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article - African Diaspora Archaeology Network

article - African Diaspora Archaeology Network

article - African Diaspora Archaeology

Omer Cooper J (1971)March 2011 NewsletterThe Archaeology of Race and African American ResistanceBy Christopher Matthews*Preface to “The Archaeology of Race and African AmericanResistance” for the African Diaspora Archaeology Newsletter.I want to thank Chris Fennell and Christopher Barton for including a chapter from mynew book on The Archaeology of American Capitalism published last fall by the University Pressof Florida in this issue of the ADAN newsletter. My book is about how archaeology documentsthe materializations of capitalism in the making of modern America. I consider a range ofexamples from the New England fur trade to the creation of the modern city to western gold rushand mining communities. I structured the book to illustrate and explain how capitalism was bothinstituted and resisted in various instances that give great texture of American life past andpresent.The chapter reproduced here is my favorite since it exemplifies how I worked to weavetogether cultural, historical, and political economic factors to produce an archaeologicalinterpretation that highlights both agency and critique. My argument is that capitalism is basedon a particular worldview that supports the agency of actors engaged in society as individuals;thus individual agency is a key to participation and to the reproduction of the capitalist system.However, individual agency comes at a price. While many pay this price in labor, debt, andsacrifice, others, usually those most marginal to the mainstream and thus least able to afford thecosts of participation, developed alternatives that I consider as critiques. These critiques pointedout the shortcomings and flaws of the system capitalism created, but as I show in the book, mostof these critiques failed to generate substantial change as they were adopted by people tooheavily invested in that system to see beyond it. My chapter on African Diaspora communitiestells a different story by showing how the material culture of African Americans exhibits astuteand critical readings of racism and the foundations of capitalism that helped to dehumanize themas slaves and, thus, commodities. Being so marginalized, in other words, African Americans feltand saw what capitalism most expects from its participants and thus were in a unique position todevelop a critical standpoint against it.

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