13.07.2015 Views

Community Involvement in Primary Education Reform - Near East ...

Community Involvement in Primary Education Reform - Near East ...

Community Involvement in Primary Education Reform - Near East ...

SHOW MORE
SHOW LESS

You also want an ePaper? Increase the reach of your titles

YUMPU automatically turns print PDFs into web optimized ePapers that Google loves.

<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong><strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong>F<strong>in</strong>al Report2007-2010A community approach to educational reform and action.<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong>


<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong><strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong>In the Regions of Souss Massa Draa & Marrakech Tensift Al HaouzMoroccoF<strong>in</strong>al Report<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 1


ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMSAREFAVDCRDMoEIGAINDHMEPIMTANEFNGOODAPACREPPTASMBSMDSSAUNRegional Academy of <strong>Education</strong> and Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g (Académie Régionale del’<strong>Education</strong> et de la Formation)Association Villageoise de DéveloppementCommune RuraleDeputy M<strong>in</strong>istry of <strong>Education</strong>Income Generat<strong>in</strong>g ActivitiesNational Initiative for Human Development (Initiative Nationale pour leDéveloppement Huma<strong>in</strong>)Middle <strong>East</strong> Partnership InitiativeMarrakech Tensift Al Haouz Region<strong>Near</strong> <strong>East</strong> FoundationNon Governmental OrganizationOxford Development Abroad<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> (Participation de laCommunauté à la Réforme de l’Enseignement Primaire)Parent Teacher AssociationSchool Management BoardSouss Massa Draa RegionSuccess School AssociationUnited NationsThis publication was produced under the <strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong>project, implemented by the <strong>Near</strong> <strong>East</strong> Foundation <strong>in</strong> cooperation with the Academies Regionales del’<strong>Education</strong> et de la Formation <strong>in</strong> Souss Massa Draa and Marrakech Tensift Al Haouz (Morocco).This report is made possible by the generous support of the Middle <strong>East</strong> Partnership Initiative(MEPI). The contents are the responsibility of the <strong>Near</strong> <strong>East</strong> Foundation, and do not necessarilyreflect the views of MEPI or the United States Government.<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 2


TABLE OF CONTENTSABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS .................................................................................................... 2TABLE OF CONTENTS......................................................................................................................... 3I. INTRODUCTION.............................................................................................................................. 4II. PROJECT OVERVIEW...................................................................................................................... 4A. Context ..................................................................................................................................... 4B. Goal .......................................................................................................................................... 5C. Location of Intervention ............................................................................................................ 5D. Project Objectives ..................................................................................................................... 5E. Expected Results ....................................................................................................................... 6III. PROJECT INTERVENTION AREAS................................................................................................... 7IV. IMPACT BY PROJECT AREA ........................................................................................................... 8A. Area 1 – Awareness Rais<strong>in</strong>g and Mobilization ............................................................................ 8B. Area 2 - Collaboration for <strong>Education</strong>al <strong>Reform</strong> .......................................................................... 9C. Area 3 –Susta<strong>in</strong>ability through Resource Mobilization ............................................................. 10D. Area 4 – Susta<strong>in</strong>ability through Capacity Build<strong>in</strong>g .................................................................... 15V. PROJECT IMPACT & SUSTAINABILITY .......................................................................................... 17VI. COMMUNICATION & PRESS ....................................................................................................... 19VII. APPENDICES ............................................................................................................................. 20A. Project Flowchart .................................................................................................................... 20B. PACREP Objectives and Indicators Overview ........................................................................... 21C. Project Impact: Indicator Overview ......................................................................................... 22<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 3


I. INTRODUCTIONThe <strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 1 (PACREP) project, funded bythe Middle <strong>East</strong> Partnership Initiative (MEPI) of the U.S. Department of State andimplemented <strong>in</strong> partnership by the <strong>Near</strong> <strong>East</strong> Foundation (NEF) and the Regional Academyof <strong>Education</strong> and Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g (AREF), worked to improve the quality of primary education <strong>in</strong>rural areas of Morocco.The PACREP project’s participatory and collaborative approach presented an <strong>in</strong>novativecontribution to efforts at improv<strong>in</strong>g education <strong>in</strong> rural areas. Implemented between 2007and 2010, the PACREP project expanded NEF’s education reform model first implemented<strong>in</strong> the High Atlas Mounta<strong>in</strong>s of Morocco between 2004 and 2007. Also funded by MEPI, thisearlier project worked to enhance enrollment and retention rates <strong>in</strong> rural primary schools<strong>in</strong> Ouarzazate by <strong>in</strong>tegrat<strong>in</strong>g schools with<strong>in</strong> their communities—develop<strong>in</strong>g parent-teacherassociations (PTAs), establish<strong>in</strong>g partnerships between local government and thecommunity, and creat<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong>come generat<strong>in</strong>g projects to ensure susta<strong>in</strong>ability.The PACREP project expanded this successful <strong>in</strong>tervention to the Souss Massa Draa (SMD)and Marrakech Tensift Al Haouz (MTA) regions of Morocco, and built upon this model ofrural education support. The project supported educational improvements and promotedlocal development by mobiliz<strong>in</strong>g communities to act as partners <strong>in</strong> the strengthen<strong>in</strong>g of theeducational system. The PACREP project worked closely with the regional AREFs, delegatesfrom the M<strong>in</strong>istry of <strong>Education</strong> (DMoE), school directors, and PTAs to mobilizecommunities and foster a susta<strong>in</strong>able and community-driven model for educationalimprovements <strong>in</strong> rural areas.The PACREP project complemented a period of reform <strong>in</strong> Morocco’s national educationalsystem. In 2009, the M<strong>in</strong>istry of National <strong>Education</strong> <strong>in</strong>stituted a four-year National <strong>Education</strong>Emergency Support Program to accelerate the pace of reforms and help the country’seducational system meet its UN Millennium Development Goal objectives by 2015. In ruralareas of Morocco, the challenges of education are particularly complex. F<strong>in</strong>ancial <strong>in</strong>security,high rates of illiteracy, problems reta<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g quality teachers, and outdated and <strong>in</strong>sufficienteducational <strong>in</strong>frastructure present marked difficulties <strong>in</strong> the rural environment. The M<strong>in</strong>istryof <strong>Education</strong> and other educational leaders have recognized the impact of the PACREPproject’s model, and promoted the approach as an example of a positive <strong>in</strong>tervention.The PACREP project furthered the U.S. government’s efforts to support Moroccaneducational reforms, particularly <strong>in</strong> primary education <strong>in</strong> rural areas. This f<strong>in</strong>al reportpresents the results and achievements of the project from 2007 to 2010.II. PROJECT OVERVIEWA. ContextAssessments conducted <strong>in</strong> 24 villages at the outset of the PACREP project highlighted anumber of challenges related to schools and the education of youth. The assessments noteda divide between the school and the community, social prejudice about girls’ education andthe result<strong>in</strong>g low level of girls’ attendance, economic factors <strong>in</strong> attendance and retentionrates, the organization of grade levels given uneven school attendance, the absence of PTAs,and weak relationships with government <strong>in</strong>spectors. Schools <strong>in</strong> the targeted areas largelyfunctioned <strong>in</strong>dependently of their socio-cultural environment, often not respect<strong>in</strong>g the local1 Participation de la Communauté à la Réforme de l’Enseignement Primaire<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 4


values, traditions, religious convictions, social hierarchy or daily occupations of villagers.Based on parent <strong>in</strong>terviews, it was estimated that 85% of parents had never before steppedon school grounds. This division resulted <strong>in</strong> alienation of the schools and teachers, and nonattendanceand abandonment by the youth of these communities—particularly girls.B. GoalThe PACREP project sought to establish and implement a susta<strong>in</strong>able participatory approachto ensure high quality primary education <strong>in</strong> rural areas of the Souss Massa Draâ region (withextension of the project approach to an additional region <strong>in</strong> Morocco).C. Location of InterventionThe PACREP project worked <strong>in</strong> two regions of Morocco: Souss Massa Draa (SMD) regionand Marrakech Tensift Al Haouz (MTA). In the SMD region, the project worked <strong>in</strong> 24schools <strong>in</strong> 6 prov<strong>in</strong>ces: (1) Agadir Idaoutanane, (2) Inezgane Ait Melloul, (3) Tiznit, (4)Chtouka Ait Baha, (5) Taroudant, and (6) Zagora. The project expanded to the MTA region<strong>in</strong> its second year, work<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> 8 schools <strong>in</strong> Chichaoua and Essaouira prov<strong>in</strong>ces.D. Project Objectives Regional education adm<strong>in</strong>istrators and the general public adopt and implement acommunity-based education reform model throughout the Souss-Massa-Draa region. PTAs and community-based education <strong>in</strong>itiatives demonstrate f<strong>in</strong>ancially viablemanagement. One additional Regional Adm<strong>in</strong>istration <strong>in</strong> Morocco adopts community/PTA supportedprimary education model.Image: PACREP ProjectLocation Sites. Map byDr. Mohamed Benatou.<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 5


E. Expected Results Parent Teacher Associations (PTAs) and the local community are mobilized, become<strong>in</strong>volved, and support the education of children <strong>in</strong> primary schools <strong>in</strong> villages <strong>in</strong> theregion of SMD (and later MTA). Targeted adm<strong>in</strong>istrators adopt an approach that promotes and ma<strong>in</strong>ta<strong>in</strong>s themobilization of local communities around quality primary education. An <strong>in</strong>tegrated assessment system is developed to enable partners to view that theirefforts have a positive impact on student performance.“As a result of the PACREP project and itsawareness sessions we have learned to bepragmatic <strong>in</strong> our actions and our PTA hasbecome functional.”Omar AKDOUH,President of the Iqra Development Association,Am<strong>in</strong>a Bent Ouahb School, Agadir da Outanane<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 6


III. PROJECT INTERVENTION AREASThe PACREP project’s <strong>in</strong>terventions focused <strong>in</strong> four ma<strong>in</strong> areas:Area 1Area 2Educate, empower, and <strong>in</strong>volve localpopulations <strong>in</strong> order to develop awarenessof the importance of quality primaryeducation <strong>in</strong> improv<strong>in</strong>g their children’sfuture.Develop the <strong>in</strong>terest and motivation ofpartners and promote collaborationaround schools <strong>in</strong> rural areas.Area 3Area 4Ensure the susta<strong>in</strong>ability of mobilization byre<strong>in</strong>forc<strong>in</strong>g means and develop<strong>in</strong>g/creat<strong>in</strong>galternative sources of revenue throughlocal <strong>in</strong>itiatives aimed at improv<strong>in</strong>g thequality of life <strong>in</strong> rural areas (IncomeGenerat<strong>in</strong>g Activities).Ensure the susta<strong>in</strong>ability of the project bydevelop<strong>in</strong>g the skills of those <strong>in</strong>volved <strong>in</strong>the project.<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 7


IV. IMPACT BY PROJECT AREAA. Area 1 – Awareness Rais<strong>in</strong>g and MobilizationEducate, empower, and <strong>in</strong>volve local populations <strong>in</strong> order to develop awareness of theimportance of quality primary education <strong>in</strong> improv<strong>in</strong>g their children’s future.PACREP : Mobiliz<strong>in</strong>g CommunitiesOne of the PACREP project’s mostimportant impacts was its mobilizationand <strong>in</strong>volvement of all potential partners<strong>in</strong> the community to promote educationalimprovement and reform. The project’sfocus on rais<strong>in</strong>g awareness of theimportance of education brought togethera variety of <strong>in</strong>dividuals and organizationsfor a common purpose – and placed theschool at the center of the community.The <strong>in</strong>tegration of the school with<strong>in</strong> itsenvironment is essential for its success.Prior to the project, most schools <strong>in</strong> thetargeted areas were noticeablydisconnected from their respectivecommunities. Parents and communitymembers were not aware of events andissues at the local school, and were oftendistrustful of the <strong>in</strong>stitutions. Likewise,teachers and staff members were notconnected with their respectivecommunities.The PACREP project established l<strong>in</strong>ksbetween schools the local community, therural commune, local developmentassociations, the general socio- economicenvironment. These l<strong>in</strong>ks enabledimproved communication, coord<strong>in</strong>ation,and accountability, and a basis for jo<strong>in</strong>taction for the community’s children. Thisawareness rais<strong>in</strong>g and mobilization has hada marked impact, and schools aregradually becom<strong>in</strong>g a priority concern forlocal partners.Schools targeted by the PACREP projecthave organized various activities andachieved a number of results <strong>in</strong> this area: Participatory assessment sessions with local partners. Action plann<strong>in</strong>g sessions with local partners. Installation of water, electricity, and latr<strong>in</strong>es at 8 schools <strong>in</strong> collaboration with PTAs. Construction of 3 classrooms <strong>in</strong> collaboration with volunteers from the University ofOxford (ODA). Organization of 116 extra-curricular activities <strong>in</strong> collaboration between PTA and faculty. Distribution of school kits benefit<strong>in</strong>g 860 students. Organization of a workshop with the National Federation of PTAs with 228 participants. Distribution of 24 awareness panels for all PACREP project schools. 240 women participated <strong>in</strong> awareness sessions led by women leaders with the support ofthe project management team. 70 PTA members have benefited from follow-up and support meet<strong>in</strong>gs. 31 community leaders participated <strong>in</strong> a workshop and discussion on school projects. A documentary film on the PACREP project was produced and shared <strong>in</strong>ternationally.<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 8


B. Area 2 - Collaboration for <strong>Education</strong>al <strong>Reform</strong>Develop the <strong>in</strong>terest and motivation of partners and promote collaboration around schools <strong>in</strong>rural areas.PACREP : Promot<strong>in</strong>g CollaborationConsensus and collaboration is a secondfocus of the PACREP project approach,and an <strong>in</strong>novative <strong>in</strong>tervention <strong>in</strong> theMoroccan education context. Ensur<strong>in</strong>gthat community members, PTA members,and teachers come together to discusschallenges and plan actions together leadsto stronger and more susta<strong>in</strong>ableeducational reform.The PACREP team produced a manualdetail<strong>in</strong>g its participatory approach, whichwas shared with project partners andeducation officials. The manual describeshow educational <strong>in</strong>stitutions, communityorganizations, and other socioeconomicactors can be effectively engaged aroundschools and children’s education.Moroccan educational officials haverecognized the importance of thisapproach, and reports have highlightedthe PACREP project as a successfulexample of educational <strong>in</strong>terventions <strong>in</strong>rural areas.All PACREP activities occurred as a resultof collaboration between various partnersat each targeted project sites. Activities <strong>in</strong>this area <strong>in</strong>clude: Project Steer<strong>in</strong>g Committee (Members) guided project; 4 meet<strong>in</strong>gs held. Meet<strong>in</strong>gs with the 24 pr<strong>in</strong>cipals of the PACREP school partners. Meet<strong>in</strong>gs with the department of cooperation at the M<strong>in</strong>istry of National <strong>Education</strong>. 6 meet<strong>in</strong>gs with delegates from the Souss Massa Draa region. 415 people attended the presentation of the Match<strong>in</strong>g Grants Fund guide at theheadquarters of the rural communes. 240 members of PTAs, school directors, women leaders, local authorities, <strong>in</strong>spectors andrepresentatives of rural communes participated <strong>in</strong> <strong>in</strong>ter-association exchange visits. Exchange visits with delegates from the MoE. Development of a handbook on consensus and collaboration.Promot<strong>in</strong>g Collaboration:A strategic approach to <strong>in</strong>terventions <strong>in</strong> the field of education.<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 9


C. Area 3 –Susta<strong>in</strong>ability through Resource MobilizationSusta<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g the mobilization by strengthen<strong>in</strong>g exist<strong>in</strong>g resources and the development and creationof alternative sources of <strong>in</strong>come from the <strong>in</strong>itiatives of local people and their aspiration for abetter standard of liv<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> rural areas.PACREP : Ensur<strong>in</strong>g f<strong>in</strong>ancialsusta<strong>in</strong>ability.The PACREP project was conceived as anexample of <strong>in</strong>ternational cooperation forsusta<strong>in</strong>able development. The projectmoves beyond the idea that developmentsimply consists of provid<strong>in</strong>g communitieswith grants to meet specific needs. If aproject is to be susta<strong>in</strong>able, a communitymust be mobilized to take charge of itsown development.To encourage this ownership of theproject, the PACREP project requiredthat communities contribute to all plannedactions. The PACREP project contributed50% for match<strong>in</strong>g grants project, and 80%for other actions and activities. Partners,particularly PTAs, often made theircontributions <strong>in</strong>-k<strong>in</strong>d—through servicesand community action. The mostimportant aspect was to ensure that therealization of an activity or a project wasthe fruit of collective community actionand that everyone understood theimportance of the results.The objective of this project area was tomake certa<strong>in</strong> that partners had the meansto assume responsibility for the realizationof all program activities and actions—bothdur<strong>in</strong>g and follow<strong>in</strong>g the completion of thePACREP project. By requir<strong>in</strong>g communitycontributions from the project’s outset,the PACREP project created a dynamic <strong>in</strong>its targeted communities that encouragedparents and community members tosupport schools. As resources <strong>in</strong> ruralareas of Morocco are often variable anduncerta<strong>in</strong>, the mobilization of funds isoften a challenge. The PACREP projectdeveloped Income Generat<strong>in</strong>g Activitiesand supported a match<strong>in</strong>g grants fund toassist community members.“Thanks to tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g and mentor<strong>in</strong>g project PACREP, membersof the PTA have expanded outreach activities and awareness<strong>in</strong> surround<strong>in</strong>g villages”M. Mohamed Ouabida président de l‟APTE.<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 10


Income Generat<strong>in</strong>g ActivitiesIndependent F<strong>in</strong>ancial Means for Rural SchoolsThe PACREP team assisted local communities <strong>in</strong> locat<strong>in</strong>g funds to realize activities <strong>in</strong>partnership. Increased awareness of the importance of education and the role of thecommunity mobilized communities around action for their schools. In particular, themobilization of rural communes presidents often lead to significant results, with communepresidents <strong>in</strong>tegrat<strong>in</strong>g PACREP schools <strong>in</strong>to their activities promot<strong>in</strong>g education.The results achieved <strong>in</strong> this area <strong>in</strong>clude: 162 community members participated <strong>in</strong> workshops organized for a socioeconomicstudy of IGA projects <strong>in</strong> 13 villages of the PACREP project. 28 match<strong>in</strong>g grant projects were funded for PACREP schools. 5 IGA projects completed. 506 PTA members benefited from project support on draft<strong>in</strong>g proposals formatch<strong>in</strong>g grant funds.Image: Cow fatten<strong>in</strong>g at the Ibnou Khaldoun School – Income Generat<strong>in</strong>g Activity.<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 11


Income Generat<strong>in</strong>g Activities implemented through the PACREP project:Prov<strong>in</strong>ces Schools IGA ProjectsInzegane Ait Meloul Oukba Ibnou Nafia NurseryTiznit Ibnou Khaldoun Cow fatten<strong>in</strong>gZagora Talat Cow fatten<strong>in</strong>gTimtiguePreschoolChichawa Al Amal Mill“The PACREP project, managed by NEF, was able to b<strong>in</strong>d the facultyand staff at schools together. It mobilized and connected variouscommunity partners and was able to br<strong>in</strong>g them together with<strong>in</strong> theschool. The advocacy and mobilization of various educational andsocial partners of the school has had a positive impact. This is one ofthe greatest benefits of PACREP.”Moubarak HANOUN,Directeur de l‟AREF/SMDImage: Nursery at the Oukba Ibnou Nafia School – Income Generat<strong>in</strong>g Activity.<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 12


Match<strong>in</strong>g Grant FundSupport for Collaborative Action around Rural SchoolsThe PACREP match<strong>in</strong>g grant fund’s objective was to enable partners to become more<strong>in</strong>volved and ―learn-by-do<strong>in</strong>g‖ by carry<strong>in</strong>g out activities that promoted the goals of theproject.In order to ensure that all partners had the same opportunities to benefit from this fund, aguide was produced that shared both the modalities and procedures for grant awards. Theguide was produced <strong>in</strong> collaboration with AREF’s and DMoEs. The guide was presented andexpla<strong>in</strong>ed to AREFs, DMoEs, PTAs, and school directors.Projects were selected by the Steer<strong>in</strong>g Committee, and all measures were taken to ensurethat the projects were achieved <strong>in</strong> partnership between NEF, the delegation, PTAs, andSSAs.Projects undertaken <strong>in</strong> partnership between AREFs and delegations <strong>in</strong>clude the follow<strong>in</strong>g:Host<strong>in</strong>g of a study workshop on PTAs <strong>in</strong> collaboration with the Prov<strong>in</strong>cial Federation ofPTAs and the delegation from Inzegane.Pr<strong>in</strong>t<strong>in</strong>g of the magaz<strong>in</strong>e Mobadarat for the benefit of the AREF/SMD.National meet<strong>in</strong>g of the PTA federation <strong>in</strong> Agadir.Host<strong>in</strong>g of a study workshop on school abandonment <strong>in</strong> Amskroude.Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g of the School Management Boards on manag<strong>in</strong>g for results, held <strong>in</strong> partnershipwith the delegation.Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g of the School Management Boards on participative management <strong>in</strong> Taroudant,<strong>in</strong> partnership with the delegation.Image: Radio education project at the Imam Al Ghazali School, funded through the match<strong>in</strong>g grants project.<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 13


Projects undertaken <strong>in</strong> partnership between PTAs and Success School Associations (SSAs)<strong>in</strong>clude the follow<strong>in</strong>g:Prov<strong>in</strong>ceAgadir IdaOutananeInezgane AitMelloulTiznitRuralCommuneAmskroudOd DahouOuijjaneSchoolS/S Am<strong>in</strong>a BenOuahbS/S DifafS/S IbnKhaldouneTaroudant Sidi Ouaaziz S/S Sidi OuaazizType of ProjectPreschool ProjectZagoraMezguitaTamgrouteS/S TalateS/S AsskjourZagora Tamgroute S/S Timtigue Multifunctional room & libraryAgadir IdaOutananeInezgane AitMelloulAgadir IdaOutananeInezgane AitMelloulIdm<strong>in</strong>e S/S Tazentoute Multifunctional room & libraryTemssia S/S Al Massira Multifunctional room & libraryAmskroud S/S Al Hidab Multifunctional roomOd DahouS/S Okba BnouNafiaaMultimedia roomTiznit Ouijjane S/S Ennakhil Multimedia roomTaroudanteTaf<strong>in</strong>goulteS/S Imam AlGhazaliRadio schoolTiznit Arbiaa Sahel S/S 11 janvier School materialsTiznit Arbiaa Sahel S/S Allal El FassiChtouka Ait Baha TassgdeltChtouka Ait Baha TassgdeltS/S ZaoueS/S EnnajahTaroudante Sidi Ouaaziz S/S EtakadoumEquipp<strong>in</strong>g of a multifunctionalroomEquipp<strong>in</strong>g of a multifunctionalroomEquipp<strong>in</strong>g of a multifunctionalroomEquipp<strong>in</strong>g of a multifunctionalroomZagora Afla n’Draa S/S Taghrote Literacy courseChichawa Gmassa GmassaChichawa Mzouda Al AmalChichawa Nfifa Hsa<strong>in</strong> School libraryEssaouiraOulayBouzraktounOum LaayounEquipp<strong>in</strong>g rooms with <strong>in</strong>teractiveboardsEquipp<strong>in</strong>g of a multifunctionalroomEquipp<strong>in</strong>g a preschool<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 14


D. Area 4 – Susta<strong>in</strong>ability through Capacity Build<strong>in</strong>gEnsure the susta<strong>in</strong>ability of the project by develop<strong>in</strong>g the skills of those <strong>in</strong>volved <strong>in</strong> the project.PACREP : Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g & Skill-Build<strong>in</strong>gEnsur<strong>in</strong>g the effectiveness andsusta<strong>in</strong>ability of the PACREP project’sactions requires more than just themobilization of communities, authorities,and school officials; it requires thedevelopment of the skills necessary tolead positive change. The project placedconsiderable effort <strong>in</strong>to strengthen<strong>in</strong>g theskills of community members andadm<strong>in</strong>istrators for the benefit of localschools. Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gs focused onparticipatory approaches to development,gender, communication, and conflictmanagement.The development of tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g curriculumand tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g sessions presented certa<strong>in</strong>organizational challenges. Participantscame from a variety of backgrounds, andhad different relationships with the localschools (parents, teachers, adm<strong>in</strong>istrators,community leaders, women leaders, etc.).However, the PACREP team did not wantto separate <strong>in</strong>dividuals <strong>in</strong>to differenttra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g groups; jo<strong>in</strong>t tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g sessionswould offer an opportunity to br<strong>in</strong>gtogether all stakeholders for a commonpurpose. The team, therefore, carefullydeveloped and organized tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gs <strong>in</strong> away that allowed all participants—educational leaders, <strong>in</strong>spectors, schoolpr<strong>in</strong>cipals, presidents of rural communes,representatives of civil society, and othercommunity members—to attend tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gsimultaneously.This approach proved to be highlybeneficial to the PACREP project.Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gs not only developed the skills ofparticipants, but also served to facilitatedirect contact between participants and topromote dialogue on key issues. Face-tofacecommunication between thesevarious participants is rare; this lack ofcommunication often result<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong>misconceptions and misunderstand<strong>in</strong>gbetween groups. Increased dialoguehelped to resolve conflicts and ensurecont<strong>in</strong>ued <strong>in</strong>teraction between thesedifferent partners—while develop<strong>in</strong>gessential skills.<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 15


Achievements <strong>in</strong> the area of skills development and capacity-build<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong>clude the follow<strong>in</strong>g:Participatory approaches to development and gender: 91 participants tra<strong>in</strong>ed.Communication: 60 participants tra<strong>in</strong>ed.Management and implementation of projects: 32 school directors, 20 <strong>in</strong>spectors,and 66 PTA members tra<strong>in</strong>ed.Exchange visits of 34 women leaders to successful women’s groups <strong>in</strong> Ouarzazate.Importance of school<strong>in</strong>g: 39 women leaders tra<strong>in</strong>ed.Adm<strong>in</strong>istrative and f<strong>in</strong>ancial management: 302 association members tra<strong>in</strong>ed.Creation and tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g of 4 School Management Boards (36 members) <strong>in</strong> theProv<strong>in</strong>ce of Taroudant.8 Conflict Management Committees established and tra<strong>in</strong>ed.Human Resource Management tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g for 21 DMoE and AREF representatives.F<strong>in</strong>ancial Management Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gs attended by 83 DMoE and AREF representatives.Strategic Plann<strong>in</strong>g Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gs attended by 53 PTA members, SSA members, andschool directors.“At the beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g, I did not want to be a „women leader‟ because Idid not know how I could help my village. But after visit<strong>in</strong>gOuarzazate, many th<strong>in</strong>gs changed <strong>in</strong> my life and <strong>in</strong> my way ofth<strong>in</strong>k<strong>in</strong>g. Now, I know I can br<strong>in</strong>g many th<strong>in</strong>gs to my community.”Ms. Aicha Rajaoui, Women Leader <strong>in</strong> Am<strong>in</strong>a Bent WahbImage: Women Leaders engaged <strong>in</strong> the PACREP project.<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 16


V. Project Impact & Susta<strong>in</strong>abilityThe PACREP project had a significant impacton the 32 schools <strong>in</strong> which it worked—and onthe regional educational adm<strong>in</strong>istrations(AREFs) <strong>in</strong> the SMD and MTA regions. As aresult of its successes, the project’s approachhas been recognized by educationaladm<strong>in</strong>istrators and leaders across Morocco.Evaluations of the project’s impact through<strong>in</strong>formal <strong>in</strong>terviews with AREF adm<strong>in</strong>istrators,community members, PTA members, parents,and teachers have demonstrated that theproject’s most important contributions werethe <strong>in</strong>tegration of the school <strong>in</strong>to thebroader community and the mobilizationof community members around theschool. The project demonstrated the strongresults that can be achieved by encourag<strong>in</strong>gcommunities to take ownership of theirschools and the education of their children.<strong>Education</strong> is not just the concern of schoolsand adm<strong>in</strong>istrators, it is a community concern.Prior to the project, many parents had neverentered their community’s school or theschool grounds. At the end of the project,teachers and school directors commented onthe <strong>in</strong>creased <strong>in</strong>terest of parents <strong>in</strong> theeducation of their children. Mothers wouldmeet with female teachers to discuss theprogress of their child. Parents and communitymembers took pride <strong>in</strong> their community’sschool, and the educational progress of theirchildren. PTA members and women leadersadvocated for improvements <strong>in</strong> schools and thequality of teach<strong>in</strong>g.Through its <strong>in</strong>tegration and mobilization efforts,the project brought together parents,community members, AREF adm<strong>in</strong>istrators,women leaders, and school staff. This dialogueallowed fuller conversations on the importanceand challenges of education—and for discussionon the reasons that children discont<strong>in</strong>ued theirschool<strong>in</strong>g. For example, recogniz<strong>in</strong>g that manyyoung girls left school as a result of a lack ofprivate restroom facilities, the PACREP projectwas able to support communities <strong>in</strong> mobiliz<strong>in</strong>gPACREP:Br<strong>in</strong>g<strong>in</strong>g CommunitiesTogether for the <strong>Education</strong>of ChildrenA PACREP story from a student atthe Sidi Ouaziz School <strong>in</strong> Taroudant.One day my teacher scolded me.When I arrived home, I told myfather. My father was enraged at theteacher, and without discussion, heordered me to quit school. I was outof school for a year and a half.When the PACREP project came toour village, the community had theopportunity to benefit from awarenesssessions that promoted dialoguebetween teachers, pr<strong>in</strong>cipals, andparents. Through these sessions, myfather began to realize the gravity ofmy not attend<strong>in</strong>g to school; hedecided to talk to my former teacherto determ<strong>in</strong>e the cause of the problem.The teacher expla<strong>in</strong>ed that I haddisrupted the class, and that he wasdo<strong>in</strong>g his duty as an educator <strong>in</strong>reprimand<strong>in</strong>g me. My father reenrolledme <strong>in</strong> school, and alsobecame president of the PTA. Herealized the importance of school<strong>in</strong>g,and further understood how conflictcan be resolved throughcommunication.<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 17


Saida:Story of a Women’s LeaderA 21-year old woman from the village ofTaf<strong>in</strong>goult <strong>in</strong> the region of Taroudant, Saida hadcompleted her baccalaureate, but rema<strong>in</strong>ed<strong>in</strong>active <strong>in</strong> her village. When the PACREP projectarrived <strong>in</strong> her village, the community graduallybecame aware of the importance of education andthe vital role of women <strong>in</strong> rural development. Saidawas selected as a women’s leader to jo<strong>in</strong> the PTA.Saida attended PACREP tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gs and strengthenedher capacity <strong>in</strong> communication, leadership,education, and development. She also participated<strong>in</strong> exchange visits with other women’s leaders. ThePACREP mobilization and awareness-rais<strong>in</strong>gefforts—particularly gender tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gs—broughtabout a change <strong>in</strong> Saida and her community.Today, as a woman leader, Saida is active <strong>in</strong> thecommunity of Taf<strong>in</strong>goult. She has helped tostrengthen the school by organiz<strong>in</strong>g activities thatbenefit the primary school <strong>in</strong> her village. Inaddition, Saida is preschool teacher, where she<strong>in</strong>corporates s<strong>in</strong>g<strong>in</strong>g, games and draw<strong>in</strong>g. Tosupport women <strong>in</strong> her village and enhance theeducation of girls, Saida plans to organize literacycourses.Saida has become a force for change <strong>in</strong> hercommunity, represent<strong>in</strong>g women <strong>in</strong> her village andby strengthen<strong>in</strong>g her school.Before, I was scared to speak with men. Now, thanks tothe work of the PACREP project, I am more active anddeterm<strong>in</strong>ed to lead-- to improve our school, encourageother women, and develop our village.-- Saidathe funds to construct latr<strong>in</strong>es <strong>in</strong>project schools. Through thisaction, girls were re<strong>in</strong>tegrated<strong>in</strong>to the school<strong>in</strong>g system.By <strong>in</strong>tegrat<strong>in</strong>g schoolimprovements with broadercommunity development, theproject developed the skills ofparticipants to advocate andpromote cont<strong>in</strong>ued change.Women leaders—who receivedtra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> communication,leadership, gender, and literacy—have become advocates for schoolimprovements.The PACREP project achieved: Over 1000 examples ofcollaboration between PTAs,adm<strong>in</strong>istrators, women leaders,rural communes, and thePACREP team. Over 900 participants <strong>in</strong>PACREP tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g programs. 5 Income Generat<strong>in</strong>g Activitiesand 28 Match<strong>in</strong>g GrantsProjects developed tostrengthen schools.The susta<strong>in</strong>ability of thePACREP model was considered <strong>in</strong>the project’s design and activities.By motivat<strong>in</strong>g communities andstrengthen<strong>in</strong>g their capacity toadvocate and lead change, theimpact of the PACREP approach isexpected to cont<strong>in</strong>ue and expand.<strong>Community</strong> members havealready demonstrated their abilityto cont<strong>in</strong>ue to improve theirschools. Income generat<strong>in</strong>gactivities have helped schools togenerate extra funds to supportactivities. Activities <strong>in</strong>itiated andundertaken <strong>in</strong>dependently bycommunity leaders cont<strong>in</strong>ue topromote the susta<strong>in</strong>ability of thePACREP project’s approach.• Saida<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 18


VI. Communication & PressDocumentaryThe PACREP project <strong>in</strong>troduced a new approach to <strong>in</strong>tervention <strong>in</strong> the field of ruraleducation <strong>in</strong> Morocco. The project’s activities have had a strong impact <strong>in</strong> the targetedcommunities, and have helped to reduce problems <strong>in</strong> rural schools.The approach, tools used, and results achieved needed to be shared and dissem<strong>in</strong>ated to<strong>in</strong>terested stakeholders to promote the replication of the project model. Through a mutualagreement between AREF and NEF, a documentary film agency was recruited to produce ashort film on the PACREP Project.The f<strong>in</strong>al film was distributed widely to project partners and stakeholders, as well as others<strong>in</strong>terested <strong>in</strong> approaches to educational reform.Multimedia l<strong>in</strong>k:http://www.neareast.org/multimedia/community_<strong>in</strong>volvement_<strong>in</strong>_primary_education_reform_videoProduced by : Agence MédiationManuals and modules:Dur<strong>in</strong>g the PACREP project, a number of tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g modules were developed. Each tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gmodule was shared with project participants and <strong>in</strong>terested <strong>in</strong>dividuals.The project team also developed a handbook on consensus and collaboration, which wasshared widely with partners and education officials. The project team also published areflection document on the PACREP impact and experience.Press:The project’s activities and impact was publicized <strong>in</strong> local, regional, national and <strong>in</strong>ternationalmedia.<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 19


VII. AppendicesA. Project FlowchartSusta<strong>in</strong>able improvement of primary education <strong>in</strong> rural areas of Souss-Massa-Draa region establishedStrategicObjectiveProjectObjectives1: Regional education adm<strong>in</strong>istrators and rural public adoptand implement community based model2: Demonstrated f<strong>in</strong>ancially viable management of PTA andcommunity based education <strong>in</strong>itiatives3: One additional regional adm<strong>in</strong>istration <strong>in</strong> Morocco adoptscommunity/PTA supported primary education modelIndicatorsActivitiesNet overall attendancerate at primary schools <strong>in</strong>target areas, and netfemale attendance ratefor primary schools <strong>in</strong>target areasNumber of consensusbuild<strong>in</strong>gprocessesassisted and result<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong>agreementsNumber of <strong>in</strong>clusive, effective communicationmechanisms established and susta<strong>in</strong>ed betweenregional adm<strong>in</strong>istration and governorates, asdeterm<strong>in</strong>ed by task force and NEF/regional MoEpartnershipNumber and type of educationprojects funded through PTArevenue generation andregional MoE/NEF match<strong>in</strong>gfundsKnowledge ga<strong>in</strong>ed regard<strong>in</strong>gschool adm<strong>in</strong>istration andrevenue generation asmeasured through surveysCooperation pledged andstrategic plans developedwith educationaladm<strong>in</strong>istrator <strong>in</strong> new regionArea I: BuildConsensusTask force createsoverall strategicplan for build<strong>in</strong>gconsensus,facilitat<strong>in</strong>g futureplann<strong>in</strong>g sessionsand M&ENEF documents prior successesand knowledge ga<strong>in</strong>ed from theMorocco project so far, anddevelops communicationstrategy for public relationsRegionaladm<strong>in</strong>istrationand NEF formtask force withrepresentativesfrom keym<strong>in</strong>istriesNEF and seniorregional educationaladm<strong>in</strong>istration staffcreate partnershipstrategies; NEF assistssenior staff <strong>in</strong> creat<strong>in</strong>gpartnershipsTask forcecreates plan forus<strong>in</strong>g theregionaleducationadm<strong>in</strong>istration’ssupport fundsMeet with regional andnational adm<strong>in</strong>istrators topromote educationalreform and skills tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gat lower adm<strong>in</strong>istrativelevels, as well as theformation of effectivePTA groupsNEF organizesadm<strong>in</strong>istrative visit toOuarzazateStartup workshop, <strong>in</strong>volv<strong>in</strong>gregional adm<strong>in</strong>istrators, nationalM<strong>in</strong>istry of <strong>Education</strong>representatives, and beneficiaries,to <strong>in</strong>troduce new project objectivesand work plan and ensure buy-<strong>in</strong>Area II: RaisePublicAwarenessNEF beg<strong>in</strong>s public awarenesscampaign <strong>in</strong> SMD region, promot<strong>in</strong>gprevious project success and the needfor further reform, target<strong>in</strong>g the generalpublic, PTAs and educationaladm<strong>in</strong>istrators through mobile libraries,radio and newspaper, promotionalsigns and meet<strong>in</strong>gsPublic awareness campaign goesnational to create buy-<strong>in</strong> amongeducational adm<strong>in</strong>istrators <strong>in</strong> advance ofproject expansionArea III:ResourceMobilizationand RevenuegenerationNEF developscriteria to determ<strong>in</strong>ewhich activities areeligible for fundsfrom the regionaleducationaladm<strong>in</strong>istration andmatch<strong>in</strong>g funds fromthe projectNEF conducts marketresearch study onpotential opportunitiesfor donor support andpublic/privatepartnership for regionaladm<strong>in</strong>istrationNEF beg<strong>in</strong>s villagelevel tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gs withPTAs and localeducationaladm<strong>in</strong>istrators ondevelop<strong>in</strong>g newrevenue generat<strong>in</strong>gprojectsArea IV:HumanResourcesCapacitydevelopedNEF and the academy ofAgadir select 24 targetvillages <strong>in</strong> 6 governoratesNEF conducts skills tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gat adm<strong>in</strong>istrative levels on<strong>in</strong>ter-agency communication,proposal development,strategy and operations, andf<strong>in</strong>ancial managementNEF and regionaleducationaladm<strong>in</strong>istration create amemorandum ofunderstand<strong>in</strong>g pledg<strong>in</strong>gcooperation and outl<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>grespective rolesNEF conducts skills tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gat community level onempowerment for womenleadersNEF conducts skills tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g atadm<strong>in</strong>istrative levels on PTAdevelopment, participatoryapproaches and gender<strong>in</strong>tegration<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong>20


B. PACREP Objectives and Indicators OverviewThe follow<strong>in</strong>g results and monitor<strong>in</strong>g framework provides an overview of the project’s <strong>in</strong>tended outcomes, objectives, and <strong>in</strong>dicators.IntendedOutcomesObjectives Indicators Results OverviewPTA/<strong>Community</strong> supported primary educationextended to children <strong>in</strong> the villages of the Soussa-Massa-Draa region.Regional educationadm<strong>in</strong>istrators and the generalpublic adopt and implementcommunity-based modelthroughout the Soussa-Massa-Draa regionPTA and community-basededucation <strong>in</strong>itiatives are wellmanaged and f<strong>in</strong>ancially viableOne additional Regional Adm<strong>in</strong>istration <strong>in</strong> Moroccoadopts community/PTA supported primary educationmodel.1. Net overall attendance rate at primaryschools <strong>in</strong> target areas2. Net female attendance rate for primaryschools <strong>in</strong> targeted areas3. # of consensus-build<strong>in</strong>g processes assistedby the project4. Number of <strong>in</strong>clusive and susta<strong>in</strong>ablecommunication mechanisms establishedbetween regional adm<strong>in</strong>istration andgovernorates5. Number and percent of PTA members andlocal educational adm<strong>in</strong>istratorsdemonstrat<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong>creased knowledge of goodmanagement and f<strong>in</strong>ancial practices relatedto PTA and community-based education<strong>in</strong>itiatives as measured through pre- andpost-implementation tests6. Number and type of education projectsfunded through PTA revenue generationand/or regional MoE/NEF match<strong>in</strong>g funds.7. Cooperation pledged and strategic plansdeveloped with educational adm<strong>in</strong>istrator <strong>in</strong>the new region.1. 98% attendance rates2. 98%+ attendance rates3. 1,3394. 1,3285. 900+ <strong>in</strong>dividuals tra<strong>in</strong>edthrough project;90%+ seevalue <strong>in</strong> tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gs and applynew skills6. Five IGAs; 28 Match<strong>in</strong>gGrant Fund Projects7. Yes; Agreements with SMD& MTA regions.<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong>21


C. Project Impact: Indicator OverviewIndicator 1: Net Overall Attendance Rate at <strong>Primary</strong> Schools <strong>in</strong> Target Areas2007/2008School Year2008/2009School Year2009/2010School Year2010/2011School YearNumber ofStudents <strong>in</strong>School(Number <strong>in</strong>EcolesMeres)Number of dropoutsdur<strong>in</strong>g theyearPercentagedrop-out9124 4385 126 1.38%8445 4321 78 0.92%8519 4200 66 0.77%8146 SMD3693 MTA4057 SMD1515 MTA27 SMD26 MTA0.33%0.70%Throughout the project, attendance rates at targeted schools rema<strong>in</strong>ed at over 98% onaverage. Drop-out rates decl<strong>in</strong>ed steadily throughout the project, and several students werere<strong>in</strong>tegrated <strong>in</strong>to the schools.Number of students re<strong>in</strong>tegrated: 6Indicator 2: Net Female Attendance Rate at <strong>Primary</strong> Schools <strong>in</strong> Target Areas2007/2008School Year2008/2009School Year2009/2010School YearBeg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g of2010 SchoolYearGirls <strong>in</strong> School(Number <strong>in</strong>EcolesMeres)Number of dropoutsdur<strong>in</strong>g theyearPercentagedrop-out3993 4385 49 1.23%3972 2027 35 0.88%3989 1958 27 0.67%3876 SMD1740 MTA1956 MTA733 MTA13130.33%0.74%Throughout the project, female attendance rates at targeted schools rema<strong>in</strong>ed at over 98%.Number of girls re<strong>in</strong>tegrated: 4<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 22


Indicator 3: Number of consensus-build<strong>in</strong>g processes assisted by the project.A total of 1,339 examples of consensus-build<strong>in</strong>g and collaboration were tracked by theproject: 97 between NEF and the AREF / SMD. 8 between NEF and the AREF / MTA. 131 between the delegations and NEF / SMD. 24 reached between the delegations and NEF / MTA. 286 reached between NEF and directors. 645 reached between NEF and PTAs. 58 reached between NEF and women leaders. 50 reached between NEF and rural communes. 40 reached between NEF and <strong>in</strong>spectors.Indicator 4: Number of <strong>in</strong>clusive and susta<strong>in</strong>able communication mechanisms established.PACREP Communication Between PartnersTo AREF To Delegate To Director To PTATo RuralCommunesFrom AREF 185 7Form Delegate 24 571 32From Director 10 41 250From PTA 10 23 100From RuralCommunes 30 45TOTAL 44 249 701 334 0Souss Massa Draa – NEF CommunicationsNEF toM<strong>in</strong>isteryNEF toAREF/SMDNEF toDMoENEF toDirectorsNEF to PTAsNEF to RuralCommunes57 562 379 702 1442 123NEF toWomenLeadersNEF toProfessors201 141M<strong>in</strong>isteryto NEFAREF/SMDto NEFDirectors toNEFPTAs toNEF22 443 581 903RuralCommunesto NEFWomenLeaders toNEF9 110<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 23


Marrakech Tensift Al Haouz—NEF CommunicationsFrom NEFtoAREF/MTAFrom NEFtodelegateFrom NEFtoDirectorsFrom NEF-PTAs From NEF-RuralCommuneFrom NEF to prov<strong>in</strong>ce138 490 184 219 38 1FromAREF/MTAto NEFFromdelegateto NEFFrom directorsto NEFFrom PTAsto NEF42 282 99 123Indicator 5: Knowledge ga<strong>in</strong>ed by DMoE, AREF staff, school adm<strong>in</strong>istration, and PTAsthrough tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gs, exchanges, etc.Gender Approaches and Development: 91 ParticipantsAREF Women Inspectors Directors PTAs Pedagogique PartnersLeadersLeaders4 13 15 24 29 4 2Total Participants 91Appreciation of Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gContentAppreciation of Activitiesdur<strong>in</strong>g Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gUnderstand<strong>in</strong>g ofTra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g ContentYes 98% 89% 89%No 2% 11% 11%Communication Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g: 60 ParticipantsAREF APTE Directors Professors Rural Communes3 24 24 2 7Total Participants 60Appreciation of Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gContentAppreciation of Activitiesdur<strong>in</strong>g Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gUnderstand<strong>in</strong>g ofTra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g ContentYes 100% 92,45% 96,22%No 0% 7,54% 3,77%Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g of PTAs: 302 ParticipantsPTAs Dev. Assns DirectorsProfessors Students Inspectors WomenLeadersRuralCommunes142 88 11 22 10 6 20 3Total Participants 302Appreciation of Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gContentAppreciation of Activitiesdur<strong>in</strong>g Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gUnderstand<strong>in</strong>g ofTra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g ContentYes 98,4% 98% 99%No 2% 2% 1%<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 24


Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g on Implement<strong>in</strong>g Projects: 90 ParticipantsDMoE Inspectors Directors PTAs2 20 24 44Total Participants 90Appreciation of Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gContentAppreciation of Activitiesdur<strong>in</strong>g Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gUnderstand<strong>in</strong>g ofTra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g ContentYes 90,27% 88,88% 87,5%No 9,72% 11,11% 12,5%Women Leader Exchange Visit: 34 women leaders participated <strong>in</strong> an exchange visit.Appreciation of ExchangeVisitAppreciation of Activitiesdur<strong>in</strong>g Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gUnderstand<strong>in</strong>g andValue of Exchange VisitYes 91,17% 97,05% 100%No 8,82% 2,94% 0%Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> Conflict Management (4 groups)Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g Content relates toObjectivesAppreciation of Activities Understand<strong>in</strong>g & useof tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g materialYes 95% 97.8% 95%No 5% 2.2% 5%Human Resources Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g : 21 ParticipantsAREF DMoE NEF8 12 1Total Participants 21Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g Content relates toObjectivesAppreciation of Activities Understand<strong>in</strong>g & useof tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g materialYes 94,74% 94,74% 100%No 5,26% 5,26% 0%F<strong>in</strong>ancial Management Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g: 29 ParticipantsAREF DMoE NEF5 23 1Total Participants 29Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g Content relates toObjectivesAppreciation of Activities Understand<strong>in</strong>g & useof tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g materialYes 96% 80% 96%No 4% 20% 4%<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 25


Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g on Results-Oriented Management: 31 ParticipantsPTAs Directors Teachers Rural Communes3 4 22 2Total Participants 31Appreciation of Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gContentAppreciation of Activitiesdur<strong>in</strong>g Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gUnderstand<strong>in</strong>g ofTra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g ContentYes 96,55% 100% 100%No 3,44% 0% 0%Strategic Plann<strong>in</strong>g Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g: 87 participantsGroup ADMoE PTAs SSAs Directors2 8 8 8Total Participants 26Group BGroup CAppreciation of Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gContentAppreciation of Activitiesdur<strong>in</strong>g Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gUnderstand<strong>in</strong>g ofTra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g ContentYes 12% 4% 8%No 92% 96% 92%AREF PTAs SSA Director2 11 11 11Total des participants 34Appreciation of Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gContentAppreciation of Activitiesdur<strong>in</strong>g Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gUnderstand<strong>in</strong>g ofTra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g ContentYes 94% 85% 91%No 6% 15% 9%Delegations Participants TotalDMoE Inspectors Directors PTAsEssaouira 3 2 3 4 12Chichawa 5 3 3 4 15Total 8 5 6 8 27Appreciation of Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gContentAppreciation of Activitiesdur<strong>in</strong>g Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gUnderstand<strong>in</strong>g ofTra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g ContentYes 99% 100% 100%No 1% 0% 0%<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 26


Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g on Project Management: 34 ParticipantsAREF APTE SSAs Directors2 11 11 11Total Participants 34Appreciation of Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gContentAppreciation of Activitiesdur<strong>in</strong>g Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gUnderstand<strong>in</strong>g ofTra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g ContentYes 100% 99% 100%No 0% 1% 0%F<strong>in</strong>ancial Management Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g (MTA): 27 ParticipantsAREF Delegations Directors3 20 4Total Participants 27Appreciation of Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gContentAppreciation of Activitiesdur<strong>in</strong>g Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gUnderstand<strong>in</strong>g ofTra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g ContentYes 96% 87% 96%No 4% 13% 4%F<strong>in</strong>ancial Management Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g (SMD): 27 ParticipantsAREF Delegations Director3 20 4Total participants 27Appreciation of Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gContentAppreciation of Activitiesdur<strong>in</strong>g Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>gUnderstand<strong>in</strong>g ofTra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g ContentYes 96% 87% 96%No 4% 13% 4%Study Day <strong>in</strong> Ait Milk: 31 ParticipantsAER APTE Directeurs Professeurs Autorité Délégation AREF/SMDlocale16 2 9 1 1 1 1Total 31Study Day meetsobjectivesLevel of Participation <strong>in</strong> theStudy DayUnderstand<strong>in</strong>g ofStudy DayYes 90% 75% 90%No 10% 25% 10%<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 27


Indicator 6: Number and Type of Income Generat<strong>in</strong>g Activities and Match<strong>in</strong>g Grant FundActivities Developed through the PACREP Project5 Income Generat<strong>in</strong>g Activities Developed through the PACREP Project:1. Nursery project at the Oukba Ibn Nafia School.2. Cattle fatten<strong>in</strong>g project at the Ibn Khaldun School.3. Cattle fatten<strong>in</strong>g project at the Talat School.4. Preschool/Head Start Program at the Timtigue School.5. Electric Mill project at the Al Amal School28 Projects funded through the Match<strong>in</strong>g Grants Fund:1. Workshop on PTAs, <strong>in</strong> collaboration with the Prov<strong>in</strong>cial Federation of PTAs and thedelegation from Inzegane.2. Pr<strong>in</strong>t<strong>in</strong>g of the magaz<strong>in</strong>e, Mobadarat.3. National meet<strong>in</strong>g of Federation of PTAs <strong>in</strong> Agadir.4. Workshop on school abandonment <strong>in</strong> Amskroude.5. Equipp<strong>in</strong>g of a multifunctional room and library at the Almassira Elkhadra School.6. Equipp<strong>in</strong>g of a multifunctional room and library at the Timtigue School7. Equipp<strong>in</strong>g of a multimedia room at the Oukba Ibn Nafia School.8. Equipp<strong>in</strong>g of a multimedia room at Elhidab School.9. Equipp<strong>in</strong>g of a multimedia room at Ennakhil School.10. Radio education project at the Imam Al Ghazali School.11. <strong>Education</strong> material development at 11 January School.12. Preschool project at Difaf School.13. Preschool project at the Am<strong>in</strong>a Bent Ouarh School.14. Preschool Project at the Ibnou Khaldoune School.15. Preschool project at the Sidi Ouaaziz School16. Preschool project at the Talat School.17. Preschool project at the Asskjour School.18. Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g of <strong>Education</strong> Management Committees <strong>in</strong> Taroudant on Results OrientedManagement.19. Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g of <strong>Education</strong> Management Committees <strong>in</strong> Taroudant <strong>in</strong> participativemanagement.20. Equipp<strong>in</strong>g of a multifunction room <strong>in</strong> the Allal El Fassi School <strong>in</strong> Tiznit.21. Literacy course <strong>in</strong> the Taghrate School <strong>in</strong> Zagora.22. Equipp<strong>in</strong>g of a multifunctional room <strong>in</strong> the Ennajah School.23. Equipp<strong>in</strong>g of classrooms with <strong>in</strong>teractive boards <strong>in</strong> the Gmassa School (MTA).24. Equipp<strong>in</strong>g of a multifunctional room <strong>in</strong> the Alamal School (MTA).25. Equipp<strong>in</strong>g of a school library <strong>in</strong> the Hssa<strong>in</strong> School (MTA)26. Equipp<strong>in</strong>g of a multifunctional room <strong>in</strong> the Zaoue School.27. Equipp<strong>in</strong>g of a multifunctional room <strong>in</strong> the Etakadoum School.28. Equipp<strong>in</strong>g of a preschool at the Oum Laayoun School.<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 28


Indicator 7: Cooperation pledged and strategic plans developed with educationaladm<strong>in</strong>istrations. Cooperation agreement between NEF and the AREF of Souss Massa Draa. Cooperation agreement signed between NEF and the AREF of Marrakech Tensift AlHaouz. Cooperation agreement signed between NEF and the DMoE of Chichawa Prov<strong>in</strong>ce. Cooperation agreement between NEF and the DMoE of Essaouira Prov<strong>in</strong>ce.<strong>Community</strong> <strong>Involvement</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>Primary</strong> <strong>Education</strong> <strong>Reform</strong> 29

Hooray! Your file is uploaded and ready to be published.

Saved successfully!

Ooh no, something went wrong!