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Spring 2004 Catalog - Pennsylvania State University Press

Spring 2004 Catalog - Pennsylvania State University Press

P H I L O S O P H YP O L

P H I L O S O P H YP O L I T I C A L S C I E N C E / P H I L O S O P H Y / W O M E N ’ S S T U D I E SNew in PaperbackSartre on ViolenceCuriously AmbivalentRONALD E. SANTONI“In this well-documented, provocative work,Professor Santoni uncovers and examinesthe ambivalences of Sartre’s treatments ofviolence throughout his writings. In theprocess he interestingly resurrects the intellectualatmosphere of mid-twentieth-centuryFrance, paying special attention to one ofthe most famous polemics of the time, theSartre-Camus clash over the latter’s TheRebel. The timeliness of Santoni’s contribution, at a moment when the word‘terrorism’ has captured everyone’s attention but the idea of it often appearsmurky and unclear, hardly needs to be underscored.”—William L. McBride, Purdue University“I do not know of anyone who has undertaken as thorough a study of boththe early and later Sartre’s ‘curiously ambivalent’ views on violence. Oneof the book’s special strengths is that it makes significant use of Sartre’sunpublished 1964 Rome Lecture as well as interviews he gave shortly beforehis death.”—Thomas C. Anderson, Marquette UniversityFrom Materialism and Revolution (1946) through Hope Now (1980), Jean-PaulSartre was deeply engaged with questions about the meaning and justifiabilityof violence. In the first comprehensive treatment of Sartre’s views onthe subject, Ronald Santoni begins by tracing the full trajectory of Sartre’sevolving thought on violence and shows how the “curious ambiguity” of freedomaffirming itself against freedom in his earliest writings about violencedeveloped into his “curiously ambivalent” position through his later writings.In the second part of the book, Santoni provides a detailed analysis ofSartre’s debate with Camus in 1952 and his Rome Lecture in 1964. Santonicriticizes Sartre for scoffing at Camus’s “limits” on violence while failingto articulate his own. And in the Rome Lecture, Santoni argues, Sartre stillheld a two-sided position: while acknowledging conditions for any legitimateuse of terror, Sartre failed to show persuasively how revolutionarykilling could be a vehicle for overcoming mass alienation or effecting the“new” humanity he sought.Ronald E. Santoni is Maria Theresa Barney Professor Emeritus of Philosophyat Denison University and a Life Member of Clare Hall, Cambridge University.His previous books include Bad Faith, Good Faith, and Authenticity in Sartre’sEarly Philosophy (1995).Feminist Interpretations ofNiccolò MachiavelliEDITED BY MARIA FALCODiplomat, bureaucrat, and practical politician,Niccolò Machiavelli served as SecondSecretary to the Republic of Florence in theearly sixteenth century and became thefirst major political thinker in the Westerntradition to make a complete break with theAristotelian model of politics as a branchof ethics. While The Prince is his mostfamous work, grounding his reputation asthe progenitor of Realpolitik, his many other writings have contributed toa more complex and broader image of the man and his political thought.Thus in recent years Machiavelli has come to be seen as a republican and aproto-liberal by some mainstream political theorists and as an obfuscator oftraditional values and ideologies, including gender roles, by feminists andnonfeminists alike.The contributors to this volume, grappling with questions about the positionof women in political society, investigate whether Machiavelli was truly amisogynist and a proto-fascist or instead a proto-feminist and a democraticrepublican. Among the themes they explore are the implications of suchdichotomies as fortuna and virtù, the public and the private, nature andreason, ends and means, functionality and the common good, as well asthe social construction of gender and the importance of the military tothe socialization of citizens (particularly women) to civic life. Some of thecontributors even consider the possibility that Machiavelli’s approach toethics provides a special insight that feminists, and women generally, mightexplore to their benefit.Along with the editor, the contributors are Wendy Brown, Jane Jaquette,Vesna Marcina, Melissa Matthes, Donald McIntosh, Martin Morris, CaryNederman, Andrea Nicki, Mary O’Brien, Hanna Pitkin, Arlene Saxonhouse,John Shin, R. Claire Snyder, and Catherine Zuckert.Maria J. Falco is Professor Emerita of Political Science at DePauw University.She has published five previous books, including Feminist Interpretations ofMary Wollstonecraft (Penn State, 1996).440 pages • 6 x 9 • AugustISBN 0-271-02388-0 • cloth: $95.00sISBN 0-271-02389-9 • paper: $39.50sRe-Reading the Canon Series200 pages • 6 x 9 • FebruaryISBN 0-271-02300-7 • cloth: $35.00s (2003)ISBN 0-271-02399-6 • paper: $19.95s16P E N N S T A T E U N I V E R S I T Y P R E S S

P O L I T I C A L S C I E N C E / P H I L O S O P H Y / W O M E N ’ S S T U D I E SP O L I T I C A L S C I E N C E / H I S T O R YPrivate Selves, Public IdentitiesReconsidering Identity PoliticsSUSAN J. HEKMANIn an age when “we are all multiculturalists now,” as Nathan Glazer has said,the politics of identity has come to pose new challenges to our liberal polityand the presuppositions on which it is founded. Just what identity means,and what its role in the public sphere is, are questions that are being hotlydebated. In this book Susan Hekman aims to bring greater theoretical clarityto the debate by exposing some basic misconceptions—about the constitutionof the self that defines personal identity, about the way liberalism concealsthe importance of identity under the veil of the “abstract citizen,” and aboutthe difference and interrelationship between personal and public identity.Hekman’s use of object relations theory allows her to argue, against thepostmodernist resort to a “fictive” subject, for a core self that is sociallyconstructed in the early years of childhood but nevertheless provides asecure base for the adult subject. Such a self is social, particular, embedded,and connected—a stark contrast to the neutral and disembodied subjectposited in liberal theory. This way of construing the self also opens up thepossibility for distinguishing how personal identity functions in relation topublic identity. Against those advocates of identity politics who seek reformthrough the institutionalization of group participation, Hekman espousesa vision of the politics of difference that eschews assigning individualsto fixed groups and emphasizes instead the fluidity of choice arising fromthe complex interaction between the individual’s private identity and themultiple opportunities for associating with different groups and the publicidentities they define.Inspired by Foucault’s argument that “power is everywhere,” Hekman mapsout a dual strategy of both political and social/cultural resistance for thisnew politics of identity, which recognizes that with significant advancesalready won in the political/legal arena, attitudinal change in civil societypresents the greatest challenge for achieving more progress today in thestruggle against racism, sexism, and other forms of oppression.Susan J. Hekman is Professor of Political Science and Director of theGraduate Humanities Program at the University of Texas, Arlington. She haspublished two previous books with Penn State Press: Moral Voices, MoralSelves: Carol Gilligan and Feminist Moral Theory (1995) and an edited volume,Feminist Interpretations of Michel Foucault (1996).Imagining the American PolityPolitical Science and the Discourse of DemocracyJOHN G. GUNNELL“Imagining the American Polity is a vivid and engaging study of the discourseof pluralist democracy in the history of political science. It tracks thevarieties of twentieth-century pluralism out of debates over ‘the state’ andconvincingly demonstrates the genealogical ties that bind Laski and theProgressive Era to the behavioral revolutionaries of the fifties to today’smulticulturalists. There is nothing quite like it in the literature on democratictheory, much less on the history of political science that John Gunnellhas already done so much to advance.”—James Farr, University of MinnesotaAmericans have long prided themselves on living in a country that serves asa beacon of democracy to the world, but from the time of the founding theyhave also engaged in debates over what the criteria for democracy are asthey seek to validate their faith in the United States as a democratic regime.In this book John Gunnell shows how the academic discipline of political sciencehas contributed in a major way to this ongoing dialogue, thereby playinga significant role in political education and the formulation of popularconceptions of American democracy.Using the distinctive “internalist” approach he has developed for writingintellectual history, Gunnell traces the dynamics of conceptual change andcontinuity as American political science evolved from a focus in the nineteenthcentury on the idea of the state, through the emergence of a pluralisttheory of democracy in the 1920s and its transfiguration into liberalism inthe mid-1930s, up to the rearticulation of pluralist theory in the 1950s andits resurgence, yet again, in the 1990s. Along the way he explores how politicalscientists have grappled with a fundamental question about popular sovereignty:Does democracy require a people and a national democratic community,or can the requisites of democracy be achieved through fortuitous socialconfigurations coupled with the design of certain institutional mechanisms?John G. Gunnell is Distinguished Professor of Political Science at SUNY-Albany and the author of six other books, including The Descent of PoliticalTheory: The Genealogy of an American Vocation (1993).296 pages • 6 x 9 • AprilISBN 0-271-02352-X • cloth: $40.00s184 pages • 6 x 9 • JuneISBN 0-271-02382-1 • cloth: $35.00s171 - 8 0 0 - 3 2 6 - 9 1 8 0

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