Views
5 years ago

Sailing to Windward With the Gentry Tuft System - ArvelGentry.com

Sailing to Windward With the Gentry Tuft System - ArvelGentry.com

Sailing to Windward With the Gentry Tuft System -

. Sailing to Windward With the Gentry Tuft System Ranger 23 Newsletter Back in 1973 I wrote an article for SAIL magazine describing the leading edge separation bubble and the use of a special set of yarns near the luff of the genoa as an aid in sailing to windward. This article is included in the book, The Best of Sail Trim, page 77. And, whether you race or cruise, you will find that this system will improve your sailing. A recent conversation while at my sailmaker's loft has prompted me to try reintroducing this idea to the sailing community. I was describing my system of short telltales (tufts) for a new genoa to my sailmaker when one of the best local sailors, Scott Rohrer, came in and overheard part of the conversation. Scott said that he had recently been driving a big boat that had a telltale near the luff of the genoa. He felt that the boat was going to windward great, fast and pointing high, even though the telltale on the leeward side was frequently twirling. The owner of the boat argued that the telltale indicated that the sail was stalled and that he should be pointing higher. As I described the leading edge separation bubble idea and my tuft system, Scott quickly saw that this was the information he needed to settle the argument with the boat owner. I had a copy of The Best of Sail Trim with me, and Scott immediately made a copy of the article so that he could use it to describe the idea to the boat owner. The basic ideas behind my tuft system are illustrated in the diagrams below. The regions where the flow is separated, and therefore very unsteady, are shown in gray. When all of the leeward tufts are lying down and the first or second windward tuft is twirling or pointing upward, the sail is about to luff. When all of the tufts are streaming smoothly aft, you are precisely on the wind and no separation bubble is present. If you head off slightly, the first leeward tuft will twirl as it reacts to a small separation bubble. All the other tufts will be lying down. The boat has good speed and pointing ability. Heading off a bit more will cause two or three of the leeward tufts to twirl. The boat will have good acceleration but the sail will be very near the full stall condition. Heading off some more will cause all of the leeward tufts to twirl and the sail will be completely stalled. The rest of this article will explain why all of this happens and how you can best use these ideas to improve your windward sailing. A. Near Luffing B. On the wind C. Speed vs. pointing D. Acceleration Near Stall E. Stalled

Sailing to Windward, January 1974 - ArvelGentry.com
The Aerodynamics of Sail Interaction.cdr - ArvelGentry.com
How Sails Really Work.cdr - ArvelGentry.com
How Sails Really Work.cdr - ArvelGentry.com
CARIBBEAN 600 RACE ANTIGUA The Hottest ... - Windward Sailing
Sailing Instructions (PDF) - Manhasset Bay Yacht Club
Sailing Center Manual - City Of Ventura
The Basics of Dingy Racing at the Kanata Sailing Club
Sailing Instructions - Manhasset Bay Yacht Club
2013 DRYA SAILING INSTRUCTIONS FOR “A/B ... - Detroit Yacht Club
Happy New Year January Meeting : Better Sail ... - SSSS Clubhouse