here - Center on International Cooperation - New York University

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here - Center on International Cooperation - New York University

4context of the collaborative design and delivery of civiliandriventraining courses in conflict prevention, peace, andsecurity. John has written on civil society and conflictearly warning in West Africa and has co-authored paperson DDR and SSR processes in Liberia and also, the impactof drug trafficking on national and sub-regional securityin West Africa with Dr. Thomas Jaye and Dr. Kwesi Aning,respectively.Summer Walker is a freelance researcher and writerfor international policy living in Berlin. Until mid-2012, Summer worked at the ong>Centerong> on InternationalCooperation on transnational organized crime,development, and governance. Prior to this, Summerfocused on peacebuilding issues at CIC. Additionally,Summer has worked as a researcher with HumanitarianPolicy and Conflict Research International and NYU LawSchool’s ong>Centerong> on Law and Security. She holds a Master’sdegree from the London School of Economics and a B.A. inPeace and Conflict Studies from Colgate University.BackgroundTackling organized crime is listed as a priority for theUK Government under its National Security Counciland Strategic Defense and Security Review. It is, first, aclear domestic threat to the UK, causing economic andsocial costs of between £20 and £40 billion per year. 1 Italso impacts the UK’s development assistance as manysources suggest that organized crime has a significantlydetrimental impact on governance in many developingcountries. 2 In some states, circumstantial evidencesuggests deep interdependent links between organizedcrime, politics, and the public sector, fostering, in somecases, a form of symbiosis between the state and criminalorganizations, and in more extreme cases, both deep ortransitory links between crime, terror, and militant groups. 3Despite these disconcerting signs, investment in academicresearch on the effects of organized crime on governanceremains limited. Tong>hereong> is a wide range of criminologicalliterature, and some relevant work on the fringes of thegovernance and conflict field, but few, policy-orientedstudies specifically examining the impact of organizedcrime on governance exist. The World Bank’s WorldDevelopment Report 2011 cited organized crime as onefactor linked to post-conflict violence in fragile states andhinted at the role weak institutions and corruption play inthis regard, but did not provide any detailed analysis ofthese links.This report presents an overview of the research team’sfindings and is divided into four parts: Section I presentsthe main Policy Summary. Section II presents the mainfindings and lays out five areas for targeted action asthe basis of an ‘organized crime-sensitive’ programmingframework. Section III provides donors with options forassessing when to engage on organized crime-relatedissues and, depending on the nature of relations betweenorganized crime and political and governance institutions,an analysis framework to help determine what specificallywithin the five areas of action to focus on. The final1. Home Office (2010), United Kingdom Threat Assessment of Organized Crime 2010/11.2. Summarized in Coffey International Development (2010), Evidence to Underpin DFID Policy onOrganized Crime and Development. Unpublished but available from Justin Williams at DFID.3. Marie Chene (2008), Organized Crime and Corruption, U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre,Bergen.NYUCICResponding to the Impact of Organized Crime on Developing Countries

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