Delegates: Torsten Krause, Serge Alain Nana - ViaMUN

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Delegates: Torsten Krause, Serge Alain Nana - ViaMUN

Policy Statement of the Republic of Tanzania on the Situation in the Democratic Republic ofCongoDelegates: Torsten Krause, Serge Alain NanaThe Republic of Tanzania warmly welcomes the initiative to convene a session of the UnitedNations Security Council on the situation in the Democratic Republic of Congo.Our agenda preference:I. Setting of the agendaII. Situation and settlement of the conflictIII. Refugee and humanitarian situationSITUATION AND SETTLEMENT OF THE CONFLICTIn the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), a complicated civil war continues to broil. Anunofficial front line diagonally cuts the country in two parts. Smaller-scale attacks, arson andmassacres have displaced hundreds of thousand in oriental province, North and South Kivuand in Ituri.Statistics in this war are difficult to obtain, but Non-Governmental Organisations (N.G.Os)estimate that more than one million people have lost their lives due to the conflict in the lasttwo years. In July 1999, the Lusaka cease-fire agreement was signed by the six warringcountries (Democratic Republic of Congo, Angola, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Rwanda andUganda) and rebel groups in an attempt to stop the civil war. The United Nations SecurityCouncil deployed UN liaison personnel in august 1999 to support the cease-fire. The liaisonoffice became the UN Organisation Mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo (MONUC)in November 1999, and in February 2000 it expanded its mandate and personnel.After the assassination of President Laurent-Désiré Kabila in January 2001, his son JosephKabila assumed power. He has taken steps towards peace and reconciliation. The task ofMONUC is to supervise the withdrawal and disengagement of the rebel forces. Since 2001, adelicate balance of peace has been re-established in large parts of the country, although thefighting persists in some areas in the eastern regions. The government has also introduced apolicy of economic stabilisation, which has achieved considerable progress: hyper-inflationand currency depreciation have been brought under control; and economic growth, whichrevived in 2002, exceeded 6 per cent in 2004.In June 2002, following the encouraging results of the enhanced interim programme (RIP),the Bretton Woods institutions (the IMF and World Bank) granted a $1.2 billion credit tosupport the government’s economic programme. The programme, which runs from April1


Policy Statement of the Republic of Tanzania on the Situation in the Democratic Republic ofCongo2002 to July 2005, aims to liberalise prices and trade, reform the banking sector and exploitgrowth possibilities due to the countries vast natural resources such as diamonds, gold andcoltan.However, the political situation remains delicate and tensions persist at the border withRwanda, in Ituri, North-Kivu and South-Kivu. Elections, initially scheduled for June 2005,cannot be held unless the government re-establishes control over all provinces.In this situation, if macroeconomic stability is to be sustained, the government must reducepublic spending, although the funding requirements of reconstruction, peacekeeping andpoverty reduction are putting the budget under heavy pressure. If the government succeeds inpreserving political stability, improving governance, combating corruption and pursuingstructural reform to improve the business climate, the DRC could return to high rates ofgrowth. The international community and particularly the U.N.O must therefore help the DRCin settling the conflict being a threat to international peace, security and stability in the region.Tanzania plays an active role in the United Nations, with the seat of the International Court ofJustice for crimes in Rwanda being seated in Arusha.REFUGEES AND HUMANITARIAN SITUATIONThe United Nations office for co-ordination on humanitarian affairs (UNOCHA) estimatesthat about 33% of the population are now vulnerable. Government spending on health andeducation have each dropped to less than 1% of government expenditure, leaving nearly athird of the children malnourished, 10% acutely so. The humanitarian crisis in the DRC hasbeen described as one of the worst in the world. The fighting has led to appalling levels ofhunger, disease, and death; and to countless abuses of human rights. More than two millionpeople are internally displaced, most of whom are in eastern DRC. They have sought refugewith friends, family or strangers, straining resources to such an extent that many of their hostsare also dragged into abject poverty.With more than 150 000 refugees, Tanzania is one of the host countries with the largestCongolese community. This also causes problems of maintenance to Tanzania, being not arich country itself and having an economy in development. It means therefore that therepatriation of the refugees should be as soon as possible to avoid an aggravation of thesituation of the refugees. But a premature return of refugees could jeopardize the instablepeace in the DRC. The repatriation needs favourable humanitarian conditions first to becontinued. The current food and humanitarian situation in the DRC give cause for seriousconcern. The eastern part faces a far bigger humanitarian crisis. Populations lack the essential2


Policy Statement of the Republic of Tanzania on the Situation in the Democratic Republic ofCongoneeds for human life: food, potable water and medical care. Diseases like malaria, cholera anddiarrhoea are wide spread due to hygiene and polluted water.In this sense the International Community must assist the government of the DRC in theprocesses of repatriation of refugees and should secure their maintenance during that time aswell as education and mediation for the inhabitants to prevent upcoming conflicts about land.The humanitarian situation in the DRC is not only limited to the country itself, but it is aproblem of the international community since not only the DRC is affected by this conflict butalso the whole region of the Great Lakes. Favourable trade terms are necessary to eliminateunfair subsidies. Desperate poverty and gross injustice remain a dangerous source ofinstability. Lasting peace demands equality and an economic wealth.Tanzania strongly supports the further enforcement of the United Nations Resolution 1596 of2005 on arms control and is in favour of an agreement of air traffic control for the region ofthe great lakes in order to monitor the enforcement of the Resolution.3

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