atomic and molecular structure, gas laws, thermochemistry,solutions, states of matter, chemical bonding,chemical reactions, and stoichiometry.CHEM 1113 General Chemistry II3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: CHEM 1103, 1121Corequisite: CHEM 1131The study of kinetics, equilibrium, thermodynamics,electrochemistry, oxidation-reduction, acid-basechemistry, nuclear chemistry, and selected descriptivechemistry. An ACS standardized exam will be given asthe final exam.CHEM 1121 General Chemistry I Laboratory1 credit: 3 hours laboratoryCorequisite: CHEM 1103Experimentation and theory in the areas of measurementsystems, chemical analysis, chemical reactions,stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and molecularstructure.CHEM 1131 General Chemistry II Laboratory1 credit: 3 hours laboratoryCorequisite: CHEM 1113Experimentation and theory in the areas of qualitativeanalysis, oxidationreduction, equilibrium, acid-basechemistry, and thermodynamics.CHEM 2203 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: CHEM 1023 or CHEM 1103Chemical substances from which life is formed.Designed for those who desire a general overview oforganic and biochemistry.172Course Descriptions


CHEM 2211 Introduction to Organic and BiochemistryLaboratory1 credit: 3 hours laboratoryCorequisite: CHEM 2203 or passing grade from CHEM2203Experimentation and theory related to the basicconcepts in organic and biochemistry. Topics include:study of physical and chemical properties, separation,purification, identification, chemical reactivity, andsynthesis of organic compounds.CHEM 3314 Quantitative Analysis4 credits: 2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: CHEM 1113,1131, MATH 1043 or 1175Analytical chemistry with emphasis on the principlesand theories of gravimetric and volumetric analysis.Annual Fall offering.CHEM 3404 Organic Chemistry I4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: CHEM 1113, CHEM 1131A study of carbon compounds, including anintroduction to organic nomenclature, reactions,reaction mechanisms, organic synthesis, and structuraland stereochemical problems. Annual Fall offering.CHEM 3414 Organic Chemistry II4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisite: CHEM 3404A continuation of Organic Chemistry I (3404). A studyof organic nomenclature, reactions, reactionmechanisms, organic spectroscopy, and greateremphasis on organic synthesis. An ACS standardizedexam will be given as the final exam. Annual Springoffering.CHEM 3444 Instrumental Analysis4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: CHEM 3314, PHYS 2203 or 2213Theoretical and practical application of instrumentalmethods to chemical analysis. Spring offering in oddnumberedyears.CHEM 3454 Organic Analysis4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: CHEM 3414Systematic separation and identification of organiccompounds with emphasis on molecular structure. Useand theory of spectrometric methods and otherphysical techniques. Fall offering in odd-numberedyears.CHEM 4603 Structure and Mechanism3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: CHEM 3404Structural considerations of organic chemistryincluding stereochemistry, electronic theory, andmechanisms.CHEM 4611 Chemistry Seminar1 credit: 1 hour lecturePrerequisite: Completion of at least 24 hours ofchemistry with a g.p.a. in chemistry of at least 3.00 andpermission of the instructor.Students give oral presentations on different topicseach semester based on laboratory and/or libraryresearch. The course may be repeated for a maximumof 2 credit hours.CHEM 4624 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisite: 12 hours of chemistryMolecular symmetry, theories of chemical bonding,acid-base definitions, coordination compounds, andselected descriptive chemistry. Fall offering in evennumberedyears.CHEM 4634 Biochemistry I4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisite: CHEM 3414Introduction to the chemical aspects of living systems:organization and production of cellular macromolecules,production and utilization of energy by the cell,major metabolic pathways and biochemical controlmechanisms. Fall offering in odd-numbered years.CHEM 4643 Biochemistry II3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: CHEM 4634Continuation of studies of chemical aspects of livingsystems: organization and production of cellularmacromolecules, production and utilization of energyby the cell, major metabolic pathways and biochemicalcontrol mechanisms. Spring offering in even-numberedyears.CHEM 469V Senior ResearchVariable creditPrerequisites: Junior or senior standing and approval ofa project proposal by the school dean.NOTE: Open only to chemistry majors. May berepeated for a maximum of 6 hours of credits.Literature search and laboratory work on individualresearch problems.CHEM 4704 Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: MATH 3495; PHYS 2323 and 2241; and12 hours of chemistryCorequisite: MATH 3525Principles of theoretical chemistry and theirmathematical interpretations, emphasizing thermodynamics.Spring offering in odd-numbered years.Course Descriptions173


CHEM 4714 Physical Chemistry: Kinetic & QuantumMechanics4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: MATH 3495; PHYS 2323 and 2241; and 12hours of chemistryCorequisite: MATH 3525NOTE: May be taken prior to CHEM 4704.Principles of theoretical chemistry and theirmathematical interpretations, emphasizing kinetics andquantum chemistry. Spring offering in evennumberedyears.CHEM 479V Independent Study in ChemistryVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.CIS Courses(Computer Information SystemsCIS 1013 Introduction to Computer-Based Systems3 credits: 3 hours lectureOffered: Fall, Spring, SummerAn introduction to computers in business and scientificdata processing. Overview of computer systems,computer languages, and data representation.CIS 2203 Programming Microcomputer Systems3 credits: 3 hours lectureOffered: Fall, Spring, SummerIntroduction to operating systems and logicalinformation flow using the BASIC language. Emphasison student programming to solve problems in severaldisciplines.CIS 2223 Microcomputer Applications3 credits: 3 hours lectureOffered: Fall, Spring, SummerPrerequisite: Keyboarding ability recommended.The study and use of microcomputer-basedapplications software to increase business and personalproductivity. Realistic computing problems will besolved using sophisticated software packages includingword processing, spreadsheets, database managementsystems, and graphics.CIS 3103 Advanced Microcomputer Applications3 credits: 3 hours lectureOffered: Fall, SpringPrerequisite: CIS 2223The advanced study, use, and integration ofmicrocomputer-based applications software to increasebusiness and personal productivity.CIS 3423 COBOL3 credits: 3 hours lectureOffered: Fall, SpringPrerequisites: General Education Mathematics, Gradeof “C” or better in CIS 2203Techniques essential to problem-solving with theCOBOL programming language. Practical applicationwith emphasis on structured approach.CIS 3443 Object-Oriented Programming Languages3 credits: 3 hours lectureOffered: Fall, SpringPrerequisite: General Education Mathematics, Grade of“C” or better in CIS 2203Provides the student with theory and application ofinformation systems development utilizing objectoriented(OO) technology. Topics include: analysis,design, data modeling, database management systems,and programming.CIS 3453 World Wide Web Programming3 credits: 3 hours lectureTechniques essential to the design and construction ofWorld Wide Web documents using Web programminglanguages and Web construction applications.CIS 3523 Structured System Analysis and Design3 credits: 3 hours lectureOffered: Fall, SpringPrerequisites: CIS 3423 or CIS 3443Application of skills and concepts developed in basicdata processing course work to more advanced topicsinvolving design, implementation, evaluation, anddocumentation of management information systems.CIS 3553 Advanced COBOL3 credits: 3 hours lectureOffered: Fall, SpringPrerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in CIS 3423Emphasis on structured methodology of programdesign, development, testing, implementation, anddocumentation of business-oriented applications.Includes coverage of sequential and random access filesand processing techniques, and development ofprograms and systems of programs for batch andinteractive environments using COBOL programminglanguage.CIS 370V Computer Information Systems PracticumVariable creditPrerequisite: Completion of 12 hours in ComputerInformation Systems or permission of unit headNOTE: May be repeated for a total of 6 hours creditwith approval of the unit head.Introduction to research and specialized programmingin computer information systems in the context ofassisting with faculty research and programmingprojects.174Course Descriptions


CIS 4503 Business Data Communications3 credits: 3 hours lectureOffered: Fall, SpringPrerequisite: CIS 3423 or CIS 3443To provide a strong introduction to both communicationsand networking for the computer literate student,focusing on system software.CIS 460V Internship in Computer InformationSystemsVariable credit (1-3 hours)Prerequisite: Advanced standing and permission of unithead and instructor.Practical experience in computer programming anddatabase management. Students work in a businesssetting which allows for application of computersystems knowledge and development of informationsystems skills.CIS 4623 Database Management Systems3 credits: 3 hours lectureOffered: Fall, SpringPrerequisite: CIS 3423, CIS 3443Emphasis on file organization methods, file accessmethods, data structures for database processing andthe process for database design and implementation.The study and use of Structured Query Language todevelop database programs.CIS 4633 Application Software Development Project3 credits: 3 hours seminarOffered: Fall, SpringPrerequisite: CIS 3523, CIS 4623System simulation techniques; their application tobusiness systems using an appropriate simulationlanguage; systems design and development; extensiveuse of computers.CIS 4723 Seminar in Computer Information Systems3 credits: 3 hours lectureOffered: Fall, SpringNOTE: May be repeated for a total of 9 hours creditwith unit head’s permission.Detailed study of one of the specialized areas ofcomputer information systems, emphasizing assignedreadings and individual research.CIS 479V Independent Study in ComputerInformation SystemsVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.C J Courses(Criminal Justice)C J 1013 Introduction to Criminal Justice3 credits: 3 hours lectureA survey of the various components of the criminaljustice system.C J 2113 Policing in America3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: CJ 1013The roles of police as they relate to modern culture andsociety.C J 2123 Corrections3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: CJ 1013Analysis of the roles and functions of correctionsincluding institutions as well as community corrections.C J 3233 Criminal Law3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: CJ 1013Basic principles of substantive criminal law includingdefenses, elements of various crimes, and considerationof the Arkansas criminal code.C J 3243 Constitutional Criminal Procedure (same asPSCI 3413)3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: PSCI 2213, CJ 1013Analysis of procedural limitations on law enforcementand in the prosecution of crimes; emphasizes casesdealing with the fourth, fifth, sixth, and eighthamendments.C J 3253 Juvenile Justice3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: CJ 1013Structure and processes of the juvenile justice system.C J 3303 Industrial Security3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: CJ 1013Analysis of private security, risk analysis, lossprevention, litigation, physical security and accesscontrol, computer technology in security. The scope,organization, and growth of the private securityindustry.C J 3353 Probation and Parole3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: CJ 1013Analysis of the systems of probation and parole,including current court cases and trends in corrections.C J 3483 Judicial Process (same as PSCI 3483)3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: PSCI 2213, CJ 1013Courts, law, and the legal system; law and politics;judicial philosophy and biography.C J 3613 Criminal Investigation and Evidence3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: CJ 1013Analysis of criminal investigation procedures; rulespertaining to collection and presentation of evidence.Course Descriptions175


C J 3783 Criminal Justice Field Study3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: CJ 1013A field study consisting of travel, observation, andstudy of different criminal justice agencies. May berepeated for a maximum of 12 hours credit.C J 4363 Criminal Justice Research Methods (Same asPSCI 4653)3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: CJ 1013Overview of social science research with applicationsfor criminal justice; methodological, statistical andcomputer related techniques.C J 4373 Criminology (same as SOC 4613)3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: SOC 2213, CJ 1013Theories of the nature and causes of crime, andanalyses of various kinds of crimes.C J 4383 Principles of Administration (same as PSCI4613)3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: PSCI 2213, CJ 1013Nature of bureaucratic organization and changingthemes in organizational theory; fiscal and personnelpolicy; public unions and collective bargaining;leadership, communication, and motivation.C J 4403 Seminar in Criminal Justice3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: CJ 1013Selected topics in the field of criminal justice, withreadings, class discussions, and travel to state criminaljustice agencies. May be repeated for a maximum of 12hours credit.C J 4453 Family Law3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: CJ 1013An examination of the law concerning the formation ordissolution of family relationships; marriage, divorce,custody, adoption, support, as well as, neglect andabuse issues.C J 479V Independent Study in Criminal JusticeVariable CreditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.C J 489V InternshipVariable creditPrerequisites: CJ 1013, Junior standing or permission ofthe instructor. Supervised learning experience in acriminal justice agency. May be repeated for amaximum of 6 hours of credit.C S Courses(Computer Science)C S 2213 Pascal Programming3 credits: 3 hours lectureCorequisite: MATH 1043 or 1175Pascal computer programming language. Emphasis onproblem-solving with examples from science, business,and mathematics.C S 2253 FORTRAN Programming3 credits: 3 hours lectureCorequisite: MATH 1043 or 1175FORTRAN computer programming language.Emphasis on practical application and use of computer.Examples in business, mathematics, and science.DEV Courses(Developmental)DEV 0101 College Skills Development1 credit: 1 hour lecturePrimary focus is designed to enhance personal skillsgrowth, academic skills improvement, careerexploration, and orientation to the University.Required of all students who are concurrently enrolledin two or more Developmental courses (courses withnumbers beginning with 0.) Students must completethe course with a grade of “C” or higher or the studentwill be required to enroll in the course until asatisfactory grade has been achieved.ECED Courses(Early Childhood Special Education)ECED 1013 Child Development Associate Training I3 credits: 3 hours lectureA beginning introduction to early childhood, withemphasis upon scope, content, sequence, materials,methods and procedures and how these things worktogether to provide developmentally appropriateexperiences for young children.ECED 1023 Child Development Associate Training II3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ECED 1013 or permission of instructorA continuation of Child Development AssociateTraining I, with emphasis upon scope, content,sequence, materials, methods and procedures and howthese things work together to provide developmentallyappropriate experiences for young children.ECED 1033 Pre-School Practicum3 credits: 3 hours lecture, 2 hours field experiencePrerequisite: ECED 1023 or permission of instructorThis course serves as an opportunity for students ofChild Development Associate Training I and II topractice their skills and apply their knowledge.176Course Descriptions


ECED 2103 Characteristics of Exceptionality3 credits: 3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratoryPrerequisite: EDUC 1143This course stresses the early identification andprevention of disabilities as well as the detection of atriskand failure-to-thrive children by identifyingcharacteristics of disabling situations that affectchildren at an early age. The importance of integratingthese individuals, birth to age 8, with their nondisabledpeers is explained and stressed. Offered in fall.ECED 2203 Child Development3 credits: 3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratoryPrerequisite: ECED 2103This course examines typical child development asdelineated by research and philosophers and the effectof disabling conditions. The role of families andcultural differences is examined within the context ofchild development. Offered in fall.ECED 3303 Strategies for Teaching Special Students3 credits: 3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratoryPrerequisites: ECED 2103, ECED 2203Attention is given to the development of fine and grossmotor skills, communication, cognition, adaptivebehavior and psycho-social development through thestudy of curriculum, instructional procedures, andmaterials needed/used in developing and implementingIEP’s and IFSP’s of children, birth through age 8.Offered in fall and spring.ECED 3323 Assessing Young Children3 credits: 3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratoryPrerequisites: ECED 2103, ECED 2203, ECED 3303This course examines the technical and statisticalcharacteristics of test selection, administration, andinterpretation of assessment instruments andprocedures appropriate for infants and preschoolchildren. Offered in fall and spring.ECED 3353 Early Childhood Education: Planning,Curriculum, and Programming3 credits: 3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratoryPrerequisites: ECED 2103, ECED 2203This course examines the roles, philosophies, andservices of various professionals providing services toyoung children with disabilities; while atransdisciplinary approach is emphasized, othermodels, strategies and problem-solving approaches arealso discussed in planning and developing programsfor children birth through age eight. Offered in spring.ECED 3403 Family and Community Relationships3 credits: 3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratoryPrerequisites: ECED 2103, ECED 2203This course will prepare students to establish andmaintain positive, collaborative relationships withfamilies and to collaborate and consult with otherprofessionals and with agencies in the largercommunity to support children’s development,learning, and well-being. Offered in spring.ECED 4609 Early Childhood and Special EducationMethods9 credits: 9 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: All required ECED coursesCorequisite: EDUC 460VThis course provides instruction in specific methodsand materials appropriate for use in children birth toage 8 and for students with special needs. Offered infall and spring.ECON Courses(Economics)ECON 2203 Principles of Macroeconomics3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrinciples and theory of economic activity. Survey ofmacroeconomics.Offered: Fall, Spring, SummerECON 2213 Principles of Microeconomics3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrinciples and theory of economic activity. Survey ofmacroeconomics; special emphasis on theory of thefirm. Offered: Fall, Spring, SummerECON 3453 Money, Banking, and Credit3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: ECON 2203, 2213.Money systems and banking structure, negotiable andcredit instruments, Federal Reserve System, monetarypolicy.ECON 479V Independent Study in EconomicsVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.Offered: SpringECED 3383 Language Development3 credits: 3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratoryPrerequisites: ECED 2103, ECED 2203This course examines the development of speech andlanguage and the impact of various disabilities on thedevelopment of communication skills. Offered in falland spring.Course Descriptions177


EDUC Courses(Professional Education)EDUC 1143 Education for Schools and Society:Developing Teacher Leaders3 credits: 3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratoryDesigned to provide students with a basic introductionto the historical, legal, social, and philosophical aspectsof public education. Character education and ethicswill be discussed. Students will participate in servicelearning activities with children and adults.Technology infusion activities will include emailapplications and the use of graphics. Offered fall andspring.EDUC 2223 Developing Critical Literacy Skills3 credits: 3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratoryPrerequisite: EDUC 1143Designed to improve students’ understanding oflanguage and communication through developingskills in: (1) traditional literacy, (2) scientific literacy, (3)mathematical literacy, and (4) technological literacy.Emphasis will be placed on developing writing skills.Students will tutor in field-based settings and will usetechnology during the tutoring experiences includingdesktop publishing, graphics, and databasemanagement. Offered fall and spring.EDUC 2253 Needs of Diverse Learners in InclusiveSettings3 credits: 3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratoryPrerequisite: EDUC 1143Designed to provide students with a basic introductionto special education and the cultural, socioeconomic,and emotional needs of students. Students will observelearners in field settings and will utilize technologythrough internet research and software analysis.Offered fall and spring.EDUC 3203 Educational Psychology: DevelopingLearners3 credits: 3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratoryPrerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education ProgramDesigned to provide an understanding of: (1) childgrowth and development, (2) styles of learning, (3)theories of learning, and (4) the role of the family in thelearning process. Students will observe in public schoolfield settings and will utilize technology throughdesktop publishing and graphics. Offered fall andspring.EDUC 3563 Effective Instructional and ManagementStrategies3 credits: 3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratoryPrerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education ProgramDesigned to improve students’ understanding of: (1)classroom management techniques, (2) state standardsand curriculum frameworks, (3) assessment techniques,and (4) the integrated curriculum. Students will workin small group settings in field-based public schoolsand will use technology during the small groupexperiences to support instructional activities,including the use of web-based and/or presentationsoftware. Offered fall and spring.EDUC 3733 Behavior Management3 credits: 3 hours lectureTreats behavior management and shaping theory.EDUC 460V Clinical Internship I4-6 credits: InternshipPrerequisite: Admission to Clinical Internship ICorequisite: Appropriate content methods courseoffered in the majorEDUC 463V Clinical Internship II12-15 credits: InternshipPrerequisite: Clinical Internship IENGL Courses(English)ENGL 0133 Fundamentals of English3 credits: 3 hours lectureFundamentals of basic grammar usage and writingskills stressing reading skills as a basis for effectivewriting.NOTE: This course may not be counted toward a majoror minor in English or toward the general educationprogram or be taken for credit after achieving a “C” orbetter in any other English course.ENGL 1013 Composition I3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in ENGL 0133,satisfactory ACT score, or Dean’s permission.Writing course stressing reading skills as a basis foreffective writing.ENGL 1023 Composition II3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in ENGL 1013 orDean’s permission.Writing course emphasizing reading skills as a basis foreffective writing. Documented term paper is required.ENGL 1033 Honors Composition I3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Minimum ACT composite score of 24 orDean’s permission.Writing course emphasizing reading and writing on amore sophisticated level than ENGL 1013. NOTE:Fulfills the General Education requirement for ENGL1013. May not be taken for credit by students who havetaken Freshman Composition I.178Course Descriptions


ENGL 1043 Honors Composition II3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ENGL 1033 or Dean’s permission.Writing course emphasizing reading and writing on amore sophisticated level than ENGL 1023. NOTE:Fulfills the General Education requirement for ENGL1023. May not be taken for credit by students who havetaken Freshman Composition II.ENGL 2263 Vocabulary Building3 credits: 3 hours lectureOrigins and growth of the English vocabulary, wordformation,semantics, meaning shifts, regionalvocabulary, nomenclature, testing for verbalproficiency.ENGL 2273 Advanced Composition3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ENGL 1023Writing course analyzing the elements of effectivewriting.ENGL 2283 Survey of World Literature I3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ENGL 1013Major periods and writers from the Classical Age to theRenaissance.ENGL 2293 Survey of World Literature II3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ENGL 1013Major periods and writers from the Renaissance to thepresent.ENGL 3253 Technical Writing3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ENGL 1023Practice in preparing reports, letters, articles, and otherforms of writing used in such professions as forestry,engineering, and management.ENGL 3343 The Bible as Literature3 credits: 3 hours lectureThe books of the Old Testament and the Apocrypha asillustrating literary development and thought. TheBible as a source for drama, philosophical poetry, lyricpoetry, essay, and story.ENGL 3403 American Literature I3 credits: 3 hours lectureA survey of American literature from its beginnings tothe 1860’s.ENGL 3413 American Literature II3 credits: 3 hours lectureA survey of American literature from the 1860’s to 1960.ENGL 3423 British Literature I3 credits: 3 hours lectureA survey of British literature from its beginnings to 1800.ENGL 3433 British Literature II3 credits: 3 hours lectureA survey of British literature from 1800 to 1960.ENGL 3453 The Short Story3 credits: 3 hours lectureHistorical and thematic study of the short story.ENGL 3463 Advanced Grammar3 credits: 3 hours lectureModern grammatical systems (traditional, structural,generativetransformational).ENGL 3533 Introduction to Language Study3 credits: 3 hours lectureIntroduction to the study of the English language,including reading and discussion of its history,structure, regional and social variations, and its use inthe modern world.ENGL 3543 Creative Writing3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ENGL 1023Laboratory/reading course in which students submitmanuscripts for analysis and criticism.ENGL 3573 Literature for Adolescents3 credits: 3 hours lecture/seminarA seminar focusing on the teaching of literature foradolescents in the upper elementary, middle, and highschools. This course is required for students pursuing amajor in secondary English education with a teachingminor, but may not be used to satisfy GeneralEducation requirements or for credit toward an Englishmajor or minor.ENGL 3583 Critical Theory and Approaches toLiterature3 credits: 3 hours lectureAn introduction to major literary and critical schools ofthought, including their historical developments andtheir practical applications.ENGL 4613 The British Novel3 credits: 3 hours lectureThe British novel from its beginning to World War II.ENGL 4623 Shakespeare3 credits: 3 hours lectureIntroduction to Shakespeare.ENGL 4633 The American Novel3 credits: 3 hours lectureThe American novel from its beginnings to World War II.ENGL 4663 Modern Poetry3 credits: 3 hours lectureReading and interpretation of British and Americanpoetry since 1900.Course Descriptions179


ENGL 4683 Seminar in Writing: Special Topics3 credits: 3 hours lectureAn in-depth study of one of the major areas of writingsuch as fiction, nonfiction, poetry, autobiographicalwriting, business and professional writing, andadvanced expository writing. May be repeated for atotal of 6 credit hours with varying topics.ENGL 4703 Contemporary Writers3 credits: 3 hours lectureWorks by current authors, including the voices ofwomen, persons of color, and writers of the postcolonialworld.ENGL 4733 Minority Writers3 credits: 3 hours lectureA survey of minority writers within the United Statesand abroad.ENGL 4743 Film and Literature3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ENGL 1023 or ENGL 1043A seminar designed to introduce the basics of cinematechniques and to encourage critical analysis of film asa literary genre.ENGL 4713 Literature of the South3 credits: 3 hours lectureNovels, short stories, poems, and essays about theSouth from the Colonial Period to the present,including Southern folklore and black writers.ENGL 4723 Seminar in English3 credits: 3 hours lectureDetailed study of one of the major areas of English,emphasizing assigned readings and individualresearch. May be repeated for a total of 12 credit hourswith approval of the dean.ENGL 479V Independent Study in EnglishVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.ENGL 4903 Seminar in Teaching English3 credits: 3 hours lectureEvaluation and critique of micro classroom teaching,history of academic discipline, philosophicaldevelopment, test design and evaluation, and materialsfor on-site teaching.ENGR Courses(Engineering)ENGR 1001 Introduction to Engineering1 credit: 1 hour lectureThe profession of engineering, including the history ofengineering and an explanation of selected branches ofengineering. Assistance will be provided in preparingindividual curricula and in executing the transfer to adegreegranting institution.ENTO Courses(Entomology)ENTO 2283 Applied Entomology3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisite: BIOL 1143 and BIOL 1171; or BIOL 1153and BIOL 1161; or BIOL 1063 and BIOL 1071Destructive and beneficial species of insects and theireffect upon agricultural enterprises.ESCI Courses(Earth Science)ESCI 1051 Elements of Geology Laboratory1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryCorequisite: ESCI 1063Identification of minerals and rocks, introduction tomaps, methodology of absolute and relative age dating.Introduction to structural geology.ESCI 1063 Elements of Geology3 credits: 3 hours lectureCorequisite: ENGL 1013Materials of the Earth’s crust and the processes andagents that affect them; plate tectonics, earthquakes,volcanoes, and Earth history.ESCI 1073 Earth and Atmosphere3 credits: 3 hours lectureCorequisite: ESCI 1081Survey of the nature of the Earth’s hydrosphere in terms ofcomposition, origin, and physical processes; weather,climate, oceans, streams, groundwater, and glaciers.ESCI 1081 Earth and Atmosphere Laboratory1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryCorequisite: ESCI 1073Exercises involving interpretation of oceanic data,methodology of collecting weather data, stream andgroundwater flow problems.ESCI 222V Field GeologyVariable creditNOTE: May be repeated for a maximum of 3 hours credit.Introduction to the methods of field investigation andinterpretation of geological features. The purpose andscope of the course will vary from trip to trip.ESCI 3473 Earth Resources3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ESCI 1063Origin, classification, and distribution of the Earth’seconomic minerals, rocks, water, and fossil fuels.ESCI 3493 Environmental Science3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: 3 hours of biology or earth scienceNOTE: Same as BIOL 3493A survey of the environment to provide an understandingof and respect for the ecosystems upon which thehuman species is dependent. Fall offering in evennumberedyears.180Course Descriptions


ESCI 358V Natural HistoryVariable creditPrerequisite: 3 hours biology or earth scienceNOTE: May be taken for a maximum of 3 hours credit.Same as BIOL 358V, FOR 358V, and WLF 358V.A field course in geology and biology of naturalecosystems, consisting of travel, study, and/or researchin unique natural areas of North America.EXSC Courses(Exercise Science)EXSC 1012 Concepts of Fitness2 credits: 1 hour lecture, 1 hour laboratoryThis course is designed to develop understanding inthe conceptual knowledge of health and fitness in thedevelopment and maintenance of human wellnessthrough theory and laboratory application. Offered inspring.EXSC 2151 Methods of Teaching Water Exercise andAerobic Dance1 credit: 1 hour lecture, 1 hour laboratoryThis course will give an overview of methods ofteaching water exercise for special populations such asthose with arthritis, orthopedic impairment, obesity,heart disease, and circulatory impairment as well ashealthy populations who use water exercise for fitness.This would include both swimming and nonswimmingactivities. The aerobic dance portion of theclass will involve aerobic dance teacher certification.Offered in fall and spring.EXSC 2163 Sport Entrepreneurship3 credits: 3 hours lectureAn emphasis for such careers as fitness directors,athletic administrators, and sports and fitness facilitydirectors will be included in this course. Students willgain insight into the operations and financial processesof sport and fitness programs at various levels. Offeredin spring.EXSC 3311 PACE Certification1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryThe student will learn proper procedure for teachingexercise to persons with arthritis. Offered in fall andspring.EXSC 3323 Strength and Conditioning3 credits: 3 hours lecture/laboratoryThis course will teach principles of strength, flexibility,agility, speed and endurance training and practicalapplication of these in preparation for certification.Offered in spring.EXSC 4503 Exercise Prescription3 credits: 3 hours lectureThis course will give students the knowledge of how toprescribe and administer fitness exercise for normalpopulations and special populations such as those whoare diabetic, arthritic, obese, have orthopedicimpairment or neurological impairment or who are incardiac rehabilitation. Offered in fall.Course Descriptions181


EXSC 4513 Exercise Certification Preparation3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrepares students to take Aerobic Dance Certification,Strength Coach Certification, and Personal TrainerCertification. Offered in fall.EXSC 4623 Community Recreation Internship3 credits: 3 hours internshipThe student will complete a nine-week internship in asenior adult rehabilitation setting and a nine-weekinternship in a youth fitness setting. Offered in fall andspring.EXSC 4683 Methods and Technology for Exercise Science3 credits: 3 hours lectureDesigned to give prospective Exercise Science majorscompetencies in methods of teaching in the areas ofself-care, consumer awareness, nutrition and weightcontrol, stress management, risk factor analysis andsubstance abuse. Offered in spring.EXSC 4806 Internship—Wellness Facility6 creditsA 200-clock-hour off-campus working experience in awellness/health promotion facility approved by theintern supervisor.Offered in fall and spring.EXSC 4xx3 Geriatric/Therapeutic Internship.A full semester of practical experience concerning theorganization, administration, and daily operation of ageriatric/therapeutic facility. Offered in fall and spring.FIN Courses(Finance)FIN 3413 General Insurance3 credits: 3 hours lectureFundamentals of insurance and their relationship tosound business administration.Offered: FallFIN 3473 Principles of Finance3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: ACCT 2213, GB 3713, and ECON 2213 orAGEC 2273Introduction to financial management and analysis,;including such topics as the risk-expected returntradeoff, financial ratios, time value of money,computation of net present value, quantifying risk,diversification, capital budgeting, and cost of capital.Emphasis is placed on problem-solving.Offered: Fall, Spring, SummerFIN 3483 Real Estate Principles3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: ECON 2203, ECON 2213 or AGEC 2273Real estate values economics, financing; homeownership, rights in real property and their transfer;problems of investment and management; regulationsof real property and brokerage.Offered: FallFIN 4683 Real Estate Finance3 credits: 3 hours lectureReal estate brokerage title closing, marketing,advertising, financing, and appraisal. Market analysis,property management, and real estate trends andoutlook.Offered: SpringFIN 4603 Financial Policy and Planning3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: FIN 3473Analysis of financial theories and practices, within arisk-return framework, as they relate to the financialdecision-making process. Topics covered includeworking capital policy, capital structure, capitalbudgeting techniques.Offered: FallFIN 4613 Investments3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: FIN 3473Principles and theories of security evaluations andanalysis for professional and personal portfolioformation, including the risk-return trade-off, types ofsecurities, market efficiency, interest rates, andspeculative investments.Offered: SpringFIN 4623 Topics in International Finance3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: FIN 3473This course covers, but is not limited to, globalization offinancial markets, exchange rates, interest rate paritytheory, international financial and capital structuredecisions, international banking and its regulation,international financial institutions, international trade,and international law and policies affecting financialmanagement of the multinational enterprise. Extensiveuse of problems and short application-oriented cases.Offered: SummerFOR Courses(Forestry)FOR 1061 Introduction to Forestry1 credit: 3 hours laboratoryOffered: FallOverview of the forestry profession using field trips toobserve and discuss forestry related activities, andprojects to help students better understand their role asprofessional foresters.FOR 2022 Financial Analysis in Natural Resources2 credits: 2 hours lectureOffered: SpringPrerequisites: MATH 1033 or MATH 1175, SophomoreStandingApplication of basic financial principles in the analysisof projects in natural resources. Topics include interest,basic financial formulas, financial decision criteria,marginal analysis, inflation, risk, and capital theory.182Course Descriptions


FOR 2071 Forest Mensuration Laboratory1 credit: 3 hours laboratoryOffered: SpringPrerequisites: MATH 1033 or MATH 1175; CIS 2223Corequisite: FOR 2273Application and field practice of forest measurementtechniques. Tree, log, and stand-level measurement offorest, forest product, wildlife, and social attributes;statistical computing and sampling methods.FOR 2231 Dendrology Laboratory I1 credit: 3 hours laboratoryOffered: FallField practice in the identification, nomenclature,classification, and ecology of local flora in the summerand fall condition. Emphasis on leaf and barkcharacters.FOR 2264 Forest Soils4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryOffered: SpringPrerequisites: CHEM 1023 and CHEM 1031, or CHEM1103 and CHEM 1121Fundamentals of soil science with application toforestry. Origin, development, and properties of soils.Identification and classification of soils with emphasison productivity.FOR 2273 Forest Mensuration3 credits: 3 hours lectureOffered: SpringPrerequisite: MATH 1033 or MATH 1175Corequisite: FOR 2071Description of tree, log, and stand-level components offorests and forest products; log rules and scalingpractices; surveying and land description; introductionto summary statistics.FOR 2291 Dendrology Laboratory II1 credit: 3 hours laboratoryOffered: SpringPrerequisite: FOR 2231Note: A one- or two-day field trip is required.Species native to Arkansas and southern forests withemphasis on twig, fruit and winter/spring identification.Limited exposure to exotic species of nationalinterest and occurring in Monticello. Special field tripsto view some of Arkansas’ threatened and endangeredplant species.FOR 2304 Forest Inventory4 credits: 4 weeks during Summer CampOffered: Summer IIPrerequisites: FOR 2071, FOR 2273, FOR 2291Application and field practice of forest inventorytechniques. Estimation of timber and non-timber forestresource attributes through prevailing inventorymethods and statistics.FOR 2342 Natural Resource Recreation2 credits: 2 hours lectureOffered: FallPrerequisite: Sophomore StandingNOTE: Two weekend field trips required.Theoretical foundations of recreation and leisure,including history, current patterns, and future trends;fundamentals or recreation planning and programming;recreation based education programs andimpacts of recreational uses on forested ecosystems.FOR 3123 Human Dimensions in Natural Resources3 credits: 3 hours of lectureOffered: FallPrerequisites: PSY 1013 or SOC 2213 and JuniorStandingNOTE: Two weekend field trips required.NOTE: Same as WLF 3343Foundations of human dimensions as it relates tonatural resources and natural resource management.Includes the history, current trends, and future ofhuman dimensions as a discipline. Stresses themanagement, leadership, and problem solving skillsnecessary to manage the human relations/naturalresource interface.FOR 3333 Contemporary Forest Resource Issues3 credits: 3 weeks during Summer CampOffered: Summer INOTE: Same as WL F 3333Prerequisite: Junior standingIntroduction to major resource issues, emphasizingfield presentations of timber and non-timber forestresource management themes in both pine andhardwood ecosystems. One and two week field tripsare required.FOR 3371 Silvics1 credit: 1 week during Summer CampOffered: Summer IPrerequisite: Junior StandingCorequisite: FOR/WLF 3333Introduction to the ecology of the principal trees likelyto be encountered during the field trips in ContemporaryForest Resource Issues.FOR 3434 Silviculture4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryOffered: SpringPrerequisites: FOR 2071, FOR 2273, FOR 2291; FOR3513 or BIOL 3484Application of ecological principles in controlling forestestablishment, composition, and growth. Detailedstudy of individual cultural treatments that maintainand enhance productivity of forest stands, and ofregeneration methods whereby forest stands areharvested and renewed.Course Descriptions183


FOR 3513 Forest Ecology3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryOffered: FallPrerequisites: FOR 2264, Junior standingIntroduction to the role of ecology and ecologicalconcepts in forest management; emphasizingecosystems, energy and nutrient cycling, abiotic/bioticinfluences on ecosystem development, and forestproductivity.FOR 3523 Tree Ecophysiology and Herbicides3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryOffered: FallPrerequisites: BIOL 1143 and BIOL 1171Aspects of tree growth, development, and physiologicalprocesses as affected by the environment. Herbicidenomenclature, classification, application anddegradation, and how they affect plant physiologicalprocesses.FOR 358V Natural HistoryVariable creditOffered: On demandPrerequisite: 3 hours biology or 3 hours earth scienceNOTE: May be taken for a maximum of 3 hours credit.Same as BIOL 358V, ESCI 358V, and WL F 358V.A field course in geology and biology of naturalecosystems, consisting of travel, study, and/or researchin unique natural areas of North America.FOR 3592 Forest Hydrology2 credits: 1 hour lecture, 3 hours laboratoryOffered: SpringPrerequisites: FOR 2071, FOR 2273; FOR 2264 or AGRO2244NOTE: One weekend field trip is required.Basic processes and measurements of water distributionand movement in forests with emphasis on forestmanagement effect on water quantity, quality, andwater-related resources.FOR 378V Undergraduate ResearchVariable CreditOffered: On demandPrerequisites: Research proposal approved by the Deanand the InstructorNOTE: May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours of creditLiterature search and laboratory or field work onindividual research projects. Written and oral reportsrequired. Requirements are documented in theUndergraduate Education Handbook.FOR 3804 Forest Operations and Fire4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryOffered: FallPrerequisites: MATH 1043 or MATH 1175; and JuniorstandingPrinciples of harvesting and other forestry operations.Quantitative approach to production and cost analysis.Role of fire in forest management, fire behavior,prescribed burning and smoke management, andwildfire suppression strategies and methods.FOR 4003 Natural Resource Policy3 credits: 3 hours lectureOffered: FallPrerequisite: Senior standingNOTE: Same as WL F 4003History and present status of natural resource-relatedpolicy in the U.S. Evolution of public and professionalattitudes toward natural resources, major laws affectingmanagement of public and private lands, policy-makingprocesses, and professional ethics. Study of major policyissues affecting renewable natural resources andprocedures for responding to those issues in managementdecision-making. Topics include individual and groupinvolvement in natural resource planning, environmentalissues, and regulation of forestry practices.FOR 410V Forest EnterpriseVariable Credit: 1 to 3 hours of lectureOffered: SpringPrerequisites: Junior standing in Forestry, SIS, orWildlife Management, or consent of the instructorEmphasizes support provided to forest resourcemanagement on private non-industrial lands. Providesincreased understanding of non-industrial private forests(NIPF), landowners, and agencies working on NIPFmanagement issues. The course is reading and discussionintensive. Guest speakers will present their perspectivesthroughout the semester. Students may register for onehour (Consulting Forestry), two hours (ConsultingForestry + Government Agencies) or three hours(Consulting Forestry + Government Agencies + NongovernmentAgencies).FOR 4113 Regional Silviculture3 credits: 3 hours lectureOffered: On demandPrerequisite: FOR 3434Ecology and silviculture of various forest cover typesthroughout the United States.FOR 4362 Wood Structure and Forest Products2 credits: 1 hour lecture, 3 hours laboratoryOffered: SpringPrerequisite: FOR 3434Structure and properties (physical and mechanical) ofwood; identification and uses of different species; forestproducts from wood, primary and secondaryprocessing as well as residue utilization.FOR 4673 Forest Resource Economics3 credits: 3 hours lectureOffered: FallPrerequisites: MATH 1073, ECON 2213 or AGEC 2273,FOR 2022, GB 3713Applications of economic principles to the specialcharacteristics of forestry and wood products production,an economic analysis of forest resources and forestindustry, economics of timber and non-timber resources,timber supply and harvest scheduling, principles ofeconomic efficiency, joint production, derived demand andcapital theory. Social and opportunity costs of alternativeforest uses are discussed.184Course Descriptions


FOR 4691 Seminar1 credit: 1 hour lectureOffered: SpringPrerequisite: Senior StandingNote: Same as WL F 4691Emphasizes the planning, organizational, and audio/visual computer skills necessary for deliveringprofessional presentations. Oral presentations tostudents, staff and faculty.FOR 4703 Cooperative Education in Forestry3 creditsOffered: On demandPractical training with a public agency or industrialfirm. Written report required for each work experience.Requirements documented in Cooperative EducationHandbook.FOR 4723 Natural Resource Management3 credits: 3 hours lectureOffered: FallPrerequisite: FOR 2022, FOR 3434Principles of resource management considering timberand non-timber resources; forest growth and yieldmodels; principles of forest regulation; risk assessmentand decision analysis; investment analysis and capitalbudgeting; forest and landscape-level managementplanning; and analytical techniques and computerapplications in forest management.FOR 4733 Forest Pest Management3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryOffered: FallPrerequisite: FOR 3434Biology, ecology, and management of disease and insectpests of southern forests. Laboratory work includesadult insect and pest damage collections.FOR 475V Advanced TopicsVariable creditOffered: On demandPrerequisites: Junior standing, consent of instructor,and approval of School Dean.Lectures and discussions in selected forestry topics.FOR 4773 Hardwood Silviculture3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 weekend field tripsOffered: On demandPrerequisite: FOR 3434Theory and practice of integrating silviculturaltreatments into functional silvicultural systems forbottomland and upland hardwood forest ecosystems.Emphasis on decision-making to satisfy bothconsumptive and non-consumptive resource uses.FOR 479V Independent Study in ForestryVariable creditOffered: On demandConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.FOR 4823 Integrated Resource Planning andManagement3 hours: 9 hours laboratoryOffered: SpringPrerequisites: FOR 4003, FOR 4673, FOR 4723, FOR4733, SIS 3814NOTE: Same as WL F 4823Integrated problem solving to apply biological,ecological, quantitative, economic, social, political, andadministrative principles in solving natural resourcemanagement problems.FREN Courses(French)FREN 1003 Elementary French I3 credits: 3 hours lectureBasic language skills — listening, speaking, reading,and writing — with emphasis on grammaticalstructures and aural-oral practice.FREN 1013 Elementary French II3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: FREN 1003Continued study of basic language skills — listening,speaking, reading, and writing — with emphasis ongrammatical structures and aural-oral practice.FREN 2203 Intermediate French I3 credits: 3 hours lectureGrammar, vocabulary, and basic idiomatic expressions.FREN 2213 Intermediate French II3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: FREN 2203.Continued study of grammar, vocabulary, and basicidiomatic expressions.FREN 3223 Intermediate Reading3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: FREN 2203Course in detailed reading of French and Francophonepoetry and short stories with an emphasis on reviewinggrammar and acquiring new vocabulary and idioms.FREN 3403 Intermediate Conversation3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: FREN 2203Intensive oral practice allowing students to becomemore comfortable with expressing themselves in thetarget language. Course is designed to further developlistening comprehension and speaking capabilitiesthrough a continued expansion of grammar andvocabulary by employing various mediums: song,literature, periodicals, film, Internet, and the like..Course Descriptions185


FREN 3413 French and Francophone Civilization andCulture3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: FREN 2203Survey of the main points in French and Francophonehistory, civilization, and culture from early Frenchkingdoms through colonization to contemporary issues.Examining both major national events and the majorworld influences which developed from the Frencheffect on the globe.FREN 3423 Intermediate Grammar and Composition3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: FREN 2213Writing course which will continue to addressproblematic areas in the French language by moreprecise review of advanced grammar topics. Studentswill learn to properly express themselves in French bywriting compositions which inform, persuade, give anopinion, and the like.FREN 3433 Survey of French Literature I3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: FREN 2203, FREN 2213Literature by periods from its beginnings to the end ofthe 18th century.FREN 4613 Advanced Composition3 credits: 3 hours lectureAdvanced French translation and free composition.Emphasis on literary style and building newvocabulary.FREN 4653 Seminar in French Literature3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: FREN 3433 or 3443, or instructor’spermission.Emphasis on literary analysis and interpretation ofmajor authors of a given century and work characteristicsof various movements of that century.FREN 479V Independent Study in FrenchVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.G B Courses(General Business)G B 1023 Introduction to Business3 credits: 3 hours lectureBusiness activities, business position in generaleconomic framework; survey of courses in production,personnel, marketing, finance, managerial control, andgovernment relations.Offered: SpringG B 1033 Elementary Computer Keyboarding3 credits: 3 hours lectureKnowledge and operation of computer keyboards.Preparation of simple business documents; developmentof a competent rate of speed.G B 2103 Administrative Support Procedures3 credits: 3 hours lectureDevelopment of a professional image and goals;development of a knowledge of computerizedadministrative tasks performed by office supportpersonnel in the electronic office; specific training inareas such as travel, communications, and reportpreparation. Some hands-on computer procedures suchas how to maintain a calendar, update a telephone list,handle electronic mail, complete an expense report, usefile transfer, and make domestic and internationaltravel arrangements.G B 2153 Intermediate Computer Keyboarding3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Keyboarding abilityDevelopment of proficiency in preparation of businessletters, reports, tabular material, and forms.Development of a competent rate of speed andproofreading ability.G B 2273 Word Processing3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Keyboarding abilityBasic concepts of word processing systems; languagearts skills as applicable to the processing of documents;development of skill in preparing and revising businessdocuments using microcomputers equipped withcommercial software.G B 2553 Advanced Computer Keyboarding3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: G B 2153An intensive course consisting of a variety of “minisimulations”designed to build confidence and aproductive level of speed in preparing officedocuments.G B 3043 Business Communications3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Keyboarding abilityComposition and preparation of a variety of effectivebusiness letters, including good news, requests,refusals, collections, sales, and employment letters.Correct and concise use of English is stressed.Offered: Fall, Spring, SummerG B 3203 Desktop Publishing3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: G B 2273Advanced concepts of word processing systems;production of high volume, high quality documents;techniques of combining text and graphics to producepublications.186Course Descriptions


G B 3301 Teaching of Business Subjects1 credit: 1 hour lecturePrerequisite: Consent of instructorMaterials and methods of teaching secondary businesssubjects. Methods course. Does not count towardsubject matter area.G B 3353 International Business3 credits: 3 hours lectureInternational business is examined from the perspectiveof three business areas: economics, management, andmarketing. The initial third of the course examines theeconomics of international trade. The remainingtwothirds of the course will focus on management andmarketing in the international environment.Offered: Spring, SummerG B 3443 Special Topics3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Consent of instructor and approval ofschool deanTopics vary in accordance with students’ demands.Presentation form may vary with each offering. Coursemay be repeated when different topics are presented.G B 3533 Legal Environment of Business3 credits: 3 hours lectureAn introduction to law, its relation and effect uponsociety, business and the individual. Topics includebusiness ethics, the federal and state judicial systems,administrative law, business crimes, torts, contracts,sales, agency relationships, consumer protection, andenvironmental and pollution regulations.Offered: Fall, Spring, SummerG B 3713 Business Statistics3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MATH 1003 or MATH 1043Statistical theory and methodologies necessary for datacollection, data analysis, and interpretation. Statisticaltopics include sampling, inferential statistics (intervalestimation and hypothesis testing), ANOVA (one-wayand two-way), regression (simple linear and multiplelinear), non-parametric statistics, and statistical processcontrol.Offered: Fall, Spring, SummerG B 4001 Methods of Teaching Business Subjects1 credit: 1 hour lecturePrerequisite: Admission to teacher educationCorequisite: EDUC 460VSpecial methods unique to the teaching of secondarybusiness subjects. Must be completed prior toSecondary Internship II with at least a “C.”G B 4193v Internship1-3 creditsPrerequisite: completion of 21 hours in the School ofBusiness and prior approval of the Dean of the Schoolof Business and advisor.Note: May be taken/repeated for maximum of 3 hours ofcreditProfessional quality experience in the student’s major fieldfor a fixed period of time and conforming to standardsestablished by the Dean of the School of Business.Internships must be arranged in advance of the semester inwhich the credit for the internship will be granted. Followupwill consist of student journals, reports, and employerevaluations.G B 4363 Topics in E-Commerce3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: MGMT 3473, MKT 3403This class concentrates on the organizational structureand design, operational, strategic, and marketing issuesinvolved in e-commerce. Familiarity with the Internetand web browsers is assumed. Extensive use of casesas well as project(s) dealing with e-commerce modelsand the use of the Internet as an information medium.This course does not cover web site design, except asrelated to security of customer information, site ease ofuse, and related topics. Offered: FallG B 479V Independent Study in General BusinessVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.GEOG Courses(Geography)GEOG 2213 General Geography I3 credits: 3 hours lectureIntroduction to the developed regions of Europe, NorthAmerica, and Australasia. Includes landforms, climates,economic activities, languages, religion and ethnicity.GEOG 2223 General Geography II3 credits: 3 hours lectureIntroduction to the developing regions of LatinAmerica, Africa and Southwest Asia. Includeslandforms, climates, economic activities, languages,religion, and ethnicity.GEOG 354V Field CourseVariable creditTour of a designated area in the United States orabroad. Includes observation and interpretation ofcultural and physical characteristics of the area. Offeredon demand.GEOG 479V Independent Study in GeographyVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.Course Descriptions187


HIST Courses(History)HIST 1013 Survey of Civilization I3 credits: 3 hours lectureCivilization to 1660. European and world developmentemphasizing cultural, economic, religious, and politicalchanges. Some attention is given to non westerncivilization.HIST 1023 Survey of Civilization II3 credits: 3 hours lectureEuropean and world development from 1660 to thepresent, emphasizing cultural, economic, religious, andpolitical changes. Some attention given to nonwesterncivilization.HIST 2213 American History I3 credits: 3 hours lectureThe growth of the United States from the discovery ofAmerica to 1876.HIST 2223 American History II3 credits: 3 hours lectureThe United States from 1876 to the present.HIST 3403 Emergence of Modern Europe3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: HIST 1013, HIST 1023The evolution of Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries,the French Revolution, Napoleon.HIST 3423 Britain3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: HIST 1013, HIST 1023British history with emphasis on political, constitutional,and imperial institutions.HIST 348V Field CourseVariable creditA field course consisting of travel, observation, andstudy of selected historic sites.HIST 349V Seminar in World HistoryVariable creditPrerequisites: HIST 1013, HIST 1023A selected period or topic with extensive readings,acquaintance with source material, and classdiscussion. Not to exceed 3 credit hours per semester.Can be repeated for up to 12 hours.HIST 3503 Middle East and North Africa3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: HIST 1013, HIST 1023From the Prophet Muhammad (6th century A.D.) to thepresent; emphasis on the development of Islamicculture from the 7th to the 13th centuries, the Ottomans,and the last 150 years.HIST 3513 Historiography and Historical Methods3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: HIST 1013, HIST 1023, HIST 2213, HIST2223A study of history as a discipline, how historians useprimary sources, and major schools of historicalinterpretation.HIST 3523 Modern Europe3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: HIST 1013, HIST 1023Major political, social, and economic developments inEurope since 1815.HIST 3543 American West3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: HIST 2213, HIST 2223The westward movement in American history, withemphasis upon the social, economic, and politicalinfluence of the frontier in American life.HIST 3553 Africa3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: HIST 1013, HIST 1023The entire continent from earliest times through thepresent; emphasis on the continuity of Africancivilization through the first independent period,colonialism, and the second independent period.HIST 3563 Russia3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: HIST 1013, HIST 1023Kievan and Appanage Russia, the rise of Moscow, theAge of St. Petersburg, the Soviet Age.HIST 3573 Colonial America3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: HIST 2213, HIST 2223European exploration and settlement in the NewWorld, the War of Independence, and the creation of theUnited States.HIST 3583 Latin America3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: HIST 1013, HIST 1023Evolution of Latin America from the PreColumbianepoch through the contemporary period with anemphasis on political, social, and economicdevelopments.HIST 3593 Arkansas History3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: HIST 2213 or HIST 2223Social, political, and economic evolution of Arkansas fromthe Spanish and French explorations to the present.HIST 4603 Modern America, 190019453 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: HIST 2213, HIST 2223The Progressive Movement, World War I, the RoaringTwenties, the Great Depression, the New Deal, andWorld War II.188Course Descriptions


HIST 4613 Recent America, 1945Present3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: HIST 2213, HIST 2223The Cold War, Korea and Vietnam, the civil rightsmovement, the dissenting sixties, and presidentialadministrationssince World War II.HIST 4623 East Asia3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: HIST 1013, HIST 1023Study of the civilizations of China and Japan withemphasis on the last two hundred years.HIST 4653 American Civil War and Reconstruction3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: HIST 2213, HIST 2223Military history, weapons, tactics, strategy, and keycampaigns; Reconstruction and its effects.HIST 466V Seminar in American HistoryVariable creditPrerequisites: HIST 2213, HIST 2223Selected period or topic with extensive readings,acquaintance with original source material and classdiscussions. Not to exceed 3 hours credit per semester.Can be repeated for up to 9 hours credit.HIST 4673 Mexico3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: HIST 1013, HIST 1023Political, economic, and social developments in thehistory of Mexico from early civilizations through themodern era.HIST 479V Independent Study in HistoryVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.HORT Courses(Horticulture)HORT 2443 Principles of Horticulture3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratoryNOTE: Extended field trips required in addition toregular lab hours.Principles of growth, fruiting habits, propagation,production, handling, and culture of horticulture plants.HORT 4663 Vegetable Crops3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratoryPrinciples underlying methods of vegetable cropproduction and handling related to yield and quality ofthe product.HORT 479V Independent Study in HorticultureVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.JOUR Courses(Journalism)JOUR 2203 Introduction to Journalism3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: ENGL 1023Principles of news gathering and writing with appliedexperiences in design, layout, and writing.JOUR 2211 Journalism Lab1 credit: 1 hour laboratoryCorequisite: JOUR 2203NOTE: This course may be repeated for a maximum ofsix credit hours.A performance lab allowing a student to work on anyexisting student publication approved by the instructor.JOUR 2223 Mass Communication3 credits: 3 hours lectureNOTE: May be used either for speech or journalismcredit, but not for both.Survey of historical, economic, and political influencesof mass communication on society and individuals.JOUR 3013 Newswriting3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: JOUR 2203Advanced writing and reporting techniques for thejournalist and/or public relations professionalincluding sports writing, editorial writing, newsfeatures, and international reporting. NOTE: Thiscourse may be used as an elective in the speechcommunication curriculum.JOUR 3043 Feature Writing3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: JOUR 2203Analysis of the feature form; readings in the genre;writing for publication including news analyses, opeds,profiles, and investigative reporting.JOUR 3023 Introduction to Public Relations3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: JOUR 2203Introduction to media campaigns, newsletterproduction, propaganda, public relations theory, andhistory. NOTE: This course may be used as an electivein the speech communication curriculum.JOUR 4243 Seminar in Journalism3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Nine hours of JOUR course work.Detailed study of one of the major areas of journalism,emphasizing assigned readings and individualresearch. Sample areas may include media management,the campaign, media ethics, etc.NOTE: May be repeated for a total of 6 hours credittoward major.Course Descriptions189


JOUR 4033 News Editing3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: JOUR 2203, JOUR 2211, JOUR 3013General copy editing skills including editing foraccuracy, fairness, grammar; general photo editing;designing and layout for publication; headline andcaption writing; and developing news judgement.JOUR 425V Journalism InternshipVariable credit (maximum 6 hours)Prerequisite: Advanced standing (minimum of twelvehours of JOUR course work) and permission of Deanand instructor.Students work in a profit or non-profit environmentwhich allows for application of theoretical knowledgeand the development of journalistic skills.JOUR 479V Independent Study in JournalismVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.MAED Courses( Mathematics Education )MAED 4663 Methods of Teaching Mathematics3 credits: 3 hours lectureCorequisite: MATH 3423Methods and strategies of mathematics instruction atthe secondary level.MATH Courses(Mathematics)Notes: 1. Students whose ACT mathematics scores fallbelow 19 will be assigned to a developmentalmathematics course.2. Students must receive a grade of “C” or higherto satisfy the prerequisite for a mathematics course.3. Students receiving a grade of “C” or higher inany mathematics course will not be allowed to enrollfor credit in any course which is a prerequisite.4. Students who wish to enroll more than threetimes in a specific mathematics course other thanMATH 0143, Introduction to Algebra, must take and/orrepeat the prerequisite for the course. Exceptions tothis must be approved by the Mathematics ReviewCommittee. (Note: See p.xx Repetition of Courses.)MATH 0143 Introduction to Algebra3 credits: 3 hours lectureA review of basic arithmetic operations and algebraicoperations. Topics covered include the arithmetic offractions and decimals, algebraic manipulations ofpolynomials, linear equations, and factoring. Thiscourse cannot be used to satisfy General Educationrequirements or for credit toward a Mathematics majoror minor.MATH 0183 Intermediate Algebra3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Math 0143 or satisfactory performance ona placement testThis course is designed to prepare students to take acollege level mathematics course. Topics covered willinclude factoring, exponents, solution of linear andquadratic equations, arithmetic of rational expressions,basic algebraic applications, and graphing. This coursecannot be used to satisfy General Educationrequirements or for credit toward a Mathematics majoror minor.MATH 1003 Survey of Mathematics3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MATH 0183 or satisfactory performanceon a placement testNOTE: This course cannot be used for credit toward aMathematics major or minor.Techniques of problem solving, topics from set theory,number theory, logic, consumer mathematics, andprobability and statistics.MATH 1033 Trigonometry3 credits: 3 hours lectureCorequisite: MATH 1043Definition of the trigonometric functions, solution ofright and oblique triangles, trigonometric equations,and identities.MATH 1043 College Algebra3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MATH 0183 or satisfactory performanceon a placement testFunctions, graphs, quadratic equations, systems ofequations, applications of algebra, and matrices.MATH 1073 Compact Calculus3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MATH 1175, or MATH 1043 and MATH1033NOTE: For those not planning to take MATH 2255. Thiscourse cannot be used for credit toward a Mathematicsmajor or minor.Limits, continuous functions, the derivative andintegral with applications.MATH 1175 Precalculus5 credits: 5 hours lecturePrerequisites: A score of 22 or higher on the Math ACTor MATH 0183 with a grade of “B” or higher.Provides the necessary background for studentsplanning to take Calculus I or Compact Calculus.Topics include: problem solving; polynomial, rational,exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions;parametric equations; and, as time permits, linearsystems. Preferred prerequisite for students planningto take calculus. Fall offering.190Course Descriptions


MATH 2243 Fundamental Geometric Concepts3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MATH 1003, MATH 1043NOTE: This course cannot be used to satisfy GeneralEducation requirements or for credit toward aMathematics major or minor.Topics in plane and solid geometry appropriate forelementary and middle school including measurement,construction, and the use of manipulatives andtechnology. Annual Spring offering.MATH 2255 Calculus I5 credits: 5 hours lecturePrerequisites: MATH 1175; or MATH 1043 and 1033Limits, derivatives, integrals, and applications of bothintegrals and limits.MATH 3233 History of Mathematics3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MATH 2255The history of mathematics as concerned with theorigins, philosophy, and development of themathematical sciences. The chronological developmentof mathematics from its use in primitive cultures to thepresent day. Spring offering in odd-numbered years.MATH 3403 Probability and Statistics3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MATH 2255Finite sample spaces, counting techniques, distributions,measures of variability, sampling theory, curvefitting, and regression analysis. Fall offering in oddnumberedyears.MATH 3413 Number Theory3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MATH 2255Basic properties of number system, congruences,divisibility, and prime numbers. Fall offering in evennumberedyears.MATH 3423 College Geometry3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MATH 2255Logic and Euclidean geometry. Required of allprospective secondary mathematics teachers. Falloffering in even-numbered years.MATH 3453 Abstract Algebra3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MATH 2255An introduction to the study of algebraic structuresincluding groups, rings, and fields. Spring offering ineven-numbered years.MATH 3463 Linear Algebra3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MATH 2255The algebra of finite dimensional vector spaces, lineartransformations, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Falloffering in odd-numbered years.MATH 3483 Mathematical Modeling3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: MATH 3495 and a programming courseA study of selected topics which demonstrate theinteraction of mathematics with real-world problems.MATH 3495 Calculus II5 credits: 5 hours lecturePrerequisite: MATH 2255Sequences and series, vector analysis, and partialderivatives.MATH 3513 Discrete Mathematics3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: MATH 2255; CS 2213 or 2253Algorithms, elements of graph theory, Boolean algebra,and combinatorics.MATH 3525 Differential Equations and Multi-Dimensional Calculus5 credits: 5 hours lecturePrerequisite: MATH 3495Multiple integrals, first-order differential equations,and systems of differential equations.MATH 3553 Number Systems3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: MATH 1003, MATH 1043NOTE: This course may not be used to satisfy GeneralEducation requirements or for credit toward aMathematics major or minor.Systems of numeration, development of the realnumber system, analysis & development of algorithms,and an introduction to probability & statistics.MATH 4613 Advanced Differential Equations3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MATH 3525A continuation of MATH 3525. Topics includenonlinear systems, numerical methods, and LaplaceTransforms.MATH 465V Mathematics Reading and ResearchVariable creditPrerequisites: Junior or senior standing and approval ofthe Dean of the School of Mathematical and NaturalSciences.MATH 4673 Numerical Methods3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: MATH 3495; CS 2213 or 2253Derivation and generation of numerical methods, errorestimates, convergence, and stability of numericaltechniques.MATH 4711, Mathematics Seminar1 credit: 1 hour lecturePrerequisite: Junior or senior mathematics major orminor.Students give oral and written presentations based onlaboratory and/or library research. This course may berepeated for a maximum of two credit hours.Course Descriptions191


MATH 479V Independent Study in MathematicsVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.MGMT Courses( Management )MGMT 3413 Office Management3 credits: 3 hours lectureSurvey of current office management concepts withemphasis on managing human resources, administrativeservices, and administrative systems.MGMT 3423 Quantitative Methods3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: CIS 2223, GB 3713Applies quantitative methods to managerial decisions.Topics include such as mathematical programming,queuing theory, simulation techniques, networkanalysis, and decision theory. Stresses the managerialperspective and the use of and interpretation ofcomputer solutions.MGMT 3453 Industrial Relations3 credits: 3 hours lectureAnalysis of problems of labor; solutions throughunionism, management, and government; labor laws.Offered: FallMGMT 3473 Principles of Management andOrganizational Behavior3 credits: 3 hours lectureExamines planning, organizing, motivating, andcontrolling as they apply to managing a businessorganization. Stresses leadership, problem-solvingtechniques, and the coordination, communication, andhuman relations necessary for successful management.Offered: Fall, Spring, SummerMGMT 3433 Entrepreneurship3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: ACCT 2223, MGMT 3473, MKT 3403.Introduction to small business operations, thecharacteristics of entrepreneurs, and the challenges andrewards of entrepreneurship. Students complete asimple business plan, or other group and individualprojects.Offered: SpringMGMT 4613 Management Information Systems3 credits: 3 hours lectureIdentifying the manager’s responsibilities for efficient,effective management of the organization’s informationsystems resources. Developing strategies for thesuccessful discharge of these responsibilities.Offered: Fall, SpringMGMT 4633 Human Resource Management3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: MGMT 3473, PSY 1013Provides students with an understanding of theprinciples, policies, and practices related toprocurement, development, maintenance, andutilization of human resources.Offered: SpringMGMT 4643 Production/Operations Management3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: MGMT 3473, G B 3713Principles and techniques of management inorganizing, planning, controlling the operations of thefirm (either production and/or service oriented). Thetopics will be: design decisions relating to capacityplanning, product design, layout of facilities, andselecting locations for facilities; operating decisionsrelating to quality assurance, scheduling, inventorymanagement, and project management. Class willperiodically meet in the computer lab. Students willuse computer software packages to solve problems.Offered: Fall, SpringMGMT 4653 Strategic Management3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: MKT 3403, FIN 3473, MGMT 3473Integration of economics, management, marketing,statistics, finance, personnel, accounting, and otherinterrelated subjects into an overall evaluation of thepolicies of business.Offered: Fall, SpringMGMT 4663 Advanced Organizational Behavior andTheory3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: MGMT 3473, PSY 1013Focuses on the dynamics of human behavior inbusiness organizations, with concentration on problemsof motivation and leadership. Emphasis is on thebehavior and performance of individuals and groupswithin organizations.Offered: FallMGMT 4673 Organizational Behavior and Theory in aGlobal Context3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: MGMT 3473, PSY 1013This course concentrates on the cultural and socialdifferences among major regions of the world and howthey affect management practice. Problems oforganization structure, motivation, leadership, HRM,and others are addressed. Extensive use of cases andin-class exercises; course project included.Offered: Summer192Course Descriptions


MGMT 4683 Strategic Management of theMultinational Enterprise3 credits: 3 hours lectureCorequisite: MGMT 4653This course applies strategic management theory andbest practice to the operation of a multinationalenterprise. Covers international strategies, jointventures, strategic alliances, among other topics.Extensive use of cases, all involving international firms.A computerized international strategic managementsimulation will be used in lieu of a course project. To betaken in last semester of program.MGMT 4693 New Venture Development3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: Senior Standing, Consent of InstructorCorequisite: MGMT 4653This course is concerned with the issues, concepts, andproblems of developing a new venture, includingfinancing, planning legal form of organization, andanalysis of competitors and economic conditions andother factors. Companies formed in this semester willbe operated by the same student teams in thesubsequent semester. Lectures, case analyses, and fieldexercises.Offered: FallMGMT 4703 Senior Entrepreneurship Practicum3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: MGMT 4653, MGMT 4693, SeniorStanding, Consent of InstructorIn this course, student teams will create and operate anew business. The course focuses on the skills requiredto operate a start-up enterprise and on operating andcompetitive issues and problems. Extensive fieldexercises, lecture, case analyses used. All teams willprepare and present a final report.Offered: SpringMGMT 479V Independent Study in ManagementVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.MKT Courses(Marketing)MKT 3403 Principles of Marketing3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: ECON 2213 or AGEC 2273Principles and practices of marketing with emphasis onthe composition and planning of a marketing strategy.Offered: Fall, Spring, SummerMKT 3443 Selling and Sales Administration3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MKT 3403Basic principles of salesmanship, background, andpreparation for selling, coupled with an emphasis onhiring, training, compensating, and motivating a salesforce. Offered: SpringMKT 3453 Marketing Communication3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MKT 3403Promotional efforts available to marketing management.Advertising’s role in marketing strategy;advertising as communication; media choice;coordination of total promotional effort; measurementof promotional effectiveness.Offered: SpringMKT 3463 Consumer Behavior3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MKT 3403Theoretical and applied concepts of the behavior ofconsumers as they engage in the process of evaluating,acquiring, and consuming goods and services.Offered: FallMKT 3483 Channels of Distribution3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MKT 3403To survey, organize, and integrate the theories andpractices relative to current problems of marketingchannel management and its use as a key strategicmarketing tool. Distribution is viewed as a functionalarea within the firm and its interface with channelintermediaries is analyzed. The course will examinethe impact of the Internet and Web-based e-commerceon channels of distribution.Offered: FallMKT 4473 Special Topics in Marketing3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MKT 3403A special topics course covering subjects of currentinterest in marketing. Topics might include E-marketing, International Marketing, ServicesMarketing. (Can be repeated for multiple credit withdifferent course content.)MKT 4623 Marketing Research3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: MKT 3403, GB 3713Modern marketing research techniques and theirapplication by management toward the determinationof a marketing strategy.Offered: FallMKT 4663 Marketing Management3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: 6 hours of MarketingMarketing from the managerial viewpoint; analysis ofthe functions of marketing planning, marketopportunity assessment, and evaluating and adjustingmarketing effort.Offered: SpringMKT 479V Independent Study in MarketingVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.Course Descriptions193


MLED Courses(Middle Level Education)MLED 2103 Programs and Practices for MiddleSchools3 credits: 3 hours lectureDesigned to introduce the history of middle school/junior high, the middle level concept, and currentpractices and trends of middle level schools to preserviceteachers. Offered in fall.MLED 2113 Physical Development of EarlyAdolescents3 credits: 3 hours lectureDesigned to provide the pre-service teacher withknowledge of the physical characteristics of the 11-14year-old by developing appropriate physical activitieswith a focus on health and wellness.MLED 3493 Middle Level Content-Based Methods3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Admission to the Teacher EducationProgramDesigned to train pre-service teachers in methods forteaching Language Arts, Social Studies, Science orMathematics in the middle level classroom.MLED 4513 Teaching and Learning in the MiddleGrades3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Admission to the Teacher EducationProgramDesigned to study advanced methods of instruction,review current research and case studies, and observeand practice components of the middle level concept.Offered in fall.MODL Courses(Modern Languages)MODL 3403 Conversational Language I - Study Abroad3 credits: 3 hours lectureThis course allows the student to utilize the targetlanguage in a native setting and through totalimmersion. The student is exposed to the languagewhile in class, with the host family, and during dailyactivities. This intensive oral practice is designed toimprove listening comprehension, oral proficiency, andvocabulary in a natural language environment.MODL 3413 Conversational Language II - Study Abroad3 credits: 3 hours lectureFor the student who has been abroad before, this courseis a continuation of conversational skills, again, all donein the target language. The student works to furtherdevelop listening comprehension, oral proficiency, andmore native vocabulary, like idiomatic and colloquialexpression. The student again advances his/herlanguage skills in a native environment and throughtotal immersion.MODL 3423 Syntax of the Language - Study Abroad3 credits: 3 hours lectureThis course allows the student the opportunity to studythe target language’s grammar and usage in a nativesetting through total immersion techniques. Each studentis placed into the appropriate classroom with regard tohis/her language ability, allowing further development ofgrammar and syntax skills in the target language. Thegrammar studies in class will complement theconversation skills obtained through the experience whileabroad.MODL 443V Seminar in Foreign Language Studies -Study AbroadVariable creditThis variable credit class allows students traveling abroadto earn credit for their experiences in a non-Englishspeakingcountry. Typically, the work done for this classwill involve either cultural studies or literary studies orpolitical studies or a combination of these. The studentwill do all work in the target language and produce andpresent a document on the topic being studied.MODL 4903 Seminar in Teaching Foreign Language3 credits: 3 hours lectureEvaluation and critique of micro classroom teaching,history of academic discipline, philosophy development,test design and evaluation, and materials for on-siteteaching.MUS Courses(Music)MUS 1012 Introduction to Theory2 credits: 2 hours lectureCorequisite: MUS 1072Study in the basic elements of music theory: pitch,notation, rhythm and counting, scales, tonality, key, modes,intervals, transposition, chords, chord inversions, Romannumeral analysis, popular music symbols, cadences,nonharmonic tones, melodic organization.MUS 1023 Theory I3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: MUS 1012 with a “C” or above and MUS1072 with a “C” or aboveCorequisite: MUS 1061Study in the theory of Species Counterpoint, four-partchoral writing, analysis of harmonic progressions, dominantsevenths, leading tone seventh, non-dominant seventh,modulation, secondary dominants and leading tones.MUS 1033 Theory II3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MUS 1023 with a “C” or aboveCorequisite: MUS 1091Study in the theory of chromatic harmony includingborrowed chords, Neapolitan sixth chords, augmentedsixth chords, ninth/eleventh/thirteenth chords, altereddominants and chromatic mediants. Composition infourvoice choral style. Instrumental and vocalarranging via computer-based notation systems.194Course Descriptions


MUS 1040 Recitals, Concerts, Productions0 credit: Attendance at recitals, concerts andproductionsNOTE: Recitals, Concert, Productions must be takeneach semester in residence for a total of eight semesters.Course will be graded pass/fail.All music majors are required to attend or participate indivisional recitals plus a minimum of six major recitals,concerts, and productions each semester in residence.May be repeated.MUS 1051 Piano Repertoire1 credit: 1 hour lectureSurvey of keyboard literature from the Renaissancethrough the twentieth century.MUS 1061 Ear Training and Sight Singing I1 credit: 2 hours lectureCorequisite: MUS 1023Sight Singing and dictation of melody, harmony, andrhythm.MUS 1072 Music Technology2 credits: 1 hour lecture, 1 hour labCorequisite: MUS 1012 or permission of instructorMusic notation and printing on the computer. Study inpage setup, click and MIDI entry, grouping, editingtechniques, lyric entry, MIDI channel and instrumentassigning, playback, Enigma Transportable Files.MUS 1081 Piano Class (non-music major)1 credit: 2 hours lectureBeginning piano for non-music majors.MUS 1091 Ear Training and Sight Singing II1 credit: 2 hours lecturePrerequisite: MUS 1061Corequisite: MUS 1033Sight Singing and dictation of melody, harmony, andrhythm.MUS 1113 Music Appreciation3 credits: 3 hours lectureStudy of the major composers and representativecompositions of the musical style periods.MUS 1121 University Chorus1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryNOTE: Mixed chorus which performs major choral/orchestral work each year. May be repeated.MUS 1142 Piano Class I2 credit: 2 hours laboratoryNOTE: Open to vocal and instrumental music majors whohave had no previous piano study. Students must pass thiscourse with a “C” or better to take Piano Class II.Fundamental skills of playing the piano.MUS 1253 Acting in Musical Theatre I3 hours credit: 3 hours lecture/labThis course is designed to instruct students in the art ofacting in musical theatre as both performer & observer;to acquaint students with the actor’s mode of thinking,creating, & working; and to introduce students to aprogram of exercise & practice for improving techniquebased primarily on the teachings of Constantin S.Stanislavski. Students will experience the creative actof performing a role, in both memorized & improvisationalscenes.MUS 1342 Piano Class II2 credits: 2 hours laboratoryPrerequisite: Students must pass MUS 1142 Piano ClassI with a “C” or better.NOTE: Open to vocal and instrumental music majors.Melody harmonization, transposition, scales, major/minor chord drills, sight reading and repertoire.MUS 2213 Theory III3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MUS 1033 with a “C” or aboveCorequisite: MUS 2231Examination and analysis of form and compositionaltechniques including Binary form, Ternary form, Twovoice18th century counterpoint, fugue, variationtechnique, sonata form, and rondo form. Advancedinstrumental and vocal arranging via computer-basednotation systems.MUS 2223 Theory IV3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MUS 2213 with a “C” or aboveCorequisite: MUS 2241An examination of Romantic, Post-Romantic,Impressionistic, and 20th century styles andcomposition.MUS 2231 Ear Training and Sight Singing III1 credit: 2 hours lecturePrerequisite: MUS 1091Corequisite: MUS 2213Advanced sight singing and dictation of melody,harmony, and rhythm.MUS 2241 Ear Training and Sight Singing IV1 credit: 2 hours lecturePrerequisite: MUS 2231Corequisite: MUS 2223Advanced sight singing and dictation of melody,harmony, and rhythm.MUS 2263 Acting in Musical Theatre II3 hours credit; 3 hours lecture/labPrerequisites: MUS 1253 Acting in Musical Theatre IActing in Musical Theatre II is a continuation of thetheories and practices developed in MUS 1253.Course Descriptions195


MUS 2292 Diction for Singers2 credits: 2 hours lecturePrerequisites: MUS 1033 and MUS 1091Introductory course for the singer dealing with thepronunciation of Italian, French, and German.MUS 3133 Basic Musicianship3 credits: 3 hours lectureProvides the basic components and fundamentals ofmusic to the student with a limited musicalbackground.MUS 3273 Acting in Musical Theatre III3 hours credit, 3 hours lecture/labPrerequisites: MUS 2263 Acting in Musical Theatre IIThis course is designed to help the student actor beginher/his career in theatre. The course will explorevarious audition techniques and will culminate withthe student having developed a marketable packagewith which to enter into graduate school or go directlyinto the world of commercial theatre. This course willalso include advanced scene study.MUS 3333 History of the American Broadway Musical3 credit hours; 3 hours lectureThis course is designed to give students a broadoverview of the historical development of the Americanmusical theatre, from its beginnings to the present time,and knowledge of the composers, lyricists, directors,choreographers, and producers who were important inits development.MUS 3413 Analysis and Music Literature3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MUS 1033A survey of music literature from the major historicalperiods including the analysis of harmonic structureand form of representative musical examples, and adiscussion of musical elements and vocabulary.MUS 3431 Instrumental Ensemble1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryKeyboard, string, or band instruments. Trios, quartets,etc. Study of standard literature. May be repeated.MUS 3441 Woodwind Class1 credit: 2 hours lectureA study of the instruments of the woodwind family.Development of basic techniques for a comprehensiveteaching knowledge.MUS 3481 Brass Class1 credit: 2 hours lectureA study of the instruments of the brass family.Development of basic techniques for a comprehensiveteaching knowledge.MUS 3491 Percussion Class1 credit: 2 hours lectureA study of the instruments of the percussion family.Development of basic techniques for a comprehensiveteaching knowledge.MUS 3501 String Class1 credit: 2 hours lectureA study of the instruments of the string family.Development of basic techniques for a comprehensiveteaching knowledge.MUS 3511 Chamber Choir1 credit: 3 hours laboratoryCorequisite: Concert ChoirSelect ensemble which performs works suitable for a12- to 20-voice mixed chorus.MUS 3563 History of Music I3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MUS 1033History of music, for music majors and minors, fromthe Ancient World to the Baroque.MUS 3573 History of Music II3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MUS 1033History of music for music majors and minors, fromearly 18th century to the present.MUS 3583 Elementary Music Methods3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MUS 1033NOTE: Open to music majors only.Theory, application, and contemporary materials andmethods in general music for K-6 in the public schools.Emphasizes the professional musician’s role as musicspecialist or music coordinator.MUS 3591 Jazz Ensemble1 credit: 3 hours laboratoryNOTE: Membership is by audition or interview. May berepeated.The study and performance of jazz forms fromDixieland to fusion through the utilization oftraditional big band instrumentation.MUS 428V Music Theatre WorkshopVariable CreditPrerequisite: Audition for performing roles.NOTE: May be taken for a maximum of 2 hours persemester. May be repeated.Course designed to give students experience in thetechniques of acting, dancing, singing, set design andconstruction, lighting, costuming, and makeup whileinvolved in a major theatre production.MUS 4613 Secondary Instrumental Music Methods3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MUS 1033Curriculum, rehearsal procedures, administration,public relations, marching band techniques, junior andsenior high school band methods.MUS 4632 Piano Pedagogy2 credits: 2 hours lecturePrerequisite: MUS 1033An examination of current methods, techniques, andliterature for private piano instruction.196Course Descriptions


MUS 4671 Marching Band1 credit: 5 hours laboratoryNOTE: Membership is by audition or interview. Onlyavailable during the fall semester. May be repeated.This instrumental ensemble provides opportunities fordevelopment through military and corps-style showdesign and precision movement. Performances includefootball games and parades.MUS 4691 Concert Choir1 credit: 3 hours laboratoryNOTE: Membership by audition. May be repeated.Mixed chorus which provides opportunities fordevelopment of vocal, technical, and expressive skillsthrough the study and performance of choral literatureof varying styles from all historical periods. TheConcert Choir tours in addition to the programspresented on campus and in the community.MUS 4712 Instrumental Conducting2 credits: 2 hours lecturePrerequisite: MUS 1033Specific conducting and rehearsal techniques forinstrumental organizations. The course instruction willinclude techniques of 18th-century performancepractice through 20th-century avant-garde style. Alsoincluded will be aspects of administration andsupervision of public school wind programs.MUS 4722 Choral Conducting2 credits: 2 hours lecturePrerequisite: MUS 1033Specialized training in the practical aspects of choralconducting. Course includes study of choral rehearsaltechniques, techniques of music research, choralliterature, and preparation of a conductor’s score.Lectures, listening assignments, and conductinginstruction make up the basic class format.MUS 4741 Concert Bands1 credit: 6 hours laboratoryNOTE: Membership is open to all students by auditionor interview. May be repeated.The university concert bands perform on-campusperformances and tour every other year. Theinstrumentation of the ensembles is variable and is setby the demands of the repertoire. Compositionsperformed range from full-band masterworks from the18th and 19th centuries, to the more progressive worksfrom the contemporary era.MUS 4751 Symphonic Band1 credit: 4 hours laboratoryPrerequisite: Membership by auditionNote: May be repeatedA select group of 40-45 instrumentalists that performcompositions from the repertoire of the modernsymphony band. This ensemble presents on and offcampus concerts.MUS 4772 Seminar in Music Technology2 credits: 1 hour lecture, 1 hour labPrerequisite: MUS 1072 or permission of instructorExamination of various programs and classroom usesfor computer-based sequencing and recording.Included are setup techniques, note entry, musicediting, quantization, MIDI channel and trackassignments, MIDI files, studio teaching applicationsand as an improvisation aid, computer-based recordingand editing techniques. May be repeated for amaximum of 6 credit hours.MUS 4783 Secondary Vocal Methods3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MUS 4722Methods for the development of junior and senior highschool vocal organizations.MUS 479V Independent Study in MusicVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.NURS Courses(Nursing)NURS 1034 LPN-RN Transition4 credits: 4 hours lecturePrerequisite: Arkansas LPN LicensureThis course is designed to introduce the LPN to RNpractice, focusing on socialization into the roles of theRN. Emphasis is placed on nursing ethics andprofessionalism, nursing process, formulating nursingcare plans, and nursing care of individuals in familieswith a focus on client adaptation within thephysiological and interdependence modes. Thephysiological needs of activity and rest and sensationare included as well.NURS 1015 Principles of Nursing Care I5 Credits: 3 hours lecture, 6 hours clinicalPrerequisite: NURS 1034, NURS2211, Arkansas LPNLicensureThis course will focus on the client’s personal selfaspect of the self-concept mode and psychosocialadaptation with an emphasis on application of thenursing process when providing nursing care to clientswith mental illness in the hospital and communitysetting. Offered in Summer II.NURS 124V Principles of Nursing Care II12 credits: 8 hours lecture, 12 hours clinicalPrerequisites: NURS 1034, NURS 1015; Arkansas LPNlicensureApplication of the nursing process to individuals andfamilies with a focus on client adaptation within thephysiological and self-concept modes. Emphasis isplaced on the physiological needs of endocrine(including reproduction), nutrition, fluid andelectrolytes, protection and the physical self of theselfconcept mode.Course Descriptions197


NURS 2003 Introduction to Nursing Concepts and Roles3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: Completion of lower-division generaleducation and nursing support courses or permissionof the Division ChairNOTE: This course is offered in Summer only.Foundations of modern nursing practice. Focuses onnursing history and trends, the nursing process, andnursing roles.NURS 2211 Basic Skills Check Off1 credit; 8 hours laboratoryNOTE: This course is offered in Summer only.Corequisite:: LPN’s: NURS 1034 LPN-RN Transition,and for RN’s: NURS 3073 Role Transition ( required ifRN graduated more than 24 months previously).Basic nursing skills are demonstrated by the studentand modified, if needed, to enhance safe practice. Theschool lab will be used.NURS 225V Principles of Nursing Care III12 credits: 8 hours lecture, 12 hours clinicalPrerequisite: NURS 1034, NURS 1015, NURS 22121,NURS 124V, and Arkansas LPN licensureApplication of the nursing process to individuals,families, and families in communities with a focus onclient adaptation within the physiological mode.Emphasis is placed on the physiological needs ofelimination, endocrine, oxygenation, and, neurologic.Concepts relevant to management of client care areincluded as well as preparation for the NationalCouncil Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses(NCLEX-RN).NURS 3065 Healthy Aging5 credits: 2 hours lecture, 9 hours practicumPrerequisites: NURS 3073, NURS 4473, Arkansas RNlicensureDesigned to explore the normal process ofaging and factors influencing the needs of older adults.Emphasis is placed on the role and function of theprofessional nurse in promoting healthy aging in olderclients and supporting families and communitiesthroughout the aging process.NURS 3073 Role Transition3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: Completion ofgeneral education requirements, nursing supportcourses, Arkansas RN licensure.Designed to increase awareness of professional nursingpractice including nursing history, theories, and trends.Focuses on professional socialization, health caredelivery systems, and critical thinking.NURS 3085 Ambulatory Care5 credits: 2 hours lecture, 9 hours practicumPrerequisites: NURS 4473, NURS 3073, Arkansas RNlicensureCorequisite: NURS 3333Designed to explore various ambulatory care settingsand the role and function of the professional nurse inpromoting, maintaining, and restoring health toindividuals and families throughout the life span.NURS 3103 Nursing Skills3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisite: NURS 2003, admission to upper-divisionnursingCorequisite: NURS 311VDevelopment of basic, intermediate, and advancednursing skills. Campus laboratories are used forstudent practice and demonstration of skills.NURS 311V Concepts in Nursing Care I11 credits: 8 hours lecture, 9 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: NURS 2003, admission to upper-divisionnursingCorequisite: NURS 3103Application of the nursing process to individuals infamilies and communities. The focusis client adaptation within physiological andinterdependence modes.NURS 332V Concepts in Nursing Care II11 credits: 7 hours lecture, 12 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: NURS 3103, NURS 311VCorequisite: NURS 3333Application of the nursing process to individuals andfamilies in communities. The focus is client adaptationwithin physiological and self-concept modes.NURS 3333 Health Assessment3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: NURS 3103, NURS 311VCorequisite: NURS 332VComprehensive health assessment of individuals.NURS 4057 Professional Nursing Leadership7 credits: 3 hours lecture, 12 hours practicumPrerequisites: NURS 3073, NURS 4473, Arkansas RNlicensureAnalyzes concepts and theories related to leadership ina rapidly changing health care environment. Emphasisis placed on research findings, professional roleresponsibilities, and critical thinking in exploringleadership skills.NURS 4097 Community Health7 credits: 3 hours lecture, 12 hours practicumPrerequisites: NURS 3073, NURS 4473, Arkansas RNlicensureFocuses on a multi-disciplinary approach to providecare for individuals, families, and communities. Anemphasis is placed on the epidemiological process andhealth promotion.NURS 4153 Community Health Nursing3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: NURS 332V, NURS 3333, NURS 4473Corequisite: NURS 444VTheoretical basis for community health nursing. Thenursing process is used to perform a communityassessment based on a conceptual model.198Course Descriptions


NURS 444V Concepts in Nursing Care III11 credits: 7 hours lecture, 12 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: NURS 332V, NURS 3333, NURS 4473Corequisite: NURS 4153Application of the nursing process to individuals,families, and communities. The focus is clientadaptation within physiological and role functionmodes.NURS 4473 Nursing Research3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: NURS 332VIntroduction to the research process and critique ofresearch literature. Discussion includes application offindings to nursing practice and identification ofclinical problems for study.NURS 4504 Leadership and Management inProfessional Nursing4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 45-hour practicumPrerequisites: NURS 444V, NURS 4153Corequisite: NURS 452VProvides an in-depth view of nursing leadership andmanagement in a changing health care environment.Emphasis is placed on development of managementskills for the delivery of quality client care within anorganization. Preparation for the NCLEX-RN isincluded as a requisite for successful coursecompletion. Preparation for the NCLEX-RN is includedas a requisite for successful course completion.NURS 452V Concepts in Nursing Care IV11 credits: 6 hours lecture, 15 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: NURS 444V, NURS 4153Corequisite: NURS 4504Application of the nursing process to individuals,families, and communities. The focus is clientadaptation within physiological and self-conceptmodes.NURS 479V Independent Study in NursingVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.P E Courses(Physical Education)PE 1001 Fishing1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryThis class will include modern casting techniques, linecontrol, hooking and controlling fish, the use of the rod,reel and line, the difference in performance of adifferent tackle, general equipment needs, knots, correcttapered leader construction, indicator fishing, riverfishing, lake fishing, reading water, and safety.P E 1011 Weight Training for Men and Women1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryStudents will develop skills in a variety of weightliftingexercises. Students are taught the types of physicalchanges the body can undergo during a weight trainingprogram and how minor changes in the structure of theprogram can emphasize one or another of thesechanges. Offered in fall.P E 1021 Recreational Activities1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryTable tennis, archery, volleyball, racquetball, and otheractivities. Offered in fall and spring.P E 1031 Golf and Tennis1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryA beginner course in tennis and golf skills, rules, andstrategy. Offered in fall.P E 1041 Square Dance1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryFundamentals of square dancing, terminology,techniques, and skills.P E 1051 Swimming1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryThis class teaches fundamentals of swimming skills,terminology, techniques and safety. Developmentalmethods will be used to demonstrate how swimming istaught for all age levels. Students will progress throughlevels as competency is shown. Offered in fall andspring.P E 1061 Special Skills and Sports1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryActivities, skills, and sports participation not found inthe regular curriculum. Dependent upon availability offacilities and instructor expertise; may be repeated forcredit if the activity, skill, or sport is different; onesection is offered per semester.P E 1071 Rhythms, Modern Dance1 credit: 2 hours laboratorySkills and techniques in modern and interpretive dance.P E 1081 CVR Fitness Class1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryFor those students who desire to strengthen their heart,blood vessels, and lungs as they lose weight. Offered infall and spring.P E 1091 Adaptive Swimming1 credit: 2 hours laboratory .Swimming adapted to individual limitations of certainstudents.P E 1103 History and Principles of Health andPhysical Education3 credits: 3 hours lectureElementary and secondary school history andprinciples of health and physical education. Offered infall and spring.Course Descriptions199


PE 1122 First Aid2 credits: 2 hours lectureStandard and Instructors American Red Cross course inemergency care of injuries. ARC Standard and Instructorscertificate awarded on successful completion.P E 1131 Fitness through Aerobic Dance1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryThe course will include a variety of contemporaryforms of exercise which might include aerobic dance,kickboxing, aquatonics, step aerobics, and yoga.Offered in spring.P E 1443 Team Sports3 credits: 3 hours laboratoryMethods of developing skills in team sports from thoseappropriate for a preschool developmental levelthrough secondary proficiency. It will include football,softball, basketball, speedball, soccer, team handball,volleyball, and lead-up games for these sports. Offeredin fall and spring.P E 1453 Individual Sports3 credits: 3 hours laboratoryMethods of developing skills in individual sports fromthose activities appropriate for a preschool developmentallevel through secondary proficiency. It willinclude golf, archery, tennis, badminton, bowling, track,table tennis, and racquetball and lead-up games forthese sports. Offered in fall.P E 2143 Principles and Theory of Coaching3 credits: 3 hours lectureTechnical coaching information concerning personnelrelationships, organization and contest management,traveling rules, coaching ethics, and evaluation ofpersonnel. Legal and administrative aspects of budget,records, scheduling and equipment. Offered in fall andspring.P E 2203 Health and Wellness Promotion3 credits: 3 hours lecture or on-linePersonal, community, and school health and wellnesspromotion. Offered in fall and spring.P E 2213 Gymnastics and Rhythmic Activities3 credits: 3 hours laboratoryProgressive skills, techniques and methods of teachingK-12 gymnastics and rhythmic activities for physicaleducation. Offered in fall and spring.P E 2263 Officiating3 credits: 3 hours lectureFootball and basketball rules. Offers opportunity forbecoming registered officials.PE 2272 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Certification2 credits: 2 hours lectureP E 2273 First Aid and CPR3 credits: 3 hours lectureOffered in fall and spring.P E 2281 Basic Movement and Pattern Development1 credit: 1 hour laboratoryBasic movement and pattern development (K-6). Forelementary education and physical education majors.P E 2313 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries3 credits: 3 hours laboratoryProvides the general knowledge and generalapplication of theory, principles, and skills used in theprevention, care, and rehabilitation of athletic injuriesrelated to participation in games, sports, and athletics.Offered in fall and spring.P E 3373 Coaching of Baseball/Softball3 credits: 3 hours lectureHistory and development of events, conduct ofcoaching, training methods, strategy, rules, and systemsof leading coaches. Offered in fall.P E 3383 Coaching of Volleyball3 credits: 3 hours lectureHistory and development of events, conduct ofcoaching, training methods, strategy, rules, and systemsof leading coaches.P E 3393 Coaching of Track3 credits: 3 hours lectureHistory and development of events, conduct ofcoaching, training methods, strategy, rules, and systemsof leading coaches. Offered in spring.P E 3413 Nutrition3 credits: 3 hours lecture or on-line.Nutritive needs of the normal individual with emphasison family nutrition and fitness. The periods ofpregnancy and lactation, infancy, childhood,adolescence, and adulthood are included. Offered infall and spring.P E 3423 Coaching of Basketball3 credits: 3 hours lectureHistory and development of events, conduct ofcoaching, training methods, strategy, rules, and systemsof leading coaches. Offered in spring.P E 3433 Organization and Administration of Healthand Physical Education3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: P E 1103For the preparation of teachers to organize andadminister programs in health and physical educationat the elementary and secondary school level. Offeredin fall.P E 3461 Exercise Physiology Laboratory1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryCorequisite: P E 3523The study of the circulatory, respiratory, nervous, andmuscular systems during and after physical exercise.Offered in spring.200Course Descriptions


P E 3473 Coaching of Football3 credits: 3 hours lectureHistory and development of events, conduct ofcoaching, training methods, strategy, rules, and systemsof leading coaches. Offered in fallP E 3493 Drivers Education I3 credits: 3 hours lectureThe highway transportation system, traffic problems,driving task perception, and implementation of thedriver education classroom program.P E 3503 Adaptive Physical Education3 credits: 3 hours lectureMethods, techniques, and special program designs forthe mildly handicapped child. Offered in spring.PE 3513 Elementary Movement and Education andLead-Up Games3 credits: 3 hours lectureHuman movement in terms of body actions, effort, space,and relationships attending to the developmental needs,interests, and potentialities of children. Emphasis onplanning and organizing experiences applying Laban’smovement framework to activities and lead-up games.P E 3523 Exercise Physiology3 credits: 3 hours laboratoryThe physiological basis of physical education andathletics. Lecture and physiology laboratory sessions.Offered in spring.P E 3553 Growth and Motor Development3 credits: 3 hours lectureGrowth and maturational factors influencing motor skilldevelopment and learning from infancy to adulthood.Planning, implementing, and evaluating of developmentalphysical education lessons for preschool and early school(K2) children. The course also includes concepts ofmovement and basic movement patterns. Offered in fall.P E 3571 Practicum in Athletic Training: Taping andWrapping1 credit: 1 hour laboratoryProvides the student with a supervised laboratoryexperience in taping and wrapping for male and femaleathletic teams in high schools and colleges.PE 3653 P-8 Physical Education Field Experience3 credits: 5 hours laboratoryA supervised P-8 field-based teaching experience thatincludes observations, small group teaching, and largegroup teaching in the public schools.P E 4401 Anatomical Kinesiology Laboratory1 credit: 1 hour laboratoryPrerequisites: BIOL 1403, BIOL 2233, BIOL 2291, BIOL2243, BIOL 2301and PE 3523Corequisite: P E 4643The scientific study of human movement includingstructural and functional analysis of osteology,myology, and neurology. Offered in fall.P E 4603 Physical Education Tests and Measurements3 credits: 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisite: Junior standingUse of achievement and skill tests in health andphysical education. Special attention to mass testingprocedures. Offered in fall.P E 4643 Anatomical Kinesiology3 credits: 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: BIOL 2233, BIOL 2291, P E 3523The scientific study of human movement; analysis ofmotor skills and programs of exercise; evaluation ofmovement performance. Offered in fall.P E 4663 Methods and Materials of Physical Education3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: Admission to teacher education forlicensure candidates.Methods and materials of teaching of physicaleducation from preschool through the secondary level.P E 4673 Drivers Education II3 credits: 3 hours lectureAdvanced course to prepare teachers of drivereducation in secondary schools. Experience provided ininstructing beginning drivers in both the classroom andlaboratory. Offered in fall.PE 4683 Health Psychology and P-12 Methods3 credits: 3 hours lectureThis course will cover the foundations of healthpsychology to include stress, pain, coping behavior ofchronic disease, and future challenges. The course willalso cover methods of teaching health P-12.P E 479V Independent Study in Physical EducationVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.PHIL Courses(Philosophy)PHIL 2223 Introduction to Philosophy3 credits: 3 hours lectureProblems of human existence and critical discussion ofsome solutions proposed by outstanding thinkers.PHIL 3433 Readings in Philosophy3 credits: 3 hours lectureReadings and critical discussion of a philosopher, abasic problem of philosophy, or a movement inphilosophy.PHIL 3523 Logic3 credits: 3 hours lectureDevelopment of thinking skills applicable to any field.Course Descriptions201


PHIL 3623 Ethics3 credits: 3 hours lectureA survey of ethical systems with an examination of howsuch systems can be applied to business, medical, legal,environmental, and personal issues.PHIL 4603 History of Philosophy3 credits: 3 hours lectureMajor philosophers and philosophical systems from thebeginnings of Western thought to the present.PHIL 4633 Special Topics in Philosophy3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Upper-level standing or approval ofinstructor.Exploration of issues involving philosophy and thehumanities. Topics might be a continuing theme, arecent controversy, or a social or scholarly movement.May be repeated for a total of nine hours credit withapproval of the Dean.PHIL 479V Independent Study in PhilosophyVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations of this catalog forprerequisites and description.PHSC Courses(Physical Science)PHSC 2203 Physical Science3 credits: 3 hours lectureCorequisite: ENGL 1013Basic concepts of physics, chemistry, and earth science.This course is designed for the General Educationprogram.PHSC 2251 Physical Science Laboratory1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryCorequisite: PHSC 2203Basic studies of chemistry, physics, and earth science,designed to illustrate and complement conceptsdiscussed in PHSC 2203.PHSC 3433 Science for Middle School Teachers3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: 8 hours of laboratory science coursesSelected topics in astronomy, earth science, andphysical science and their interrelationships. Discovery,demonstrations, and laboratory experiences.PHYS Courses(Physics)PHYS 1003 Elements of Physics3 credits: 3 hours lectureNOTE: A General Education course for the non-sciencemajor.A survey of the basic concepts of physics includingmechanics, light, energy, relativity, and atomicstructure.PHYS 1021 Elements of Physics Laboratory1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryCorequisite: PHYS 1003A laboratory course to supplement PHYS 1003.PHYS 2203 General Physics I3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MATH 1033 or 1175A study of mechanics, heat, sound, energy andmomentum relying heavily on the student’sunderstanding of algebra and trigonometry.PHYS 2213 General Physics II3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PHYS 2203A study of electricity, magnetism, optics and modernphysics relying heavily on the student’s understandingof the concepts developed in PHYS 2203.PHYS 2231 General and University Physics Laboratory I1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryCorequisite: PHYS 2203 or PHYS 2313A laboratory course which supplements General andUniversity Physics. Experiments are related to thosecourses.PHYS 2241 General and University Physics Laboratory II1 credit: 2 hours laboratoryCorequisite: PHYS 2213 or PHYS 2323A laboratory course which supplements General andUniversity Physics. Experiments are related to thosecourses.PHYS 2313 University Physics I3 credits: 3 hours lectureCorequisite: MATH 2255A study of mechanics, heat, sound, energy andmomentum relying heavily on the student’sunderstanding of basic math including algebra,trigonometry and calculus.PHYS 2323 University Physics II3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PHYS 2313A study of electricity, magnetism, optics and modernphysics relying heavily on the student’s understandingof basic math including algebra, trigonometry, andcalculus.PHYS 2354 Radiation Physics4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryNatural radioactivity and fundamental particles.Disintegration, fission, and fusion of nuclei. Theoryand use of radiation detection instruments.PHYS 3404 Modern Physics4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: MATH 3495; PHYS 2213 or 2323The phenomena and theories of atomic, nuclear, andsolid state physics. Relativity and the quantum theory.202Course Descriptions


PHYS 3444 Optics4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: PHYS 2241; PHYS 2213 or 2323Light, wave motion, dispersion, interference,diffraction, and spectra.PHYS 4603 Mechanics3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: MATH 3495; PHYS 2303 or 2313Applied physics and mathematics using the vectorapproach. Analysis of problems in statics, kinematics,and dynamics.PHYS 4681 Seminar in Physics Teaching1 credit: 1 hour lectureSeminar in classroom teaching for General Science,Physical Science, and Physics. Covers topic selection,laboratory and demonstration possibilities, instructionalmaterials, test design, and evaluation.PMUS Courses(Private Music Instruction)NOTE: Enrollment in all applied music courses is restrictedto music majors or minors or by permission of instructor.PMUS 2401 Applied Piano1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2412 Applied Piano2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2441 Applied Voice1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2452 Applied Voice2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2461 Applied Flute1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2472 Applied Flute2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2481 Applied Oboe1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2492 Applied Oboe2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2501 Applied Clarinet1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2512 Applied Clarinet2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2521 Applied Saxophone1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2532 Applied Saxophone2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2541 Applied Bassoon1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2552 Applied Bassoon2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2561 Applied Horn1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2572 Applied Horn2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.Course Descriptions203


PMUS 2581 Applied Trombone1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2592 Applied Trombone2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2601 Applied Euphonium1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2612 Applied Euphonium2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2621 Applied Tuba1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2632 Applied Tuba2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2641 Applied Percussion1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2652 Applied Percussion2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2941 Applied Trumpet1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2952 Applied Trumpet2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2961 Applied Guitar1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 2972 Applied Guitar2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to freshman and sophomore students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3661 Applied Piano1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3672 Applied Piano2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3701 Applied Voice1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3712 Applied Voice2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3721 Applied Flute1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3732 Applied Flute2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3741 Applied Oboe1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3752 Applied Oboe2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.204Course Descriptions


PMUS 3761 Applied Clarinet1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3772 Applied Clarinet2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3781 Applied Saxophone1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3792 Applied Saxophone2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3801 Applied Bassoon1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3812 Applied Bassoon2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3821 Applied Horn1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3832 Applied Horn2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3841 Applied Trombone1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3852 Applied Trombone2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3861 Applied Euphonium1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3872 Applied Euphonium2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3881 Applied Tuba1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3892 Applied Tuba2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3901 Applied Percussion1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3912 Applied Percussion2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3921 Applied Trumpet1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3932 Applied Trumpet2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3981 Applied Guitar1 credit: One-half hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.PMUS 3992 Applied Guitar2 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to junior and senior students.Study of the fundamental techniques and literatureappropriate to the level of development.Course Descriptions205


PMUS 4611 Instrumental Recital1 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to senior students.The final semester of performance study culminating ina public recital.PMUS 4621 Voice Recital1 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to senior students.The final semester of performance study culminating ina public recital.PMUS 4661 Piano Recital1 credits: 1 hour lesson per weekNOTE: Open to senior students.The final semester of performance study culminating ina public recital.PSCI Courses(Political Science)PSCI 2213 American National Government3 credits: 3 hours lectureConstitutional principles, political parties and publicopinion, civil rights, organization and functions of theexecutive, legislative, and judicial branches.PSCI 2223 State Government of Arkansas3 credits: 3 hours lectureAn analysis of state and local government with anemphasis on Arkansas.PSCI 2233 Comparative Politics3 credits: 3 hours lectureComparative analysis of structures, processes, andproblems of selected world powers.PSCI 2273 Contemporary Political Ideologies3 credits: 3 hours lectureA study of the political patterns of today=s world,explaining the instruments, functions, and theoriesintertwined in modern ideologies. Emphasis will beplaced on the predominant theories of democracy,communism and the aspects of an authoritarian regime.PSCI 3403 American Political Parties3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSCI 2213Development, organization, and changing role ofpolitical parties, including nominations, elections, andvoting behavior, and the impact of the mass media.PSCI 3413 Constitutional Criminal Procedure (sameas CJ 3243)3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSCI 2213Analysis of procedural limitations on law enforcementand in the prosecution of crimes with an emphasis oncases dealing with the fourth, fifth, sixth, and eighthamendments.PSCI 3423 Legislative Process3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSCI 2213Congress and the committee system, executivelegislative relations, Congress and the federalbureaucracy, and reform proposals.PSCI 3433 Public Administration3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSCI 2213Trends and organization of public administration;administrative powers and responsibilities; policymaking and intergovernmental relations; and theregulatory commissions.PSCI 3443 Middle East Politics3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSCI 2213Contemporary politics in the Middle East; emphasis onthe political cultures, institutions, ideologies, andconflicts in the modern Middle East.PSCI 3463 International Relations3 credits: 3 hours lecture Prerequisite: PSCI 2213Modern diplomacy, alliances and treaties, powerpolitics, and international organizations.PSCI 3483 Judicial Process (same as CJ 3483)3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSCI 2213Courts, law, and the legal system; law and politics;judicial philosophy and biography.PSCI 3563 Russian Politics3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSCI 2213Contemporary Russian politics; emphasis on politicalinstitutions, political culture, political decision making,and political change in Russia.PSCI 4603 American Executive3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSCI 2213Powers and duties of the American Presidency,including domestic, economic, and foreign policydimensions, growth of presidential power, andpresidential personality.PSCI 4613 Public Management (same as CJ 4383)3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSCI 2213Nature of bureaucratic organization and changingthemes in organizational theory; fiscal and personnelpolicy; public unions and collective bargaining;leadership, communication, and motivation.PSCI 462V Seminar in Political ScienceVariable creditPrerequisite: PSCI 2213Selected topics with extensive readings, and classdiscussions. May be repeated for a total of 12 hourscredit.206Course Descriptions


PSCI 4643 American Foreign Policy3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSCI 2213Decision making in foreign policy with emphasis oncase studies.PSCI 4653 Research Methods in the Social Sciences(same as CJ 4363)3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Junior or Senior standingAn overview of social science research includingmethodological, statistical, and computer relatedtechniques.PSCI 4663 American Constitutional Law3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSCI 2213Principles, practices, and basic features of constitutionallaw with emphasis on the role of the Supreme Court,federalism, national powers, and individual rights.PSCI 4673 Global Studies3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSCI 2213Nature and analysis of contemporary global issues.Emphasis on frameworks for analyzing globalproblems and in-depth acquaintance with selectedworld issues.PSCI 4683 Western Political Theory3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSCI 2213Major political thinkers and their ideas with emphasison more recent political theories.PSCI 4693 Developing Nations3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSCI 2213Governments and major problems facing nations in thelesser developed world.PSCI 478V InternshipVariable creditSupervised learning experience in a government orprivate agency. May be repeated for credit up to 6hours.PSCI 479V Independent Study in Political ScienceVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.PSY Courses(Psychology)PSY 1013 Introduction to Psychology3 credits: 3 hours lectureSurvey of the science of behavior.PSY 1023 Advanced General Psychology3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSY 1013In depth coverage of basic psychological concepts,providing the core of knowledge necessary forunderstanding the sub-disciplines of psychology.PSY 2203 Statistical Methods3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: PSY 1013, MATH 0183Introduction to the use and interpretation of statistics.PSY 2263 Mental Health3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSY 1013A survey of the techniques necessary for making apositive adjustment to our environment.PSY 2273 Experimental Methods in Psychology3 credits: 3 hours lectureIntroduction to the research methods used bypsychologists. Offered every fall.PSY 2282 Experimental Methods Laboratory2 credits: 4 hours laboratory.Prerequisites: PSY 2203, PSY 2273.Students will design, conduct and analyze psychologicalresearch. Offered every spring.PSY 3243 Social Psychology3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSY 1013Study of social behavior through group dynamics andmass communication.PSY 3253 Adolescence3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSY 1013Physical, mental, and emotional development ofchildren and adolescents including social adaptation,interests, attitudes, and ideals.PSY 3413 Psychology of Learning3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSY 1013Major empirical findings and theoretical positions inthe psychology of learning.PSY 3423 Industrial Psychology3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSY 1013Applications of psychology in industry, includingpersonnel selection, placement, and counseling,engineering and organizational psychology, laborrelations, the consumer, and survey research.PSY 3433 Child Development3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSY 1013Surveys major research findings and theoriesconcerning development from conception throughadolescence.Course Descriptions207


PSY 3443 Developmental Psychology3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSY 1013Comprehensive study of individual development fromconception to death.PSY 3453 Exceptional Children3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSY 3433Atypical children; survey of major findings related tothe causes and nature of deviations.PSY 3463 Principles of Guidance and Counseling3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSY 1013Interviewing skills, counseling techniques, and theoriesof interpersonal dynamics.PSY 3473 Human Sexuality3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSY 1013Physiological, psychological, and sociological aspects ofhuman sexual behavior, with emphasis on healthyadjustment.PSY 3483 Physiological Psychology3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSY 1013Introduction to the biological bases of behaviorincluding the role of neurology, sensory physiology,and endocrinology in the mediation of behavior.PSY 3493 Fundamentals of Measurement3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSY 1013Basic psychometric concepts, methods, and problems inthe use of aptitude, interest, personality, andpsychodiagnostic tests.PSY 4603 History and Systems in Psychology3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSY 1013Study of the theoretical issues important in the historyof psychology.PSY 4623 Psychology of Personality3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSY 1013A study of the dynamics and nature of the normalpersonality.PSY 4633 Gerontology3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSY 1013Deals with psychology of aging and methods ofworking with the aging.PSY 4643 Applied Human Service Skills3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: PSY 3463 or PSY 4623.Advanced training in the areas of counseling, legalissues, professional ethics, and intervention techniques.Students learn a systematic approach to client-centeredproblem solving.PSY 465V Practicum in PsychologyVariable creditPrerequisite: 12 hours in psychology and permission of staffSupervised field experience in special areas. Studentsmay not enroll for more than 6 hours per semester andnot more than a total of 9 hours.PSY 4673 Abnormal Psychology3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSY 1013Study of the dynamics and diverse patterns of deviantbehavior.PSY 4683 Seminar3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Junior standingOpportunity for in depth study of selected topics inpsychology. Special emphasis on contemporaryresearch.PSY 479V Independent Study in PsychologyVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.SCED Courses(Science Education)SCED 4663 Secondary Science Teaching Methods3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: 20 hours of laboratory science andadmission to teacher educationMethods and strategies of secondary science instructionin biology, chemistry, and physical science. Developmentof lesson plans and teaching of laboratoryactivities will be emphasized. Clinical experience infreshman-level science laboratories will constitute amajor part of the course.SCED 4671 Seminar in Classroom Teaching1 credit: 1 hour arranged conferencePrerequisites: 20 hours of chemistry.Preparation for prospective chemistry teachers with anemphasis on conducting laboratories.208Course Descriptions


SIS Courses(Spatial Information Systems)SIS 1001 Introduction to Spatial Information Systems(SIS)1 credit: 1 hour lectureOffered: FallIntroduction to computer systems, geographicinformation systems (GIS), global positioning systems(GPS), remote sensing, surveying, and the SpatialInformation Systems Program. Students will beintroduced to spatial technology terminology.SIS 2014 Boundary Surveying4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryOffered: SpringCorequisite: MATH 1043 or MATH 1175History of public land surveying systems, evolution ofthe rectangular system of land subdivision, descriptionand computation of land areas, past and currentmonumentation procedures, use of surveyinginstruments in the field determination of propertyboundaries.SIS 2023 Computer Assisted Cartography3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryOffered: FallPrerequisites: CIS 2223; MATH 1033 or 1175This course provides a technical introduction to spatialinformation design and thematic mapping. Lectureswill cover principles of scientific visualization, andgraphical design and mapping. In labs, students willdesign digital, static maps using computer aided design(CAD) software available on Windows workstations.By the end of this course, students will be capable ofproducing high quality cartographic displays ofcartographic data for geographic visualization.SIS 2114 Plane Surveying I4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryOffered: FallPrerequisite: SIS 2014Corequisite: SIS 2023Measuring horizontal and vertical distances and angles,collection and adjustment of traverse data, areacalculations, differential and trigonometric leveling,topographic surveys, and the creation of plats—manually and computer aided design (CAD) generated.SIS 3153 Survey Plats and Deeds3 credits: 3 hours lectureOffered: SpringPrerequisites: MATH 1073 or MATH 2255; SIS 2014 andSIS 2114Writing deeds and preparing plats. Terminology usedin metes and bounds, condominium, coordinate, andsubdivision descriptions. Legal definitions, Arkansasstate code for filing plats, required plat and deedinformation, deed and plat searches in county records.SIS 3264 Route and Construction Surveying4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryOffered: SpringPrerequisites: MATH 1073 or MATH 2254; SIS 2023 andSIS 2114Construction of horizontal, vertical and spiral curves,cuts and fills, volume determination, road layout andconstruction, building layout, design and layout of asubdivision; all computer assisted.SIS 378V Undergraduate ResearchVariable CreditOffered: On demandPrerequisites: Research proposal approved by the Deanand the InstructorNOTE: May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours ofcreditLiterature search and laboratory or field work onindividual research projects. Written and oral reportsrequired. Requirements are documented in theUndergraduate Education Handbook.SIS 3814 Introduction to GIS, GPS and RemoteSensing4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryOffered: Fall, SpringPrerequisites: CIS 2223; MATH 1043 or MATH 1175Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)using both raster and vector spatial data models, withhands on experience utilizing computers to aid problemsolving. Applications to be mastered include dataentry, verification, database construction, cartographicmodeling, and mapping of spatial data. Application ofGlobal Positioning Systems (GPS) in natural resourcemanagement is described and utilized.SIS 3843 Advanced Geographic Information Systems(GIS) I3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryOffered: SpringPrerequisites: GB 3713 and SIS 3814This course will cover advanced GIS and GPS softwareto further enhance the student’s spatial skills. The useof different map projections and coordinate systems inGIS is examined in depth along with their effects ondata positional accuracy. The first part of the coursewill cover network analysis for routing andtransportation issues, and spatial analysis as a decisionsupport tool. The second portion of the course willcover the use of advanced GIS/GPS software andhardware. The final portion will cover the use,management, creation and storage of spatial data andmetadata in GIS.Course Descriptions209


SIS 3913 Database Design and Management3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryOffered: FallPrerequisites: GB 3713; SIS 3814; and MATH 1073 orMATH 2255This course is designed to provide a comprehensiveunderstanding of database management systems. Particularemphasis will be placed on the management of spatial dataand associated applications. Logical vector and raster datastructure organization, analysis, and design will beinvestigated in depth. Relational database systems and objectoriented databases will both be studied. Database designtechniques using entity-relationship diagrams for datamodeling will be introduced as well as database access andmanipulation using structured query language (SQL).SIS 3923 Remote Sensing3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryOffered: FallPrerequisites: GB 3713 and SIS 3814Remote sensing concepts including both electronic andanalog sensor systems, land cover classification, rectifyingand registering images, and digital mapping will bediscussed.SIS 3933 Spatial Statistics3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryOffered: FallPrerequisites: GB 3713 and SIS 3843This is an analytical, problem-based course thatexplores the field of spatial statistics. Students will usestatistical tools to determine patterns of spatialvariability across a wide variety of data sets. Some ofthe topics that will be explored include universalkriging, cokriging, inverse distance weighting, trendsurface analyses, and three dimensional analysis forterrain and surface modeling.SIS 4183 Mapping Law and Professionalism3 credits: 3 hours lectureOffered: FallPrerequisites: PHIL 3523 or PHIL 3623; SIS senior standingInterpretation of legal statutes pertaining to surveying andmapping, cadastral and riparian rights, adversepossession, legal authority of spatial information systemspersonnel, preparation for court appearances, and conductin court. Discussion of the moral and ethical principlesguiding the professional conduct of spatial informationsystems personnel, professional societies’ codes of ethics,moral and legal obligation to clients and community.Arkansas surveyor’s code of ethics.SIS 4454 Plane Surveying II4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryOffered: FallPrerequisites: GB 3713, MATH 2255, SIS 2114, and SIS 3264Partitioning of land, introduction to vector and matrixalgebra, least squares adjustment of data, mapprojections and state plane coordinates, coordinatetransformations, triangulations, standards of accuracyand error propagation. Global positioning systems(GPS) surveying.SIS 4633 Digital Photogrammetry3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryOffered: SpringPrerequisites: GB 3713, SIS 3814, SIS 3923Image mosaicing, digital orthophoto creation, aerialtriangulation, single image and block triangulation,ground control, digital terrain modeling extraction,orthorectification, and mono and stereo terrain modelediting.SIS 4703 Cooperative Education in SpatialInformation Systems3 creditsOffered: On demandPractical training with a public agency, industrial, orprivate firm. Written report required for each workexperience. Requirements documented in CooperativeEducation Handbook.SIS 4713 Advanced Geographic Information Systems(GIS) II3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryOffered: FallPrerequisites: SIS 3843, CIS 3443This course will focus on the use of advanced GIS andobject oriented programming language software for thedevelopment of algorithms to customize GeographicInformation Systems to solve problems. Third partyand Component Object Model (COM) compliantprogramming languages will be used to build andcustomize GIS applications. Customized applicationswill be incorporated into existing GIS Internet packagesfor display and presentation on the Internet.SIS 475V Advanced TopicsVariable creditOffered: On demandPrerequisites: Junior standing, consent of instructor,and approval of School DeanLectures and discussions in selected Spatial InformationSystem topics.SIS 479V Independent Study in Spatial InformationSystems (SIS)Variable creditOffered: On demandConsult the Independent Study Courses section in theAcademic Regulations chapter of this catalog forprerequisites and description.SIS 4886 SIS Practicum6 credits: 1 hour lecture, 15 hours laboratoryOffered: SpringPrerequisites: SIS 3913, SIS 3843, SIS 4183, SIS 4633,Senior standingIntegrated problem solving to apply geographicinformation systems (GIS), remote sensing, globalpositioning systems (GPS), and surveying to solve realworld problems. Students will work with a federal,state, private, or nonprofit agency using spatialtechnologies in their area of specialization to solve areal world problem for that agency.210Course Descriptions


SOC Courses(Sociology)SOC 2213 Introduction to Sociology3 credits: 3 hours lectureIntroduction to sociological concepts, group interaction,and social institutions.SOC 2223 Social Problems3 credits: 3 hours lectureOverview of contemporary social problems in the U.S.,such as crime, poverty, substance abuse and addiction,racial, ethnic and gender inequality, health care access,and the impact of environmental disruptions on socialsystems.SOC 3413 The Family3 credits: 3 hours lectureNature, development, and function of the family as asocial institution; special factors affecting maritalrelations and family stability.SOC 3433 Social Welfare Work3 credits: 3 hours lectureSocial work, its history, functions, methods, and statusin modern society.SOC 3443 Rural Sociology3 credits: 3 hours lectureThe transformation of rural life and institutions incontemporary society. Social problems related to ruralliving.SOC 3453 Race and Ethnic Relations3 credits: 3 hours lectureSocial processes in a pluralistic society with emphasison the cultural contributions of different racial andethnic groups.SOC 4603 Sociological Theory3 credits: 3 hours lectureCritical examination of modern sociological thought,origins of sociological theories, and applicability oftheories in social life.SOC 4613 Criminology (same as CJ 4373)3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: SOC 2213Theories of the nature and causes of crime, andanalyses of various kinds of crimes.SOC 4643 Population Problems3 credits: 3 hours lecturePopulation growth, distribution, composition, andmigration in relation to political, social, economic, andecological implications.SOC 4663 Seminar in Sociology3 credits: 3 hours lectureSelected topics with extensive readings and classdiscussions. May be repeated for up to 9 hours credit.SOC 479V Independent Study in SociologyVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.SOSC Courses(Social Science)SOSC 4653 Teaching Secondary Social Studies.3 credit:3 hour lecturePrerequisites: Junior or senior standing and admissionto teacher education.Methods of teaching social studies at the secondarylevel. Includes teaching applications in social sciencedisciplines; design of lesson plans, instructionalmaterials, and tests; performance, evaluation andcritique of microclassroom teaching.SPAN Courses(Spanish)SPAN 1003 Elementary Spanish I3 credits: 3 hours lectureAn introduction to the essentials of the Spanishlanguage. It is designed to develop the four basiclanguage skills: listening, speaking, reading, andwriting. It emphasizes standard pronunciation,functional syntactical structures, vocabulary, andidiomatic expressions, as well as an awareness ofHispanic cultures.SPAN 1013 Elementary Spanish II3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: SPAN 1003A continuation of the essentials of the Spanish languagein Spanish 1003. It is structured to develop a solidfoundation of the four basic language skills with majoremphasis on the oral and written communicative skillsand an understanding of Hispanic cultures.SPAN 2203 Intermediate Spanish I3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: SPAN 1013Review of the linguistic essentials and expansion ofsyntax, vocabulary, idiomatic expressions, and conceptsof Hispanic cultures studied during the first year. It isdesigned to continue emphasizing oral and writtencommunicative skills.SPAN 2213 Intermediate Spanish II3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: SPAN 2203An extension of SPAN 2203 including a systematicreview of grammatical topics. It introduces selectedreadings in Spanish to develop reading comprehensionfor analysis and commentary. It is designed to developthe student’s ability to function linguistically within theHispanic world.Course Descriptions211


SPAN 3503 Conversational Spanish I3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: SPAN 2213Intensive oral practice. It is designed to developlistening comprehension, oral proficiency, andvocabulary through analyses, discussions, and oral andwritten commentaries on selected readings in Spanish,films, and audio recordings.SPAN 3513 Conversational Spanish II3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: SPAN 3503Continued emphasis on oral and written proficiency inSpanish. Students develop an appreciation of Spanishliterature through readings and discussions ofmagazine articles, short stories, essays, and poetry.SPAN 3603 Advanced Modern Spanish Grammar andComposition3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: SPAN 2213Designed to cover problematic areas of Spanish syntaxand usage and to perfect the student’s linguistic skillsthrough oral practice and writing of standard Spanishprose. Course highly recommended to students whowish to continue their studies in Spanish, seek teachingcertification in Spanish or bilingual education, or desireto use it as their graduate language tool.SPAN 3613 Cultures and Civilizations of Spain andSpanish America3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: SPAN 2213Designed to give a panoramic view of Spanish andSpanish American cultures and civilizations. Itemphasizes salient aspects of historical and currentsocial and political perceptions; cultural traditions andcontributions; their geographical influence on the restof the world; their art, letters, and music; and their rolein the modern world. The course is interdisciplinary.SPAN 3623 Survey of Major Hispanic Literatures3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: SPAN 2213Designed to offer students the opportunity to examinevarious forms and themes of major Spanish Americanliterary works. Readings include selections in Spanishfrom the twelfth century to the present. The course isconducted in Spanish.SPAN 4633 Seminar in Spanish Studies3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: SPAN 2213A detailed study of a special topic area in Spanish. Itmay be repeated when the topic varies for a total of sixsemester credit hours with the approval of the unitchairperson.SPAN 479V Independent Study in SpanishVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.SPCH Courses(Speech)SPCH 1013 Voice and Diction3 credits: 3 hours lectureArticulation and pronunciation including anintroduction to phonetics.SPCH 1023 Public Speaking3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrinciples of audience analysis, collection of materials,and outlining. Emphasis on careful preparation ofspeech and delivery. May not be taken for credit bystudents who have taken SPCH 1043.SPCH 1043 Honors Speech Communication3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Minimum ACT composite score of 24 orDean’s permission.Performance course emphasizing research andpersuasion on a more sophisticated level than that inSPCH 1023. NOTE: Fulfills General Educationrequirement for speech. May not be taken for credit bystudents who have taken SPCH 1023.SPCH 2203 Interpersonal Communication3 credits: 3 hours lecturePromotes conceptual understanding of relevant theoryand research with a combination of theory, skillspractice, and competency evaluation.SPCH 2223 Mass Communication3 credits: 3 hours lectureNOTE: May be used either for speech or journalismcredit, but not for both.Survey of historical, economic, and political influencesof mass communication on society and individuals.SPCH 2243 Technical Theatre Arts3 credits: 3 hours lectureTheory and practice of technical theatre (set, stageproperties, costumes, light, and make-up). Laboratoryhours in addition to regular class meetings assigned byinstructor.SPCH 2273 Argumentation and Debate3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: SPCH 1023Principles of argumentation and place of debate indemocratic government, analysis of propositions,proper use of evidence and reasoning, case construction,and persuasive speech.212Course Descriptions


SPCH 2283 Business and Professional Speech3 credits: 3 hours lectureOral communication needs of professional persons.Practice in the construction and delivery of varioustypes of speeches and participation in groupconferences, discussions, and interviews.SPCH 340V Intercollegiate Debate/ForensicsVariable creditPrerequisite: SPCH 2273One or two hours credit given to students participating inactivities designed to enhance and test skills in competitivespeaking and debate. Includes study and activities relatedto the directing of speech tournaments, festivals, andexhibitions. Students concurrently enrolled in SPCH 2273may enroll for only 1 hour credit.SPCH 3413 Intercultural Communication3 credits: 3 hours lecturePractical and theoretical approach to communicationacross cultures. Perceptions, language use, nonverbalstyle, thinking modes, and values will be explored.Emphasis will be placed on communicating withindividuals and groups from cultures around the worldas well as diverse cultures within the United States.SPCH 3453 Persuasion3 credits: 3 hours lectureThe theory and practice of persuasion in rhetorical andbehavioral contexts as a means of motivating humanconduct.SPCH 3483 Communication in Small Groups3 credits: 3 hours lecturePractical and theoretical study of communicationduring decision making, conflict management, andinterpersonal interaction in task-oriented work groups.SPCH 3513 Introduction to Oral Interpretation3 credits: 3 hours lectureStudy and techniques of interpretative reading.SPCH 3523 Acting3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: SPCH 2243, or consent of instructor.A detailed study of character analysis, creation, andstage movement.SPCH 3533 Communication in Organizations3 credits: 3 hours lectureStudy and practice of using effective communicationskills to improve management within the organization.SPCH 395V Communication PracticumVariable creditPrerequisite: Completed 12 hours in Speech orpermission of Dean.Note: May be repeated for a total of 6 hours credit withapproval of the Dean. Introduction to researchmethods in communication in the context of assistingwith faculty research.Course Descriptions213


SPCH 4623 Seminar in Speech3 credits: 3 hours lectureNOTE: May be repeated for a total of 12 hours creditwith Dean’s permission.Detailed study of one of the major areas of speech,emphasizing assigned readings and individualresearch.SPCH 4643 Directing3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: SPCH 2243A detailed study of basic interpretation, casting,rehearsal procedures, and director-actor relationships inan analysis and creation of character.SPCH 4653 Theories of Human Communication3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Senior standingOrigin and development of basic concepts incommunication theory. Survey and analysis ofcommunication theories and models used inquantitative and qualitative research.SPCH 4663 Performance Studies3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: SPCH 3513Cutting, arranging, and delivery of all literary formsand development of original character studies. Specialemphasis on program building.SPCH 468V Communication InternshipVariable creditPrerequisite: Advanced standing and permission ofDean and instructor.Practical experience in organizational, interpersonal,and public communication. Students work in abusiness setting which allows for application oftheoretical knowledge and the development ofcommunication skills.SPCH 479V Independent Study in SpeechVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations sections of this catalog forprerequisites and description.SPCH 4903 Seminar in Teaching Speech3 credits: 3 hours lectureEvaluation and critique of micro classroom teaching,history of academic discipline, philosophicaldevelopment, test design and evaluation, and materialsfor on-site teaching.SWK Courses(Social Work)SWK 1013 Introduction to Social Work3 credits: 3 hours lectureAn introduction to the profession of social work,methods and fields of social work practice, socialwelfare, and the on the empowering approach to thegeneralist social work method.SWK 2133 Human Behavior in the Social Environment I3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: PSY 1013, SOC 2213, SWK 1013, orpermission of instructorFirst HBSE course presents human developmenttheories in the context of biological, social, cultural,psychological, and physical environments that helpshape behavior. The focus is on conception to youngadulthood.SWK 2233 Human Behavior in the Social Environment II3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: SWK 2133 or permission of instructorSecond HBSE course presents human developmenttheories in the context of biological, social, cultural,psychological, and physical environments that helpshape behavior. The focus is on middle adulthood todeath.SWK 3113 Generalist Social Work Practice I3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: SWK 1013, SWK 2233First practice course covers the theory and skills of thegeneralist method of social work. The focus is onindividuals, small groups, and families using theempowering processes from forming partnerships toanalyzing resource capabilities. Restricted to SocialWork majors.SWK 3143 Social Welfare Policy I3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: SWK 1013 or permission of instructorFirst course on social policy covers the historical rootsof social policy, the history of the United States ofAmerica=s social welfare policy, and introduces policyanalysis frameworks.SWK 3213 Generalist Social Work Practice II3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: SWK 3113Second practice course covers the theory and skills ofthe generalist method of social work. Its focus is onindividuals, small groups, and families, using theempowering processes from framing solutions tointegrating gains. Restricted to SWK majors.SWK 3223 Social Welfare Policy II3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 2 hours field experience perweekPrerequisite: SWK 3143 or permission of instructorSecond course on social policy covers current socialwelfare policies, policy analysis, and programevaluation. A total of 30 hours of field experience forthe semester is required.SWK 3243 Methods of Social Work Research3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSY 2203 or permission of instructorAn introduction to the methods used in conductingquantitative and qualitative research. Social workvalues and ethics and issues of diversity are givenspecial attention.214Course Descriptions


SWK 3513 Child Abuse and Neglect3 credits: 3 hours lecturePresents major topics in the area of child abuse andneglect, such as warning signs, use of appropriateservices, and prevention.SWK 3523 Working with Children at Risk3 credits: 3 hours lectureEmphasis of course is on working with at-risk childrenin home and school environments, and the partnershiproles of parents, teachers, and social workers. A total of12 hours of field experience for the semester is required.SWK 3543 Learning Through Community Service3 credits: 1 hour lecture, 8 hours field experience perweekPrerequisites: SWK 1013, or both SOC 2213 and PSY1013, or permission of instructorStudents have an opportunity to develop knowledge ofand basic skills in social service work throughexperience in agencies or other community settings. Aminimum of 110 hours of field experience for thesemester is required.SWK 3653 Special Topics in Social Work3 credits: 3 hours lectureThis course is an examination of various topics ofinterest to social work and other human service majors.Topics include diversity advocacy, aging, communityorganization, poverty, and social justice. This course isavailable on a rotating basis or as interest indicates.Students can repeat this course for up to 6 hours ofcredit.SWK 3663 Family Centered Services3 credits: 3 hours lectureThis course covers the concepts of family centeredpractice, family preservation, and related child welfareissues, with an emphasis on intervention strategies andservices.SWK 3813 Children and the Law3 credits: 3 hours lectureThis course covers the legal principles related tochildren. It includes indepth coverage of the ArkansasJuvenile Code, Child Maltreatment Act, and otherapplicable statutes.SWK 3913 Crisis Intervention3 credits: 3 hours lectureThis course examines the basic theory and skills ofcrisis intervention, including concepts, constructs, andtechniques.SWK 4313 Generalist Social Work Practice III3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: SWK 3213Third practice course covers the theory and skills of thegeneralist method of social work. Focus is on mid- andmacro-level systems, employing the processes ofempowerment practice learned in the first two practicecourses. Restricted to SWK majors.SWK 4419 Generalist Social Work Field Practicum9 credits: 30 hours field experience per weekPrerequisite: SWK 4313Co-requisites: SWK 4421, SWK 4633Social work majors have an opportunity to apply socialwork knowledge, values, and skills in a social worksetting under appropriate supervision. A minimum of420 hours of field experience for the semester isrequired. Restricted to SWK majors.SWK 4421 Generalist Social Work Field PracticumSeminar1 credit: 1 hour lecturePrerequisite: SWK 4313Co-requisites: SWK 4419, SWK 4633A seminar course designed to help students processtheir field practicum experiences and integrateknowledge, values, and skills into generalist socialwork practice. Restricted to SWK majors.SWK 4633 Generalist Social Work in RuralEnvironments3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: SWK 4313Co-requisites: SWK 4419, SWK 4421Emphasis is on the special considerations of generalistsocial work practice in rural and small townenvironments. Specific Issues that concern ruralpopulations and the generalist social worker arecovered. Restricted to SWK majors.SWK 479V Independent Study in Social WorkVariable creditConsult the Independent Study Courses section in theAcademic Regulations chapter of this catalog forprerequisites and description.U ST Courses(University Studies)U ST 1013 Contemporary Issues3 credits: 3 hours lectureNOTE: General elective credit only. May not be countedtoward major, minor, or general education requirements.May not be repeated for credit.Survey of contemporary issues emphasizinginternational awareness and understanding.U ST 221V Field CourseVariable creditNOTE: Does not count toward major, minor, or generaleducation. No more than 9 hours of field courses inUniversity Studies can be counted toward graduation.A field experience in the subject indicated designed toenrich the student’s background.Course Descriptions215


U ST 341V Field CourseVariable creditNOTE: Does not count toward general education. Maycount toward major or minor requirements asdetermined by department. No more than 9 hours offield courses in University Studies can be countedtoward graduation.A field experience in the subject indicated designed toenrich the student’s background.WL F Courses(Wildlife)WL F 2112 Introduction to Wildlife Conservation2 credits: 2 hours lectureOffered: FallAn introduction to the major aspects of wildlife biology,ecology and management. The programs of variouswildlife conservation and management agencies andorganizations are discussed in detail.WL F 2121 Wildlife Laboratory1 credit: 3 hours laboratoryOffered: FallAn overview of wildlife ecology and management.Field trips to observe and discuss the programs ofvarious wildlife conservation and managementagencies and organizations.WL F 3314 Ichthyology/Herpetology4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryOffered: Spring, odd yearsPrerequisites: BIOL 1153, BIOL 1161NOTE: Same as BIOL 3314Taxonomy and natural history of fishes, amphibians,and reptiles, emphasizing the local fauna.WL F 3324 Ornithology/Mammalogy4 credits: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryOffered: Spring, even yearsPrerequisites: BIOL 1153, BIOL 1161NOTE: Same as BIOL 3324Taxonomy and natural history of birds and mammals,emphasizing the local fauna.WL F 3333 Contemporary Forest Resource Issues3 credits: 3 weeks during Summer CampOffered: Summer IPrerequisite: Junior standingNOTE: Same as FOR 3333Introduction to major resource issues, emphasizingfield presentations of timber and non-timber forestresource management themes in both conifer andhardwood ecosystems. One and two week field tripsare required.WL F 3343 Human Dimensions in Natural Resources3 credits: 3 hours of lectureOffered: FallPrerequisites: PSY 1013 or SOC 2213 and JuniorStandingNOTE: Two weekend field trips required.NOTE: Same as FOR 3123Foundations of human dimensions as it relates tonatural resources and natural resource management.Includes the history, current trends, and future ofhuman dimensions as a discipline. Stresses themanagement, leadership, and problem solving skillsnecessary to manage the human relations/naturalresource interface.WL F 3413 Mammalogy3 credits: 3 hours of lectureOffered: Fall, odd yearsPrerequisites: BIOL 1153, BIOL 1161Taxonomy, morphology, physiology, behavior, ecology,and conservation of mammals; emphasizing mammalsthat occur in the central and southeastern United States.WL F 3451 Mammalogy Lab1 credit: 3 hours of laboratoryOffered: Fall, odd yearsPrerequisites: BIOL 1153, BIOL 1161Corequisites: BIOL/WL F 3413 (Mammalogy Lecture)Taxonomy and natural history of mammals,emphasizing Arkansas fauna.WL F 358V Natural HistoryVariable creditOffered: On demandPrerequisite: 3 hours biology or 3 hours earth scienceNOTE: May be taken for a maximum of three hourscredit. Same as BIOL 358V, ESCI 358V, and FOR 358V.A field course in geology and biology of naturalecosystems, consisting of travel, study, and/or researchin unique natural areas of North America.WL F 378V Undergraduate ResearchVariable CreditOffered: On demandPrerequisites: Research proposal approved by the Deanand the InstructorNOTE: May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours ofcreditLiterature search and laboratory or field work onindividual research projects. Written and oral reportsrequired. Requirements are documented in theUndergraduate Education HandbookWL F 3831 Wildlife Techniques I1 credit: 3 hours laboratoryOffered: SpringPrerequisite: Junior StandingThis course gives students hands-on experience withsome of the more common research and samplingtechniques used for investigating wildlife populations.216Course Descriptions


WL F 3841 Wildlife Techniques II1 credit: 3 hours laboratoryOffered: FallPrerequisite: Junior StandingThis course covers common wildlife habitat researchand sampling techniques, and provides students withhands-on field experience.WL F 4003 Natural Resource Policy3 credits: 3 hours lectureOffered: FallPrerequisite: Senior standingNOTE: Same as FOR 4003History and present status of natural resource-relatedpolicy in the U.S. Evolution of public and professionalattitudes toward natural resources, major laws affectingmanagement of public and private lands, policymakingprocesses, and professional ethics. Study ofmajor policy issues affecting renewable naturalresources and procedures for responding to those issuesin management decision-making. Topics includeindividual and group involvement in natural resourceplanning, environmental issues, and regulation offorestry practices.WL F 4612 Wildlife Habitat Management2 credits: 2 hours lectureOffered: FallPrerequisite: Junior standingManipulation of habitat for optimum wildlifepopulations. Emphasis on influence of silviculturalpractices on wildlife habitat, and measurement andevaluation of habitat quality.WL F 4691 Seminar1 credit: 1 hour lectureOffered: SpringPrerequisite: Senior StandingNote: Same as FOR 4691Emphasizes the planning, organizational, and audio/visual computer skills necessary for deliveringprofessional presentations. Oral presentations tostudents, staff and faculty.WL F 4702 Wildlife Ecology and Management2 credits: 2 hours lectureOffered: SpringPrerequisite: Junior standingHistorical development, ecological principles,population dynamics, and habitat management as theyrelate to the manipulation of wildlife populations.WL F 4753 Cooperative Education in WildlifeManagement3 creditsOffered: On demandPractical training with a public agency or industrialfirm. Written report required for each work experience.Requirements documented in Cooperative EducationHandbook.WL F 479V Independent Study in WildlifeManagementVariable creditOffered: On demandConsult the Independent Study Courses subheading inthe Academic Regulations section of this catalog forprerequisites and description.WL F 480V Advanced TopicsVariable creditOffered: On demandPrerequisites: Junior standing, consent of instructor,and approval of School DeanLectures and discussions in selected wildlife topics.WL F 4823 Integrated Resource Planning andManagement3 hours: 9 hours laboratoryOffered: SpringPrerequisites: SIS 3814, WL F 3343, WL F 3831, WL F3841, WL F 4003, WL F 4612, WL F 4702NOTE: Same as FOR 4823Integrated problem solving to apply biological,ecological, quantitative, economic, social, political, andadministrative principles in solving natural resourcemanagement problems.Course Descriptions217


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GRADUATEprogramsGraduate Degrees OfferedThe University of Arkansas-Monticello offers four master’sdegree programs:Master of Science (M.S.) Forest ResourcesMaster of Education (M.Ed.) DegreeMaster of Education (M.Ed.) Degree in Educational LeadershipMaster of Arts (M.A.T.) Degree in TeachingAdmission to the UniversityAll students must be admitted to the University before they may enroll in graduateclasses. A completed application for graduate school must be submitted to the Office ofAdmissions. Students who have earned a baccalaureate degree from an accreditedinstitution and who have achieved a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.50 orbetter may be unconditionally admitted to the University and enroll in graduate-levelcourses.Graduate school applicants are required to submit an official transcript verifying theirbaccalaureate degree. Students who do not submit an official transcript may be admittedprovisionally. Provisional students may not enroll for a second semester without the requireddocuments. Graduate students living in UAM’s residence halls must also submit proof ofimmunization as required by state law. In addition, applicants may be required tosubmit scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) general test. To pursue a graduatedegree, applicants must also be admitted to the appropriate school. Specific master’s degreeprograms may require a certain GRE score before students may be admitted to that program.Students should refer to the specific master’s degree program for its requirements.International applicants must submit scores from the Test of English as a ForeignLanguage (TOEFL) and must submit supporting documents required to receive an I-20. Aminimum score of 550 (paper-based) or 213 (computer-based) on the TOEFL is required foradmission.Applicants who do not meet the minimum grade point average of 2.50 may petition tothe Graduate Council for probationary admission. Probationary admission will allow astudent to enroll in up to 12 hours of course work. To continue enrollment in graduateclasses, students admitted on probationary admission must complete 12 hours with a gradepoint average of 3.00 or better.A graduate student who has not been enrolled for a period of two calendar years willbe classified as inactive. To resume graduate study, the student must reapply for admissionto the University through the Office of Admissions.Acceptance of Transfer CreditNormally, no more than six transfer credits will be accepted from another institutionfor inclusion into a student’s UAM academic record. Additionally, no courses with gradesbelow a “B” will be accepted for transfer credit.Graduate Programs219


As many as 9 credits, not to include specifically required courses in areas ofspecification, may be accepted from the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff.Acceptance of transfer credit toward the student’s degree plan must be approved bythe degree program committee and/or advisor, and the dean of the school.Course Loads and Course WorkNormally, the maximum course load must not exceed 12 graduate hours during thespring or fall semesters and six hours for each summer term. Students who hold agraduate assistantship must enroll for a minimum of six hours during the fall and springsemesters. To be considered full-time status, during the academic year, graduate studentsmust enroll in six hours during the fall and spring semester. Students, especially graduateassistants, should refer to their specific degree programs for additional enrollmentrequirements.Normally, courses older than six years will not apply to a graduate program of study.Courses older than six years must be appealed to the Graduate Council.Independent StudyA graduate student’s intellectual growth can be enriched when he/she is engaged inindependent study.Independent study courses may require extensive independent study, research, formalwritten reports, and regular conferences with the instructor. A detailed description of theindependent study and its requirements must be submitted for approval to the instructor,dean/chair, and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs/Graduate Dean. Students maycomplete only one independent study course each semester. Independent study should notduplicate existing courses in the academic catalog.Only students who have been admitted to a degree program will be eligible forindependent study. Normally, a maximum of nine hours of independent study may applyto a degree program.Professional Development CoursesCourses offered specifically for the purpose of professional development are designatedwith a PD course prefix. These courses focus on the exact skill development neededby the professional that is relevant for a specific need and purpose. PD courses are nottransferable into a master’s degree graduate program of study at the University ofArkansas-Monticello.Grades and Academic StatusGraduate students may earn grades of A, B, C, D, or F. These grades indicate thefollowing:A Excellent graduate workB Good graduate workC Marginal graduate workD Poor graduate workF Failing graduate workA student whose grade record includes three graduate courses with grades of “C” orlower may not maintain graduate status unless the Graduate Council, upon petition from agraduate faculty member, has authorized a plan of study for the student. Normally,courses in which “D” or “F” grades are earned must be repeated.Undergraduate Students Enrolling in Graduate CoursesQualified undergraduate students may be permitted to enroll in graduate courses foreither undergraduate or graduate credit within the following guidelines. Only undergraduatestudents within 30 hours of graduation may petition to enroll in graduate coursesby contacting the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs/Graduate Dean. A minimum220Graduate Programs


cumulative grade point average of 3.00, approval by the course instructor, faculty advisor,and consent of the dean or chair of the offering unit must be presented as part of thepetition. Normally, undergraduate students will not receive graduate credits when takinga graduate class. When circumstances warrant, upon petition from the student, theGraduate Council may authorize awarding graduate credit. However, students enrolling ingraduate courses for graduate credit (not undergraduate credit) may not apply such creditsto undergraduate degree requirements.Academic Conduct CodeAcademic dishonesty involves any act that undermines the professional standardsand integrity of the academic programs at the University of Arkansas-Monticello. Academicdishonesty includes, but is not limited to: A) Cheating, B) Plagiarism; and, C) Misuseof University Documents.Academic dishonesty is considered unsatisfactory progress and may result in an “F”grade(s), withdrawal from a course(s), dismissal from the UAM Graduate School and/orfrom the graduate degree program. The level of penalty is determined by the facultymember, advisor, school dean, and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs/Graduate Dean.DismissalAny graduate student whose course work is unsatisfactory or violates good studentconduct or campus employment rules may be dismissed from graduate courses orgraduate programs.Policy and Regulation ChangesThe University further reserves the right to change any other regulations affecting thestudent body. Changes shall become effective whenever the proper authorities sodetermine, and shall apply not only to prospective students, but also to those currentlyenrolled in the University.Graduation Under a Particular CatalogStudents have a maximum of six years to graduate under the catalog in effect at thetime of their original enrollment.Students have the following two options: 1) abiding by the requirements of the UAMcatalog in effect at the time of their original enrollment, or 2) abiding by a more currentactive UAM catalog, as long as they were enrolled at UAM during the period that thecatalog was in effect. Changes in academic programs or actions taken by authoritiesexternal to the University (e.g., accrediting agencies or state agencies) may make itnecessary for a student to move to a more recent catalog.The present catalog is in force from Summer II 2003 through Summer I 2005.Appeals of Academic PolicyAppeal rights are open to all students in graduate programs. Appeals should beinitiated through the graduate student’s advisor and pursued with the school dean, ViceChancellor for Academic Affairs/Graduate Dean, and the Graduate Council.Graduate Programs221


GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN THE SCHOOL OFEDUCATIONGraduate FacultyProfessors Dillard, Jones, O’Connor, and Terrell; Associate Professors King, Lang, andRichards (Dean); Assistant Professors Hector and C. Smith.Mission StatementThe University of Arkansas-Monticello (UAM) School of Education is committed tothe development of high quality teacher leaders who are caring, competent professionalsdedicated to meeting the needs of a changing, diverse society. The UAM School ofEducation faculty and teacher education students serve their communities through activeparticipation in academic studies and field experiences that develop high-level competenciesin content knowledge, pedagogy, professionalism, and equity. The UAM School ofEducation, in close partnership and collaboration with partnering schools and the arts andsciences, is dedicated to providing the highest level of teacher training and excellence insoutheast Arkansas.Graduate Program GoalsThe graduate programs in the School of Education are developed around standardsthat govern accomplished teaching, including the National Board for Professional TeachingStandards. Additionally, standards from discipline-specific learned societies are referencedin course materials and activities.Graduate students in the advanced programs in the School of Education are expected to:• Develop an in-depth understanding of advanced principles and theories of teachingand learning;• Acquire an attitude of inquiry and curiosity for learning that permeates instruction;• Conduct action-based research that demonstrates that students are learning andachieving;• Collaborate with other professional educators and leaders to address issues andconcerns in education;• Demonstrate the ability to become educational leaders who have the potential tomake a difference in their individual educational settings.Degrees OfferedThe School of Education offers three advanced degrees: Master of Education (M.Ed.)degree with prescribed concentration areas; Master of Education (M.Ed.) in EducationalLeadership; and a Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) degree.Master of Education (M.Ed.) with Concentration AreasThe Master of Education degree is a 36-hour program that includes prescribedconcentration areas. This program is designed for teacher practitioners who hold a currentteaching license and offers value-added opportunities for additional endorsements orlicensure. Because the M.Ed. is an advanced program, all candidates will engage inscholarly activities that provide depth and breadth to current knowledge.Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Educational LeadershipThe Master of Education degree in Educational Leadership is a 36-hour program thatprepares candidates for an elementary or secondary principalship. The curriculum is basedon the standards of the Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC) and theInterstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC).222Graduate Programs


Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.)The Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) is a 30-36 hour accelerated program designedto prepare students for teacher licensure who have undergraduate degrees in English,mathematics, science, social studies, business, speech, art, music, and physical education.On-the-job teaching opportunities are incorporated into the program.Important Steps in the Graduate ProgramStep 1: Apply to the University of Arkansas-Monticello.Step 2: Apply to the School of Education Graduate Program.Step 3: Complete all appropriate admission requirements.Step 4: Obtain a major advisor.Step 5: With major advisor, prepare a Program of Study.Step 6: Apply for Degree Candidacy.Step 7: Select Comprehensive Review Committee. (M.Ed. and M.A.T. programs)Step 8: Successfully pass Comprehensive Examinations. (M.Ed. and M.A.T. programs)Step 9: Successfully pass PRAXIS II Principles of Learning and Teaching. (M.A.T. only)Step 10: GraduationAdmission Requirements and ClassificationsThe first step in the admission’s process for the School of Education graduate programis to be admitted with graduate status to the University of Arkansas-Monticello. Afterbeing admitted to the University of Arkansas-Monticello, students are then eligible toapply for admission to the School of Education graduate program. Applications forgraduate programs are available in the Dean’s Office.Admission to the Master of Education (M.Ed.) ProgramsStudents seeking admission to the School of Education’s Master of Education degreeand the Master of Education degree in Educational Leadership must fulfill the followingrequirements:• Have a 3.0 GPA (on a 4.00 scale) or greater in the last 60 hours of undergraduatecoursework from an accredited college or university;• Provide evidence of passing state-mandated licensure examinations in the appropriateteaching fields;• Submit three letters of recommendation from individuals who are familiar with thestudent’s academic achievement, teaching proficiency, and/or community and serviceinvolvement. No more than one recommendation may come from School of Educationfaculty;• Successfully complete an interview session with a committee comprised of the Deanof the School of Education, an appropriate member of the Teacher Education Committee,and the Coordinator for Graduate Programs for the School of Education.• Three years successful teaching experience (M.Ed. in Educational Leadership only).Admission Requirements for the Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) ProgramAn M.A.T. Admissions Committee comprised of the Dean of the School of Education,the Coordinator for Graduate Programs in the School of Education, and the content areafaculty representative will review applications. Admission requirements for the M.A.T.program include:• Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree from a regionally accredited collegeor university and verified with official transcripts from each college/university attended;• A cumulative grade point average of 3.00 in the last 60 hours;• Successful criminal background check;• Official GRE score of 1000 or higher with the following minimum scores: Verbal,370; Quantitative, 370; and Analytic/Writing 4.5;• Passing scores on the appropriate PRAXIS II Specialty area examination for whichlicensure is sought;Graduate Programs223


• Oral interview; and• Transcript review that determines: 1) adequate background in, or 2) an academicmajor or minor in, the area for which the candidate is seeking licensure.Arkansas State Licensure Examinations for M.A.T. CandidatesTo complete the M.A.T. program and become eligible for graduation with an M.A.T.degree, all teacher candidates must successfully pass both the Specialty Area test and thePrinciples of Learning and Teaching (PLT) examination as required by Arkansas Departmentof Education for licensure.Major AdvisorAfter the student is successfully admitted to the appropriate graduate program in theSchool of Education, a major advisor is assigned by the Dean of the School of Education.This assignment of the advisor will be based on the student’s area of study and interests.The advisor will provide assistance in the completion of forms dealing with a Program ofStudy, Degree Candidacy, and Comprehensive Examination Review Committee. The majoradvisor and the student work closely to ensure appropriate progress through the program.Program of StudyAll students must complete a program of study with the assistance of the majoradvisor. The program of study is intended to provide guidance and direction for degreecompletion. Programs of study must be signed by the student and approved by the majoradvisor, the Coordinator for Graduate Programs, and the Dean of the School of Education.Following approval, the Program of Study is forwarded to the Registrar’s Office.Admission to Degree CandidacyMaster of Education with Concentration AreasThe application for admission to degree candidacy is the student’s notification of theintent to earn a Master of Education degree (M.Ed.) at the University of Arkansas-Monticello. The application for admission to degree candidacy must be submitted to theDean’s office after completing 18 hours but before 27 hours of work in the approvedProgram of Study. The student must have completed all prior application procedures andmaintained a minimum 3.00 grade point average for all graduate work. The Dean of theSchool of Education and Coordinator for Graduate Programs will validate the student’sadmission to degree candidacy.Master of Education in Educational LeadershipStudents in the Master of Education in Educational Leadership must apply for degreecandidacy after the completion of 18 hours but before 27 hours of work in the approvedProgram of Study. The student must have completed all prior application procedures andmaintained a minimum 3.00 grade point average for all graduate work. The Dean of theSchool of Education and Coordinator for Graduate Programs will validate the student’sadmission to Degree Candidacy.Master of Arts in TeachingTo be eligible for degree candidacy in the M.A.T. program, students must successfullypass the PRAXIS II Specialty area examination and the PRAXIS II Principles of Learningand Teaching examination. Additionally, students must have completed at least 24 hours inthe approved Program of Study to apply for degree candidacy.Comprehensive Review CommitteeFollowing application for degree candidacy, students in the M.Ed. and M.A.T.programs will select, along with the Dean of the School of Education, four members of theComprehensive Review Committee. Members of the Comprehensive Review Committeewill assist in reviewing and scoring the comprehensive examinations.224Graduate Programs


Comprehensive ExaminationStudents in the M.Ed. and M.A.T. programs must satisfactorily complete a writtencomprehensive examination in the advanced professional core and in the appropriateconcentration areas. The comprehensive examination is scored for content and composition.All comprehensive questions are aligned with predetermined performance indicatorsdeveloped by the School of Education graduate faculty. The examination will consist ofessay questions and will be graded on content and composition. Students who failcomprehensive examinations will be informed in writing of deficiencies and notified of thetime when a second comprehensive examination will be administered. Failing studentsmay be required to complete additional courses and must petition for more than oneretake. Additionally, students have one year from the first failure to retake the sections ofthe comprehensive examination which were not passed.GraduationTo graduate from Master’s programs in the School of Education, students mustcomplete ALL requirements, including passing the appropriate exit examinations.Policies and ProceduresAppealsAppeal rights are open to all students who are denied admission or continuation ingraduate programs. Appeals must be initiated with the advisor and may be pursued withthe Dean of the School of Education and the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs.Course LoadsNormally, the maximum course load must not exceed 12 graduate hours, during thefall and spring semesters. Normally, the maximum load for each summer term is six hours.Acceptance of Transfer CreditAcceptance of transfer credit for the M.Ed. degree and the M.A.T. is based on thenature, quality and recency of the credit. Special consideration will be given to transferstudents from other public institutions of the state, especially those in the University ofArkansas system.Time FramesStudents enrolled in the Master of Education program can expect to complete theprogram in a three-four year time period. Most students in the M.A.T. program can expectto complete the program within an 18-month time frame.All course work included in the program of study must be recent. Courses older thansix years must be appealed to the Graduate Council. Normally, courses older than six yearswill not apply to a graduate program of study.Independent StudyIndependent study and research courses will require extensive independent study andresearch, formal written reports and regular conferences with the instructor. A detaileddescription of the proposal and its requirements will be submitted for approval to theinstructor, the Coordinator for Graduate Programs, the Dean, and the Vice Chancellor forAcademic Affairs. Students may complete only one independent study/research projectper semester. Independent study/research proposals should not duplicate existing coursesin the academic catalog.ExpulsionAny education graduate student whose course work is unsatisfactory or who violatesstudent conduct or employment rules may be withdrawn from the School of EducationGraduate Program at any time upon the recommendation and agreement of the advisor, theCoordinator for Graduate Programs, and the Dean of the School of Education.Graduate Programs225


Certificate ProgramsCurrently licensed teachers may enroll in a certificate program. Certificates aretwelve-eighteen hour programs of study that are designed to meet additional licensurerequirements needed for teaching endorsements. Certificates are offered in early childhoodeducation, special education, educational technology, reading, middle level education, andphysical education. The 12-18 hour course of study for the certificate programs is the sameas the course of study offered in the M.Ed. concentration areas.Master of Education (M.Ed.) with Concentration AreasAdvanced Professional Core Courses ............................................................................... 12 hoursPsychological Foundations of Teaching and Learning ................................................................ 3Instructional Technology ................................................................................................................. 3Educational Research Methodology ............................................................................................... 3History and Philosophy of Education orIssues and Trends in Education ....................................................................................................... 3Concentration Areas (Select Two Areas) .......................................................................... 24 hoursEducational TechnologyEducational Technology and Cognitive Learning ........................................................................ 3Social and Legal Issues in Educational Technology ..................................................................... 3Instructional Courseware Development ........................................................................................ 3Information Management and the Teaching Process ................................................................... 3Teacher LeadershipPublic Education Law ....................................................................................................................... 3Supervision of Instruction ................................................................................................................ 3Teacher Leaders: Preparing for National Board Certification .................................................... 3Strategic and Instructional Leadership orPublic School Organization and Administration .......................................................................... 3Early Childhood EducationCreative Arts ....................................................................................................................................... 3Trends, Problems, and Issues of Early Childhood Education ..................................................... 3Child Development ........................................................................................................................... 3Historical and Theoretical Approaches to Early Childhood Education .................................... 3ReadingSurvey of Reading Programs and Practices ................................................................................... 3Literacy Across the Curriculum: An Interdisciplinary Approach .............................................. 3Developmental and Corrective Reading ........................................................................................ 3Practicum in Reading Instruction ................................................................................................... 3Middle LevelHistory, Philosophy and Future of Middle Level Education ...................................................... 3Teaching the Young Adolescent ....................................................................................................... 3Middle Level Curriculum ................................................................................................................. 3Middle Level Seminar ....................................................................................................................... 3Special Education (select 12 hours)Application of Assessment Data for Exceptional Learners ......................................................... 3Behavior Management .................................................................................................................. 3Problems and Issues in Individualized Educational Planning ................................................... 3Language Development of Exceptional Learners ......................................................................... 3Contemporary Issues in Special Education ................................................................................... 3Methods and Materials for the P-8 Level ....................................................................................... 3Methods and Materials for the Secondary Level ......................................................................... 3226Graduate Programs


Physical EducationResearch Methods in Physical Education ...................................................................................... 3Problems and Trends in Physical Education ................................................................................. 3Adapted Individually Prescribed Program Practicum ................................................................ 3Psychology of Sports in Physical Education ................................................................................. 3Content Areas (select 12 hours in one of the following areas)EnglishMathematicsScienceSocial StudiesMaster of Education in Educational LeadershipAdvanced Professional Core Courses ............................................................................... 12 hoursPsychological Foundations of Teaching and Learning ................................................................ 3Instructional Technology .................................................................................................................. 3Educational Research Methodology ............................................................................................... 3History and Philosophy of Education orIssues and Trends in Education ....................................................................................................... 3Educational Leadership Core Courses .............................................................................. 24 hoursPublic Education Law .................................................................................................................. 3Public School Organization and Administration .......................................................................... 3Supervision of Instruction ................................................................................................................ 3Strategic and Instructional Leadership ..........................................................................................3Elementary/Secondary School Administration ............................................................................ 3Curriculum Development ................................................................................................................ 3Practicum in Educational Administration (Elem/Sec) ................................................................ 6Master of Arts in TeachingPedagogy CoursesSummer Hours*Content Specific Methods .............................................................................................................. 3EDFD 5063 Psychological Foundations ................................................................................ 3FallEDUC 5033 Teaching Diverse Learners ................................................................................. 3EDFD 5043 Instructional Technology .................................................................................... 3EDUC 5803 Internship I ........................................................................................................... 3SpringEDUC 5043 Assessment Techniques ...................................................................................... 3EDUC 5023 Critical Literacy .................................................................................................... 3EDUC 5813 Internship II .......................................................................................................... 3Advanced Education CoursesSummerEDFD 5003 History and Philosophy ................................................................................... 3**EDFD 5413 Educational Tech/Cog Learning .................................................................... 3**Content Courses (as required) .................................................................................................... 0-6M.A.T. teacher candidates may be required to take content coursework in the area oflicensure as determined by the advisor, the Coordinator for Graduate Programs in theSchool of Education, the content area faculty representative, and the Dean of the School ofEducation.*Offered in the major area**May be substituted with graduate-level content coursework in the area of licensure.TOTAL: ............................................................................................................................. 30-36 hoursGraduate Programs227


MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE (M.S.) INFOREST RESOURCESGraduate FacultyProfessors Kluender (Dean), Sundell, Thompson, and Zeide; Research ProfessorPatterson; Associate Professors Liechty, Pelkki,Tappe and Weih; Assistant ProfessorsDoruska, Ficklin, Heitzman, Kissell, Mehmood, Stephens-Williams, and White.MissionThe mission of the School of Forest Resources is to educate professional naturalresource managers, to enlarge the body of knowledge in renewable forest resources and todisseminate new ideas and technology. Successful accomplishment of this mission willpromote and enhance management, conservation and appreciation of public and privateforests, thereby providing for continuous production and optimum attainment of a varietyof forest resources for the people of Arkansas, the southern U.S. and the Nation. Theseresource benefits include the production of wood and fiber, wildlife, and clean water; aswell as provision for recreation, aesthetic and other important values.Educational Goals and Objectives of the Graduate ProgramThe School of Forest Resources is committed to providing postbaccalaureate studentswith the opportunity to enhance their educational goals through a program of study,teaching, and research in an environment that promotes freedom of expression, intellectualinquiry, and professional integrity. The goal of the School of Forest Resources is to enhancestudents’ understanding of forest resources and their management, and to prepare studentsfor lifelong learning and pursuit of career goals through advanced study. A student whograduates with a M.S. Degree in Forest Resources should:(1) Have an advanced understanding of biological principles relating to forestresources and ecosystems.(2) Have an advanced understanding of natural resource issues and topics pertinent toan individual’s program of study and career goals, and be able to apply this knowledge inthe decision making process.(3) Be able to apply the scientific method in designing, implementing, analyzing,interpreting and integrating studies related to forest resource management problems andissues.(4) Be able to communicate effectively using written and oral communication skills intechnical and non-technical settings.(5) Have good decision-making and critical thinking skills.Admission Requirements and ClassificationTo be admitted for pursuing the degree of M.S. in Forest Resources, a student mustfirst be admitted with graduate status to the University of ArkansasMonticello. Additionally,the student must submit an application to the School of Forest Resources alongwith three completed reference forms. Specific additional requirements are listed below.It is recommended that applicants have a baccalaureate degree in forestry, the wildlifesciences, or another natural resource management discipline. However, prospectivestudents from other fields are also encouraged to apply. All applicants will have transcriptsanalyzed by School of Forest Resources faculty to assess the need for cognate work.Applicants whose record shows an insufficient background in natural resources will berequired to enroll in undergraduate cognate course work (and the prerequisites to thosecourses) that will not count for credit toward a degree. This course work will be scheduledin consultation with the student’s advisory committee.Applications for admission to the M.S. in Forest Resources degree program mustnormally be received by August 1 for the fall semester and January 1 for the spring228Graduate Programs


semester. In order to be considered for a Graduate Assistantship, admission applicationsmust normally be received by June 1 for the fall semester and November 1 for the springsemester.Regular AdmissionTo obtain regular admission, applicants must have a grade point average (GPA) of 2.70or better (on a 4.00 scale) on all course work, or a GPA of 3.00 or better on the last 60 hoursof course work, taken prior to receipt of a baccalaureate degree from an accreditedinstitution of higher education. Applicants must have completed the Graduate RecordExamination’s general test and been accepted for graduate study by the School of ForestResources Dean and a School of Forest Resources faculty member willing to serve as thatstudent’s Major Advisor. Any other consideration for regular admission must be made byindividual petition to the School of Forest Resources Dean and, where pertinent, arecommendation from the appropriate faculty, and will be considered on its own merits,case by case.Conditional AdmissionStudents that do not meet the criteria for regular admission may be conditionallyadmitted upon approval of the School of Forest Resources faculty and dean. Students whoare admitted conditionally must earn a GPA of 3.0 or better in their initial 9 hours ofgraduate course work to continue graduate studies in the program. Students are noteligible for a graduate assistantship during conditional status.International Student AdmissionInternational students must meet all criteria required by the University of ArkansasMonticello to be admitted with graduate status. A minimum total score of 550 (paperbased)or 213 (computer-based) on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) isrequired, as is a minimum score of 55 (paper-based) or 21 (computer-based) on each sectionof the TOEFL. In addition, international students must also have a satisfactory score on theGraduate Record Examinations general test, and acceptance by the School of ForestResources Dean and a major professor.Graduate AssistantshipsA limited number of part-time graduate assistantships are available through theSchool of Forest Resources. These are awarded to outstanding students who can makevaluable contributions to the School of Forest Resources teaching, research, and serviceprograms. In order to be considered for a Graduate Assistantship, an application foradmission to the M.S. in Forest Resources degree program must normally be received byJune 1 for the fall semester or November 1 for the spring semester. When offered, graduateassistantships typically provide students a stipend for a 24-month period, fundingpermitting. Graduate Assistants are provided further financial assistance through thewaiver of tuition and certain fees. Additionally, work/study space is provided for eachGraduate Assistant.Student AdvisingMajor AdvisorPrior to a student enrolling in the School of Forest Resources graduate program, aSchool of Forest Resources faculty member must agree, with the concurrence of the Schoolof Forest Resources Dean, to serve as that student’s Major Advisor. The Major Advisorassists the student in choosing members of an Advisory Committee and developing aprogram of study, guides the formulation of a thesis proposal and the conduct of theresearch project, and assists in providing resources for the research project.Graduate Programs229


Advisory CommitteeDuring the first semester of enrollment, the student and the Major Advisor must selecta three- to five- member Advisory Committee and submit their selections for approval tothe Director of Graduate Studies and the Dean of the School of Forest Resources by March15 (spring semester) or October 15 (fall semester). The Advisory Committee serves to guidea student in program development, approves the program of study, makes recommendationson the thesis proposal, approves the thesis proposal, and administers the comprehensiveexamination. The Committee must consist of the Major Advisor and two othergraduate faculty members in the School of Forest Resources and/or Arkansas ForestResources Center. Additionally, up to two additional Committee members may be selectedfrom the School of Forest Resources; the Arkansas Forest Resources Center; other membersof the Graduate Faculty; other institutions within the University of Arkansas System; orfrom other qualified individuals from cooperating institutions, agencies, or industries,provided they are awarded Graduate Faculty status.Degree PlanEach student will be required to develop a degree plan with the advice and approvalof his or her Advisory Committee. The degree plan will include an individualizedsequence of courses in addition to a required forest resources core curriculum. A total of 30hours containing at least 24 – 27 hours of course work and 3 – 6 hours of Research andThesis will be required. An appropriate level of Research and Thesis hours will bedetermined by the Advisory Committee based on the scope of individual thesis projects. Ifindicated on an approved degree plan, up to 6 hours of undergraduate courses numberedat the 3000- or 4000-level may be used to satisfy course requirements.The student, Major Advisor, and Advisory Committee members must all approve andsign the degree plan. The degree plan must then be submitted for approval to the Directorof Graduate Studies and the Dean of the School of Forest Resources during the firstsemester of enrollment by May 1 (spring semester) or December 1 (fall semester). Onceapproved, the document will then be forwarded to the Registrar’s Office.Transfer CreditA maximum of six hours of graduate-level course work completed prior to developmentof a degree plan may be transferred to the University of ArkansasMonticello fromanother university, provided the course subjects are acceptable to the School of ForestResources faculty as a part of the program of study. Up to 15 hours of course workcompleted at other Universities in the University of Arkansas System may be appliedtoward the graduate degree if so indicated on an approved degree plan. Courses takenmore than six years prior to admission to the University of ArkansasMonticello will notbe accepted for transfer credit. Additionally, no courses with grades below a “B” will beaccepted for transfer credit.Academic StatusGraduate students may earn grades of A, B, C, D or F, except for Research and Thesisand required undergraduate cognate course work that does not count for credit toward adegree. Research/Thesis is graded as Pass/Fail, with a grade of Incomplete awarded untila thesis has been approved and a comprehensive examination has been passed. Requiredundergraduate cognate course work that does not count for credit toward a degree may begraded as Pass/Fail if so recommended by a student’s Advisory Committee.The grades of A, B, C, D and F indicate the following: A – excellent, B – good, C –marginal, D – poor, and F – failing. A cumulative GPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 must be maintainedto complete degree requirements and to retain a graduate assistantship. No more than twocourses with a grade of “C” may be applied toward degree requirements. A student whosegrade record includes three courses with grades of “C” or lower may not maintaingraduate status unless the Graduate Council, upon petition from a graduate faculty230Graduate Programs


member, has authorized a plan of study for the student. Three courses with grades of “C”or lower will also result in the loss of a Graduate Assistant stipend. A student may notrepeat a course in which a grade of “B” or higher is earned.Course LoadsThe maximum course load must not exceed 12 hours during the fall and springsemesters. The maximum load for each summer term is three hours. Students who hold agraduate assistantship must enroll for a minimum of six hours during the fall and springsemesters and one hour for each summer term. All graduate students are required to beenrolled for at least one hour each semester until all requirements for the M.S. in ForestResources degree are fulfilled.Time LimitTo fulfill degree requirements, course credits can be used for a maximum of six yearsfrom the time of entry into the School of Forest Resources graduate program.Thesis ProposalEach student will be required to develop a thesis proposal with the advice andapproval of his or her advisory committee. The thesis proposal consists of a justification,literature review, and plan of action for the thesis project. This proposal serves the purposeof formulating a proper protocol for the research and allows the student’s AdvisoryCommittee to evaluate (i.e., accept, expand, or reduce) and approve the intended work.The student, Major Advisor, and Advisory Committee members must all approve the thesisproposal and sign the cover sheet. The thesis proposal must then be submitted forapproval to the Director of Graduate Studies and the Dean of the School of Forest Resourcesduring the second semester of enrollment by May 1 (spring semester) or December1 (fall semester).Thesis and Comprehensive ExaminationAn approved thesis is required for completion of the M.S. in Forest Resources degree.Students are required to define an appropriate problem for investigation; review relevantliterature; develop a thesis proposal; collect, analyze, and interpret data; test hypothesesand draw conclusions; and write and defend a thesis.At the conclusion of the study and research program, a seminar and an oral comprehensiveexamination, including a thesis defense, is required of all graduate students forcompletion of the M.S. in Forest Resources degree. Enrollment in at least one hour ofResearch / Thesis is required during the semester the examination is taken.Immediately prior to the examination, all students are required to present a seminaron their thesis work. This seminar is open to the university academic community at-large.Following the seminar, the Advisory Committee and one additional graduate facultymember appointed as a witness by the Dean of the School of Forest Resources administerthe examination. The primary role of the witness is to confirm the examination is administeredproperly and fairly with sufficient academic rigor to ensure that the student hassuccessfully mastered the thesis material. Others may observe the examination uponpetition to and approval by the Dean of the School of Forest Resources. The comprehensiveexamination will typically cover, but is not limited to, material presented in and related tothe thesis, course work, and other appropriate literature and information. Unanimousagreement of the Advisory Committee will be required to pass a student. The student canrequest a second examination if he or she fails the first. A student who fails a secondexamination is withdrawn from the School of Forest Resources graduate program.Summary of Graduation RequirementsFor graduation, each student must successfully complete 24 – 27 semester hours ofcourse work and 3 – 6 hours of Research and Thesis, as outlined in an approved degreeGraduate Programs231


plan. A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher is required with no more than twocourses with a grade of “C”. In addition, each student must complete an approved thesisand pass an oral comprehensive examination. The thesis format must be approved, and acompleted Intellectual Property Form (and completed Invention Disclosure Form, ifnecessary) must be on file in the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. Fiveunbound copies of the thesis in prescribed form (not including a student copy) must besubmitted for binding to the University Library, with the binding fees paid at that time.ExpulsionAny graduate student whose course or thesis work is unsatisfactory or who violatesstudent conduct or employment rules may be withdrawn from the School of ForestResources Graduate Program at any time upon the recommendation and agreement of theMajor Advisor, the student’s Advisory Committee, and the Dean of the School of ForestResources.Forest Resources Core CurriculumFRS 5113 Statistics in Research I ................................................................................. 3 hrs.FRS 5123 Statistics in Research II ............................................................................... 3 hrs.FRS 5223 Forest Ecosystem Ecology .......................................................................... 3 hrs.FRS 5691 Seminar (two required) ............................................................................... 2 hrs.FRS 5102 Research Methods ........................................................................................ 2 hrs.FRS 579V Research and Thesis .............................................................................. 3 – 6 hrs.(based on the scope of individual thesis projects and determined by the Advisory Committee)Electives: .............................................................................................................................. 11 – 14 hrs.Total Hours: .............................................................................................................................. 30 hrs.Forest Resources Graduate CoursesFRS 5013 Southern Teachers’ Conservation WorkshopFRS 502V Special TopicsFRS 5033 Advanced Forest SoilsFRS 5043 Adv. Geographic Info. Systems IFRS 5053 Adv. Geographic Info. Systems IIFRS 5063 Remote SensingFRS 5073 Spatial StatisticsFRS 5083 Digital PhotogrammetryFRS 5093 Data Base Design and ManagementFRS 5102 Research MethodsFRS 5113 Statistics in Research IFRS 5123 Statistics in Research IIFRS 5133 Wildlife-Habitat RelationshipsFRS 5143 Landscape EcologyFRS 5153 Wildlife Population Analysis and ManagementFRS 5203 Human Dimensions in Natural ResourcesFRS 5223 Forest Ecosystem EcologyFRS 5233 Natural Resource PolicyFRS 5253 Advanced Forest EconomicsFRS 5283 Advanced Wood Properties and ProductsFRS 5303 Forest ModelingFRS 5313 Digital Remote SensingFRS 5433 Forest Stand DynamicsFRS 5691 SeminarFRS 5723 Advanced Natural Resource ManagementFRS 573V Forest EnterpriseFRS 579V Research and ThesisFRS 589V Independent Study232Graduate Programs


Graduate Course DescriptionsCourse Listing GuideThe Course Listings section of the catalog provides descriptions of all coursesapproved by the faculty. Any of these courses may be scheduled during the University’sacademic terms. The listings follow a uniform pattern. The listing for FRS 5133 can serveto explain the course listings of this section.FRS 5133 Wildlife-Habitat Relationships3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: One course in wildlife ecology or permission of instructor.Advanced concepts in wildlife-habitat relationships. Combines study of natural historyand ecological theory to investigate and discuss wildlife habitat concepts.The first line of the listings entry consists of:Prefix: in this case FRS, prefixes always consist of upper case letters, prefixes used byparticular divisions of the University are listed below;Number: in this case 5133, numbers always consist of four digits (or the letter V): thefirst number indicates the level of the course (1 for freshman level, 2 for sophomore level, 3for junior level, 4 for senior level, 5 for graduate level), the last digit indicates the numberof credits earned in the course (V means that credit may vary or that credits in the courseexceed 9);Title: The course’s full title which may be abbreviated in some course listings andschedules.The second line of the listing states the number of credits a student may earn in thecourse and indicates the number of weekly hours the course requires in classroom lectureor laboratories.The third line lists course prerequisites (courses) which must be passed beforeregistering for the course) and corequisites (courses which the student must either havepassed previously or be enrolled in concurrently).The course description follows the items identified above.Prefixes Used By University Academic UnitsAgriculture prefixes include: AGEC, AGEN, AGRI, AGRO, ANSC, ENTO, HORT;Arts and Humanities prefixes include: ART, ENGL, FREN, JOUR, MODL, PHIL,SPAN, SPCH;Business prefixes include: ACCT, ECON, FIN, G B, MGMT, MKT;Computer Information Systems courses have the prefix CIS.Education prefixes include: ECED, EDFD, EDLD, EDUC, EXSC, MLED, P E, READ,SPED;Forest Resources prefixes include: FOR, FRS, SIS, WLF;Mathematical and Natural Sciences prefixes include: ASTR, A T, BIOL, C S, CHEM,ENGR, ESCI, GEOL, GSCI, MAED, MATH, PHSC, PHYS, SCED;Music prefixes include: MUS, PMUS;Social and Behavioral Sciences prefixes include: ANTH, C J, GEOG, HIST, PSCI, PSY,SOC, SOSC, SWK.All Nursing courses have the prefix NURS.The College Skills Course has the prefix DEV.Professional Development courses have the prefix: PDA prefix of U ST may designate a course taught by a faculty in any subdivision of theUniversity which is done experimentally or for a short period of time.Graduate Programs233


Index To Graduate Course DescriptionsART (Art) ........................................................... 234CIS (Computer Information Systems) ......... 234ECED (Early Childhood Education) ................. 234EDFD (Educational Foundations) ..................... 234EDLD (Educational Leadership) ....................... 235EDUC (Education M.A.T.) .................................. 236ENGL (English) .................................................... 237FRS (Forest Resources) .................................... 237GEOG (Geography) ............................................. 239GSCI (General Science) ..................................... 239HIST (History) .................................................... 240JOUR (Journalism) .............................................. 241MAED (Math Education) ..................................... 241MLED (Middle Level Education) ...................... 241MODL (Modern Languages) ............................... 242PD (Professional Development) ................... 242PE (Physical Education) ............................... 242PSCI (Political Science) ..................................... 242READ (Reading) .................................................. 243SPAN (Spanish) ................................................... 243SPCH (Speech) ..................................................... 243SPED (Special Education) .................................. 243ART CoursesART 589V Independent StudyVariable credit: 1-3 hours creditSee listing for ART 479V. In addition, students wouldbe required to perform significant independent researchin the studio area of their choice under the guidance ofa faculty mentor. This research should lead to aprofessional quality portfolio using that media, or acompetitive quality research paper that meets thestandards of the discipline.ART 590V Special Topics3 credits: 3 hours lecture and/or studio, may berepeated for credit.Selected topics from the areas of art emphasizingindividual research and/or studio projects.ART 5923 Seminar: Teaching Art3 credits: 3 hours lectureEvaluation and critique of micro classroom teaching,history of academic discipline, philosophy development,test design and evaluation, preparation ofclassroom materials, lesson planning, and use ofcurrent technologies.CIS Courses(Computer Information Systems)CIS 589V Special Topics in Computer InformationSystemsVariable creditGraduate level detailed study of one of the specializedareas of computer information systems, emphasizingadvanced study and skills application.ECED Courses(Early Childhood Education)ECED 5023 Creative Arts3 credits: 3 hours lectureThis course will involve students in projects thatintegrate art, music, movement, and literature forchildren in early childhood education programs. Itspurpose is to demonstrate various ways in whichchildren learn through creative experiences.ECED 5033 Trends, Problems, and Issues of EarlyChildhood Education3 credits: 3 hours lectureA study of current trends, problems, and issues that areprevalent today in the field of early childhoodeducation. Educational models and frameworks for theanalysis of models for early childhood education arepresented and discussed.ECED 5043 Child Development3 credits: 3 hours lectureAn analysis of psychological theories of growth anddevelopment of young children, including Piaget,Skinner, Montessori, responsive environments,contingency management, social dramatic play, anddidactic teaching.ECED 5053 Historical and Theoretical Approaches toEarly Childhood Education3 credits: 3 hours lectureAn historical analysis of various approaches to earlychildhood education and how these approaches relateto recent research in child development and learning.EDFD Courses(Educational Foundations)EDFD 5003 History and Philosophy of Education3 credits: 3 hours lectureAn analysis of major historical and philosophicaldevelopments and their impact on American education.EDFD 5543 Issues and Trends in Education3 credits: 3 hours lectureA study of current issues and trends that impact thefield of education.EDFD 5013 Southern Teachers’ ConservationWorkshop(same as FRS 5013)3 credits: 1 week of studyOne week of intensive instruction and laboratoryexercises on conservation issues. Course requirespreparation of teaching plans.234Graduate Programs


EDFD 5023 Educational Research Methodology3 credits: 3 hours lectureEmphasizes qualitative and quantitative researchdesign in education. Emphasis is placed onunderstanding the design of research studies and thedevelopment of an action research study. The courseshould be taken within the first 15 hours of enrollment.EDFD 5043 Instructional Technology3 credits: 3 hours lectureTreats media and instructional design with applicationsof state-of-the-art technology.EDFD 5063 Psychological Foundations of Teachingand Learning3 credits: 3 hours lectureIn-depth integrated treatment of development andlearning with emphasis on cognitive development.EDFD 5153 Child Development and the Family3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: PSY 3433 or PSY 3443Critical examination of the research relevant todevelopmental factors influencing the growth processof the individual from conception to adolescence.Particular emphasis on family functioning, and thefamily’s influence on early child development.EDFD 5213 Teaching the At-Risk Child3 credits: 3 hours lectureExplores intervention strategies, relations with parents,counseling, special instructional strategies, and peerrelations.EDFD 5273 Teaching the Culturally Different Child3 credits: 3 hours lectureIdentification and address of needs manifested bychildren from diverse backgrounds, with provisions forusing resource people.EDFD 5293 Special Topics3 credits: 3 hours lectureA series of specially designed courses which treat themajor contemporary problems confronting today’seducators.EDFD 579V Independent StudyVariable creditConsult the Independent Study subheading in theGraduate Programs section of this catalog forprerequisites and description. Prior approval necessaryfor enrollment.EDFD 5823 Independent Research in Education3 credits: 3 hours researchDesigned to allow an in-depth exploration of aneducational topic. The advisory committee mustapprove the topic and the research methodologyemployed. The student will make a formal presentationrelated to the research and will present anapproved copy of the final paper to the Dean of theSchool of Education.EDFD 590V Distance Education WorkshopVariable CreditDesigned to provide learning opportunities through theuse of compressed interactive video, satellite, and othersources.EDFD 5413 Educational Technology and CognitiveLearning3 credits: 3 hours lectureThe purpose of this course is to acquaint the studentwith the latest information in the area of cognitivescience, including the physiological and neurologicalfindings in brain research as related to the humanlearning process.EDFD 5423 Information Management and theTeaching Process3 credits: 3 hours lectureThis course is intended to provide classroom teacherswith the skills required to store, access, analyze, anddistribute electronic information in an effective andefficient manner. Such information includes textdocuments, still images, digital audio and video files,email correspondence, animated graphics, instructionalcourseware, etc.EDFD 5433 Instructional Courseware Development3 credits: 3 hours lectureThe purpose of this course is to provide a hands-on,experiential learning opportunity in the design,development, and testing of educational software usedin P-12 settings.EDFD 5443 Social and Legal Issues in EducationalTechnology3 credits: 3 hours lectureThe purpose of this course is to study issues related totechnology usage, such as: copyright/licensinginfringement; inequity of access to technology due togender, economic, and/or race factors; student access toInternet sites; confidentiality and privacy rights; andintellectual property and ownership.EDLD Courses(Educational Leadership)EDLD 5813 Leadership Through Mentoring3 credits: 3 hours lectureDevelops mentoring skills through the examination oforganization, planning, and continuous evaluation of aplanned sequence of direct teaching.EDLD 5083 Teacher Leaders: Preparing for NationalBoard Certification3 credits: 3 hours lectureDevelops skills and strategies for teachers seeking orplanning to seek National Board Certification.Supportive networking and collaboration are stressed.Graduate Programs235


EDLD 5103 Public Education Law3 credits: 3 hours lectureThis course prepares school leaders who applyknowledge of federal and state constitutional, statutory,and regulatory provisions and judicial decisionsgoverning education.EDLD 5213 Public School Organization andAdministration3 credits: 3 hours lectureThis course prepares school leaders who understandand improve organization, implement operationalplans, manage financial resources, and applydecentralized management and procedures.EDLD 5223 Supervision of Instruction3 credits: 3 hours lectureMethods of supervising instructional personnel,including teachers, aides, volunteers, student teachers,and field experience students.EDLD 5333 Strategic and Instructional Leadership3 credits: 3 hours lectureThis course prepares school leaders who work withfaculty and other stakeholders to: 1) identify needs forprofessional development; 2) organize, facilitate, andevaluate curriculum and programs; and 3) develop andimplement techniques to ensure that new knowledgeand skills are practiced in the workplace.EDLD 5403 Elementary/Secondary SchoolAdministration3 credits: 3 hours lectureThis course is a critical study of current theories,concepts, trends/issues, and innovative practices inschool administration specifically designed to focus onthe school leader in improving instruction of teachersand the quality of education in elementary andsecondary public schools.EDLD 5423 Fiscal Management in School Settings3 credits: 3 hours lectureThis course prepares school leaders who demonstratethe ability to identify and analyze the major sources offiscal and non-fiscal resources for schools and schooldistricts.EDLD 5483 Curriculum Development3 credits: 3 hours lectureConsideration of historical, philosophical and societalimpact on the school curriculum; emphasis onevaluation and analysis of curriculum developmentmodels and the change process.EDLD 5513 Technology for School Leaders3 credits: 3 hours lectureThis course prepares school leaders who usetechnology, telecommunications, and informationsystems to enrich curriculum and instruction.EDLD 5643 Practicum in Educational Administration(Elem/Sec)6 credits: 6 hours internshipThis practicum experience requires a variety of schoolbasedexperiences over an extended period of time indiverse settings that are planned cooperatively andsupervised by university and school district personnel.EDUC Courses(Education M.A.T.)EDUC 5023 Critical Literacy Across the Curriculum3 credits: 3 hours lecture; 1 hour laboratoryPrerequisites: Admission to MAT programDesigned to improve students’ understanding oflanguage and communication through developingskills in: 1) traditional literacy; 2) scientific literacy; 3)mathematical literacy; and 4) technological literacy.Emphasis will be placed on writing skills. Students willtutor in field-based settings and will use technologyduring the tutoring experiences, including desktoppublishing, graphics, and database management.EDUC 5033 Teaching Diverse Learners3 credits: 3 hours lecture; 1 hour laboratoryPrerequisites: Admission to MAT programDesigned to provide students with a basic introductionto special education and the cultural, socioeconomic,and emotional needs of 7-12 learners. Students willobserve learners in field settings and will utilizetechnology through Internet research and softwareanalysis.EDUC 5043 Assessment Techniques for Teachers3 credits: 3 hours lecture; 1 hour laboratoryPrerequisites: Admission to MAT programAn introductory course in the assessment and researchprocedures commonly used in the field of education,including alternative, performance-based, teacherdeveloped,and standardized assessments.EDUC 5803 MAT Internship I3 creditsPrerequisites: Admission to MAT programThe first semester of the year-long internshipexperience, this course focuses on directed teachingstrategies, classroom management, working withparents and colleagues, state and local standards, andbest-practices for the content being taught. Studentswill be working in the schools during Internship I.EDUC 5813 MAT Internship II3 creditsPrerequisites: Admission to MAT programThe second semester of the year-long internshipexperience, this course focuses on directed teachingstrategies, classroom management, working withparents and colleagues, state and local standards, andbest-practices for the content being taught. Studentswill be working in the schools during Internship II.236Graduate Programs


ENGL Courses(English)ENGL 5013 Advanced Studies in American Literature I3 credits: 3 hours lectureAn in-depth study of major writers, periods,movements, and themes in American literature fromthe beginning to 1850.ENGL 5023 Advanced Studies in American Literature II3 credits: 3 hours lectureAn in-depth study of major writers, periods,movements, and themes in American literature from1850 to the present.ENGL 5053 Advanced Studies in British Literature I3 credits: 3 hours lectureAn in-depth study of major writers, periods,movements, and themes in British literature from theMiddle Ages through the 18th century.ENGL 5063 Advanced Studies in British Literature II3 credits: 3 hours lectureAn in-depth study of major writers, periods,movements, and themes of British literature from theRomantic Period to the 1960’s.ENGL 5093 Studies in Composition3 credits: 3 hours lectureTheory of and research in composition, its history andits cognitive and social dimensions. The courseemphasizes the effective teaching of writing.ENGL 5123 The English Language and the Teacher3 credits: 3 hours lectureCurrent research on the English language, its history, itsgrammar, dialects and uses, with an emphasis on howlanguage is learned and used in the classroom.ENGL 5153 Special Topics in Language and Literature3 credits: 3 hours lectureDetailed study of a specific topic in language and/orliterature, emphasizing readings and individualresearch. Topics selected may cover themes, genres,single authors, national literatures or other history orlanguage-related subjects. May be repeated for a totalof 6 hours credit when different topics are covered.ENGL 579V Independent Study in EnglishVariable CreditConsult the “Independent Study and Research” policyin the Graduate Programs section of this catalog forprerequisites and description. Prior approval necessaryfor enrollment.ENGL 5923 Seminar: Teaching English3 credits: 3 hours lectureEvaluation and critique of micro classroom teaching,history of academic discipline, philosophy development,test design and evaluation, preparation ofclassroom materials, lesson planning, and use ofcurrent technologies.FRS Courses(Forest Resources)FRS 5013 Southern Teachers’ Conservation Workshop(same as EDFD 5013 )3 credits: 1 week of studyOne week of intensive instruction and laboratoryexercises on conservation issues. Course requirespreparation of teaching plans.FRS 502V Special TopicsVariable creditSelected topics in forest resources.FRS 5033 Advanced Forest Soils3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: FOR 2264, or graduate standing andpermission of instructor. Preparation for professionaland research careers in forest soils. Quantitativeevaluation of soil fertility and water movement, andqualitative consideration of patterns and processes ofpedogenic processes across forested landscapes.FRS 5043 Advanced Geographic Information Systems I3 Credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: FRS 5113 and SIS 3814. This coursecovers advanced GIS and GPS software to furtherenhance the student’s spatial skills. The use of differentmap projections and coordinate systems in GIS isexamined in depth along with their effects on datapositional accuracy. The first part of the course coversnetwork analysis for routing and transportation issues,and spatial analysis as a decision support tool. Thesecond portion of the course covers the use of advancedGIS/GPS software and hardware. The final portioncovers the use, management, creation and storage ofspatial data and metadata in GIS.FRS 5053 Advanced Geographic Information Systems II3 Credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisite: FRS 5043. This course focuses on the useof advanced GIS and object oriented programminglanguage software for the development of algorithms tocustomize Geographic Information Systems to solveproblems. Third party and Component Object Model(COM) compliant programming languages are used tobuild and customize GIS applications. Customizedapplications are incorporated into existing GIS Internetpackages for display and presentation on the Internet.FRS 5063 Remote Sensing3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisite: SIS 3814. Remote sensing conceptsincluding electronic and analog sensor systems, landcover classification, rectifying and registering images,and digital mapping.Graduate Programs237


FRS 5073 Spatial Statistics3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: FRS 5113 and FRS 5043. This is ananalytical, problem-based course that explores the fieldof spatial statistics. In lectures and laboratory exercisesstudents will use statistical tools to determine patternsof spatial variability across a wide variety of data sets.Some of the topics that will be explored includeuniversal kriging, cokriging, inverse distanceweighting, trend surface analyses, and threedimensional analysis for terrain and surface modeling.FRS 5083 Digital Photogrammetry3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: FRS 5113, SIS 3814, and FRS 5063. Imagemosaicing, digital orthophoto creation, aerialtriangulation, single image and block triangulation,ground control, digital terrain modeling extraction,orthorectification, and mono and stereo terrain modelediting.FRS 5093 Data Base Design and Management3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: FRS 5113 and SIS 3814. This course isdesigned to provide a comprehensive understanding ofdatabase management systems. Particular emphasiswill be placed on the management of spatial data andassociated applications. Logical vector and raster datastructure organization, analysis, and design will beinvestigated in depth. Relational database systems andobject oriented databases will both be studied. Databasedesign techniques using entity-relationship diagramsfor data modeling will be introduced as well asdatabase access and manipulation using structurequery language (SQL).FRS 5102 Research Methods2 credits: 2 hours lectureIntroduction to the conceptual and technical aspects ofresearch. Topics include the scientific method, sciencereasoning, literature searching, scientific writing, andethics.FRS 5113 Statistics in Research I3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratoryFundamental concepts and applications of statisticswith focus on natural resources. Probability anddistribution theory; estimation and hypothesis testsinvolving one parameter; hypothesis tests involvingtwo parameters; simple and multiple linear regression.Use of statistical software.FRS 5123 Statistics in Research II3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratoryPrerequisite: FRS 5113 or permission of instructor.Essential concepts and applications of statistics withfocus on natural resources. Analysis of variance;multiple range tests; analysis of covariance; higherorder experimental designs; categorical data; non-linearregression. Use of statistical software.FRS 5133 Wildlife-Habitat Relationships3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: One course in wildlife ecology orpermission of instructor. Advanced concepts inwildlife-habitat relationships. Combines study ofnatural history and ecological theory to investigate anddiscuss wildlife-habitat concepts.FRS 5143 Landscape Ecology3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: One course in ecology or permission ofinstructor. Advanced concepts associated withlandscape ecology. Study of spatial variation inlandscapes at a variety of scales. Includes biophysicaland societal causes and consequences of landscapeheterogeneity.FRS 5153 Wildlife Population Analysis andManagement3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryIntroduction to the techniques used in the analysis,interpretation, and management of wildlifepopulations. Measures of abundance, dispersal,fecundity and mortality, population modeling,competition and predation, and the management ofrare species and their habitats are discussed in detail.FRS 5203 Human Dimensions in Natural Resources3 credits: 3 hours lectureFoundations for understanding human-naturalresource relationships. Development of a theoreticalunderstanding of the importance of viewing humans aspart of the natural resource decision making process.FRS 5223 Forest Ecosystem Ecology3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: Graduate status and one course inecology. Advance study into the structure and functionof forest ecosystems including current and foundingtheories on energy flow, nutrient cycling, temporalchange in and disturbance of ecosystems, landscapeand spatial relationships, biodiversity, and anthropogenicalteration of ecosystems.FRS 5233 Natural Resource Policy3 credits: 3 hours lectureFoundations for understanding forest and naturalresource policy. Includes historical context as well associal, biological, and political constraints andramifications of policy.FRS 5283 Advanced Wood Properties and Products3 credits: 3 hours lectureStructure and properties (physical and mechanical) ofwood, tree growth and wood properties, and woodproducts (processing and raw materials).FRS 5253 Advanced Forest Economics3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisites: FOR 4673 or equivalent; MATH 1073 orequivalent; FRS 5113 and FRS 5123. Advancedeconomic principles applied to forest-based natural238Graduate Programs


esource problems. Valuation, forecasting, inventorymodels, supply and production of forest outputs,regional economic analysis. Readings and problems.FRS 5303 Forest Modeling3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: FRS 5113 or permission of instructor.Model construction of ecological processes and theirapplication to solve practical and conceptual issues offorestry.FRS 5313 Digital Remote Sensing3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: FRS 5113 and FOR / SIS / WLF 3814, orpermission of instructor. Advanced digital remotesensing concepts. Includes principles of remote sensingfor mapping, landcover classification, and analysis ofspectral data.FRS 5433 Forest Stand Dynamics3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisite: FOR 3434 or permission of instructor.Study of contemporary silvicultural practices and theirecological, social, and economic underpinnings.Emphasis on case studies from forests in Arkansas.FRS 5691 Seminar1 credit: 1 hour lectureDiscussions and presentations relating to forestresource topics. May be repeated for credit.FRS 5723 Advanced Natural Resource Management3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: FOR 4723 or permission of instructor.Natural resource principles considering timber andnon-timber resources; forest models; principles of forestregulation; harvest scheduling; decision analysis;investment analysis; and analytical techniques andcomputer applications in forest management.FRS 573V Forest EnterpriseVariable creditPrerequisite: Graduate student status or permission ofthe instructor. Forest enterprise is an endeavor, astruggle, a campaign to assist private forest landownersin managing their forest resources (water, wildlife,timber, recreation). Course modules are 1 credit each.Module 1 focuses on the role of consulting foresters inproviding management assistance. Module 2 stressesassistance from government agencies and programs.Module 3 describes programs from private, industrial,and non-government organizations (NGOs). Thecourse may be taken for 1-3 credits, but may not berepeated.FRS 579V Research and ThesisVariable creditResearch while enrolled for a master’s degree under thedirection of faculty members.FRS 589V Independent Study in Forest ResourcesVariable creditConsult the Independent Study and Researchsubheading in the Graduate Programs section of thiscatalog for prerequisites and description.GEOG Courses(Geography)GEOG 5113 World Geography3 credits: 3 hours lectureFocus on selected regions of the world to be chosen fromamong Europe, Africa, West Asia, North America, andLatin America. Emphasis on physical, political, cultural,and economic characteristics of the selected regions.GSCI Courses(General Science)GSCI 5013 Advanced Biology3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisite: 12 hours of biologyBasic concepts and principles of the study of life,including biochemistry, cell structure and function,respiration and photosynthesis, transmission genetics,molecular genetics, evolution, and ecology.GSCI 5043 Advanced Geology3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisite: 12 hours of physical sciencesMaterials of the earth’s crust and the processes andagents which affect them; earth history interpreted fromrocks and fossils.GSCI 5063 Advanced Chemistry3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: 12 hours of chemistry or 8 hours ofchemistry and at least 2 years experience teachingchemistry at the secondary levelComposition, occurrence, preparation, properties anduses of matter, the changes it undergoes, its energyrelations, and the laws governing its behavior.GSCI 5083 Advanced Physics3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: 12 hours of physics or 8 hours of physicsand at least 2 years experience teaching physics at thesecondary levelForms of energy and properties of matter - mechanics,heat, magnetism, electricity, sound, and light.GSCI 519V Special Topics: BiologyVariable CreditSelected topics in biology appropriate for high school teachers.GSCI 5203 Molecular Genetics3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: 8 hours of biology and 8 hours ofchemistry.DNA biology; recombinant DNA techniques andapplications; laboratory methods.Graduate Programs239


GSCI 5243 Advanced Environmental Science3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: 12 hours of course work in chemistryand/or biology.Natural environments and ecosystems, and theirdegradation by pollution, habitat destruction and lossof biodiversity.GSCI 5263 Advanced Field Biology3 credits: 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratoryPrerequisites: 12 hours of biologySurvey of the plant and animal kingdoms emphasizingrecognition and natural history of local flora and fauna.GSCI 528V Special Topics in Advanced ScienceTeachingVariable creditSelected topics in contemporary science appropriate forhigh school teachers.GSCI 529V Special Topics: ChemistryVariable CreditSelected topics in contemporary chemistry appropriatefor high school teachers.GSCI 5303 Higher Order Thinking in Science3 credits: 3 hours lectureThis course stresses the learning of science as an active,integrated, constructive process involving experimentation,investigation, communication, reasoning, andproblem solving.GSCI 539V Special Topics: Earth ScienceVariable CreditSelected topics in earth science appropriate for highschool teachers.GSCI 549V Special Topics: PhysicsVariable CreditSelected topics in physics appropriate for high schoolteachers.GSCI 559V Field GeologyVariable CreditThe methods of field investigation and interpretation ofgeological features. The focus of this course will varyfrom trip to trip. May be repeated for a maximum ofthree (3) hours credit.GSCI 579V Independent StudyHIST Courses(History)HIST 5013 American History3 credits: 3 hours lectureA thematic view of American history, with ahistoriographical emphasis. Possible topics includereform movements, social trends, and wars.HIST 5023 World History3 credits: 3 hours lectureMajor themes in the intellectual, social, political, andeconomic developments which have shaped our worldfrom earliest times to the present. Included will beAsian, African, American and Western civilizations.HIST 5033 Historiography and Research3 credits: 3 hours lectureAn introduction to research and historical writing,including a review of major historians and trends in thewriting of history.HIST 5123 Arkansas History3 credits: 3 hours lectureAn overview of Arkansas history from the earliest timesto the present, with emphasis on the State’s political,social, and economic development. Designed especiallyfor those preparing to teach Arkansas history.HIST 5133 Africa in Global Perspective3 credits: 3 hours lectureMajor themes in African history from earliest times tothe present; emphasis on the continuity of Africancivilization through the centuries and the interplay ofAfrican culture with Islamic and Western influences.HIST 5143 Colonial America3 credits: 3 hours lectureAn intensive survey of European settlement in NorthAmerica from the Columbian voyages to 1789.Emphasis on the emergence of Anglo-Americancultural and political institutions culminating in theWar of Independence.HIST 5153 America in Peace and War3 credits: 3 hours lectureAn in-depth view of America between 1919 and 1945,with emphasis on cultural conflict in the 1920’s and theimpact of the Depression, the New Deal, and WorldWar II on the American people.HIST 5163 America Since 19453 credits: 3 hours lectureAn in-depth view of America in the past half-century, withemphasis on political, social, and economic change.HIST 5283 Global Economic SystemsAn analysis of economic systems and ideologiesemployed by societies from the Ancient World to thepresent.HIST 5603 Selected Readings in History3 credits: 3 hours lectureAdvanced readings in an area of history. To be selectedin consultation with the course instructor.HIST 581V Field StudyVariable creditClassroom and/or field studies of historicallysignificant sites.240Graduate Programs


JOUR Courses(Journalism)JOUR 589V Independent StudyVariable credit: 1-3 hours creditSee listing for JOUR 479V. In addition, students wouldbe required to perform significant research under theguidance of a faculty mentor, leading to a professionalqualityperformance as a writer or an editor, or acompetitive-quality research paper that meets thestandards of the discipline.JOUR 590V Special Topics3 credits: 3 hours lecture, may be repeated for creditSee listing for JOUR 4243. In addition, students wouldbe required to be familiar with the major research in thetopic area and to prepare a major research paper usingprimary source material.MAED Courses(Math Education)MAED 5013 Geometry3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MATH 3423A study of formal and informal geometries, geometricconstructions, applications, and learning theory.MAED 5023 Linear Algebra3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Completion of the calculus sequenceA study of linear algebra with an emphasis on topicsrelevant to the secondary school curriculum.MAED 5033 Probability and Statistics3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Completion of the calculus sequenceThe mathematical theory of probability and itsapplication to statistical inference.MAED 5043 Intermediate Analysis3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Completion of the calculus sequenceTopics from calculus designed to prepare teachers ofcalculus.MAED 5203 History of Mathematics3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: MATH 2254A study of selected topics in the history of mathematicswith emphasis on the biographies of importantmathematicians and the development of significantmathematical ideas.MAED 5243 Modern Algebra3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Completion of the calculus sequence.A study of abstract algebraic structures includinggroups, rings, and fields. Also a survey of numbertheory to include equivalence relations, divisibility,congruences, and prime distribution.MAED 5263 Higher Order Thinking in Mathematics3 credits: 3 hours lectureThis course provides mathematics teachers in gradesfive through college with examples of lessonsincorporating methods appropriate for students withdifferent learning styles. These lessons emphasize theuse of manipulatives, hands-on materials, cooperativelearning techniques, portfolio assessment strategies,and technology.MAED 5273 Discrete Mathematics3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Completion of the calculus sequenceA survey of discrete mathematical systems, includinggraph theory, combinatorics, and Boolean algebras.MAED 5293 Topics in Mathematics3 credits: 3 hours lecturePrerequisite: Permission of instructorSelected topics in contemporary mathematicsappropriate for high school teachers.MLED Courses(Middle Level Education)MLED 5013 Teaching the Young Adolescent3 credits: 3 hours lectureThe students will study and examine the latest data onthe developmental characteristics of the youngadolescent. The class will also examine and reviewyoung adolescent research, and how it impacts theinstructional strategies, facilities, and the developmentof programs and materials.MLED 5023 History and Philosophy of Middle LevelEducation3 credits: 3 hours lectureThis course provides the historical development of themiddle school/junior high school, its current status,and the direction of middle level education in thefuture.MLED 5033 Middle Level Seminar3 credits: 3 hours lectureThis course will address current issues and research inmiddle level education. Best practices will be reviewedand compared from field experiences with recommendationsfor change and improvement.MLED 5043 Middle Level Curriculum3 credits: 3 hours lectureThis course will address middle level curriculum basedon research and current practices. Students willexamine curriculum theories and middle level researchwill be reviewed regarding design options forintegrated curriculum. A required student project willbe in the area of middle level education and/or acontent teaching field.Graduate Programs241


MODL Courses(Modern Language)MODL 5923 Seminar: Teaching Foreign Language3 credits: 3 hours lectureEvaluation and critique of micro classroom teaching,history of academic discipline, philosophy development,test design and evaluation, preparation ofclassroom materials, lesson planning, and use ofcurrent technologies.PD Courses(Professional Development)PD 550V Professional DevelopmentVariable CreditA professional development course that cannot beapplied toward a master’s degree graduate program ofstudy at UAM.PE Courses(Physical Education)PE 5003 Applied Evaluation in Physical Education3 credits: 3 hours lectureAdvanced methods of assessment for the componentsof physical and motor fitness. Latest evaluationprocedures in physical education, including review ofcurrent literature.PE 5033 Research Methods Application in PhysicalEducation3 credits: 3 hours lectureStudy of significant research, research methods, and theapplication of modern research principles to physicaleducation and related areas.PE 5103 Advanced Exercise Physiology3 credits: 3 hours lectureExercise physiology and its application to fitness andtraining with emphasis on recent research, energymetabolism, cardiovascular respiratory function,ergometry, body composition, work capacity, ergogenicaids, aging, health risk factors,and environmental stress.PE 5133 Problems and Trends in Physical Education3 credits: 3 hours lectureThe analysis of current literature and research in the field ofphysical education with emphasis on the isolation of currentproblems and possible solutions to special problems.PE 5213 School and Community Activity Planning3 credits: 3 hours lectureOrganization and administration of recreationalprograms and activities. Finance, promotion, joint useof areas and facilities, group and individual activities,yearly programs, and future trends.PE 5233 Adapted Individually Prescribed ProgramPracticum3 credits: 3 hours lectureDiagnostic and prescriptive evaluation in adaptedphysical education with hands-on testing exposure inareas of low motor ability and fitness. The AdaptedPhysical Education Individualized Program and itsrelation to the Special Education IndividualizedProgram (IEP) will be stressed.PE 5243 Kinesiology3 credits: 3 hours laboratoryHuman movement and related anatomical andmechanical principles. Biomechanical analysis of jointmovement, stability, and range of movement, neuromuscularphysiology, and electromyography.PE 5253 Psychology of Sports in Physical Education3 credits: 3 hours lectureA study of selected material from literature in sociology,social psychology, and physical education dealing withthe effects and interaction of these areas. Topics dealingwith competition, cooperation, the audience,leadership, group interaction and maturation will beconsidered along with analysis of the culturalsignificance of sports in contemporary society.PE 5313 Applied Nutrition in Wellness and Sports3 credits: 3 hours laboratoryThe practical application of modern principles todevelop nutritional plans for students, sportsparticipants, and later life fitness. Modern computerizednutritional programs utilized and hands-onexperience with modern instrumentation and casestudies provided for basal metabolism, lean weight, fatweight, caloric expenditure, and the use of properexercise with various nutritional plans.PSCI Courses(Political Science)PSCI 5013 American Political System3 credits: 3 hours lectureMajor approaches to the study of Americangovernment. Emphasis on approaches to the study ofthe Presidency, Congress, the Judiciary, political parties,and interest groups.PSCI 5103 The Middle East in Global Perspective3 credits: 3 hours lectureMajor elements of Middle Eastern politics. Emphasis oninteraction of cultural, social, political, and economic factorswhich determine political behavior in the Middle East.PSCI 5123 Global Studies3 credits: 3 hours lectureNature and analysis of contemporary global issues.Emphasis on frameworks for analyzing globalproblems and in-depth acquaintance with selectedworld issues.PSCI 5133 Selected Readings in Political Science3 credits: 3 hours lectureAdvanced readings in an area of political science. To beselected in consultation with the course instructor.242Graduate Programs


READ Courses(Reading)READ 5033 Survey of Reading Programs and Practices3 credits: 3 hours lectureExamination of latest instructional strategies in readinginstruction. Best practices in reading, writing,speaking, listening, and technology will be examined asthey relate to improvement in literacy instruction.READ 5063 Literacy Across the Curriculum: AnInterdisciplinary Approach3 credits: 3 hours lectureThe learning of science, mathematics, and reading asactive, integrated, constructive processes involvingexperimentation, investigation, communication, andproblem solving.READ 5123 Practicum in Reading Instruction3 credits: 3 hours laboratoryPractical application of reading and literacy strategies.Students will conduct action-based research that centerson the improvement of readingREAD 5203 Developmental and Corrective Reading3 credits: 3 hours lectureApplication of learning theory and research findings todiagnosis and remediation of reading difficulties.SPAN Courses(Spanish)SPAN 589V Independent StudyVariable credit. 1-3 hours credit.See listing for SPAN 479V.SPAN 590V Special Topics3 credits: 3 hours lecture, may be repeated for credit.Exploration of issues involving philosophy and thehumanities. Topics might be a continuing theme, arecent controversy, or a social or scholarly movement.May be repeated for a total of nine hours credit withapproval of the dean.SPCH Courses(Speech)SPCH 589V Independent StudyVariable credit: 1-3 hours creditSee listing for SPCH 479V. In addition, students wouldbe required to perform significant research under theguidance of a faculty mentor, leading to a professionalqualityperformance or a competitive-quality researchpaper that meets the standards of the discipline.SPCH 590V Special TopicsVariable credit: 3 hours lecture, may be repeated for creditSee listing for SPCH 4623. In addition, students wouldbe required to write a research paper for significance inthe topic area and conduct a minimum of one (1)session of the seminar.SPCH 5923 Seminar: Teaching Speech3 credits: 3 hours lectureEvaluation and critique of micro classroom teaching,history of academic discipline, philosophy development,test design and evaluation, preparation ofclassroom materials, lesson planning, and use ofcurrent technologies.SPED Courses(Special Education)SPED 5263 Methods and Materials for the Secondary Level3 credits: 3 hours laboratoryInstructional methods, materials, and activities for teachingadolescents with mildly handicapping conditions.SPED 5043Application of Assessment Data for Exceptional Learners3 credits: 3 hours laboratoryStudy of current tests used to assess exceptional children.SPED 5123 Behavior Management3 credits: 3 hours lectureProvides competencies required to manage learningand classroom behaviors of exceptional children.Students will be exposed to accepted theoretical andfunctional principles of behavior management usedand observed in the classroom.SPED 5073 Problems and Issues in IndividualizedEducational Planning3 credits: 3 hours lectureMethods in informal diagnosis and prescriptiveprogramming that provide the teacher with skills todetermine the child’s learning style and to successfullyplan instructional sequences appropriate to the child’schanging skill needs.SPED 5053 Language Development of ExceptionalLearners3 credits: 3 hours lectureThe study of classification, etiology, abnormalities ingrowth and development, relationship of speech tohandicapping conditions, diagnosis of speech ofhandicapped children and therapeutic measures usedin the development of speech and language.SPED 5033 Contemporary Issues in Special Education3 credits: 3 hours lectureThe study of current trends, problems, and issuesconcerning students with exceptionalities are presentedand discussed. Also included is a study of thelegislation that shapes the field.SPED 5313 Methods and Materials for the P-8 Level3 credits: 3 hours lectureInstructional methods, materials and activities forteaching children with mildly handicapping conditions.Graduate Programs243


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FACULTYand professional staffUniversity of ArkansasBoard of TrusteesWilliam E. “Bill” Clark, Chair, Little RockGary C. George, Vice Chair, SpringdaleJane Rogers, Little RockCharles E. Scharlau, III, FayettevilleStanley E. Reed, MariannaJames E. “Jim” Lindsey, FayettevilleTim E. Hunt, ParagouldJay Dickey, Pine BluffCarl L. Johnson, Little RockMike Akin, MonticelloPresidentUniversity of ArkansasB. Alan Sugg, B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D.University AdministrationFred J. Taylor, B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D., ChancellorDennis M. Travis, B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., ViceChancellor for Academic AffairsPeggy M. Doss, B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D., ViceChancellor for Student Affairs andUniversity RelationsMark Davis, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., ViceChancellor for Finance and AdministrationAdministrative andProfessional StaffJames L. Brewer, B.A., M.A., Director ofMedia ServicesSusan Brewer, B.S., Director of StudentFinancial AidDebbie Bryant, B.S.E., M.Ed., Ed.D.,Assistant Vice Chancellor forAcademic Affairs, Director of DataManagement, Assistant Professor, andRegistrarClay Brown, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D., AssistantVice Chancellor for Student Affairs/Dean of StudentsAustin Carr, B.A., M.S.E., AreaCoordinator/Student AffairsFred Cooper, Head Women’s CrossCountry, Head Women’s Tennis CoachKurt Corbin, B.S.E., M.A., Assistant FootballCoach/InstructorRobert Crocker, B.A., M.A., AssistantFootball Coach, InstructorGerald B. Daugherty, B.S., Project Coord.Asst. Director Information TechnologyKevin Downing, B.S.E., Head BaseballCoach/ InstructorBryan Dudak, B.S., M.A., Upward BoundCounselorAlvy E. Early, B.S.E., M.Ed., Director ofAthletics and Head Softball CoachRanelle Eubanks, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D.,Director of Gateway Student SupportServices, Human Relations Officer,Director Learning Support Servicesand Y.O.U.Shellye Emfinger, B.S., M.S., AssistantAthletic TrainerBryan Fendley, B.A., M.S., Director ofAcademic ComputingDebbie Gasaway, B.S., ControllerJulie Gentry, B.S., M.A., Director ofIntramuralsJeff Handly, B.S., Head Golf CoachLaura Hughes, B.A., M.A., Director ofCounseling and Testing/CareerServicesRegina James, B.A., M.Ed., Director ofUpward BoundTawana Jones, B.B.A., M.S., GatewayStudent Support Services EducationalSpecialist/CounselorDaryl Kendrick, B.S., M.S. Ed., HeadAthletic Trainer, InstructorJohn Kidwell, B.S., Director of Public SafetyFaculty / Staff245


Jill Lewis, B.A., Head Women’s BasketballCoach, InstructorJeff Longing, B.S., M.A., EducationalTechnology DirectorMike Newell, B.A., M.Ed., Head Men’sBasketball CoachJoshua Pettigrew, A.A.S., Coordinator ofGraphic Design/Copy CenterCrystal Ratliff, B.A., Area CoordinatorStudent AffairsGreg Riccono, B.S., M.S. Ed., Head FootballCoachRhonda Richards, B.S., M.A., Ph.D.,Assistant Vice Chancellor forAcademic Affairs, Director of Divisionof General Studies, Director ofAcademic Advising Center, Director ofAcademic Grants and Contracts,Director of Institutional ResearchMark Taylor, B.A., Assistant FootballCoach/InstructorRenea Thompson, B.S., Director ofResidence LifeAndy Turner, B.S., Assistant Director ofInformation TechnologyMatt Turner, B.A., M.Ed., Assistant FootballCoach, InstructorSarah Waltermire, B.S.E., M.A., Director ofStudent Programs and ActivitiesBobby Webb, B.S., M.S., Forest ManagerJolyn Wells, B.S., Agriculture, Rodeo CoachJames R. White, B.A., M.B.A., Business ManagerMary Whiting, B.S., M.S., Director ofAdmissionsEmeritiCLAUDE HUNTER BABIN, ProfessorEmeritus of History and Political Science(1954-1992). B.A., Louisiana State University;M.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D.,Tulane University.SHIRLEY J. BELL, Assistant ProfessorEmeritus of English (19651992). B.A.,Hendrix College; M.Ed., University ofArkansas, Fayetteville.ERNESTINE B. BROOKS, AssociateProfessor Emeritus of Nursing (1968-1982).R.N., St. Mary’s School of Nursing; B.S.E.,University of Arkansas -Monticello; M.S.E.,Henderson State University.JAMES CATHEY, Associate ProfessorEmeritus of Business Administration (1968-1999). B.S.E., Henderson State University;M.B.A., University of Arkansas,Fayetteville.ANTHONY CHANDLER, ProfessorEmeritus of Psychology (1966-2000). B.S.,University of Arkansas -Monticello; M.Ed.,University of Arkansas, Fayetteville; Ed.D.,University of Mississippi.JESSE M. COKER, Professor Emeritusof Education (1965-1988). B.S.A., M.Ed.,Ed.D., University of Arkansas, Fayetteville.THOMAS C. COLEMAN, III,Professor Emeritus of English andHumanities (1955-1988). B.A., TransylvaniaUniversity; M.A., University of Louisville;Ph.D., University of Southern California.FRANCES C. DANIELS, AssociateProfessor Emeritus of History (1962-1987).B.A., Huntingdon College; M.A., VanderbiltUniversity.BOYCE DAVIS, Professor Emeritus ofHealth and Physical Education (1964-1997).B.S.E. University of Arkansas -Monticello;M.Ed., University of Arkansas, Fayetteville;Ed.D., University of Southern Mississippi.WILLIAM DROESSLER, DirectorEmeritus of Library (1974-2001). B.A., St.John’s University; M.L.S., University ofOklahoma; Ph.D., Florida State University.LOUIS DUNLAP, Instructor Emeritusof Mathematics (1973-1996). A.A., ShorterCollege, B.S.; University of Arkansas at PineBluff; M.E., University of SouthwesternOklahoma State University.FRANCES S. FRANKLIN, AssociateProfessor Emeritus of Speech (1966-1992).B.A., M.A., Louisiana Tech University.MARY JANE GILBERT, AssociateProfessor Emeritus of Health and PhysicalEducation (1968-1998). B.S.E., SouthernArkansas University; M.S.E., HendersonState University; Ed.D., University ofMississippi.CECIL C. HAYWOOD, ProfessorEmeritus of Education (1962-1993). A.A.,Ventura College; B.S., Arkansas TechUniversity; M.Ed., Ed.D., University ofArkansas, Fayetteville.FRANCES A. HAYWOOD, ProfessorEmeritus of Education (1968-1989). B.A.,Arkansas College; M.S.E., University ofCentral Arkansas; Ed.D., University ofArkansas, Fayetteville.JAMES HUEY, Assistant Professor ofBiology (1966-1997). B.S., Henderson StateUniversity; M.S., University of SouthDakota.246Faculty / Staff


ALFRED S. K. HUI, AssociateProfessor Emeritus of Engineering andPhysics (1958-1988). B.S.M.E., National SunYet University; B.A.S., M.S.M.E., Universityof Houston.ROBERT L. KIRCHMAN, ProfessorEmeritus of Education and Psychology(1961-1987). B.S., Hendrix College; M.Ed.,University of Missouri.ROBERT KIRST, Professor Emeritus ofAgriculture (1973-1998). B.S., LouisianaState University; M.S., University ofFlorida; Ph.D., Louisiana State University.TIMOTHY KU, Professor Emeritus ofForestry (1959-1996). B.S., University ofNanking; M.F., Ph.D., Michigan StateUniversity.VICTORIA F. KU, Associate ProfessorEmeritus of Chemistry (1964-1992). B.S.,Barat College; M.S., Ph.D., University ofArkansas, Fayetteville.ROBERT A. LANGLEY, AssociateProfessor Emeritus of Economics (1962-1994). B.S.E., Henderson State University;M.A., Ed.S., George Peabody College.GALE LONG, Associate ProfessorEmeritus of French (1972-1998). B.A.,University of Utah; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio StateUniversity; I er Degre, II eme Degre,Universite De Grenoble.E. WESLEY MCCOY, AssociateProfessor Emeritus of Forestry (1953-1992).B.S.F., M.S.F., Purdue University.JULIAN W. METTETAL, AssistantProfessor Emeritus of Business Administration(1950-1983). B.S., University ofArkansas-Monticello; M.B.A., University ofMississippi.KERMIT C. MOSS, Professor Emeritusof Business Administration (1950-1978).B.B.A., University of Michigan; M.S.,University of Arkansas; Fayetteville, C.P.A.,State of Arkansas and State of Texas.BEATRICE I. PEARSON, AssistantProfessor of Art (1968-1992). B.S., KansasState College of Pittsburgh; B.A., M.A.,Idaho State University.ROBERT S. PEARSON, Professor ofChemistry (1968-1992). B.S., Kansas StateTeachers College, Pittsburgh; M.S., Ph.D.,Kansas State University.DANIEL WAYNE PUCKETT,Professor Emeritus of Education (1966-1983). B.S.A., M.S., Ed.D., University ofArkansas, Fayetteville.IRENE H. PUCKETT, AssistantProfessor Emeritus of Psychology (1966-1983). B.S.M.E. University of Arkansas,Fayetteville; M.A., Pennsylvania StateUniversity.WILLIAM H. ROBERTS, JR., AssistantProfessor Emeritus of Speech (1966-1983).B.S.E., University of Central Arkansas;M.A., University of Kansas; B.S.E.,University of Michigan; M.M.E., Universityof Arkansas, Fayetteville.ELWOOD SHADE, AssociateProfessor Emeritus of Forestry (1956-1981).B.S., Juniata College; B.S.F., M.F., PennsylvaniaState University.EDWARD E. STONE, InstructorEmeritus of English (1965-1997). B.S.E.,University of Arkansas -Monticello; M.S.E.,Henderson State University.JERRY WEBB, Professor Emeritus ofPhysics (1969-1999). B.S., NortheastLouisiana University; M.S., University ofArkansas, Fayetteville; Ph.D., Texas A&MUniversity.ROBERT W. WILEY, ProfessorEmeritus of Biology (1972-2002). B.S.,Central Missouri State College; M.S., FortHays Kansas State College; Ph. D., TexasTech University.FacultyFARROKH ABEDI, AssociateProfessor of Mathematics (1982). B.S., ParsCollege (Iran); M.A., Eastern New MexicoUniversity; Ph.D., Oklahoma StateUniversity.JOHN T. ANNULIS, Professor ofMathematics and Dean of the School ofMathematical and Natural Sciences (1972).B.A., Grand Valley State University; M.A.,Ph.D., University of New Mexico.EDMOND J. BACON, Professor ofBiology (1974). B.S.E., Southern ArkansasUniversity; M.S., University of Arkansas,Fayetteville; Ph.D., University of Louisville.ISABEL BACON, Instructor of Spanishand Art (1992). B.A., University ofLouisville; M.A., University of Arkansas,Fayetteville.PAUL BECKER, Associate Professor ofMusic (1992). B.M., University of Arkansasat Little Rock; M.M., D.M.A., University ofMemphis.DONNA BRACKIN, Instructor ofECEd/SPED Methods (2002). B.S., M.Ed.,Mississippi CollegeFaculty / Staff247


DON BRAGG, Adjunct AssistantProfessor (2000). B.S., Michigan TechnologicalUniversity; M.S., MichiganTechnological University; Ph.D., Utah StateUniversity.MORRIS BRAMLETT, AssociateProfessor of Chemistry (1993). B.S.,Arkansas Tech University; Ph.D., Universityof Arkansas, Fayetteville.DEBBIE BRYANT, Assistant Professorof Business Administration (1985). B.S.E.,University of Arkansas - Monticello; M.Ed.,University of Arkansas - Fayetteville;Ed.D., University of Arkansas - Little Rock.KELLY BRYANT, Professor ofAgriculture (1993). B.S., M.S., University ofArkansas - Fayetteville; Ph.D., Texas A&MUniversity.ROY CABANISS, Associate Professorof Marketing, (2001). B.S., M.S., OklahomaState University; M.B.A., Jacksonville StateUniversity; Ph.D., Oklahoma StateUniversity.LINDA CHAPMAN, Instructor ofMathematics (1986). B.S.E., M.Ed.,University of Arkansas - Monticello.JESSIE CHAPPELL, Biology LaboratoryInstructor (1997). B.S., University ofArkansas-Monticello; M.Ed., University ofArkansas-Pine Bluff.MARSHA CLAYTON, AssociateProfessor of Business Administration(1992). B.S., Arkansas State University;M.A., Ph.D., University of Mississippi.RICHARD CLUBB, AssociateProfessor of Psychology (1989). B.A.,Arizona State University; Ph.D., TexasChristian University.CLIFF COKER, Adjunct AssociateProfessor of Agriculture and ExtensionPlant Pathologist (1991). B.S., M.S.,University of Arkansas, Fayetteville.A. EDWIN COLBURN, Professor ofAgriculture and Chair of the Division ofAgriculture (1994). B.S., Sam Houston StateUniversity; M.S., Louisiana State University;Ph.D., West Virginia University.VANNEISE COLLINS, Dean, School ofSocial and Behavioral Sciences (1999). B.A.,Ed. M., Ph. D., University of New York atBuffalo.RICHARD CORBY, Professor ofHistory (1988). B.M.E., M.M.E., MillikinUniversity; M.A., Western Illinois University;Ph.D., Indiana University.JAMES CROW, Instructor of Nursing(2001). A.D.N., University of Arkansas -Monticello; B.S.N., Pacific Union College.GENE DILLARD, Professor ofEducation (1983). B.A., Central StateUniversity; M.A., Ed.D., University ofKansas.CHARLES L. DOLBERRY, AssistantProfessor (2002). M.A., University ofAlabama in Huntsville; Ph.D., AuburnUniversity.JEFF DOMBROWSKI, Instructor ofComputer Information Systems (2002).B.S. B.A., M.I.S., University of Arkansas,FayettevillePAUL DORUSKA, Assistant Professorof Forestry (1998). B.S., Michigan TechnologicalUniversity; M.S., Ph.D., VirginiaPolytechnic Institute and State University.STEPHEN M. DUFFY, AssistantProfessor of History (1997). B.A., AngeloState University; M.A., Ph.D., Texas A&MUniversity.SANDRA DUPREE, Director ofLibrary (1984). B.A., M.S., Clark - AtlantaUniversity.JAMES EDSON, Professor of Geology(1977). B.S., Arkansas Tech University;M.S., University of Arkansas, Fayetteville;Ph.D., Tulane University.CAROLE MCGARR EFIRD, Instructorof Mathematics (1998). B.S., M.Ed.,University of Arkansas - Monticello; Ed.D.,University of Arkansas at Little Rock.LARRY EUSTACE, Associate Professorof Nursing, Chair of the Division of Nursing(2001). B.S.N., University of Texas-Austin;M.S.N., Texas Woman’s University; D.S.N.,University of Alabama, Birmingham.DOROTHY E. EVERTS, AssistantProfessor of Sociology (1999). B.S., StateUniversity of New York-Potsdam; M.A.,Ph.D., Arizona State University.ROBERT L. FICKLIN, AssistantProfessor of Forestry (2002). B.S., M.S.,Ph.D. University of Missouri.CHARLES FLEIS, Instructor ofSpanish and French (1998). A.A., NorthwesternMichigan College; B.A., M.A.,Western Michigan University.ELLOISE FOSHEE, AssociateProfessor of Nursing (1991). A.D.N., B.S.N.,University of Arkansas - Monticello;M.S.N., University of Central Arkansas.248Faculty / Staff


PAUL FRANCIS, Professor ofAgriculture (1987). B.S., University ofTennessee at Martin; M.S., Iowa StateUniversity; Ph.D., University of Tennessee.MEMORY FRAZER, Instructor ofPhysical Education (1999). B.S., Universityof Arkansas - Monticello; M.S., Universityof Southern Mississippi.TODD W. GARNER, Instructor ofPhysical Education (2002). B.S., M.S.,University of South Alabama.WALTER GODWIN, Professor ofChemistry (1974). B.S., Arkansas TechUniversity; Ph.D., Oklahoma StateUniversity.ROBERT S. GRABER, AssistantProfessor of Finance (2002). B.S., MassachusettsInstitute of Technology, M.A., M.B.A.,Ph.D. University of New Orleans.JEREMY GREENE, Adjunct AssistantProfessor of Agriculture and ExtensionEntomologist (2001). B.A., College ofCharleston; M.S., Ph.D., Clemson University.HELEN GIESSEN GUENTER,Assistant Librarian (1982). B.A., CentenaryCollege; M.A., Louisiana Tech University;M.L.S., University of Southern Mississippi.JOE M. GUENTER, Assistant Professorof Physics (1962). B.S., Hendrix College;M.S., University of Arkansas, Fayetteville.JAMES M. GULDIN, AdjunctProfessor of Forestry (1999). B.S., PennsylvaniaState University; M.F.S., YaleUniversity; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison.DEXTER GULLEDGE, Professor ofAccounting (2001). B.S.B.A., M.B.A.,University of Southern Mississippi; D.B.A.,Mississippi State University.ANNETTE HALL, Associate Professorof Music and Chair of the Division of Music(1972). B.M.E., University of Arkansas -Monticello; M.M.E., University of Arkansas- Fayetteville.TED M. HAMMETT, AssociateProfessor of Accounting (2000). B.S.,Louisiana Tech; M.S., Sam Houston StateUniversity; D.B.A., Louisiana Tech.CLAUDIA HARTNESS, Instructor ofEnglish (1969). B.S.E., University ofArkansas - Monticello; M.A., University ofArkansas, Fayetteville.ERIC HEITZMAN, Assistant Professorof Forestry (1999). B.S., University ofVermont; M.S., State University of NewYork; Ph.D., Michigan TechnologicalUniversity.JAMES HECTOR, Assistant Professorof Physical Education (1999). B.S.,University of Texas at Austin; M.Ed., SulRoss University; Ed.D., East TexasUniversity.BETTY HENDRICKS, Instructor ofEnglish (2000). B.A., M.F.A., University ofMassachusetts.JEAN HENDRIX, Associate Professorof Computer Information Systems (2000).B.S., Arkansas A& M College; M.B.A.,University of Arkansas - Fayetteville.DONALD HOLLEY, Professor ofHistory (1967). B.A., Louisiana TechUniversity; M.A., Ph.D., Louisiana StateUniversity; M.A., University of Texas.TERRI HOPKINS, Instructor ofComputer Information Systems (2000).B.B.A., Northeast Louisiana University;M.B.A., University of Arkansas at LittleRock.D. RAYMON HUSTON, AssistantProfessor of Political Science (2000). B.A.,M.A., Midwestern State University; Ph.D.,Texas Tech University.MARVIN D. JETER, AssociateProfessor of Anthropology and UAMStation Archeologist, Arkansas ArcheologicalSurvey (1988). B.A., University ofAlabama, Tuscaloosa; B.A., University ofAlabama, Birmingham; Ph.D., Arizona StateUniversity.C. MORRELL JONES, Professor ofEducation (1973). B.S.E., University ofArkansas, Fayetteville; M.S., Kansas StateCollege of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., GeorgePeabody College.MYEONG W. KIM, Assistant Professorof Psychology (2003). B.A., George MasonUniversity; M.A., University of Arkansas atLittle Rock; Ph.D., Texas Tech University.KATHY KING, Associate Professor ofHealth and Physical Education (1988). B.S.,Southern Arkansas University; M.S.,University of Arkansas, Fayetteville; Ed.D.,University of Georgia.ROBERT KISSELL, JR., AssistantProfessor of S IS (2002). B.S., ChristianBrothers College; M.S., Memphis StateUniversity; Ph.D., Memphis State University.Faculty / Staff249


RICHARD KLUENDER, Professor ofForestry and Dean of the School of ForestResources (1984). B.S., M.F., Ph.D., VirginiaPolytechnic Institute and State University.DAVID KOSKOSKI, AssistantProfessor of Music (1972). B.A., MoreheadState University; M.A., Marshall University.VERA LANG, Associate Professor ofEducation (1995). B.S., University ofArkansas at Pine Bluff; M.Ed., University ofArkansas-Fayetteville; Ph.D., Iowa StateUniversity.HAL O. LIECHTY, Associate Professorof Forestry (1996). B.S., M.S., Ph.D.,Michigan Technological University.BEVERLY LOBITZ, Assistant Professorof Music (1972). B.M., Kansas StateUniversity; M.S., Emporia State University.YANCY LONG, Instructor of Speech(2002). M.A., Arkansas State UniversityLOWELL F. LYNDE, JR., AssistantProfessor of Mathematics (1969). B.S., M.S.,Louisiana Tech University.ANGELA MARSH, AssociateProfessor of Computer Information Systems(1991). B.S., Henderson State University;M.S., Arkansas State University; M.E.,Arkansas Tech University.GARY MARSHALL, AssociateProfessor of Speech (1992). B.S., MurrayState University; M.S., Ph.D., SouthernIllinois University.BETTY MATTHEWS, Professor ofEnglish (1967). B.A., B.S.E., University ofArkansas - Monticello; M.A., Ph.D.,University of Arkansas, Fayetteville.JAMES MCCONNELL, AdjunctAssociate Professor of Agronomy (1984).B.S.A., M.S., Arkansas State University;Ph.D., Texas A&M University.ROSE MCCONNELL, Professor ofChemistry (1992). B.S., Arkansas StateUniversity; Ph.D., Texas A&M University.E. WESLEY MCCOY, VisitingAssociate Professor Emeritus of Forestry(1953-1992). B.S.F., M.S.F., PurdueUniversity.ADAM MCKEE, Assistant Professor ofCriminal Justice (2002). B.S., M.A., Ph.D.,University of Southern Mississippi.GARY MEGGS, Instructor of Musicand Director of Bands (2002). M.M.E.,Henderson State University.SAYEED MEHMOOD, AssistantProfessor of Forestry (2001). B.S., Instituteof Forestry University of ChittagongBangladesh; M.S., University of Maine; Ph.D., Auburn University.LISA B. MOON, Director of SocialWork (1999). B.A., University of Louisiana-Monroe; M.S.W., University of SouthernMississippi.ROBERT MOORE, Associate Professorof English (1997). B.S., M.S., Illinois StateUniversity; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati.GUY NELSON, Instructor of Mathematics(1989). B.S., M.S., University ofArkansas, Fayetteville.GLYNDA NIXON, Instructor ofBusiness Administration (1968). B.S.E.,University of Arkansas - Monticello; M.S.E.,Henderson State University.RUSSELL NORDEEN, AssociateProfessor of Biology (1992). B.A., Universityof California, Los Angeles; M.S., KansasState University; Ph.D., Monash University,Australia.RICHARD O’CONNOR, Professor ofEducation (1993). B.S., Boston College;M.S., University of Massachusetts; Ed.D.,Louisiana State University.LEIA O’FALLON, Assistant Professorof Nursing (2002). B.S.N., University ofArkansas - Monticello; M.N.S., Universityof Arkansas Medical Sciences.DAVID W. PATTERSON, ResearchProfessor of Forestry (1996). B.S., PennsylvaniaState University; M.S., Colorado StateUniversity; Ph.D., Texas A&M University.J. DENNIS PATTERSON, AssociateProfessor of Business Administration(2000). B.S., University of Missouri; M.B.A.,Golden Gate University; Ph.D., Universityof Illinois.DIANE PAYNE, Instructor of English(2000). B.S., Northern Arizona University;M.F.A., University of Arizona.MATTHEW PELKKI, AssociateProfessor of Forestry, George H. ClippertEndowed Chair (2001). B.S., University ofMichigan at Ann Arbor; M.S., University ofMinnesota; Ph.D., University of Minnesota.WAYNE PONIEWAZ, AssociateProfessor of Psychology (1982). B.A.,Marquette University, M.S., Ph.D., KansasState University.250Faculty / Staff


ANBOLYN POTTER, AssistantLibrarian (2003). B.A., Arizona StateUniversity; M.L.I.S., University of Texas atAustin.R. DAVID RAY, Associate Professor ofSpeech and Dean of the School of Arts andHumanities (1970). B.A., M.A., Texas TechUniversity.ANTHONY K. RHEE, Professor ofBusiness Administration (2000). B.S., M.A.,D.B.A., Kent State University.THOMAS RICHARD, AssistantProfessor of Art (1997). B.F.A., LouisianaState University; M.F.A., State University ofNew York at Albany.JAMES ROIGER, Associate Professorof Computer Information Systems andChair of the Division of ComputerInformation Systems (1993). A.S., A.A.,Southwestern College; A.B., M.A., SanDiego State University; Ph.D., University ofArizona.STEPHEN RUEGGER, Instructor ofCriminal Justice (1999). B.S., M.S.,University of Southern Mississippi.CHRISTINE RUFF, Assistant Professorof Nursing (2001). B.S.N., DeaconessCollege of Nursing; M.S., Texas Women’sUniversity.LYNDA SAMONS, Assistant to theDean/Partnership Coordinator (2002).M.S.E., Henderson State University.HASSAN SAYYAR, AssociateProfessor of Mathematics (1996). B.S.,University of Tehran (Iran); M.A., M.S.,Mississippi State University; Ph.D., KansasState University.KELLEY SAYYAR, ChemistryLaboratory Instructor (1999). B.S., KansasState University.MARK SCHMIDT, Associate Professorof English (1992). B.S., Dallas Bible College;M.A., University of Texas at Dallas; Ph.D.,University of Texas at Arlington.LORI SELBY, Associate Professor ofComputer Information Systems (1986).B.B.A., Baylor University; M.B.A., Universityof Arkansas, Fayetteville.DONNA R. SHANKLIN, AdjunctAssistant Professor of Agriculture andExtension Entomologist (1996). B.S., M.S.,University of Kentucky.ANITA SHAW, Assistant Professor ofNursing (1999). B.S.N., University ofArkansas-Pine Bluff, M.S.N., University ofCentral Arkansas.WILLIAM L. SHEA, Professor ofHistory (1974). B.A., Louisiana StateUniversity; Ph.D., Rice University.MICHAEL G. SHELTON, AdjunctAssociate Professor of Forestry (1988). B.S.,M.S., Ph.D., Mississippi State University.MARK SHORES, Assistant Librarian(1998). B.A., University of Minnesota atMorris; M.S.L.S., University of Kentucky.CHRISTOPHER SIMS, AssistantProfessor of Biology (2002). B.S., Universityof North Alabama; Ph. D., University ofMississippi.KENT SKINNER, Associate Professorand Director of Choral Activities (2001).B.A., M.M., University of NorthernColorado; M.M., D.M.A., University ofTexas at Austin.V. CAROLE SMITH, AssistantProfessor of Education (2000). B.M., M.M.,M.Ed., Ph.D., University of Arizona.KENNETH L. SMITH, AdjunctProfessor of Agriculture and ExtensionWeed Scientist (1998). B.S., Stephen F.Austin State University; M.S., Sam HoustonState University; Ph.D., Oklahoma StateUniversity.JULIE SPARKS, Assistant Professor ofEnglish (2000). B.A., San Jose StateUniversity; M.A., California State University;Ph.D., Penn State University.C. ROBERT STARK, JR., AssociateProfessor of Agriculture (1996). A.S.,Elizabethtown Community College; B.S.,M.S., University of Kentucky; Ph.D.,University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.PAT STEPHENS WILLIAMS, AssistantProfessor of Forestry (2001). B.A., M.A.,M.S., Ph. D., Southern Illinois University,Carbondale.KATE STEWART, Professor of English(1988). B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University ofMississippi.ERIC SUNDELL, Professor of Biology(1980). B.S., M.S., Arizona State University;Ph.D., Tulane University.PHILIP TAPPE, Associate Professor ofWildlife Management (1991). B.S., M.S.,Stephen F. Austin State University; Ph.D.,Clemson University.Faculty / Staff251


CHARLOTTE TAYLOR, AssociateProfessor of Nursing (1986). A.D.N., B.S.N.,University of Arkansas - Monticello;M.S.N., Northwestern State University.FRED TAYLOR, Professor of Educationand Chancellor (1971). B.A., NortheasternState University; M.Ed., Universityof Oklahoma; Ed.D., University of NorthernColorado.S. MAX TERRELL, Professor ofEducation (1984). B.S., Indiana University;M.S., University of Tennessee; Ph.D.,Indiana State University.LYNNE THOMPSON, Professor ofForestry (1980). B.S., Kansas State University;M.S., Ph.D., University of Minnesota.STEPHEN A. TRANA, AssociateProfessor of Music and Assistant Director ofBands (1996). B.S., Northern MichiganUniversity; M.M., D.M.A., University ofColorado.DENNIS M. TRAVIS, Professor ofBiology and Vice Chancellor for AcademicAffairs (1998). B.S., M.Ed., EdinboroUniversity of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., MiamiUniversity.ALYSSA VOUGAS, Social Work FieldDirector/Instructor (2002). B.A., BeloitCollege; M.S.W., Smith College of School ofSocial Work, Northampton, MA.RICHARD WALLACE, AssociateProfessor of Accounting (1968). B.B.A.,University of Arkansas - Monticello;M.B.A., University of Arkansas,Fayetteville; C.P.A., States of Oklahoma andArkansas.SHARON WALTERS, AssistantProfessor of Nursing (1995). B.S.N.,University of Arkansas - Monticello;M.S.N., Delta State University.MICKIE WARWICK, Instructor of SIS(2002). B.S., Oregon State; M.S., ArkansasTech.SANDRA WATSON, Instructor ofEnglish (1995). B.A., University ofArkansas at Pine Bluff; M.A., New MexicoState University.LINDA WEBSTER, Professor ofSpeech (1990). B.S., M.A., SouthernConnecticut State University; Ph.D.,Louisiana State University.MARK WEGLEY, Instructor of English(2000). B.A., University of Washington;M.A., Boise State University.ROBERT C. WEIH, JR., AssociateProfessor of Forestry (1994). A.S., NorthwesternConnecticut Community College;B.S., Northern Arizona University; M.S.,University of Minnesota; Ph.D., VirginiaPolytechnic Institute and State University.DONNELL D. WHITE, JR., AssistantProfessor of Forestry (2000). B.S., M.S.,Southwest Missouri State University; Ph.D.,Montana State University at Bozeman.WHITNEY A. WHITWORTH,Assistant Professor of Animal Science(2002). B.S., M.S. Angelo State University;Ph.D., Texas A&M University.CHRISTOPHER J. WRIGHT, Instructorof Political Science (2002). B.A.,Southern Utah University; M.A., Universityof Southern California.BORIS ZEIDE, Professor of Forestry(1980). M.Sc., The Moscow College ofForestry; Ph.D., All-Union ResearchInstitute of Standardization, (Russia).ELIZABETH ZEIDE, Instructor ofMathematics (1989). M.S., The PenzaPolytechnical Institute, (Russia).252Faculty / Staff


INDEXto the 2003-05 catalogAcademic Appeals ............................................................ 65Academic Calendar ......................................................... 4-5Academic Clemency ........................................................ 56Academic Code Violations .............................................. 65Academic Credit ............................................................... 55Academic Degrees and Majors ......................................... 8Academic Programs ......................................................... 62Academic Regulations ..................................................... 55Academic Sessions ........................................................... 55Academic Standing and Suspension ............................. 63Academic Structure ............................................................ 9Academic Support Units ................................................. 10Accounting Courses ....................................................... 162Accounting Major ............................................................. 94Accreditation ....................................................................... 7Adding Courses ................................................................ 61Administrative Staff ....................................................... 245Administrative Support Systems ................................... 95Admission (Conditional) ................................................. 62Admission (First-Time Freshmen) ................................. 62Admission (Former Students) ........................................ 14Admission (Freshman Early) .......................................... 14Admission (Graduate) ..................................................... 15Admission (International Students) .............................. 16Admission (Pre-Freshmen) ............................................. 15Admission (Post-Baccalaureate) ..................................... 15Admission (Provisional) .................................................. 16Admission Requirements ................................................ 13Admission (Special Student) ........................................... 15Admission (Transfer) ....................................................... 14Admission (Undergraduate) ........................................... 13Admission (Visiting Students) ........................................ 15Admission to Teacher Education ................................. 104Admissions, Office of ....................................................... 51Advanced Placement Credit ........................................... 59Agribusiness Major .......................................................... 77Agricultural Economics Courses .................................. 164Agricultural Engineering Courses ............................... 165Agriculture, Division of ................................................... 75Agriculture Courses ....................................................... 165Agriculture Minor ............................................................ 81Agronomy Courses ........................................................ 165Alpha Chi Honor Society ................................................ 64Alumni Affairs .................................................................. 52Animal Science Courses ................................................ 166Animal Science Option .................................................... 78Anthropology Courses .................................................. 167Apartments (Student) ...................................................... 44Applied Music Fees ........................................................ 142Arkansas Assessment of General Education ................ 63Arkansas Core Curriculum ............................................. 73Art Courses ...................................................................... 167Art Major ........................................................................... 84Art Minor ........................................................................... 84Arts and Humanities, School of ..................................... 83Associate Degrees and Majors ........................................ 70Associate of Applied Science Degree .......................... 130Associate of Science/Land SurveyingTechnology Degree ............................................. 125Associate of Applied Science in Nursing Degree .......... 148, 153Associate of Arts Degree ............................................... 129Astronomy Courses ....................................................... 168Athletic Training Courses .............................................. 169Athletic Training Minor ................................................. 138Athletics ............................................................................. 52Attendance ........................................................................ 61Audit ................................................................................. 58Automobile Registration ................................................. 20Bachelor of Arts Degree ................................................... 70Bachelor of Business Administration ...................... 71, 93Bachelor of Music Education Degree .................... 72, 141Bachelor of Science Degree ............................................. 71Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree ................. 72, 147Bachelor of Social Work Degree ............................. 72, 158Band .................................................................................. 141Bankston Hall .................................................................... 43Biology Courses .............................................................. 170Biology Major .................................................................. 134Biology Minor ................................................................. 134Board of Trustees ............................................................ 245Bookstore ........................................................................... 23Business, School of ........................................................... 93Business Administration Major ...................................... 95Business Core .................................................................... 94Business Technology Major ............................................ 97Calendar ............................................................................ 4-5Campus Map ........................................ Inside Front CoverCareer Services Office ...................................................... 41Catalog Time Limits ....................................................... 221Certification to Teach ..................................................... 156Change of Registration (Drop/Add) ............................. 61Chemistry Courses ......................................................... 172Chemistry Major ............................................................. 135Chemistry Minor ............................................................ 135Choir ................................................................................. 141Classification ..................................................................... 55Coaching Minor .............................................................. 113Collaterals .......................................................................... 71College Entrance Exam Scores ........................................ 14College Level Examination Program (CLEP) ............... 58Commencement ................................................................ 73Comprehensive Examinations (Graduate) ......... 225, 231Computer Information Systems, Division of ............... 99Computer Information Systems Courses .................... 176Computer Information Systems Major ......................... 99Computer Science Courses ........................................... 176Index253


Conditional Standing ....................................................... 62Conduct Code (Student) .................................................. 46Core Curriculum ............................................................... 73Co requisite ........................................................................ 57Correspondence Courses ................................................. 59Continuing Education ...................................................... 11Continuous Enrollment in Required Courses .............. 63Course Descriptions (Undergraduate) ................. 162-217Course Load (Graduate) ................................................ 220Course Load (Undergraduate) ....................................... 61Course Prefixes ............................................................... 161Course Symbols and Numbers ............................... 57, 161Counseling and Testing ................................................... 42Credit by Academic Unit Examination ......................... 60Credit by Examination ..................................................... 60Credit for Prior Military Training .................................. 61Criminal Justice Courses ............................................... 175Criminal Justice Major ................................................... 155Criminal Justice Minor .................................................. 156Dean’s List ......................................................................... 57Degree Audit Requirement ............................................. 69Degree Requirements ....................................................... 70Development Office ......................................................... 52Developmental Courses ................................................ 176Developmental Courses, Enrollment in ........................ 57Diploma Date .................................................................... 73Discipline Procedures ...................................................... 49Distance Education ........................................................... 11Double Major .................................................................... 69Dropping Courses ............................................................ 61Early Childhood Education Courses ........................... 176Early Childhood Special Education Major ................. 106Earth Science Courses .................................................... 180Economics Courses ........................................................ 177Education, School of ....................................................... 103Education Courses ......................................................... 178Education Courses (Middle Level Education) ........... 194Education Courses (Professional) ................................ 178Education Foundations Courses .................................. 234Education Testing ............................................................. 42Engineering Courses ...................................................... 180English Courses .............................................................. 178English Major .................................................................... 85English Minor ................................................................... 85Entomology Courses ...................................................... 180Entrance Exam Scores ...................................................... 14Entrepreneurship Concentration ................................... 96Exercise Science Courses ............................................... 181Exercise Science Option ................................................. 111Expenses, Estimate ........................................................... 21Faculty .............................................................................. 247Faculty Emeriti ................................................................ 246Family Housing ................................................................ 44Fees and Expenses ............................................................ 19Fees (Miscellaneous) ........................................................ 20Finance Concentration ..................................................... 96Finance Courses .............................................................. 182Financial Assistance ......................................................... 25Food Service ...................................................................... 42Forest Resources, School of ........................................... 115Forestry B.S. Degree ....................................................... 119Forest Resources M.S. Degree ....................................... 228Forest Resources Courses (Graduate) .......................... 237Forest Courses (Undergraduate) .................................. 182Forestry Major ......................................................... 116, 119Forestry Minor ........................................................ 116, 125French Courses ............................................................... 185French Minor ..................................................................... 88Full-Time Student (Definition) ....................................... 61General Agriculture Option ............................................ 79General Business Courses ............................................. 186General Education ............................................................ 67General Education, Restrictions ..................................... 67General Education for Teachers ............................... 67, 72General Information ........................................................... 7General Studies, Division of ......................................... 129Geography Courses (Undergraduate) ......................... 187GIS Minor ........................................................................ 126Grade Point Average (G.P.A.) ......................................... 62Grade Point Requirements for Graduation .................. 69Grading System ................................................................ 55Graduate Appeals ........................................................... 219Graduate Courses ........................................................... 233Graduate Degrees ..................................................... 72, 219Graduate Programs ........................................................ 219Graduation Requirements ............................................... 67Graduation Under a Catalog .......................................... 69Graduation with Honors ................................................. 72Grants ................................................................................. 25Grants Office ..................................................................... 52Gulf Coast Research Laboratory .................................. 139Heath and Physical Education Major (non-licensure) .......... 109Heath and Physical Education Major (P-12) ............... 108Health Services ................................................................. 45History and Social Studies Major ................................. 156History Courses (Undergraduate) ............................... 188History Major .................................................................. 156History Minor ................................................................. 156History of UAM .................................................................. 7Honor Society (Alpha Chi) .............................................. 64Honors, Graduation with ................................................ 72Horsfall Hall ...................................................................... 44Horticulture Courses ..................................................... 189Housing Eligibility ........................................................... 44Human Services Minor .................................................. 158Incomplete Grade ............................................................. 55Independent Study (Graduate) .................................... 220Independent Study (Undergraduate) ............................ 58Information Technology .................................................. 10Instrumental Concentration (Music) ........................... 143Intercollegiate Athletics ................................................... 52Intramurals ........................................................................ 42Journalism Courses ........................................................ 189Journalism Major .............................................................. 89Journalism Minor ............................................................. 89Judicial Board .................................................................... 51Jury Examinations (Music) ............................................ 142Learning Support Services .............................................. 43Library ................................................................................ 10Loans .................................................................................. 26Majors ................................................................................... 8Management Concentration ........................................... 96Management Courses .................................................... 192Map ........................................................ Inside Front CoverMarketing Concentration ................................................ 97Marketing Courses ......................................................... 193Married Student Housing ............................................... 44Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) ............................. 224Master of Education Degree (M.Ed) ............................ 224Master of Education in Educational Leadership Degree .............. 224Master of Science (Forest Resouces) ............................ 228Mathematical and Natural Sciences, School of .......... 133Mathematics Courses ..................................................... 190Mathematics Educational Courses ............................... 190Mathematics Major ......................................................... 136Mathematics Minor ........................................................ 136Maximum Course Load ................................................... 61Maxwell Hall ..................................................................... 44Media Services .................................................................. 53MIA/KIA Dependents ..................................................... 39254Index


Middle Level Education Courses ................................. 194Middle Level Education Major ..................................... 106Minors ................................................................................ 71Mission .............................................................................. 7-8Modern Languages Courses ......................................... 194Motor Vehicles .................................................................. 21Music, Division of .......................................................... 141Music Courses ................................................................. 194Music Education Major ................................................. 144Music Major ..................................................................... 142Music Minor .................................................................... 145Music/Private Instruction Courses ............................. 203Music (Instrumental Concentration) ........................... 143Music (Music Theatre Concentration) ......................... 143Music (Piano Concentration) ........................................ 142Music (Vocal Concentration) ......................................... 142Natural Sciences Major .................................................. 136Natural Sciences Minor ......................................... 126, 137Non-Classroom Credit ..................................................... 58Nursing, Division of ....................................................... 147Nursing Advanced Placement ...................................... 148Nursing Courses ............................................................. 197Nursing Major ................................................................. 150Part-Time Employment ................................................... 25Part-Time Student ............................................................. 61Payment of Accounts ....................................................... 22Philosophy Courses ....................................................... 202Physical Education Courses (Graduate) ..................... 242Physical Education Courses (Undergraduate) ........... 199Physical Education Minor ............................................. 113Physical Science Courses ............................................... 202Physical Science Option ................................................. 137Physics Courses .............................................................. 202Physics Minor .................................................................. 138Piano Concentration (Music) ........................................ 142Piano Proficiency ............................................................ 141Plant and Soil Science Option ......................................... 79Political Science Courses (Undergraduate) ................ 206Political Science Major ................................................... 157Political Science Minor ................................................... 157Pre-Freshman Admission ................................................ 15Pre-Law Program ........................................................... 157Pre-Professional Studies .................................................... 9Prerequisite ........................................................................ 57Professional School Candidates ..................................... 72Provisional Admission ..................................................... 16Psychology Courses ....................................................... 207Psychology Major ........................................................... 157Psychology Minor .......................................................... 158Public Safety ...................................................................... 21Readmission (Former Students) ..................................... 14Refunds (Bookstore) ......................................................... 23Refunds (Residence Halls) .............................................. 23Refunds (Tuition and Fees) ............................................. 22Registrar ............................................................................. 11Repayments ....................................................................... 22Repetition of Courses ....................................................... 57Residence Hall Fees .......................................................... 20Residence Life ................................................................... 43Residency of Fee Purposes .............................................. 22Residency Requirments ................................................... 69Royer Hall .......................................................................... 43Satisfactory Degree Progress .......................................... 62Schedule Changes ............................................................ 61Scholarships ...................................................................... 27Science Education Courses ............................................ 208Second Baccalaureate Degree ......................................... 69Second Major ..................................................................... 69Senior Citizen Fee Waiver ............................................... 20Senior Credit Requirement ............................................. 68Social Science Courses ................................................... 211Social and Behavioral Sciences, School of ................... 155Sociology Courses .......................................................... 211Social Work Courses ....................................................... 214Social Work Major .......................................................... 159Spanish Courses .............................................................. 211Spanish Minor ................................................................... 89Spanish Study Abroad Program ..................................... 90Spatial Information Systems Courses .......................... 209Spatial Information Systems Major (GIS Option) .......................... 120Spatial Information Systems Major (Surveying Option) .............. 122Special Education Courses ............................................ 176Special Student Admission ............................................. 15Special Student Services .................................................. 45Speech Courses ............................................................... 212Speech Communication Major ....................................... 91Speech Communication Minor ....................................... 91Student Absences .............................................................. 62Student Activities ............................................................. 45Student Affairs Office ...................................................... 44Student Conduct ............................................................... 46Student Health Program .................................................. 45Student Load ..................................................................... 61Student Services ................................................................ 41Student Support Services ................................................ 45Table of Contents ................................................................ 3Teaching Certification .................................................... 156Teacher Education, Admission to ........................... 72, 104Teacher Education Internships ..................................... 105Teacher Licensure ........................................................... 104Testing Center ................................................................... 42Title IV Funds (Return) .................................................... 26Transcripts ......................................................................... 14Transfer Admission .......................................................... 14Transfer Policy .................................................................. 64Tuition and Fees ................................................................ 19Arkansas Resident (Fall/Spring) ........................ 19Arkansas Resident (Summer) .............................. 20Graduate Students (Fall/Spring/Summer) ...... 20Out of State Resident (Fall/Spring) .................... 19Out of State Resident (Summer) ......................... 20Undergraduate Enrolled in Graduate Courses .... 58, 220University Calendar ........................................................ 4-5University Center ............................................................. 42University Judicial Board ................................................ 51University Relations Office ............................................. 53University Studies Courses ........................................... 216Upward Bound ................................................................. 46Veterans Affairs Benefits .................................................. 39Veterinary Medicine ......................................................... 75Visiting Student Admission ............................................ 15Visitors ............................................................................... 62Vocal Concentration (Music) .