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Newsletter 63 - ICAN

Newsletter 63 - ICAN

Newsletter 63 -

NORTHERN REGIONSEED TREATMENT CRITICALFOR 2012 CHICKPEA CROPSGrowers planting chickpeas this year withseed retained from their 2011 crops areurged to treat seed correctly to control seedand soil borne fungal diseases.Dr Kevin Moore from NSW Department ofPrimary Industries said “. . . in 2011, Botrytisseedling disease was common in mostnorthern NSW crops sown with growerretained seed. The disease, caused by thefungus Botrytis cinerea, came from seedinfected during the 2010 Botrytis Grey Mould(BGM) epidemic. In every case, this seedlingdisease could be traced to inadequatetreatment of the 2010 crop seed, due topoor coverage or insufficient rate.“Together with poor germination andvigour, the result was patchy crops withlow populations and secondary infectionof healthy seedlings by Botrytis via rootcontact. Botrytis basal collar rot appearedfrom September onwards. Patchy standsmade weed management challenging andled to a higher incidence of viruses .“2011 field trials at Moree, Bellata, Breeza(in collaboration with NGA) and Tamworth,using seed from 2010 crops affected byBGM, showed conclusively that Botrytisseedling disease is readily controlled withregistered seed treatments, as long as theyare applied correctly”, said Dr Moore,“We were fortunate in 2011, because whilstBotrytis was present in most canopies,BGM did not cause any widespread lossesas growers and agronomists were ontop of it and where appropriate, appliedfungicides. In addition, many crops startedto senesce early (mid October), and the wetweather forecast for early November did noteventuate. However, in a longer wet seasonit would have been a different story”.Whilst BGM and Ascochyta were notwidespread in 2011, chickpea planting seedshould always be treated properly with aregistered seed treatment. These productsprovide excellent control of seedborneBotrytis and Ascochyta. In addition, theyFigure 1. Moree agronomist Phil Davis in a plot sown with untreated chickpea seed from a 2010 crop that hadsevere BGM. Seedborne Botrytis is the cause of the poor establishment. The plot on Phil’s right wassown with the same seed treated with a registered seed treatment. Photo 8 July 2011RESEARCH INFORMATION FOR FARM ADVISERSNORTHERN UPDATE | AUTUMN 2012 | ISSUE 63Print Post Approved PP 255003/03570

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