Wisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers - Center for ...

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Wisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers - Center for ...

WisconsinFarm to School:Toolkit forProducersWISCONSINOctober, 2011Wisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers 1


The Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems (CIAS) is a research center for sustainableagriculture in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison. CIASbrings together university faculty, producers, policy makers and others to conduct research,curriculum and program development projects at the intersection of farming practices, farmprofitability, the environment and rural vitality. For more information, visit www.cias.wisc.edu or call608-262-5200.The Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS), Division of Public Health, ObesityPrevention Unit, works to lead strategic public health efforts to prevent and control obesity andchronic disease through policy, environmental and systems changes that support regular physicalactivity and good nutrition. For more information, visit www.dhs.wisconsin.gov.The Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) Divisionof Agricultural Development works to grow Wisconsin agriculture and related commerce.Wisconsin’s $59 billion agriculture and food sector accounts for 10 percent of the jobs in the state.For more information, visit www.datcp.wi.gov.The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) School Nutrition Team providesnutrition information and program guidance to sponsors of school nutrition programs. The teamworks to ensure a strong nutritional foundation that supports learning and development for allstudents through statewide leadership, guidance, partnership and advocacy. For more information,visit dpi.wi.gov/fns/.Special thanks to the C.S. Mott Group for Sustainable Food Systems at Michigan State University.This resource builds on their publication: Marketing Michigan Products to Schools: A Step-by-StepGuide.This publication was supported by a grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC) 3U58DP001997-01S3. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do notnecessarily reflect the official views of the CDC, the Department of Health and Human Services orthe federal government.2 Wisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers


ContentsOverview........................................................................................................................ 1About this toolkit.............................................................................................. 1What is Wisconsin Farm to School?......................................................................... 1Tool: Reap the benefits..................................................................................... 4Tool: Crawford County success story.................................................................... 4Know your customer...................................................................................................... 5School bid processes........................................................................................... 6Tool: Sample bid sheet with scoring...................................................................... 7Prepare your business.................................................................................................... 8Tool: Producer survey...................................................................................... 8Tool: Product availability and pricing.................................................................... 8Forward contracting........................................................................................... 8Production costs and pricing................................................................................. 9Tool: Setting prices for various markets................................................................. 9Insurance........................................................................................................ 9Tool: Introduction to insurance considerations......................................................... 9Food safety.....................................................................................................10Tool: Food safety success story...........................................................................11Licensing and labeling requirements.......................................................................11Tool: Licensing, labeling and regulation requirements in Wisconsin..............................11Wisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers 3


Processing, collaborative marketing and distributors...................................................12Tool: Directory of food business incubators...........................................................12Tool: Collaborative marketing............................................................................13Tool: Distributors..........................................................................................13Connect with schools....................................................................................................14Meet with the school nutrition director...................................................................14Tool: School nutrition director survey..................................................................14Tool: School nutrition meeting checklist...............................................................15Tool: Pounds to servings calculator......................................................................16Tool: Pecks to pounds.....................................................................................16Tool: Sample purchasing agreement.....................................................................16Tool: Sample invoice.......................................................................................16School relationships and marketing.............................................................................17Beyond sales: Getting involved in education..............................................................17Tool: Guide for farm field trips..........................................................................18Additional resources.....................................................................................................19Acknowledgements.......................................................................................................204 Wisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers


OverviewAbout this toolkitWelcome to the Wisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers. Farmto school encourages healthy lifestyles in children and helps supportlocal economies. Whether you are just starting off or looking toexpand your production for schools, this toolkit will provide you withresources to aid in your success.This toolkit is an interactive resource. You can access all of the toolsby clicking on them, and you may then print them if desired. Thebody of the toolkit may also be printed as one document (minustools) if a hard copy is a useful reference. You may use the entiretoolkit or select certain sections or tools, in an à la carte fashion, asneeded.Washburn students meet a pig on the farmPlease note there is a separate Wisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for SchoolNutrition Directors at www.cias.wisc.edu/toolkits.School nutrition programs share many similarities, yet they all have unique needs.Understanding their needs and being able to clearly communicate your own are keysto a successful initiative.What is Wisconsin Farm to School?Wisconsin Farm to School promotes the health of children, farms and communitiesby connecting schools to local farms that supply fresh, healthy and minimallyprocessed food.Wisconsin Farm to School goals:• Promote children’s health by providing fresh, minimally processed foods inschools and supporting the development of healthy eating habits• Strengthen children’s and communities’ knowledge about and attitudestoward agriculture, food, nutrition and the environment• Strengthen local economies by expanding markets for Wisconsin’sagricultural producers and food entrepreneursWisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers 1


Wisconsin Farm to School values:Overview• An individual’s lifelong well-being depends on healthy eating habits• All children should have access to fresh, minimally processed food as part ofa nutritionally balanced school meal program• Wisconsin farms that serve local markets make essential contributions to adiverse food system• Schools and nutrition professionals are important partners in supportingcommunity well-being, local economies and environmental stewardshipthrough their food and nutrition education programs and purchasing practicesSchools are motivated to purchase from local producers so they can:• Support their local farms and economies• Access a wide variety of foods• Encourage students’ healthy eating habits through agriculture and nutritioneducation• Receive fresh, high quality product• Increase meal participation by offering food “with a farmer’s face on it”• Increase students’ knowledge of how their food is produced througheducational partnerships with producersThe benefits of farm to school are considerably richer and longer lasting when diversecommunity members and advocates are involved. Farm to school programs are allunique and there is no “one size fits all” recipe for success. It is important that bothschool nutrition directors and producers understand the many key support rolesneeded for a comprehensive approach to farm to school beyond food procurement.The graphic on page 3 provides a snapshot of the types of community members andexperts who can help further farm to school efforts. Consider approaching individualsyou believe may be interested in getting involved.“Now that my school customers know me and what I have to offer, they’re easy towork with. I like knowing what to expect since they know what they will need far inadvance. I also like knowing my produce is helping to feed kids in my community.”—Rufus Haucke, Keewaydin Farms, Viola, WI2 Wisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers


OverviewCommunity support for farm to schoolSchoolcommunityAdministratorsTeachersParentsStudentsSchool board membersSchool nursesKey practitionersSchool nutritionprogram staffLocal producers:individuals or groupscooperativelyorganizedDistributors of localproductCommunitypartnersNon-profitorganizationsLocal businessesLocal governmentColleges anduniversitiesAdvocates andexpertsLocal public healthofficials and medicalpractitionersLocal ExtensioneducatorsCommunity econ.developmentexpertsWisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers 3


Know your customerSchool bid processesMost schools receive federal reimbursements for their meal programs. They arerequired to:1. Demonstrate that they are responsibly spending taxpayer money by seeking topurchase the most affordable options2. Demonstrate that they are facilitating open and free competition by solicitingmultiple offers when considering new products or new vendorsTo meet these requirements, schools use either an informal or a formal bid process.The informal bid process may be used as long as the cost of the food being purchasedfalls under the small purchase threshold. While the informal bid threshold inWisconsin is $100,000, some school districts set lower thresholds.Informal bid processThe informal bid process is relatively simple compared to the formal bid process.Under this process, the school nutrition director must develop a written solicitationidentifying the number, quality and variety of goods needed. Schools may not issuea solicitation that states, “Will only accept locally grown products” or includes anyother language that purposefully excludes non-locally grown products. The nutritiondirector must then attempt to get price quotes from three or more vendors (this mayor may not include their prime vendor). When approached by an orchard owner whowants to sell apples, for example, the school is required to contact at least two otherapple vendors for a price quote. If no other orchards or vendors are interested or ableto provide the sought after products, as specified, then the school may document theattempts to get additional price quotes. With the informal bid process, schools arerequired to choose the least expensive option that has met their specifications.Formal bid processThe formal bid process must be used by schools for purchases exceeding the smallpurchase threshold. Schools may use the formal bid process for smaller purchases, andmay choose to do so in order to help local vendors compete by meeting criteria forgeographic preference (see p. 7) or educational involvement with schools.The formal bid process requires that schools publicly solicit sealed bids from potentialvendors. Schools determine criteria and write out specifications for the food they are6 Wisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers


Know your customerlooking to purchase, advertise the bid to potential vendors and award points—basedon each vendor’s ability to meet specifications—to submitted bids. Schools arerequired to award at least half the points based on price. When participating in aformal bid process, there are other opportunities to earn points if your price pointmay not be as competitive as others.The remaining points can be awarded to a variety of specifications such as:• Location of vendor. Schools may determine a ‘geographic preference’; forinstance, a school may award points for product grown within 50 or 100miles of the school district, in-state, etc.*• Guaranteed consistent pricing throughout the season. Produce pricingthrough distributors often fluctuates with market conditions.• Ability to supply particular produce varieties such as Fireside apples or AllBlue potatoes.• Ability to deliver to the school.• Ability and willingness to visit the lunchroom or classroom for taste testingor other educational activities.• Ability and willingness to host field trips for students and staff.See the sample bid sheet with scoring for an example of how a school scores bids.Tool: Sample bid sheet with scoringTool*Geographic PreferenceHighlights of the final rule on geographic preference issued by the US Department of Agricultureon April 22, 2011 can be found on the National Farm to School Network’s website:www.farmtoschool.org/files/publications_365.pdf. This summary explains which products can andcannot have a geographic preference applied and clarifies what is meant by “minimally processed.”Additional information about using geography as a preferred option for bids, as well as additionalinformation about informal and formal procurement processes, can be found on the USDA SchoolNutrition website: www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/F2S/faqs_procurement.htm.Wisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers 7


Prepare your businessIt is important to determine your level of interest and capacity to market your farmproducts to schools before your first meeting with the school’s nutrition director orstaff. Key questions to consider include:• What products do you currently have available to sell to schools?• What are your production costs and the minimum amount you would need tocharge to cover your costs?• Do you have the capacity and interest to expand production ofyour current products?• Are you willing and able to grow new crops?Complete the producer survey and product availability and price form to answersome of the above questions and communicate additional information about yourbusiness, such as your food safety protocol and ordering and delivery logistics. Thisself-assessment tool can provide important information to school nutrition directors.Be sure to describe what makes your farm special—whether it’s how your family isinvolved in the farm, sustainable farm management practices or particular cropvarieties you grow.ToolTool: Producer surveyToolTool:Product availability and pricingForward contractingAfter you develop a good working relationship with a school nutrition director, youmay want to plan together to meet future purchasing needs. In the late fall or winter,you and the school nutrition director agree to crops or food you will grow specificallyfor the school during the upcoming season. This agreement includes the crop,quantity, harvest time, size, quality and price. The school nutrition director agreesto purchase the crop or food from you, as long as your product meets the agreedtospecifications. This is called a forward contract. It is a formal agreement, thoughnot a legally binding contract. This system can provide security for both the schoolnutrition director and producer.8 Wisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers


Prepare your businessProduction costs and pricingIn order to determine profitable pricing and make your farmeconomically sustainable, you need to know yourproduction costs. The Wisconsin Local Food Marketing Guideprovides an overview and strategies for settingprices for various markets. The enterprise budgetsmentioned in this tool can be found at:www.cias.wisc.edu/category/economics/enterprise-budgets/.Harvesting Wisconsin applesToolTool: Setting prices for various marketsMost vegetable growers produce a wide variety of crops that they sell throughseveral different marketing channels such as farmers’ markets, CommunitySupported Agriculture, institutions or wholesale. This diversity makes itchallenging for producers to obtain timely, accurate, crop- and market-specificinformation on their production costs. Veggie Compass is a whole-farmmanagement tool that addresses the complex needs of diversified fresh marketvegetable producers. A comprehensive spreadsheet facilitates the analysis of eachmarketing channel using cost, sales and labor data provided by the producer. You canaccess the Veggie Compass spreadsheet at www.veggiecompass.com.InsuranceInstitutions typically require food vendors to carry product liability insurance.Insurance costs will vary depending on your gross sales and other variables, but arenot typically out of reach for producers. Talk with the school nutrition director todetermine his or her school’s liability insurance requirements. If you plan to haveschool guests (such as students or food service staff) visit your farm, you may want tomake sure your policy includes premises liability as well as product liability. Coveragedetails vary between insurance companies. Always talk with your insurance agentwhen you are about to begin a new marketing venture to be sure you are protected.The Wisconsin Local Food Marketing Guide provides an introduction to insuranceconsiderations.ToolTool:Introduction to insurance considerationsWisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers 9


Prepare your businessFood safetyCooling and washing salad greensIn general, fresh fruits and vegetables pose a relatively low risk for foodborneillness when handled properly on the farm, in transit and in thekitchen. However, given the vulnerable populations they serve, schoolsprioritize food safety and most will want some assurance that vendors arereducing this risk. Many producers follow practices on their farms thatmaximize food safety. Examples include having a manure managementplan, water cooling greens to remove field heat, using clean boxes fordelivery and providing clear trace-back of product through labeling.State and federal regulations on the direct sale of whole, raw fresh produce do notcurrently exist, so most schools will want some form of food safety assurance fromtheir vendors. This may be as straightforward as providing answers to the food safetyrelated questions on the producer survey tool (page 8), creating a food safety planfor your farm or obtaining an optional third-party audit such as Good AgriculturalPractices (GAP). These requirements can be determined through discussions with thenutrition director.The Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection(DATCP) has created an on-farm food safety website:http://datcp.wi.gov/OnFarmFoodSafety/index.aspx. This site provides informationon state and federal regulations for individual farms, as well as additional resourcessuch as templates for food safety plans. Producers selling produce to schools will findthe “diversified fruit and vegetable growers” link particularly useful.“Performing a food safety audit on my farm did mean making some changes, but inthe end it has been very worthwhile for my business. It helps me to proactivelyaddress this topic with schools and other customers for whom this is a priority.”— Rufus Haucke, Keewaydin Farms, Viola, WI“We need some way to help assure food safety in our schools, but we needregulations and procedures that are respectful of small farmers.”— Marilyn Volden – Food/Nutrition Program Supervisor10 Wisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers


Prepare your businessInitiating conversations about food safety with school nutrition directors will go along way toward increasing their confidence in your product. Each school district andschool nutrition director determines what they will require of their fresh fruit andvegetable vendors—so ask! Some school nutrition directors are comfortable with theassurance gained from the producer survey and a face-to-face conversation with a newvendor. Others want to see a new vendor’s operation firsthand. See the food safetysuccess story for an example of how the Viroqua Area School District handled foodsafety requirements with a farm visit.ToolTool: Food safety success storyLicensing and labeling requirementsIt is important to know the regulations for selling locally grown products. The sale ofmost food products (other than whole, raw fresh fruits and vegetables) is regulated bythe Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection. The chartbelow gives a snapshot of state requirements for different food items. The licensing,labeling and regulation requirements in Wisconsin tool offers a detailed look atthe state requirements by product and market. Schools fall under the “institution”category.ToolTool:Licensing, labeling and regulation requirements inWisconsinState processing and licensing requirements for selling to schoolsFood item sold toschoolFresh produce,whole, uncutFresh produce,minimally processed(chopped,shredded)DairyMeatHoneyMaple syrupWisconsin state requirementsNoneMust come from licensed facilityMust come from licensed dairy plantMust be processed at USDA inspected facilityNo license required (see detailed regulations for exceptions)Must be processed in licensed facilityWisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers 11


Prepare your businessProcessing, collaborative marketing and distributorsIt is beyond the scope of this toolkit to explore the details involved withprocessing and distribution to schools through third parties such as producercooperatives, brokers and private vendors. Nonetheless, these are criticalconsiderations for significantly shifting school food purchasing to local andregional suppliers.Many schools appreciate a direct connection with local farms and find ways topurchase and use whole produce. Some schools require delivery of fresh fruits andvegetables in a processed form because of limited kitchen facilities and labor. Anumber of initiatives around Wisconsin are creating opportunities for producers orother entrepreneurs to process local produce into value-added products.UW Cooperative Extension offers a number of resources related to food businessincubators at http://fyi.uwex.edu/foodbin/. Extension has also created a directoryof food business incubators.ToolTool:Directory of food business incubatorsProducers and consumers ornonprofit groups may worktogether to create new markets, orimprove access to existing markets,in order to help small producers stayin business. This is often referred toas collaborative marketing.Examples of collaborativemarketing groups includemulti-stakeholder cooperatives,Madison students celebrate spinach on a local farm12 Wisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers


Prepare your businessaggregation partnerships, produce auctions and more. See thediscussion of collaborative marketing in the Wisconsin LocalFood Marketing Guide for more information, resources and casestudies.ToolTool: Collaborative marketingSchools purchase most of their food through distributors. Inresponse to increased demand for locally and regionally grownfood, many of these distributors have begun to highlightWisconsin-grown product and have added new vendors to meetProduce auctions are one example of collaborativemarketingthe increased demand for these products. Selling product through distributors canwork for producers, especially if they have large quantities of produce to sell and canmeet the liability and food safety requirements of these companies. Read more aboutthis option, including a case study, in the Wisconsin Local Food Marketing Guidesection on distributors.ToolTool:DistributorsWisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers 13


Connect with schoolsStart to build relationships with nutrition directors and schoolcommunity members by searching for schools in your area:www.dpi.state.wi.us/schldist.html. Organizations listed in theresources section at the end of this toolkit may be able to helpyou identify and reach out to schools.Harvesting salad greensMeet with the school nutrition directorWhen you are ready, schedule a face-to-face meeting with theschool nutrition director. Like you, nutrition directors are typically busypeople who will appreciate your flexibility with meeting times. In general, manydirectors are available to meet early in the afternoon, following lunch. While it isappropriate to approach a school nutrition director any time of year, they usuallymake purchasing decisions in the late winter and early spring for the following schoolyear.Bring these materials to your meeting with the school nutrition director:1. Business card2. Producer survey (page 8)3. Product availability and pricing form (page 8)4. Copies of any certifications or licenses (if applicable)5. Copy of your food safety plan (if applicable)Ask your nutrition director to complete the school nutrition director survey prior toyour meeting. This tool will provide you with essential information about the school’smeal program and needs, and help guide your discussion.ToolTool: School nutrition director survey14 Wisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers


Washing and sorting apples at a Wisconsin orchardConnect with schoolsOnce you and the school nutrition director have decided to work together, be sure todiscuss important details such as:• An ordering schedule• Post-harvest handling• Delivery• Packaging requirements• Payment termsThis will clarify expectations and minimize unexpected surprises. For instance, if thenutrition director is accustomed to receiving cases of apples with exact counts packedin trays, he or she may have concerns about bruising or running short of product ifyou deliver bulk boxes with approximate counts. Discussing expectations ahead oftime will help prevent these miscommunications and allow time for planning. Use theschool nutrition meeting checklist to ensure you and the school nutrition directorcover all the important details and cultivate a good working relationship.ToolTool: School nutrition meeting checklistWhen buying and selling food, school nutrition directors usuallythink in terms of number of servings, while producers tend tothink in pounds. The pounds to servings calculator createdby the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food & ForestryFarm to School Program can bridge this communication gap.This tool will tell you:1) the number of servings a pound of produce will yield, and2) the cost per serving, based on your price per pound.The calculator takes waste into account. The weight of wholeheads of broccoli, for instance, is translated into usableservings. On average, school nutrition programs can spendtwelve to eighteen cents of their $1.00 per meal on fruits andWisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers 15


Connect with schoolsvegetables. Use this calculator as a quick reference to see if you can price your productwithin this budget and assess which of your crops you can profitably offer to schools.ToolTool: Pounds to servings calculatorThe pecks to pounds tool from the Maryland Department of Agriculture convertscommonly used farm measurements—such as bushels and crates—into approximatenet weight for a variety of fruits and vegetables.Tool Tool Pecks to poundsSchools may have uses for your product outside of theirbreakfast or lunch programs!• Special events or meals• Classroom or lunchroom tasting activities for students• Cooking contests• Snack programs• Fundraisers: Parent-teacher associations can sell localfood to raise money. One example is REAP Food Group’sTaste of Wisconsin fundraiser:www.reapfoodgroup.org/farm-to-school/school-fundraiserIt’s a good idea to create a written agreement with the school nutritiondirector. This agreement should include terms of ordering, delivery andpayment. The sample purchasing agreement can provide a starting pointand can be modified to fit your needs. We have also provided a sampleinvoice that can be used as a template.ToolTool: Sample purchasing agreementMadison student enjoys a vegetablewrapToolTool: Sample invoice16 Wisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers


School relationships and marketingOnce you’ve begun selling your product toa school, take advantage of opportunities topromote your farm and the food you areproviding. Community recognition is just oneadded benefit of working with local schools.Farm to school provides unique, valuableopportunities to market your farm to students,their parents, teachers and other school staff.Potential marketing opportunities include:• Point of service signs in cafeterias• Recognition in school newsletters• Recognition in school lunch menus• Local media coverage• Visits to schools• Hosting field trips on your farmBeyond sales: Getting involved in educationInformational school sign describes source of applesIntegrating agriculture and nutrition education is an essential part of a farm to schoolinitiative. You can sell to schools without getting involved in student education.However, farm to school does offer many rewarding opportunities for teachingstudents about food and farming. Some examples of producer involvement in foodeducation include:• Visiting the school cafeteria or classrooms during tasting activities. Childrenare more willing to try new food when the producer is handing it out!• Presenting lessons in the classroom. You can find proven ‘farmer-educator’lessons on the REAP Food Group website:www.reapfoodgroup.org/Farm-to-School/resources-for-educatorsWisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers 17


School relationships and marketing• Hosting a field trip at your farm. Students and school staff members canlearn firsthand where their food comes from and how it is grown or raised.Vermont FEED has put together a guide for farm field trips that suggestshow to organize a field trip on your farm and reviews importantconsiderations when hosting a school group.ToolTool: Guide for farm field tripsWhen working with schools, as with any customer, satisfaction matters! Stayconnected with your school customers to ensure the farm to school experience isrewarding for everyone involved. Be sure to notify your school of any newproducts or services that you are offering. Good communication can help youmaintain a professional, profitable relationship for years to come.Petting a cow during a farm visit18 Wisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers


Additional resourcesConnect with ongoing farm to school initiatives, technical assistance and resourcesavailable through local, state and federal organizations. These organizations may alsobe able to assist with your outreach to local schools.Wisconsin Farm to School: www.wifarmtoschool.orgUW-Madison Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems:www.cias.wisc.edu/category/farm-to-fork/farm-to-school/Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction Farm to School information:www.dpi.wi.gov/fns/f2s.htmlWisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer ProtectionAmeriCorps Farm to School Program:http://datcp.wi.gov/Business/Buy_Local_Buy_Wisconsin/Farm_to_School_Program/index.aspxREAP Food Group: www.reapfoodgroup.org/programs-events/farm-to-schoolNational Farm to School Network: www.farmtoschool.orgUSDA Farm to School: www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/f2sWisconsin Department of Health Services Nutrition, Physical Activity and ObesityProgram: www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/health/physicalactivityWisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers 19


AcknowledgementsAuthorsDoug Wubben, Farm to School Specialist, UW-Madison Center for IntegratedAgricultural SystemsSara Tedeschi, Wisconsin Farm to School Program Director, UW-Madison Center forIntegrated Agricultural SystemsAmanda Knitter, Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Division of PublicHealth, Bureau of Community Health PromotionEditing by Cris Carusi and Ruth McNair, CIAS; publication design and layout byRuth McNairReviewersRufus Haucke, Keewaydin Farms, Viola, WIKim Lapacek, Lapacek’s Orchard, Poynette, WIDiane Westra, Mammoth Produce, Randolph, WITeresa Engel, Economic Development Consultant, Wisconsin Department ofAgriculture, Trade and Consumer ProtectionAlicia Dill, Public Health Nutritionist, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction,School Nutrition TeamKathy Bass, Nutrition Program Consultant, Wisconsin Department of PublicInstruction, School Nutrition TeamSarah Combs, Public Health Nutritionist, Wisconsin Department of PublicInstruction, School Nutrition TeamJulie Shelton, Nutrition Program Consultant, Wisconsin Department of PublicInstruction, School Nutrition TeamDiane Mayerfeld, Wisconsin State Sustainable Agriculture Research andEducation (SARE) Program Coordinator, UW Cooperative ExtensionAmy Meinen, Nutrition Coordinator, Wisconsin Department of Health Services,Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity ProgramCamilla Vargas, AmeriCorps Farm to School Program Manager, WisconsinDepartment of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer ProtectionVanessa Herald, Great Lakes Region Farm to School Network Coordinator,UW-Madison Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems20 Wisconsin Farm to School: Toolkit for Producers

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