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2 THE NEWS MONITOR July 15, 2011MEDIA, CONSTITUTIONAL AND HUMAN RIGHTS ISSUESZANU PF claims security sectorreforms designed to oust MugabeAs the contentious issue ofsecurity sector reformsthreatens to cause a breakupof Zimbabwe’s shaky coalitiongovernment, some private mediasought opinions from security anddefence experts on the issue as theytried to debunk myths surroundingthis area which ZANU PF wants toappear sacrosanct.While Prime Minister MorganTsvangirai’s MDC-T party and theother faction of the MDC wantreforms to the security sector whichhas been openly biased towardsPresident Robert Mugabe’s ZANUPF arm of the coalition governmentin order to ensure the armed forcesdo not influence the electoralprocess in favour of one particularparty, ZANU PF is adamant thatthese attempts are part of thebroader regime change agenda.Martin Rupiya, a security expert,told SW Radio Africa that it is notcorrect to suggest security sectorreforms (SSR) are part of a regimechange agenda by those opposed toZANU PF.He said SSR is the set of policies,plans, programs and activities thata government undertakes toimprove the way it provides safety,security and justice to its citizens.But ZANU PF has flatly refused tocountenance security sectorreforms, arguing they are designedto oust President Mugabe frompower.The MDC has demanded thesereforms saying the military junta ledby Mugabe loyalists has powersthat put them above the law andthat blocked the transfer of powerwhen Mugabe lost the presidentialelection to Tsvangirai in theharmonized March 2008 elections.Instead of serving the populationthe country’s army, police, CentralIntelligence Organisation and theAirforce have been accused of sidingwith ZANU PF to oppress PresidentMORE JOURNO ARRESTS AS ELECTION FEVER RISES• From Page 1published covering thedetention of Jameson Timba,a minister in Tsvangirai’s office.The Zimbabwe Union ofJournalists (ZUJ) condemned thearrests, saying theyAT ODDS…President Mugabe, Brig-Gen Douglas Nyikayaramba and Prime Minister Morgan TsvangiraiNO POLLS THIS YEAR: SOUTH AFRICA• From Page 1She added: “We have to bearin mind that the roadmap wascrafted by the negotiators, whorepresented their parties and itwas adopted not only by theTroika, but the whole SADC.We, therefore, expect theroadmap and also the GPA tobe implemented before electionsare held.”Zulu said the facilitationteam would not be distracted bycomments made (by ZANU PFor anyone else) outside thenegotiation process as her teamonly dealt with negotiators.Mugabe’s opponents. The “junta”has been accused of being the mostimportant instrument throughwhich President Mugabe andZANU PF have maintained powersince independence.“The reform of this sector is veryimportant in order to break withthe past. Zimbabwe is in thissituation of an inclusive governmentbecause of the intervention by thesecurity sector soon after theoverwhelming vote for change byZimbabweans in 2008,” Rupiya said.He added: “The overall objectiveof SSR is to provide and promotean effective and legitimate publicservice by the armed forces that istransparent, accountable to civilianauthority and not what has beenpeddled by ZANU PF.”A serving army colonel BassieBangidza recently told a securitysector reform debate thatParliament was not the best avenueto tackle the matter.Bangidza, the director for theCentre for Defence Studies at theUniversity of Zimbabwe questionedParliament’s effectiveness inhandling such a “sensitive” issue.“Parliamentarians are interestedin party political interests and partydiscipline. At individual level, theconfirmed that the country was a“rogue state like Burma (Myanmar)and Iran.”ZUJ secretary general, FosterDongozi, said in a statement:“This is really frightening exercisethe police has started. The union’sfears are that the arrests willShe said her team would soonmeet the negotiators to work onthe timelines, which would bepresented at the SADC summit inAngola in August.While the negotiators agreedon timelines and presented themto the principals, ZANU PF hasrefused to accept them claimingthey would drag electionsinto next year or 2013.Speaking soon after the politburomeeting, ZANU PF spokesmanRugare Gumbo said their chiefnegotiator, Patrick Chinamasa,had taken them through theparliamentarians are often eager toremain in the good books ofinfluential officials of the decisionmaking branch both civilian andsecurity sector,” he said.“They want more aboutmaintaining good relations with thePresident or Prime Minister ratherthan looking after the interests ofthose who elected them includingthe security sector,” Bangidza said.“Parliamentary oversight of thesecurity sector often comes acrossas being ornamental, rubberstampor appendages of their respectiveexecutives (political parties).”Bangidza warned that if the“security sector reforms” were donein an ill-manner that may worsencivil and military relations or resultin political instability.Another presenter at the samedebate, Wilfred Mhanda, a formerliberation war commander castigatedmembers of the uniformed forceswho were making partisanpolitical statements. He said themilitary must be apolitical and thatthey must remain loyal to thenation.He said the nation “commandsthe gun and never must the gun beallowed to command the nation”.“The military serves us. They areescalate as elections areapproaching.”Rights groups say police havelaunched a clampdown againstindependent journalists andpoliticians opposed to PresidentMugabe who is trying to foistelection on the country this year.issue of election timelines, butthe party had rejected them.“Some of the timeframes areunacceptable, given that they willdrag elections until next year or2013,” Gumbo said, addingZANU PF would push forelections this year.Political analysts werequoted pointing out that ZANUPF’s insistence on elections thisyear would most certainly hita brickwall because Zuma andSADC would notaccept another disputedelection in Zimbabwe.our servants and they are not ourmasters. We cannot only discusstheir conditions of service and notabout their conduct.”“Parliament cannot only discussabout giving them uniform and foodand not about their conduct. It doesnot make sense. They have to takeboth into account. They are ourservants because they are paid bythe taxpayer, they are accountableto us,” said Mhanda, now aMugabe critic.Meanwhile the truth wasanother casualty in the officialmedia’s follow-up coverage ofrenewed calls for security sectorreforms by Tsvangirai and hisMDC-T party after the military’slatest public show of allegiance toPresident Mugabe and ZANU PFby Brigadier-General DouglasNyikayaramba.All their four stories on thematter dismissed the need for suchreforms as unfounded, maintainingthat Zimbabwe’s uniformed forceswere professional, even as the issueresurfaced in the week with reportsof fresh conflict between the MDC-T and the police over allegations ofbias (ZTV, The Herald, Studio 7,Zimbabwe Independent and RadioVoP).Mugabe under pressureover security reforms• From Page 1quoted an indignant PresidentMugabe telling his party’s centralcommittee meeting that Parliamentshould leave “his” generals alone,without questioning the legality ofsuch remarks by a leader who tookan oath to uphold the constitutionof Zimbabwe.“As Commander-in Chief of thesecurity forces, I want to make it veryclear that no one should meddlewith the command and Parliamentcannot be the commander in chiefof the security forces. Never at all,”Mugabe was quoted as having said.The remarks were obviously indirect response to the MDC-T whoselegislators approached Parliamentseeking a resolution that compels thecountry’s security commanders tostop meddling in the country’spolitical affairs.“Very few of our politicianstoday can dispense to these finemen and women any lessons onThe government media alsopromoted the idea that securityreforms are not part of the GlobalPolitical Agreement (GPA) despiteprovisions of Section 13.1: “Stateorgans and institutions do notbelong to any political party andshould be impartial in the dischargeof their duties”.Three of the official media’sreports were editorials by columnistsNathaniel Manheru (believed to bepresidential spokesman GeorgeCharamba), Caesar Zvayi andZANU PF Politburo memberJonathan Moyo, all vigorouslydismissing proposals for reform.None sought to examine the issueimpartially.Zvayi described “the so-called”security sector reforms as “nothingmore than an attempt to effect regimechange” (The Herald), while Moyodismissed them as a “threat to ournational security” (The Sunday Mail).Earlier, ZTV accused Tsvangiraiand his party of “using publicplatforms” to “provoke and insult”security chiefs, in what “observers”and “military experts” such asRetired Brigadier Felix Muchemwaviewed as a “very clear sign thatTsvangirai and his Western handlersare panicking that securityforces…will not tolerate a puppetgovernment in Zimbabwe”.The private media providedmore factual analysis. Theyviewed remarks byNyikayaramba and policeCommissioner-GeneralAugustine Chihuri as havingvindicated concerns that thecountry’s security organs werepartisan and unprofessional andin need of reform.They also viewed thecomments as inflammatory anda violation of the Constitution,while insisting that the issue waspart of the GPA.freedom and democracy. Wedon’t want to teach themabout freedom and democracy.They fought for it. It’s theirproduct,” Mugabe said to loudcheers from party loyalists.He added: “Teach the lesson onfreedom and democracy topersons who liberated themwhen they were on the otherside, even refusingto participate in the struggle forliberation and today they wantto say the security forces are notsupporting them. They won’tsupport them because of theirpast…“How can those who wine anddine with the enemy? We see themgoing to Europe, the Europeanswho imposed sanctions on us andthey will come and in broaddaylight, ask that the security forceswill respect you. Are they fools?They are not idiots. Change yourways, ngavachinje.”


THE NEWS MONITOR July 15, 2011 3VMCZ defends media self-regulation principleBy Takura Zhangazha.*Avery significant debate onmedia self regulation hasrecently emerged in the UnitedKingdom and in media related professionsacross the world. The main reason for this isthe phone hacking scandal of one of the UK’sleading private publications, News of the World.This scandal has since led the publication’sproprietors, on their own volition, to shut itdown altogether. In the wake of theseunfortunate developments, the Cameroongovernment, the Labour opposition,professional journalists and media relatedorganizations have roundly criticized themedia self regulatory body, the PressComplaints Commission (PCC) for failing todeal firmly with the unethical conduct of thenow closed weekly.This is a debate that has since gonebeyond the borders of the UK to countriessuch as the United States of America andAustralia, among others, where the News ofthe World’s owner, Mr. Rupert Murdoch, hassignificant ownership of television and printmedia.In Zimbabwe the thread has been pickedup by some of our local papers andcommentators and I am sure the debate hasalso been noted by those in policy makingpositions, either by way of Government,Constitutional Commissions or Parliament.It is also a debate that the Voluntary MediaCouncil of Zimbabwe (VMCZ) has keenlyfollowed, particularly after the VMCZChairperson and other members of the Boardwere invited to make presentations before theParliamentary Portfolio Committee onInformation, Media and Publicity in the firstweek of July 2011.It is from the submissions made by theVMCZ Chairperson, Aleck Muchadehama tothe Parliamentary Committee that I put upmy own perspective on the democraticimportance of self regulation of the media inZimbabwe, notwithstanding the outcome ofthe debate on the same in the UK orelsewhere.The premise of self regulation of the mediaAn analysis of the media showed thatPresident Robert Mugabe’s ZANUPF arm of the coalition governmentcontinues to ignore the requirements of theGlobal Political Agreement (GPA) as it continuesto use the public media exclusively to publiciseits own activities.Apart from treating these media as theirnotice board, ZANU PF has continued toheavily depend on the state media it controlsto market itself and its political programmesincluding the now absurd demand that electionsshould be held this year.This is evidenced by the ever increasingnumber of announcements flighted on theZimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation (ZBC)’sradio and television stations. Spot FM and RadioTakura Zhangazha.STATE MEDIA CONTINUES TO BE WILLING ZANU PF NOTICE BOARDfacebookacross the world has been the recognition ofthe right to freedom of expression and accessto information that is enshrined in Article 19of the Universal Declaration of Human Rightsand closer home, in Article 9 of the AfricanCharter on Human and Peoples Rights. Thisright is further fortified in our currentconstitution in Section 20 of the Bill of Rightswhich states that every Zimbabwean shallhave the right to receive and impartinformation without interference.Self regulation of the media, in seeking topromote the full enjoyment of the right tofreedom of expression by citizens throughprofessional, accountable, ethical, fair andbalanced reporting as well as voluntary codesof conduct for media practitioners, does notnegate from the media’s responsibility of whatis in the public interest or the promotion ofdemocratic practice or culture. In fact itreinforces this through promoting a cultureof consensus between the media stakeholdersand the public on best democratic practice andunderstanding of democratically justifiableand publicly accountable reporting.Self regulation avoids the spectre of prisonfor anyone who says, writes, broadcasts orZimbabwe made more than a dozen suchannouncements of ZANU PF’s activities. In almostevery news bulletin on Radio Zimbabwe towardsthe end of the week the news anchor finished thenews bulletin with the words: “Don’t missPresident Robert Mugabe’s address in thePolitburo”.ZTV screened the Day of the African Child,the Junior Parliament and his party’s Centralcommittee and in all these events PresidentMugabe took the chance to address ZANU PFagenda.While there was a lot of publicity of ZANUPF activities, ZBC and the public media censoredall activities of other political parties. The onlyreports that the media carried were that of thearrest of MDC-M officials on their way fromprints opinions in pursuit of their enjoymentof their right, as well as that of others, tofreedom of expression and access toinformation. Where there is a false, unfair orunethical report in the media, voluntary selfregulatory media councils establish complaintsmechanisms that seek to acquire resolutionto complaints about the conduct of the mediavia consensus, apology, retraction andavoidance of costly legal suits.As the late national hero, HonourableMember of Parliament and former Chairmanof the Parliamentary Legal Committee,Eddison Zvobgo once opined while deliveringan adverse report during the third reading ofthe Access to Information and Protection ofPrivacy Act (AIPPA) which introducedstatutory regulation in 2002, (that) allowingthe state to undertake such actions would betantamount licensing it’s own people to‘speak’ and therefore in violation of Section20 of our constitution.Since AIPPA became law and regardlessof the various negotiated amendments by ourpoliticians to it, it has continued the clearlyundemocratic practice of seeking to registerall of us to be licensed to speak and wherewe do so without the requisite clearance, weget arrested.It is exactly because the media, which isthe primary target of AIPPA, remains themain medium through which Zimbabweancitizens seek or attempt to speak truth topower in the interests of the public good anddemocratic values that politicians, as yieldersof power, seek to gag the press.The current circumstances prevailing inour country wherein those in power, whoshould be monitored in their exercise ofpower, are the ones determining which mediahouses they will permit to publish in a carrotand stick fashion (with the stick the one thatis more liberally used), are patentlyundemocratic and inimical to the exercise ofour right to freedom of expression and accessto information.Further to this, the Minister of Media,Information and Publicity, Webster Shamu hasbeen quoted as saying that journalists mustZANU PF spokesman Rugare GumboHwange were they had held a small meeting.On elections, the public broadcaster ZBCcontinued to carry out reports in which ZANUVisit our page — Media Monitoring Project Zimbabweor send a friend request to Mmpz Zimbabweunderstand media freedom to be a privilegeand not a right. Such a statement can only bedescribed as unfortunate because it betraysan underlying but mistaken assumption thatfreedom of expression is only enjoyed at thebehest of the governments of the day.Because of this in most instances,government officials and influentialmembers of the public have alwaysfound it convenient to seek the arrestof journalists and editors with alarminglevels of impunity. Even those that aretasked with executing the arbitraryarrests of journalists appear to considerit ‘normal’ to do so.What is happening with the PressComplaints Commission in the UKprovides important lessons toZimbabwean media stakeholders, policymakers. The first lesson being that itdoes not demonstrate anything wrongwith media self regulation as democraticpractice and principle.It merely demonstrates anaberration in a society where it isgenerally not expected that journalistscan be so unethical. The second andeven more important lesson is that themedia in the United Kingdom are notthe same media in Zimbabwe. And thatthe Zimbabwean media has committeditself to self regulation does not meanit will go the same route as that of themost likely changes that are going tohappen to the Press ComplaintsCommittee in the UK.Given our country’s repressive mediahistory, it is imperative that selfregulation be carried through infulfillment of the broad commitment thatall Zimbabweans have in enjoying theright to say their opinion and to defendto the hilt the right of the other to do thesame.*Zhangazha is the Executive Director of theVMCZ. He can be contacted ondirector@vmcz.co.zw; FacebookUsername: TakuraZ.PF gave its hardline stance that elections shouldbe held this year without fail. The reports onZBC stations lacked analysis on how theelections will be possible when there is no moneyto fund the process.SW Radio carried a report with RugareGumbo confirming that the politburo haddecided that the timelines in the electionroadmap should be cut so that the elections couldbe held this year.The same reports quoted Zimbabwe ElectionSupport Network (ZESN) calling for even moretime than negotiators had allocated for thereforms. Joy Mabhenge from the Institute forDemocratic Alternatives South Africa dismissedthe ZANU PF call for early elections as “politicalposturing”. He said the announcement byGumbo was nothing new because the party hadalways campaigned for elections in 2011.ZBC censored a report that was carried byStudio 7 in which the SADC facilitation teamresponded to the demand by the ZANU PFpolitburo demanding for elections this year sayingthe ballot will be called according to a roadmapdrawn up by negotiators from the three politicalparties with the help of the facilitation team.Radio VoP carried a report that ZANU PF’spolitburo had rejected the Jacob Zuma’s inspiredelection roadmap to fresh polls. Contrary to thesereports, The Daily News carried a report whichpointed out that despite its repeatedgrandstanding ZANU PF was ill-prepared forelection due to a catalogue of obstacles whichinclude lack of a commonly accepted presidentialcandidate other than the 87-year old Mugabewho could prove very difficult to sell to theelectorate.


4 THE NEWS MONITOR July 15, 2011SPOTLIGHT ON PIRFConcern over information blackout on detailsof commercial radio licence applicantsMMPZ welcomes the recentinvitation by the BroadcastingAuthority of Zimbabwe (BAZ)for applications for two “independent”national radio broadcasting licences that ithas offered to make available to Zimbabwe’saspiring broadcasting community.Following this invitation towards the endof May, notices of companies applying forthese licences began appearing in thenational Press, and it has been subsequentlyreported that there are a total of 15 applicantswho qualified to be considered.According to the notices in the Pressinserted by the applicants, interestedZimbabweans wishing to comment on theapplications were invited to do so within 14days of the advertisement’s publication bycontacting BAZ.MMPZ responded to this invitation inorder to seek information about the identitiesof the individuals behind the companiesapplying for the broadcasting licences andto establish their broadcasting credentials,among other points of interest.However, on two separate occasionsrepresentatives of this organization weredenied access to any information beyondthat published in the Press on the groundsthat it was confidential. The only informationabout the applicants in the Press noticeswere the names of the companies applyingand their head office addresses.According to Section 10 (3) of theBroadcasting Services Act “...an applicantEditor — The Voluntary Media Council ofZimbabwe (VMCZ) notes the unfortunatestatements made to the Parliamentary PortfolioCommittee on media, information andcommunications technologies by the permanentsecretary in the Ministry of Media, Informationand Publicity, George Charamba.The statements attributed to Charamba inThe Herald of July 22, 2011 are not reflective ofthe truth, particularly where he makes referenceto the VMCZ.The VMCZ is not an organisation that isawaiting “baptism” by the Zimbabwe MediaCommission (ZMC) or any other body. TheVMCZ, having been in existence since 2007, is atestimony to the enjoyment of the right of mediastakeholders and citizens to freely associate andassemble as provided for in Section 21 ofZimbabwe’s Constitution. In exercising this rightto associate and assemble, media stakeholdersestablished the VMCZ in order to protect andenhance another fundamental human right asguaranteed in Article 19 of the UniversalDeclaration of Human Rights, Article 9 of theshall publish his application in a nationalnewspaper...and in a manner and form approvedby the Authority...”Evidently, the Press notices were published“in a manner and form approved by theauthority...” But the sparse informationprovided by the notices cannot possiblyconstitute the publication of an application byany stretch of the imagination.The Act (Section10:4) also provides for any member of the publicto lodge an objection to an application withthe BAZ within 14 days of the publication ofthe application.It is clear that the Act intended details ofthe applications to have been made public inorder to allow Zimbabweans the opportunityto object to applications they disagreed with.MMPZ believes that in the absence of thenecessary information to make intelligentcomments upon the applications, it isincumbent upon the broadcasting authority toprovide it.Denying such information to the publicsubverts the open and transparent process ofselection intended in the provisions of the Act– and the right of Zimbabweans to have a sayin the selection of these broadcasters.This is especially so since the BSA alsostipulates that BAZ draws up a short- list ofapplicants and conducts a public inquiry forthe purpose of determining the suitability ofthe applicants to be licensed.In drawing up its short-list, BAZ is alsoobliged to take into account objectionssubmitted by the public. However, the publicGeorge Charamba is wrongFEEDBACK WELCOMEThe News Monitor is anxious to get feedback from readers.We would like to get your views on stories covered in this newsletter.Do you enjoy what you read? Is it helpful? Are there issues that you thinkwe overlooked?If there is anything you think we can do to improve our product, please letus know.You can contact us by e-mail at: monitors@mmpz.org.zw or sms yourcomments to: 0774 432 509LettersAfrican Charter on Human and Peoples Rightsand Section 20 of the Constitution of Zimbabwe.This right being the right of all citizens to freedomof expression and access to information. Themandate of the VMCZ is therefore self regulationof the media in order to allow the greatestenjoyment of the right of all citizens to freedom ofexpression and access to information.It is a mandate that does not require“baptism”. Where Charamba is cited as sayingthat the Access to Information and Protection ofPrivacy Act (AIPPA) allows the Zimbabwe MediaCommission(ZMC) to form a statutory mediacouncil by “consensus” the VMCZ can onlyexpress regret at the misleading nature of such astatement. AIPPA is a law that has continuallybeen used to curtail freedom of expression throughthe mandatory registration of journalists/mediahouses; the arrest of journalists and the closure ofmedia houses.To say that the ZMC can arrive at a“consensus” with media stakeholders is to bedishonest about the full negative import of AIPPAon media freedom and freedom of expression incannot make the necessary interventionswithout sufficient information to make aninformed comment. Nor can they participateeffectively in the public inquiry.Denying the public such informationundermines the intention of the Act to ensurea transparent and public process in theselection of the broadcasters and shrouds theentire procedure in secrecy.For example, the 14 days have alreadyexpired and the public remain completelyignorant about the identities of the applicantsand their capacity to provide an effectivenational radio broadcasting service. Nor willwe know how BAZ arrived at its short-list ofapplicants to attend the public inquiry, orindeed, who these individuals andorganizations are at the time the inquiry iseventually held.MMPZ calls on BAZ to make details of theapplications public so that Zimbabweans canparticipate effectively in the public inquiry, andin order for the nation to be fully informedabout the identity of those organizations thateventually win the right to broadcast to thenation.If the authority continues to deny thepeople this right it will further undermine itscredibility whose legitimacy is already a subjectof dispute between the parties to Zimbabwe’scoalition government. This followed Media andInformation Minister Webster Shamu’sunilateral appointment of the BAZ board inSeptember, 2009, packed with former militarymen and allies of President Mugabe’s ZANUZimbabwe.Given this narrative of the usage of AIPPAagainst media freedom in our country, the VMCZreiterates that it is of paramount importance thatthe government and the Parliament of Zimbabwe,move much more purposefully toward therepealing of this undemocratic Act of Parliamentsooner rather than later. This is regardless of theoutcome of the constitutional reform process,which the inclusive government has misleadinglybegun to refer to on a regular basis as an excuseas to why there is no progress on issues such asmedia reform.PF party. This action violated the letter andspirit of the Global Political Agreement(GPA), which demands that Mugabe andhis ZANU PF arm of government consulthis coalition partners over the appointmentof such national institutions.MMPZ is concerned about delays inreconstituting the BAZ board (as well as theboards of the Mass Media Trust that controlsthe state-owned Zimpapers stable ofnewspapers, and the national publicbroadcaster, ZBC) despite reports thatZimbabwe’s coalition principals had agreedto this during one of their Monday meetingsin October 2009 (SW Radio Africa, 8/10/09),and that the parties’ negotiators reinforcedthis agreement in Cape Town, South Africa,during their discussions on the terms of anelection roadmap in April and May this year(The Sunday Mail, 5/6/11).Equally disturbing is the media’s silenceover BAZ’s handling of applications fornational commercial broadcasting licencesand the fact that the authority itself shouldbe dissolved and reconstituted with theparticipation of all the partners to thecoalition government before it embarks onissuing any new broadcasting licences thatwill bring an end to government’s illegalmonopoly of the airwaves. Only with theappointment of an independent, credible,new board, which Zimbabweans can trust,will there be any genuine reform ofZimbabwe’s broadcasting sector.The VMCZ is also aware of the Karibaconference that Charamba is cited as referring toin The Herald.The full report of the Kariba Conference is,however, still not a public document and whereit is suggested that among it’s resolutions is thepromise of a Media Practitioners Bill, the VMCZinsists that such a proposition should be guidedby a firm understanding of the principle of selfregulation of the media as democratic practice andthorough media stakeholder and publicconsultation. – Alec Muchadehama,VMCZ chairpersonTHE NEWS MONITOR CARTOONThe News Monitor is produced and circulated by the Media Monitoring Project Zimbabwe, 9 Knight Bruce Road, Milton Park,Harare, Tel: 263 4 741816 / 778115, E-mail: monitors@mmpz.org.zwFeel free to comment on the news in this publication. We may not able to respond to all the correspondence but we plan toestablish a letters column, especially for our Public Information Rights Forum members. For more information about MMPZ,please visit our website at http://www.mmpz.org/

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