The Navy Vol_64_Part2 2002 - Navy League of Australia

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The Navy Vol_64_Part2 2002 - Navy League of Australia

INS MYSORE al anchor during ihe Indian Naval Review of 2001. MYSORE and her iwo sisters are ihe most powerful surface combatants built by India andemployed hy any Indian ocean power. (Brian Morrison. Warships & Marine Corps Museum)Last year Frtmantle became the first Australian port of call for the Indian Navy's latest guided missile destroyer, theDelhi class INS MUMBAI (D-62). THE NAVY"s WA based correspondent Ian Johnson toured this impressive destroyerand filed this report.INS MUMBAI arriving in Sydney Harbour for the first time. The smokeemanating from her slacks made many Sydneysiders fear she was on fire.(Brian Morrison. Warships & Marine Corps Museum Ivisually on a clear day but difficult on bad days. All bulkheadsigns arc bilingual, with Sanskrit first, and English second,reflecting the use of English as a language used in all regionsof India.MUMBAI is powered by a Ukrainian-built ZoryaProduction Association M36 COGAG (Combined Gas AndGas) plant comprising two paired DT59 reversible gasturbines each using a RG 54 gearbox. The powerplant cangenerate in excess of 8().(KX) hp. The ship also has installed 2Bergan-Garden Reach KVM-18 Diesel engines. The enginesarc housed in soundproofed boxes, lowering the acousticsignature of the ship. These engines move the ship at morethan 32kts. The ship's cruising speed is 24kts with the class"maximum range not known.WEAPONS AND SENSORSThe Delhi class is equipped with Russian weapons andIndian sensor suites. The ship's Air/Surface Surveillance radarconsists of a Bharat/Signaal RAWL/P318Z (LW-08) operatingin D-band with an IFF interrogator mounted atop the antenna.MUMBAI is also equipped with a MR-775 Fregat (NATOcode name: Half Plate) planar array radar. The ship relies on aBharat Rashmi 3 Pa,.a Frond (I-band) radar system fornavigation.MUMBAI's surface-to-surface missiles (SSMs) comprisesixteen Kh-35 Uran or SS-N-25 (NATO: Switchblade) SSM s.housed in four quadruple KT-184 launchers, angled out at30°. These sea skimming missiles have an activeradar homing seeker, a range of 13()kms at Mach 0.9 anduse a 145kg blast fragmentation warhead. All sixteenmissiles can be ripple-fired at one-second intervals. Firecontrol for the missiles is provided by a Garpun-Bal (NATO:Plank Shave) radar. The Switchblade is the equivalent of theUS Harpoon Bli>ck IC SSM hence its Western nickname of'Harpoonski'.MUMBAI's air defence relies on two single arm KashmirSAM missile launchers one of which is locatcd forward of thebridge and the other is aft just before the helicopter hangar.Each launcher has a magazine of 24 missiles. Guidance andtarget illumination for the missiles is provided by six MR-90Orekh (NATO: Front Dome) fire control radars. The Kashmirlaunchers use the SA-N-7 (NATO: Gladfly) SAM which has a70kg warhead and a speed of Mach 3 out to 25kms.The ship is equipped with one KKImm AK-100 gun whichis used against surface targets, firing 60rpm (rounds a minute)with a range of up to I5knis. The AK-I00's fire control isprovided by the MR-184 (NATO: Kite Screech) radar system.MUMBAI's visit was timed as part of the Centenary NavalReview that was to be held in Sydney in early October 2001before world events, and the possible commitment of the RANin military action, forced the review's cancellation.The officers and crew of MUMBAl were disappointedwith the event's cancellation, yet were happy that their 2001goodwill cruise would continue, even with events near Indiaescalating towards war.MUMBAI is assigned to the IN's (Indian Navy's) WesternCommand and is based at Mumbai (formerly known asBombay). This was her first overseas cruise sincecommissioning earlier in 2001.The IN. once a nation that relied on the UK and then theSoviet Union for ship designs, began to design a warship fromscratch in the early 1970's. After the success of the six shipGodavari class frigate program, the IN began to plan for adestroyer size ship to be built at the Mazagon Dockyards inMumbai.THE CLASSKnown by the IN as Project 15. the first of the class. INSDELHI (D-60) was laid down at the Mazagon Dockyard on 14November 1986. The class are the largest warships built inIndia, yet as the project continued, delays began to occur asthe Soviet Union, who was providing techical assistance aswell as the weapons suite, began to collapse. When the SovietUnion finally disolved in 1991. the Delhi class were alreadyfar behind schedule as the supply system from Russia failed.It would be another six years before supply problems werefixed and INS DELHI outfitted enough to begin sea trials inIW7. Her two sister ships. MYSORE and BOMBAY (whosename was changed to MUMBAI in 1999) were also delayeddue to these problems. INS DELHI (D-61) was finallycommissioned on 15 November 1997. with MYSORE (D-60)following on 02 June 1999 (after modifications from thelessons learnt from DELHI'S construction) and MUMBAIcommissioning in Mumbai on 22 January 2001.The Delhi class were designed as multi-role ships thatcould operate either as part of a carrier screen orindependently with a balanced weapons outfit to handlesurface, sub-surface or air threats.DESIGNThe Delhi class design, which Russia's Severnoyc DesignBureau assisted as a consultant, is described as a stretchedRAJPUT (Kashin-II) with Godavari features. Because of thedelays in building the Delhi class, design advances such asstealth were seen as too costly for the first three ships. It ishoped to incorporate these into the follow on class known asProject I5A.MUMBAI's displacement is between 6.700 standard to6.900 tons fully loaded, and is 163 metres long. These vesselsare fitted for use as flagships and can accommodate anAdmiral with staff.The 320 crew live in quarters comparable to the RAN'sPerth class destroyers, while the 31 officers live in two bunkcabins except for the Captain who has his own cabin.One of the interesting aspects of MUMBAI is the near fullgloss dark sea grey paint used on the outer hull, which makeslight reflect off the ship, making it easier to find the ship14 VOL 64 NO. 2 IHE NAVYINS MUMBAI. Note the two banks of eight SS-N-25 Switchblade' ASCM on her starboard side The class carries 16 of these Russian madeanti-ship missiles, known in the West as "Harpoonski*. (Brian Morrison. Warships & Marine Corps Museum)THE NAVY VOL. 64 NO. 5215

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