Beyond the Ballroom 8 Catering Needs for Tented Weddings 13 A ...

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Beyond the Ballroom 8 Catering Needs for Tented Weddings 13 A ...

CONTRIBUTORSTonia Adleta, PBC, is the owner and lead planner ofAribella Events, an award-winning wedding and eventplanningboutique with a design division in the Philadelphiaarea. When not working, planning stylized shoots, consumingcoffee, or playing with her two kids, she’s likely plotting theacquisition of the next stamp in her passport.Boca Raton Resort & ClubThe Ritz-CarltonCate Buscher planned weddings for six years before joiningPutting on the Ritz Catering, with locations in Laurel andSavage, Md., as an off-premise event specialist. She is the currentvice president of the Baltimore Chapter of the NationalAssociation for Catering and Events and loves this industry.Create a wedding day memory to last a lifetime.At America’s First Resort Destination®,couples have stayed, played and exchanged vowsfor more than100 years…now it’s your turn.Contact our Destination Wedding Specialistat 561-233-3057 or emailMyWedding@PalmBeachFL.comPalmBeachFL.com/weddingsMeghan Ely is the owner of the wedding marketing and PRfirm OFD Consulting. She is a frequent contributor to industrymagazines and blogs, a highly sought-after speaker, and aproud member of the Association of Bridal Consultants.Elise Enloe, MBC, is the vice president of North AmericanOperations and director of education for the Associationof Bridal Consultants as well as the owner of Attention toDetails Weddings and Events in Oviedo and Orlando, Fla.Cris Joseph, event rental consultant at Classic Party Rentals,has more than 20 years of experience in the special eventfield and specializes in creating events “beyond the ballroom.”Cris loves taking a parking lot, backyard, or estate lawn andtransforming it into a one-of-a-kind wedding venue that iscustomized to the bride and groom’s specific tastes.The “Miss Dorothy” Heart AwardDeadline is August 15, 2013The Miss Dorothy Penner Heart Award for Passion andExcellence to the Wedding Industry is the only awardpresented by the Association of Bridal Consultants. Ithonors a member who has demonstrated a “passionfor the wedding industry.” Members are nominated bytheir peers and are judged by the Miss Dorothy committee.The winner will be announced at the Businessof Brides Conference in West Palm Beach, Fla.The “Miss Dorothy” ScholarshipDeadline is July 31, 2013This scholarship is for Novice members only. It allowsthem to attend this year’s ABC Business of Brides AnnualConference in West Palm Beach, Fla. The winner willbe notified on Sept. 1, 2013, and will be announced atthe conference. The award must be used for the 2013conference.Download both applications today at www.BridalAssn.com.The Brazilian Court HotelThe Breakers4 Wedding Planner Magazine


© Mi Boda Màgica© Amanda Temple Photographycourtesy of edward griffn, MWV81624Table o f ContentsFeaturesBeyond the BallroomTented Weddings OfferGroundbreaking Venues..............................................................................................8Planners get free rein on creativity with tented weddings, which allowthem to create a venue from the ground up. For a successful event,tented professionals help navigate the many requirements, options, anddetails critical to tented wedding success.A Minute With Matthew: Advice and Insight From Wedding ProMatthew Robbins......................................................................................................... 19Get wedding planning tips and advice in this one-on-one interview withMatthew Robbins, a contributing editor for Martha Stewart Weddingsand owner of Matthew Robbins Design. Robbins will be a keynotespeaker at the Association of Bridal Consultants Business of BridesConference in November.DepartmentsInternational: Wedding Crasher Provides Glimpse Into Brazil’sWedding Scene..............................................................................................................15Tonia Adleta, PBC, Aribella Events, gives you a glimpse into the customsand culture of Brazilian weddings with her experience as a weddingcrasher guided by one of Brazil’s premier photographers.Real Wedding—Wisconsin.......................................................................................26Is two better than one? Certainly for this couple who celebrated withtwo events—a small, natural lighting ceremony and intimate receptionand a larger, 1940s themed reception days later.Real Wedding—Indiana.............................................................................................27If it had been held in September, this outdoor wedding would have feltlike A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Regardless, the casual, eclectic charmof this event, which almost didn’t happen due to heavy rains, lent adreamlike feel.Industry Best Practices..............................................................................................29Techno-Tidbits: How do you put your iPad to work for you?ColumnsConsider Catering—A Pinch of This a Dash of That Could Save the Dayfor Tented Weddings...................................................................................................13Prep space, proximity, and power needs are just a few of the detailscritical to the success of a tented wedding from the caterer’s perspective.Cate Buscher, National Association of Catering and Events, tells youhow to anticipate these needs to prevent last-minute problems.Master Profile: Mary Charmoli, MBC..................................................................21Business Basics: The Wedding Not-So Confidential: How to SuccessfullyDiscuss Pricing With Clients....................................................................................22Many are familiar with Alan Berg’s public response to the 20/20 “WeddingConfidential.” In this companion piece, Berg shares his tips for how to addressthe issue of wedding pricing—both your company’s and the industry’s.Ask the Experts.............................................................................................................23Wedding Planner Magazine readers pose their pressing industry-relatedquestions, and our advisory group has the answers.ABC Member Insight—Edward L. Griffin, MWV, The Wedding DJs/Hardcastle Entertainment, Inc...............................................................................24What’s the best way to make your event shine? Discover the latest tipsand trends in event lighting.Let’s Talk Education: ABC’s Seminar Series One, Two, and Three............28Learn more about the Association of Bridal Consultant’s revampededucation series in this review of the World of Wedding Planning, LetYour Business Blossom, and Rehearsal to Reception Rx.In Every IssueContributors....................................................................................................................4Editor’s/Publishers’ Letter......................................................................................... 7President’s Letter........................................................................................................... 7ABC Meetings & News............................................................................................... 16Advertisers Index.........................................................................................................30Wedding Planner Magazine 5


f e at u r e© Mi Boda Màgica event design and producton Merryl Brown Events © Isaac HernandezWhen envisioning flooring, keep the elevation and terrain of the groundin mind and know that a site survey with a trained event rental consultantwill help determine the feasibility of the style you prefer.Many of today’s designers also are requesting wood veneers to coverthe internal metal tent poles to “warm” up an event and bring inside atouch of the outdoors. There are also tent types with wood poles insteadof metal and that incorporate sailcloth, a translucent fabric that allowsnatural light to penetrate the space. Many times, the sailcloth tents haverounded ends that may fit better into unusual spaces and backyards. Inaddition, some clients are requesting the exterior of the tent also blendwith the venue. In those cases, tents are being constructed to resembleawnings complete with striped tops as well as tents in soft beige andmuted colors. Once again, these tents are not as prevalent and beforeselling your bride and groom on a specific look involve a tented professionalat the inception.The icing on the cakeA tent ceiling is the perfect “canvas” for a designer’s creativity. Aclear-top tent lends itself nicely to an industrial glam theme as wellcourtesy of classic party rentals10 Wedding Planner Magazine


c at e r i n gConsider Catering—A Pinch of This, a Dashof That Could Save theDay for Tented WeddingsBy Cate Buscher, National Association for Catering and Events,baltimore photo by Daniel McGarrity Photographya tent. An onsite refrigerator eliminates thechance of potentially being charged more fora refrigerated truck. Generators for ovens andlighting for caterer’s tents don’t come cheap. Isthere adequate room for prepping the food aswell as a breakdown area? An appropriate prepspace for the caterer will enhance the efficiencyof getting the food out, and we all know howimportant an itinerary is for maximizing dancetime. Becoming familiar with the necessities ofthe prep space and realizing the need for one isa huge step in the right direction.Creating a successful tented affair requiresa lot of careful planning. Anticipating the needsof the caterer can reduce the number of potentialcomplications and make the experiencemuch more rewarding for everyone involved.As a wedding planner, before I became an offpremisecaterer, I loved the challenge of tentedweddings—and still do. Far from routine weddingsat familiar venues, tented events allowcouples to embrace a location that truly meanssomething to them and offers the stunningambience of a photographer’s dreams. They alsomake hiring a planner pretty crucial. Someone’sbackyard doesn’t come with a dance floor,tables, chairs, restrooms, or marked parkingspaces. An empty field does not necessarily offerelectricity or running water. Identifying andobtaining all of these things can be a dauntingand expensive process for couples—and nearlyimpossible with no guidance.Therefore, it’s up to the planner to pulltogether all of those elements and create arealistic budget to make it happen. But carefulplanning can be undone if the logistics of whatthe caterer needs to prepare the food interfereswith the flow of the event. The needsof the caterer can also add up financially andmake an unwelcomed impact on the final billif unexpected.A common mistake among planners is toaddress the obvious concerns, like budgetingfor restrooms and rentals but neglecting toconsider some of the biggies that have a majorimpact on catering. How can you avoid this?Consider the following:Prep space is cost- and time-savingWhen preparing for a tented wedding, besure to ask yourself: Where will the caterer bepreparing the food? A home kitchen? A garage?In their truck? In a caterer’s tent? While itseems almost silly to bring this up, this detail isoften overlooked by planners and clients alike.Some solutions are less costly than others. Apre-existing kitchen costs less than rentingProximity keeps food service promptSuppose there is an amazing prep spaceestablished for the caterer, but it is far from thereception. Maybe there is no avoiding this, orthe couple doesn’t want an unsightly cateringtruck ruining their view. Regardless, the issuenow is getting the food from the kitchen tothe tent. Additional staffing might be requiredto ensure a meal served in a timely fashion. Inthe case of rain, additional tenting would berequired to cover the path of the servers. Oneguest’s last-minute surprise request could takean eternity to fulfill. Keeping this in mind,discussing layouts and aesthetics will be worthit in the long run.Consider setup and breakdownA commonly encountered money-saving techniqueis using the same rented chairs for theceremony as well as the reception. How doesthis affect catering? It usually requires cateringstaff to relocate the chairs from ceremony totent for the reception. And if the ceremony andthe tent are separated by the cocktail area, ornot at all near one another, the caterer mustemploy more staff to make it happen. It’s possiblethis could be the most economical approach,depending on headcount, but it might be themost awkward way to handle the turnover.Any caterer worth her salt will tackle these issuesas soon as she is involved, but the plannerworth her weight in gold will anticipate theseneeds and prepare her clients for them in advance.This can make things infinitely easier forboth client and caterer throughout the process,prevent last-minute charges from arising, andhave a beneficial effect on the day-of itinerary.By considering the requirements of the caterer,you will be operating in the best interests ofyour clients. ••Wedding Planner Magazine 13


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u s i n e s s b a s i c sThe Wedding Not-So ConfidentialHow to Successfully Discuss Pricing With ClientsBy Alan Berg, Author, Speaker, Consultant, Kendall Park, N.J.There has been a lot of talk lately aboutthe value of wedding planning services. A Januarytelevision episode of 20/20, called “WeddingConfidential,” questioned the price of all thingswedding and focused on ways couples can cutcosts. This piece seemed to do more damagethan good. How can you respond to questionsabout the value of your services?Start with fair pricingWhether you’re a Master Bridal Consultantor aspiring newbie, you have to decide whatservices you’re going to offer and then set aprice for those services. How do you set yourpricing? Do you look at what others charge andthen determine whether you’re worth moreor less? Or, do you sit down and figure yourcosts, financial needs, and the time it will taketo perform those services? If you look at whatothers are charging and base your prices onthat, you’re actually using the wrong metric.Theoretically, the other business set their pricesbased upon their financial needs, their costs,their inventory (how many weddings they wantto plan this year), and other factors. Thosefactors work for that company, but they don’tapply to you. If you set your pricing correctly,you’ll be ready to answer questions about it.Know your advantageFirst, however, learn how and when to addresspricing. If you’ve already had a chance to hearwhat your clients’ needs are and explain whatyou can do for them, then price is a legitimatequestion. If it’s the first contact, move theconversation to what’s really important, thesuccess of their wedding. It’s also important toknow when clients are not a good fit. Then, referthem to someone more qualified for what they’reseeking, or if it’s Bridezilla, simply walk away.22 Wedding Planner MagazinePeople can always find someone who chargesless than you, so why should they pay yourprice—especially if you’re higher than mostarea planners? If you don’t know why youcharge more, then why should anyone pay yourprice? The answer is that they can’t get you andyour team anywhere else. They can get servicesthat look similar on paper, but if they reallywant you and your team to plan their wedding,or handle their wedding day management, theyhave to hire you—at your price. So, the key isnot to sell the services, it’s to sell, specifically,you providing those services. That’s somethingthey can’t get anywhere else—at any price.The most important thing is...A client of mine called the other day lamentingabout a potential customer who said theyhad gotten a significantly better price with acompetitor (40 percent less). On the one hand,he was angry. On the other, he wanted to getthe sale. I suggested he tell the prospect that ifthe most important thing was price, then theyshould choose his competitor. However, if themost important thing was success, he couldassure them of that outcome if they chose histeam. As a planner, you can’t know what theother company will do. You have no controlover it. You do, however, know what you canprovide. This planner had a very experiencedteam that had earned the right to be paid morebecause of proven success.Don’t price match or loweryour qualityPlanners also shouldn’t choose to match alower price. Your price equals your quality. Ifyou offer to price match at 40 percent less, youwon’t give the client 40 percent less service, 40percent less quality, or 40 percent less guestAlan Berg is an in-demand, professional speaker, domestically andinternationally; a marketing guru and business consultant; and theauthor of the books If Your Website Was an Employee, Would You FireIt?, Don’t Paint the House, and his newest book Your Attitude for Success,all available on his website, along with a series of DVD and AudioCD presentations. For more information, or to see Berg’s responseto open response to the 20/20 “Wedding Confidential,” visit www.AlanBerg.com.satisfaction, will you? Bring the discussionback to what’s really important to the client.Make your clients feel you’re the best solutionfor their wedding. In the case of my client, Ialso reminded him that if price was the mostimportant factor, his client would have alreadybooked the other company, but they didn’t.They came back to him because they wouldrather book him, but the price disparity madethem pause. That’s understandable. No onewants to think they overpaid, especially bya lot. If price truly was the most importantfactor, then it wasn’t his sale to get.Know why “it takes a village”Another question that can arise is: Why does itcost more for some services for a wedding thanfor a party? Should it? Is it fair to the consumer?From the outside, it may seem that a weddingis just a party. But, as professional weddingplanners know, a lot more goes into planninga wedding, DJ’ing a wedding, photographing awedding, etc. than for a party. Much of the extrawork happens out of the view of the host andguests, before the event. While the 20/20 piecesuggested that some vendors increase pricingwhen they hear it’s a wedding, they didn’tacknowledge that there is a good reason for it.When talking with clients, do you explain aboutthe extra planning and prep time involvedfor wedding pros, including yourself, to properlyexecute a wedding versus a party? Do youunderstand the extra work that the wedding prosyou recommend do? If not, learn more. It’s yourjob to know as much as you can about all of thedifferent services of a wedding. I have a coachingclient in Australia who’s starting a weddingplanning business. I suggested she “intern” withas many different wedding pros as she can. Be anextra set of hands to the florist, band, DJ, caterer,etc. Learn, firsthand, what it takes to successfullyperform those services. That way, she’ll be moreprepared to explain the difference to her clients.Give value and chargewhat you’re worthThe lessons here are this. Price fairly, beinformed, and know the effort that goes into awedding from all sides. And don’t sell the price.Sell you and your team providing the servicesand products clients need. Once they want you,they have to pay your price. ••


Industry ExpertsTackle Your Toughest Questions"As a beginner in the wedding industry, with very little to no extrafunds to spend, on what would you advise someone like me tospend money for promotion and advertising?"Q- Callie M. Rackley, CWP, Sister Secrets Wedding & Event, Elko, Ga.A“Start with developing a good website, then research weddingInternet sites, and see what is the best fit for you and yourtarget market. Internet marketing seems to be the way to go,but don’t rule out print. Stick to wedding-related magazinesand newspaper sections that the couples will be reading to getspecific wedding information.”- Frank J. Andonoplas, MBC, Frank Events, Chicago“Position yourself with some of the more popular venues and wedding professionalsby asking them to meet for coffee. I suggest meeting in the lobby of a greathotel. Stop by early and bring a treat, something inexpensive. See the cateringmanager since you were ‘in the area.’ And it’s great to be meeting in the lobby andpotentially run into to people who know you.”- Mark Kingsdorf, MBC, The Queen of Hearts Wedding Consultants, Clermont, Fla.“Where to put your advertising dollar has always been a big question. Theproblem is, there is no clear answer. What worked yesterday may or may not worktoday. What worked for one company may not work for another. Part of theproblem is the speed of information these days. Websites go in and out of favormuch quicker, and there are more and more of them every year. Print can workbecause it’s tangible, tends to stick around longer, and is passed from person toperson. When you are starting off, your most abundant resource is your time. Youhave more time to network and get your name out in person. Your company musthave a clear and consistent image and message no matter what.”- Ed Griffin, MWV, The Wedding DJs/Hardcastle Entertainment, Inc., Renton, Wash.“The most important thing is to get a website and business cards. When I firststarted, I also tried doing some small, local bridal shows. Try reaching out tocaterers in the area. In my area, they host monthly tastings and invite vendors tohave a table during the tastings. Another great way to promote your business isto volunteer to help with registration or check-in for vendors at your larger bridalshows. It will give you a chance to network and get noticed.”- Tammy Waterman, MBC, Special Moments, Pinellas Park, Fla.“Invest in a very nice and professional-looking website, blog, and business cards.Use Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. There are fantastic companies out there thatwill help set a site up for you with stock images, until you have your own to add,for minimal funds. Also, invest in at least one, high-traffic bridal show. This shouldhelp you get your name out there, and get some bookings to begin. Stay local, butmake sure you look professional when you attend anything. And, make sure tonetwork and gather business cards. Meet your local catering companies, florists,and entertainment companies. These people will be great assets to you.”- Shelly Stone, Signature Events by Shelly, Wauwatosa, Wis.Q-"There have been so many suggestions on what to say and whatnot to say during an initial interview or consultation. What is thebest manner to get a client to agree to a first or initial consultation,after the big ‘How much’ question?"Stephanie K. Davis, Creative Weddings and Events, Ellicott City, Md.A“I always try to ‘create concern,’ showing ways I can assist themthrough features of my service, followed by the benefits of how itwill assist them with their specific need.”- Frank J. Andonoplas, MBC, Frank Events, Chicago“We don’t do initial consultations. We make ‘get-acquainted meetings.’ Theyare designed to get to know the couple and their specific needs, share with themwhat we can do for them, and see if we are a good match. There is no obligationto ‘plan’ anything this way, and you can share a few tips with them without feelingtoo obligated.”- Mark Kingsdorf, MBC, The Queen of Hearts Wedding Consultants, Clermont, Fla.“What I always tell people is that, even though I have my packages, I am alwayshappy to create a customized package for them. They might realize that, duringthe consultation, they could use help in one way or another. This seems to makepeople happy to meet with me—and I do quite well on the percentages of couplesthat I book after that first consultation.”- Shelly Stone, Signature Events by Shelly, Wauwatosa, Wis.“I coordinated a wedding this past January and the mother-ofthe-groomhired a second wedding planner and brought her fromOrlando to South Carolina. In this situation, how do you, as thefirst planner, respond to the second?”Q- Justin Séan Brown, PBC, Creations by Brown, Pamplico, S.C.A“This is wrong on so many levels! I have a sign on my desk thatsays, ‘You don’t get what you deserve, you get what you negotiate.’So, first, and hopefully, your contract says that you are theonly wedding consultant on the job (photographers do it all thetime). Second, your client needs to have a chat with the motherof-the-groom.There is no need for two quarterbacks calling the plays. Third, Ihonestly don’t know that I’d want to have a lot of communication with the planneruntil the lines were drawn, by the clients, as to what she was supposed to do anduntil you had ‘circled the wagon’ with all of the wedding professionals on the job.”- Mark Kingsdorf, MBC, The Queen of Hearts Wedding Consultants, Clermont, Fla.“I have in my contract I am the only planner. Period.”- Frank J. Andonoplas, MBC, Frank Events, Chicago“I would reach out to the wedding planner, because, after all, we are all there forthe same common reason—to make the bride and groom’s day special. See whathe or she can do to assist and move forward so there’s no drama.”- Tammy Waterman, MBC, Special Moments, Pinellas Park, Fla.a s k t h e e x p e rt sAsk Our Experts!Is there a situation that’s been puzzling you? Do you want answers? Email your wedding industry questions to editor@weddingplannermag.com. Be sure to put “Askthe Experts” in the subject line and include your full name, designation(s), business name, and its city and state. Questions are answered by our Advisory Board.Wedding Planner Magazine 23


A B C m e m b e r i n s i g h tEven Diamonds Don’t Sparkle Without Light—Make Your Event Shine With the Right Lightingarticle and photos By Edward L. Griffin, MWV, The Wedding DJs/Hardcastle Entertainment, Inc., Renton, Wash.Lighting is a powerful and effective tool for decorating, butit’s much more than that. Great lighting can transform a venue, capturea mood, tell a story, and add extra pizzazz.The key to polishing yourevent is finding a lighting designer who understands the event and thateverything they put into the space is now part of the décor. Discusswhat you want the room to look like, the colors and textures you willincorporate into the décor, and the budget. The three biggest things thatlimit a lighting designer are: their own skill and creativity, power, andthe budget. As a planner, it’s also important to know the basics aboutlighting. Here’s a primer:Uplighting is Easy and EffectiveUplighting is simply floor-based lighting. It’s a quick, easy, and verycost-effective way to enhance the atmosphere of any room. Consideramber lighting, which make rooms feel warmer and look richer. It’salso about the only color to make people look healthy and alive. It evenmakes those of us from Seattle look tan. Avoid green lighting at all cost!It makes people look ill, or worse, like aliens. Traditional par cans usedwith halogen lamps give you a warm, pleasing light. To change the color,a gel or mylar film is placed over the top. The drawback is that you needto swap out that color gel to change the color.LEDS Have Power and RangeDue to advances in technology, LED uplighting has become very popular.24 Wedding Planner MagazineBecause this technology is relatively new, better and brighter LED lightsthat cost the same or cheaper are continually being developed. Somepeople believe LEDs don’t use any power and don’t get hot. That isn’tcompletely true. True, LEDs use less power, but the LEDs that actuallyput out as much light as a traditional halogen still use power and can gethot. With LEDs, it’s not just the “bulb,” it’s also the circuit board thatuses power and can get hot.To fix the harsh look of white LEDs, find fixtures with amber colorcorrection. A big advantage of LEDs is the range of colors they canproduce with the push of a button when using a DMX console forlinking controllers. It’s even possible to overcome the need to connecteach light with a cable when using wireless DMX. Of course, it costsmore. However, some LED fixtures can be preprogrammed with acustom color before your event, removing the need for DMX cables.Ask your lighting designer. Some LEDs are even battery-powered withwireless DMX all-in-one.Gobos Transform and Add TextureGobos allow a pattern to be projected from a theater light calledEllipsoidal or Leko. Projecting the bride and groom’s name or initialsis a nice touch, but fairly common. However, using gobos for texturecan really make a room “pop.” Aim them on the ceiling, walls, or dancefloor. Themed gobos also add to the décor. Imagine orange leaves for an


A B C m e m b e r i n s i g h t…using gobos for texturecan really make a room "pop."autumn-themed wedding in a building with old wooden beams. On rareoccasions where you have attach points above, you can aim them on thefloor for a gobo aisle runner.Moving Heads Create Hollywood EffectMoving heads are very powerful and versatile light fixtures that look likea headlight on the end of an egg. You see them on TV at every awardsshow. Their ability to spin and tilt make them able to hit almost anywherein a room. Some are used for spotlights and color washes. Othershave rotating gobos, so you can use them for texture on the walls. Whenthe dancing starts, these lights can come alive by moving, strobing,changing colors, and rotating the gobos—all at the same time. Movingheads are fairly expensive and require a skilled DMX programmer, butthey can be very impressive.The Secret to Great Tent LightingLighting in a tent is a must. When the sun goes down, light is needed, soyou might as well make it look great. Uplighting and chandeliers are standard.Down-lighting can also look amazing when installed between thetop of the tent and the liner. The liner diffuses the light and helps createa warm feel. You may want dimmers here, especially if you have a DJ orband and dancing is planned. With tents, however, power can be an issue.Distance from a power source may require you to rent a generator. Don’tskimp here. If your caterer has heating ovens or coffee pots, they may usemore power than your lighting and your entertainment combined. Even ifyou are close to a building with power, it may not be desirable to run cablesbetween them if they cross a major walkway. You could put the generatoron a corner and run cables where no one will trip over them.Make it over the top!Create a “lightscape,” not just a couple splashes of color. Turn off allflorescent lighting. Layer your lighting with color using uplighting andtextures with gobos, and enhance both with moving heads. Use lightingto take your bride’s, groom’s, and guests’ breath away the minute theywalk into the room. ••Ed Griffin, MWV, is owner of Hardcastle Entertainment,Inc., a full-production, audio-visualcompany, and The Wedding DJs. He is a memberof the American Disc Jockey Association (ADJA),having served as president of its Puget SoundChapter. An active member of the Association ofBridal Consultants, Griffin served as the WashingtonState Coordinator in 2009 and 2010 andbecame a Master Wedding Vendor in 2011. Heis also a member of Wedding Planner Magazine’sAdvisory Board.Wedding Planner Magazine 25


Real Weddingi n d i a n aABC member planner: Janice Board, SpectacularSoirees Wedding & Event Planning, Terre Haute, Ind.,812.841.4311, spectacular.soirees@gmail.com,www.spectacularsoirees.com.Photographer: Vintage Spark Photography.Non-member business involved: Brandon HarrisEvent Lighting, Heinl’s Flower Shop, J. Lin CateringThe couple: Betsy Young and Matt Dillin live inColorado and share a great love of the outdoorsand sports. They weren’t afraid to get their handsdirty with DIY projects, which made the experienceeven more enjoyable. They were invested in thiswedding process more than the average couple.wedding Date: Sept. 8, 2012.Inspiration: Betsy and Matt were inspired by theoutdoors and a casual sense of style.Color palette: Teal, yellow, white.Approximate budget: $15,000.Guest count: 50.Most unique design element: Using the canoeas the bar, mismatched vintage plates for place settings,creating a clearing and aisle in the middle ofthe forest, hanging/draping a multitude of lanternsfrom wire 12 feet off of the ground surrounding theceremony site, and using a great deal of burlap.Biggest challenge: By far, the ceremony site wasthe biggest challenge. We were excited to finallyhave a venue owned by the client. That meant wecould take our time to set up both the ceremonyand reception site over the course of seven days.We created a clearing in the forest and a hikingpath to the site. The path was about a quarter-of-amilewalk from the reception location on the familyproperty. Unfortunately, the weather did notcooperate. It poured the two days before the wedding,so we had to do the ceremony and receptionsite installations in one day. The site and the pathleading up to it were mud pits. We covered theentire area with straw so guests would not sink intothe ground. We also designed a temporary aislemade of heavy concrete blocks—the groom andgroomsmen installed it. It was all hands on deckwhen the two days of rain truncated the schedule.Another challenge was the distance from the familyhome to the ceremony site. Everything had tobe transported via “gator.” Additional challengesincluded widening the path to the family homefor access by the coach bus transporting guests,clearing a pathway to the site so the gators/truckscould transport materials multiple times, and juryrigging table leg jacks under the reception tables sothey didn’t sink into the wet ground.Hindsight: We really don’t have any regretsfor this wedding, except the weather, which wecould not control. Of course, one can alwaysuse more detail photos including—the visuallybeautiful vignettes of antique lanterns, hand-madewooden buckets/barrels, bales of straw, an antiquewooden wheelbarrow filled with colorful mums,candles, and more, all set up along the lantern-linedwalkway to the ceremony site. The family also hada fabulous old, red barn and rusty farm implementsthroughout the property. ••Wedding Planner Magazine 27


“My entire portfolio is on my iPad—to showpotential clients the photographs, publications,and itineraries of events I’ve done.The iPad also helps show current clientsexamples of setup and décor. It holds mycalendar and emails so I can stay on top ofemails in between meetings and know myagenda. I also keep up with trends—readingmagazines, blogs, and using Facebook.Clients use my iPad during meetings to showtheir Pinterest wedding boards.”- Jennifer Lackey, ABC, StorybookWedding Consulting, Newnan, Ga.“My iPad has completely simplified mywedding practices. I use the app Bamboo tosketch out designs the bride and I discusswhile we’re meeting so she can confirmit. Before every event, I send all the latestto-do lists, room diagrams, seating charts,guest lists, timelines, and vendor informationto my iPad. Then, I can flip throughthe various documents without a bulkynotebook, enlarge the timeline withouthaving to print off multiple sheets, and, ifnecessary, email a document to a staffer orvendor at the last minute. Just be sure tocharge your iPad first!”- Lynn H. Wheatley, Lasting Impressions ofTulsa, LLC, Tulsa, Okla.“I use my iPad to engage with potentialclients by sharing a digital format galleryand inspiration. It’s one thing for them tosee my work ahead of time at home ontheir own computer or device, but, faceto-face,I’m able to add context and detailto the design decisions when walking themthrough the portfolio. The majority of myclients are in the millennial generation, theyappreciate working with a professional whois tech-savvy.”- Amber Housley, Amber Housley Style +Design, Nashville, Tenn.“Using the iPad allows you to take mobilepayment on the go with apps like Square,Intuit, and Paypal. Use Facetime, Skype, andGoogle Hangout to virtually ‘meet’ withclients and vendors. When you want to getin a quick face-to-face with a client or vendor,these apps are great. You can use theDocuSign Ink app to store, send, and signdocuments for your signature as well asyour client’s signature. Quickoffice Pro HDallows you to view and edit your MicrosoftOffice documents (Word, Excel, Powerpoint).OmniFocus for iPad is a high-leveltask management app that allows you totrack all you do by attaching notes, audio,links, and images to your action items.”- LaToya Parnell, PBC, Something BlueWeddings, Washington, D.C.“We love using our iPad to show offalbums, Pinterest boards and inspiration,past events, and future ideas to clients. Wemake sure we have our iPad handy for allmeetings and also use it during site visitsto take video and photos. The iPad is sucha handy tool to check email and look upanything, anywhere!”- Jolene Greenbaum Peterson, CallunaEvents, Boulder, Colo.“My iPad is my portable office and hasbuilt-in cellular, so ‘we’ can go anywhere. Ihave even used video conferencing in thecar, while parked, of course! I use SaiSukecalendar, which syncs all of my gadgetswirelessly. Foliobook holds my event portfolio.And then there are the useful appsthat make me look like a genius around mybrides: Sunset & Rise, ColorSchemer, andFun Wedding (to suggest songs).”- Stephanie L. Hassan, PBC, Table 7 Events,Inc., Fullerton, Calif.“I scan all contracts into PDFs and loadthem to my iPad for a wedding day. Thisincludes the itinerary. Additionally, whenmeeting with potential clients, I use theslideshow to display past weddings andreview the packages I offer.”- Angela Dupont, ABC, CPCE, DupontEvents, Fort Worth, Texas“Our iPad is a wonderful tool to use duringclient meetings. We are able to showcaseexamples of floral designs, table décor, andlayout options for venues. Our business hasadvanced by the innovation of technology!”- Jennifer N. Friend, MAED, Pink with EnvyEvent Planning, Beavercreek, Ohio“I store all client information in Evernotealong with emails, digital contracts, andlocation and inspiration photos all in oneinstantly available device. To have it at myfingertips during a client meeting in-officeor on-location is invaluable! Notes, changesto plans, timelines, details, etc. can be typedup or even recorded for later text translationanytime. The same information travelsto my phone on the wedding day for easiertransport in my pocket!”- Bryan Glynn, BG Pictures, Holiday, Fla.“I absolutely love my iPad! There are severalgreat apps I use on it. One of my favoritesis Dropbox. I create my own design boardsin PowerPoint, save them, and then uploadthem to Dropbox. It makes for a greatpresentation when meeting with potentialnew brides. The presentation looks moreprofessional, clean, and flawless on the iPad.- Nishaka Proctor, PBC, Events By Nishaka,Greensboro, N.C.Techno-Tidbits:How doyou putyour iPadto workfor you?Wedding Planner Magazine 29i n d u st ry b e st p r ac t i c e s


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