Viva Brighton Issue #30 August 2015

VivaMagazines

IT’S TIME TO STANDUP TO SPINAL PAINNUFFIELD HEALTH BRIGHTON HOSPITALAt Nuffield Health Brighton Hospital, we want to make sure you areliving the life you love. That’s why we offer rapid access to expertassessment, diagnosis and treatment of spinal pain. Whether you’reexperiencing back or neck discomfort, we have specialists that can help,at a time and date to suit you. Get back to the life you love.Nuffield Health Brighton Hospital,Warren Road,Woodingdean,Brighton,BN2 6DX01273 987 089nuffieldhealth.com/hospitals/brighton


vivabrightonIssue 30. Aug 2015editorial...................................................................................Pride falls at the very beginning of August this year, which gave us aproblem. We wanted to celebrate the city’s biggest annual event, butwere aware that some readers will pick up the mag after it’s finished.So we decided upon a theme which was, in effect, powered by Pride,and came up with ‘Every Which Way’, in celebration of the city’sprevailing acceptance of who and how its inhabitants choose to loveand how they gender identify. A few figures here: a 2014 Brighton &Hove Council report estimates that 11-15% of the over-16 population identify as LGB (lesbian,gay or bisexual), and 0.9% as transgender. This compares with a national estimate (LGBonly) of just 1.5% in a recent survey conducted by the Office for National Statistics, with thegay rights organisation Stonewall estimating the figure to be more like 5-7%. Whatever thecase, Brighton certainly has one of the biggest per-capita populations of people identifying asLGBT in the country, and thus every right to proudly host the country’s biggest celebrationof sexual and gender orientation diversity. While recognising that an attempt to be allinclusivecan lead to long, complicated sentences in columns like these, we salute tolerance inall its forms, and are proud to live in a city where few people bat an eyelash when whosoeverflutters theirs. Or not. Or whatever. Enjoy the issue...The Team.....................EDITOR: Alex Leith alex@vivabrighton.comDEPUTY EDITOR: Steve Ramsey steveramsey@vivabrighton.comART DIRECTOR: Katie Moorman katie@vivabrighton.comPHOTOGRAPHER AT LARGE: Adam BronkhorstEDITORIAL ASSISTANT: Rebecca CunninghamADVERTISING: Anya Zervudachi anya@vivabrighton.com, Nick Metcalf nickmetcalf@vivabrighton.com,PUBLISHERS: Nick Williams nick@vivabrighton.com, Lizzie Lower lizzie@vivamagazines.comCONTRIBUTORS: Black Mustard, Joe Decie, Amy Holtz, Chloë King, Antonia Phillips, JJ Waller,John Helmer, Ben Bailey, Lizzie Enfield, Joda, Martin Skelton and Andrew DarlingViva is based at Brighton Junction, 1A Isetta Square, BN1 4GQFor advertising enquiries call 07596 337 828Other enquiries call 01273 810259Every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of our content. We cannot be held responsible for any omissions, errors or alterations.


contents...............................Bits and bobs.9-23. The Pavilion’s partying past, JoeDecie’s proud moments, JJ Waller andcompetition time with Di Coke36Photography.25-29. Antony Luvera explores what itis to be ‘Queer in Brighton’Columns.30-33. Amy Holtz on dressing other,John Helmer’s pimp shoes, ChloëKing declutters and Lizzie Enfield’stoo-conventional familyBrighton in History.34-35. The unseen gay scene inBrighton in the 50s and 60s55My Brighton.36-37. Radio presenter and pop-up DJBoogaloo StuIn Town This Month.38-47. Billy Bragg, part-time-waitresspart-time-singer-songwriter SamanthaCrain, an almost impossible productionat Brighton Open Air Theatre, ex-BBhousemate Pete Bennett and RadioReverb presenter Kathy Caton53Art and design.49-55. ‘The Canaletto of Dieppe’Walter Sickert, JanaNicole’s A-Z ofSwearing, local neon artist Andy Doigand giant-origami folder Coco Sato....4 ....


contents...............................Literature.56-59. John Gordon, Afrocentricwriter. Plus our last Flash Fact story63Work.61-69. Folk music supermarket Hobgoblin,Adam Bronkhorst photographssome of Brighton’s drag queensFood and drink.73-79. Burgers and stinky fries atNeighbourhood, cream tea in thePavilionPhoto by Paul Marc Mitchell769798Family.80-85. A cuppa with Children’sLaureate Chris Ridell, Technologyworkshops for kids and LGBTadoptionHealth and safety.87-95. Cycle safety for grown-ups,electric mountain-biking and chef tothe (football) stars Lottie KempBricks and Mortar.97. From mausoleum to cabaretvenue, and many things in betweenInside left.98. ‘Blacksanders’ beachcombing toget by, January 1936....5 ....


this month’s cover art..............................................6 ....


this month’s cover art..........................................“My idea for the design was to rework theBrighton & Hove coat of arms with additionalfeatures to create an alternative crestfor the city,” explains Kitty Finegan, thedesigner of this month’s ‘Every Which Way’cover. “The central part of the design featuresa compass, used to cover every angle ofsexual orientation which can be discoveredin a place as diverse as Brighton. Withinthe compass there are the three symbols formale, female and transgender.” The compassis divided into 12 dials, representing the 12months of the year, showing Brighton asan “all-year round city of acceptance andcelebration.”The original coat of arms features two dolphins,which were used to reflect Brighton’sdependence on the sea. “I replaced the twodolphins with divers, and added martlets’feathers, which appear on the Brighton &Hove coat of arms.”Kitty’s work frequently features strongfemale characters, although it’s not entirelyclear whether the arms at the centre of thedesign are male or female – nor does it matter.“The flexing muscled arms are a show ofstrength and a play on the idea of a coat ofarms,” she explains, “and the pink nails arethere as an idea of multi-sexual strength.”Each little detail is important. The sevenflowers represent “the Seven Dials area ofBrighton, which reminds me of a compass,and was the first place I lived when I movedhere.” The crown symbolises ‘Brighton Royalty’- “the infamous characters and personalitiesyou can say would only be seen andfound in Brighton.” And the ‘VACANCIES’sign is “a nod to theseaside, the B&B’sand the visitors thatcome to Brightonand help make thecity thrive.”The traditional coatof arms displays themotto: ‘INTERUNDAS ET COLLES FLOREMUS’ whichtranslates as ‘Between Downs and Sea WeFlourish’. Kitty’s new motto seems to betterfit our modern city, this month even more sothan usual: ‘EVERYBODY WELCOME’.You can see more of Kitty’s work atkittyfinegan.com....7 ....


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its and bobs...............................on the buses:spread the word#4 jimmy edwards (No 12)Illustration by Joda, jonydaga.weebly.comIn 1944, Jimmy Edwardswas flying equipmentand supplies overthe Netherlands, whenhe spotted a Germanplane heading in his direction.It was firing athim. His first thought,according to his warmemoirs, was: ‘Thiswon’t do. We’ve got a show to put on tonight!’Shot up till his engines failed, despite his evasivemanoeuvres, he had to crash land, and then hide ina ditch till nightfall to avoid getting captured. Hedidn’t make it to the show. But he did win the DistinguishedFlying Cross.Edwards had entered the RAF as an introverted,bow-tie wearing, aspiring poet-and-teacher; he wasdemobbed in 1946 as a ‘hard-drinking, hard-swearing,jocular Jim,’ in his words, who was now beginninga career in comedy.Noted for his bumbling, caricature-English persona,Edwards had a comically large moustache, possiblygrown to cover a scar sustained during his wartimecrash landing. ‘He was a special kind of Englishman,’former Goon Michael Bentine told the Times. ‘A realshooting, fishing and quaffing-of-ale man. At thesame time he was very intelligent and scholarly.’ Hewas nicknamed The Professor.‘Jimmy Edwards was a very funny man, but he wasgay and very troubled about it,’ Barry Cryer has said.Though Edwards married a woman in 1959, he apparentlytold her, on their honeymoon, that he wasgay but ‘trying to reform’. In 1976, he was outed inthe newspapers, which upset him greatly.Edwards lived in Fletching, East Sussex, for 20years; he died in 1988, and was buried in the village.“Here’s my chap, Andy Johnson, on one of themany Rome hop-on-hop-off bus tours sailingpast the Coliseum,” writes Viva reader Anne Dennington.“His ears are plugged into the bus tour’scommentary of the sights, although he is momentarilydistracted by June’s Viva Brighton magazine.These sightseeing buses are a very good way ofseeing Rome and for getting your bearings ofwhere everything is in this fascinating ancient city.”Peter Harold sent this picture from “a lovely littleplace in the mountains of Mallorca” while onholiday at the end of June. “Just thinking aboutwhere to eat and drink when we get back,” hewrites. He doesn’t mention the cat’s name; theyboth look very relaxed.Carry on taking Viva wherever you go, and, viainfo@vivabrighton.com, help us spread the word…....9 ....


its and bobs...............................jj waller’s prideJJ’s latest offering is a gentleman from last year’s Pride Parade, commenting onRussia’s homophobic laws. ‘The Pride Parade has to be amongst my favourite ofBrighton and Hove’s public events,’ writes JJ. ‘Amid its brash and often hedonisticexterior are reminders of serious underlying scenarios. I know of one ‘older’transsexual who comes from Essex every year without fail, who told me last year“I have struggled all my life to be able to be part of such a public display celebratingmy freedom to express who I am.”’....11....


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Joe decie...................................13....


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its and bobs...............................Pub: the marine tavernThe Marine Tavern, according to its landlordLee Cockshott, is known as ‘The Gay Cheers’.This is due, presumably, to the banterful interchangesbetween its regulars. The nicknamedoesn’t seem to fit the day I go in. Thefive or so men huddled round the bar seemto barely have the energy to lift their pints.To be fair, it is 2pm on an energy-sappinglyhot July weekday afternoon, so it’s not thebest time to judge the pub’s atmosphere. DuringPride, for example, the clientele take overthe whole of Broad Street, dressed in all sortsof outrageous get-up, which I can’t imagineever happening in Boston’s most famous. OnWednesdays and Thursdays there’s a free shotwith every drink, which should soon raise thetempo a little. On Sundays it’s jammed withpunters enjoying one of the best-value roastsin town. Pub quizzes on Mondays come witha free curry thrown in. Another nickname forthe pub, according to G-Scene, is ‘the littlepub with the big personality’.The pub is tiny, but it was even tinier backin the day. Lee shows me a card they keepbehind the bar with the back-story of the establishment:a Marine Tavern was first listedin Broad Street in 1862, at no 13. By 1884 thepub had moved next door to its current premises,though ‘pub’ might be pushing it. TheTavern was only half its current size until anextension in the 50s, and in the earlier dayswould have been little more than a hole in thewall selling beer.Apart from various reported hauntings theTavern, like many little city-centre locals,hasn’t left much of a mark on history. Until2002, that is, when landlords Steve Chillingworthand Nat Robinson took over the placeas a feeder bar for their Harlequin Nightclub,which particularly catered for the transgender customers.They gave up involvement in the London-Roadareaclub to concentrate entirely on the Broad Streetventure in 2005, and worked tirelessly to make it a communityhub as well as the centre of numerous fund-raisingactivities. Their legacy lives on under Lee, and Natis still to be seen there, compering the Monday quiz.Alex Leith; painting by Jay Collins....15....


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its and books...............................Time out brightonTime Out guides have always been the coolest on the market, aimedat, well, Viva-type readers, with an eclectic interest in all things culture,shopping and food. The new edition of the Brighton ‘Shortlist’(a mini version of the bigger guides, £7.99) certainly doesn’t let theside down, if you don’t judge the book by its cover, which shows(yawn) a picture of Brighton Pier. ‘The complete reference to anyonevisiting the city’ it says in the blurb on the back, but it’s arguablya great little keep-handy guide for people living in it, too, and it’sbeautifully written. Here, for example, is how they describe how thecity greets its tourists: ‘just witness the way [the sea] draws day trippersstraight down Queens Road and West Street from the station tothe beach, where the gaudy candy floss-scented Brighton Pier and starling-haunted skeleton of the West Piercrouch on the city’s shoulders, fighting over its soul.’ Wow. The book cannily divides the city into eight areas:City Centre; The Lanes; North Laine; Seven Dials; Montpelier & Clifton Hill; Kemp Town & Hanover;New England Quarter & Preston, and Hove. In each it recommends sightseeing hotspots, shops, pubs,bars, coffee shops and restaurants, each given a savvy, up-to-date and well-researched write-up. Interspersedbetween are page-long box-outs giving a chance for the writers to let their hair down a little. The best entry asfar as we’re concerned is the ‘What’s On’ paragraph in the ‘Resources’ section, which describes this magazineas ‘excellent’. Well, Time Out, we’d like to return the compliment.di coke’s competition cornerWelcome to the first of a series of creative challenges where you can win fantastic prizes! This month,we’d like you to take a photo on the theme of ‘Brighton at night’. Share on Twitter, Instagram or Facebookwith the #VivaBrightonComp hashtag - or alternatively, email to competitions@vivamagazines.com. The most entertaining after-dark shot will feature in our October issue and win the prize outlinedbelow. Entries must be received before 15th August 2015 and full terms & conditionsare at vivabrighton.com.Brighton’s Big Screen have teamed up with ibis Hotels to give away apair of premium tickets to watch Pulp Fiction followed by a night’sstay at the Hotel ibis Brighton City Centre on Friday 21st August2015. Presented by Patterns, Pulp Fiction is an absolute cult classicand one of the most influential films of the 90s. Perfect for a Fridaynight down at the beach! For a full line-up of films and to check outthis year’s new swanky bar head down to the beach, next to BrightonPier from 13th August – 14th September 2015 and pre book tickets at:www.brightonsbigscreen.comDi Coke is very probably the UK’s foremost ‘comper’, who has won over£250,000-worth of prizes. For winning inspiration and creative competitions,check out her blog at www.superlucky.me....17....


its and bobs...............................Secrets of the pavilion:‘Devil take me!’George IV’s enchanted party palaceThe Royal Pavilion sprang almost entirely fromGeorge IV’s creative mind. He was nothing if notdaring, often verging on the reckless in his lifestyle,design ideas and spending habits and thus gave uswhat is surely the most extravagant, madly beautiful,romantic and exotic of all historic buildings in Britain.It was the expression of a man who loved partyingand entertaining, as well as being admired andflattered. The Pavilion was, as a guidebook from the1820s puts it, ‘an enchanted place’, a ‘fairyland’, andalways intended to be a place for amusement, whererules were different from those at the London court.George first visited Brighton in 1783 as Prince ofWales, having just come of age. Ostensibly thiswas because his doctors recommended that the seawater would be good for his glands. However, themore relaxed atmosphere in Brighton, away fromhis strict father George III, must have appealed.From 1781 reports of the Prince’s wild behaviourreached his father, who complained that it was ‘almostcertain that some unpleasant mention of him’was now to be found in the newspapers each morning.Brighton quickly became his playground awayfrom London. In the Pavilion, he would hold lavishparties, concerts and balls. Despite the ostentatioussplendour of these occasions, some guests complainedabout the conditions in the building. MrsCreevey, a visitor in 1805, remarked that she soonbecame ‘sick of the heat and stink’. Dinner partieswere relatively small in number, with a maximum of40 guests. The image of the Banqueting Room fromNash’s Views shows George sitting amidst a party ofno more than 16.George embraced the fashion for extravagant dinnersin the French manner, even hiring a Frenchchef, Marie-Antoine Carême, in 1816. Carême wasparticularly renowned for elaborate so-called piècesmontées and grosses pièces – dishes resemblingsculptural works of art or architectural models.Crucially, George introduced ‘promiscuous seating’in Brighton, which disregarded the commonetiquette of sitting according to rank. This enabledhim to sit next to the ladies of his choice, whetherthey were aristocratic or not. Dinners would lasthours and were followed by musical entertainmentand – late in the evening – more food. On a visit inJanuary 1822 the sharp-tongued Russian PrincessAaron Edwin Penley, The Music Room, Royal Pavilion:The Grand Re-Opening Ball, 1851Exhibition of hairdressing at the Pavilion,Brighton, from The Illustrated London News, 1889....18....


its and bobs...............................Lieven commented on the decadent and intoxicatingatmosphere at the Pavilion: ‘I do not believethat, since the days of Heliogabalus, there have beensuch magnificence and luxury. There is somethingeffeminate in it which is disgusting. One spendsthe evening half-lying on cushions; the lights aredazzling; there are perfumes, music, liqueurs –“Devil take me, I think I must have got into badcompany.”’Balls in and near the Pavilion were much largerin respect of guest numbers than dinner parties.Both George IV and his mistress/illegal wife MariaFitzherbert loved holding ‘masqued balls’ in thestyle of those held at London pleasure gardenssuch as Vauxhall and Ranelagh. On 28 September1795 for example, the Brighton Gazette alerted itsreaders to a ‘Masquerade under the patronage andsanction of the Prince of Wales’, for which thegeneral public could purchase tickets at a price ofone guinea. Many local costumiers would advertisein the same paper as having a range of fancy dresscostumes for hire. After the event, the papers wouldthen publish detailed accounts of how each of thefamous attendants had dressed up for the occasion.A Miss Smythe, a guest at one of Mrs Fitzherbert’smasqued balls at her house on the Old Steine, wore‘A beautiful Turkish dress, with a handsome turbanof scarlet and gold, and a profusion of diamonds.’The time after the sale of the Pavilion estate to thetown commissioners of Brighton in 1850 has beendescribed by a former Director as the period of‘municipal nakedness’, due to the fact that QueenVictoria gutted the palace in order to recycle theinteriors at Buckingham Palace. However, thecommissioners didn’t do such a bad job. In hisDescriptive Guide to the Palace and Gardens of the RoyalPavilion at Brighton from 1851, the author CharlesWilmott praised the valiant efforts to re-createthe interiors as quickly as possible, so as to be ableto open the building to the public: ‘In three briefmonths, the dingy, dilapidated ruin of the town’spurchase has been transformed into “a thing ofbeauty”’. On 21 January 1851 the building wasformally re-opened with a grand ball, attended bymany Brightonians. In an oil painting by AaronPenley from the same year the municipal chandeliersthat replaced the Craces’ lotus-shaped orientallustres are clearly visible. The painting is on displayon the upper floor of the Royal Pavilion, in QueenVictoria’s apartments.Throughout the 19th century the Pavilion’sstripped-down historic interiors were used formany a charity ball as well as other strange andwondrous events, such as dog shows, flower displaysand, in 1889, a hairdressing exhibition. In the 20thcentury the building became particularly popularwith fashion photographers and filmmakers, and itspopularity persists. Today the Music Room is oneof the rooms available for civil wedding ceremonies.Featured widely in news media around the globe,on 29 March 2014 it was the setting for what wasprobably the first same-sex wedding to take place inthe UK. I think George IV would have approved.Alexandra Loske, Art Historian and CuratorRobert Dighton, The return from a masquerade - a morning scene, 1784....19....


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its and bobs...............................magazine of thE month: fathersMen and boys are makingeveryone very thoughtfulthese days. In the shop rightnow, at least two magazineshave features on how boys arebeing raised to be the kind ofmen who can take their placein the 21st century.It’s perhaps not surprisingthat in the past three monthswe have started to sell twomagazines dedicated to discussingwhat it means to bea father. It’s an importantdiscussion and it’s great tofind places where it can takeplace. As a bloke, I get it andI like it.One of those magazines is called Fathers Quarterly.It’s published from Poland, in both Polish and internationalversions. The publishers certainly gotsomething right with Issue 1 - we sold out of itthree times.Issue 2 is in the shop now. What I like about FathersQuarterly is that it doesn’tharangue. It’s a gentle publicationthat encouragesdads to make time for andtake time with their children.Through featuresthat bring to the fore consciousfatherhood, culture,travel and lifestyle it providesa visual and writtenconfirmation of the importanceof fathers and kindlyprompts to help us reflecton how we are doing thisimportant and joyful work.One of those reflectionswas written here in Brighton,about pebbles on thebeach, children and fathering.How we father is important. Fathers Quarterly givesspace to let us reflect about it and doesn’t beat usup while we are doing so. I hope Issue 2 is as successfulas Issue 1.Martin Skelton, MagazineBrighton, Trafalgar Streettoilet graffito #7Name that toilet!Our toilet graffito correspondentTanya Phillips has noticedthis character popping up incubicles round town. Thecharacter seems to have losther friend, Alberto. But who isshe? Where is Alberto? And,most importantly, can youidentify which pub this toonwas snapped in? Last month’sanswer: The Heart and Hand.....21....


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its and bobs...............................pechakucha night #2Since our very popular inaugural PechaKucha night in May, we are delightedto announce that together with illustrator Zara Wood (aka Woody) we havebeen made the official Brighton organisers of the format. To celebrate, our nextPechaKucha night has a ‘Japan Brighton’ theme and takes place on Thursday 3rdSeptember. As Woody explains: “PechaKucha was started up by Tokyo-based architectsAstrid Klein and Mark Dytham to give a platform to designers and othercreative people to offer a short presentation of their work. Participants are asked to prepare a slideshowof twenty carefully chosen images, each shown for twenty seconds, during which they explain what theaudience is seeing. There is no pause between slides, so it’s engaging and full of energy: each presenter’sslot lasts a total of just six minutes and forty seconds.” Pechakucha means ‘chit chat’ in Japanese, butparticipators don’t get the chance to drone on… far from it. We’re currently assembling another stellarline-up to deliver their quick-fire show-and-tell, including Children’s Laureate Chris Riddell (who usesa Japanese brush in his illustrations), Manga artist Inko, origami furniture designer Coco Sato, fabulousprint-maker (and one of Kirsty Allsop’s upcycling experts) Lee Baker, and former PK Brighton organisersBranwen Lorigan and Julie Watson.Talent Pool, powered by Pecha Kucha, will be hosted by Woody and Viva’s Alex Leith at Yellowave, MadeiraDrive. Doors open 6.30pm with the talks running, with a break, between 7pm - 9pm, Thurs September 3.Participants will be around afterwards for a chat. Earlybird tickets £5 from zarawood.comFirle Place InternationalHorse Trials * Country Fair * Dog FestivalSunday August 30th 2015 - Firle Place nr Lewes BN8 6LP39th International Horse TrialsDog Festival open to all - showing, racing, scurrys, agiltyArchery, Craft Fair, Farmers Market, Food, Bar, ShoppingGate opens 9am - www.firleplaceevent.co.uk


photography..........................................Anthony Luvera‘Not Going Shopping’In June 2013, AnthonyLuvera was invited to createnew work with LGBT*people, and to co-editan anthology of writing,oral history interviews,photography and culturalephemera for Queerin Brighton. “The activitiesundertaken by the project,”he explains, “seemed to fitwith my interests in workingcollaboratively with groupsof marginalized people toexplore issues related toidentity, community, locality and self-representation.I thought the prospect of creating this workcould offer a useful way to further my enquiry intocollaboration and at the same time provide an opportunityto confront my own views of queerness.”How do you go about working on somethingwith such a large scope? I started by arrangingan open call - I was conscious I’d be bringingtogether a group of people who may not knoweach other and who could have differing opinionsabout all kinds of things, least of all what it is to bequeer. When we first met, I asked that they bringalong three photographs that told their story. Iwanted to find a way to strike up conversationsabout photography and identity, and for us all tobegin to get to know each other. This activity setup an atmosphere of openness and conversation,enabling the discussions that formed our worktogether to begin to flow.I discussed my intention to create collaborativeportraits. I didn’t know how this would take placeat first, but I knew that by meeting regularly anddeveloping our conversations aprocess for making the portraitswould begin to take form. Wecontinued to talk about thisover the coming months andto test out ideas. At one of thegroup meetings, a participantbrought in a black and whitephoto booth portrait to showme. Intrigued by the image Isuggested we all go and use aphoto booth. I was inspiredby how in the context of ourdiscussions about photography,identity and queerness,the photo booth – with its associations with theproduction of images for official identificationpurposes – could provide a framework with whichto develop our conversations further. We beganusing the photo booth regularly and I broughtin equipment and materials with which to createour own photo booth images. Over the followingweeks I showed participants how to use the equipmentand together we created portraits of eachother for the photo booth wall.We also set up a public blog shortly after the firstmeeting in order to collectively represent theprocess of working together and we used a privateFacebook group as a way to extend our conversations.These online spaces were an integral part ofthe process of the work.So the final images form a relatively small partof a larger process? Yes, Not Going Shopping ismore than a set of final images. The process undertakenbetween the participants and me is veryimportant. Interview by Jim Stephenson of Miniclick/miniclick.co.uk. Anthony’s website at luvera.com....25....


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1 Aug Duckie: Border Force2 - 6 Aug Comedy SummerSchool2 Aug Max and Ivan30 Aug Jimmy Carr䈀 刀 䤀 一 䜀 䤀 一 䜀 吀 䠀 䔀 䈀 䔀 匀 吀 伀 䘀 䈀 刀 䤀 䜀 䠀 吀 伀 一 䌀 唀 䰀 吀 唀 刀 䔀吀 䠀 刀 伀 唀 䜀 䠀 䤀 一 䐀 䔀 倀 䔀 一 䐀 䔀 一 吀 䈀 唀 匀 䤀 一 䔀 匀 匀 䔀 匀 Ⰰ匀 吀 䄀 刀 吀 ⴀ 唀 倀 匀 Ⰰ 䌀 伀 䴀 䴀 唀 一 䤀 吀 夀 倀 刀 伀 䨀 䔀 䌀 吀 匀 䄀 一 䐀䰀 伀 䌀 䄀 䰀 䌀 刀 䔀 䄀 吀 䤀 嘀 䔀 匀 㬀 䌀 刀 䔀 䄀 吀 䤀 一 䜀 倀 伀 倀 ⴀ 唀 倀䔀 嘀 䔀 一 吀 匀 䤀 一 䤀 一 吀 䔀 刀 䔀 匀 吀 䤀 一 䜀 唀 一 唀 匀 䔀 䐀 匀 倀 䄀 䌀 䔀 匀䤀 一 䄀 䰀 伀 圀 ⴀ 刀 䤀 匀 䬀 ⼀⼀ 䰀 伀 圀 ⴀ 䌀 伀 匀 吀 䔀 一 嘀 䤀 刀 伀 一 䴀 䔀 一 吀 ⸀䨀 唀 一 䔀 ⼀⼀ 䨀 唀 䰀 夀 ⼀⼀ 䄀 唀 䜀 唀 匀 吀䀀 刀 䤀 䈀 伀 吀 䠀 䔀 䄀 䐀 儀 唀 䄀 刀 吀 䔀 刀 匀匀 䔀 嘀 䔀 一 䐀 䤀 䄀 䰀 匀 Ⰰ 䈀 一 アパート 吀 䐀眀 眀 眀 ⸀ 瀀 漀 氀 礀 最 漀 渀 瀀 漀 瀀 甀 瀀 ⸀ 挀 漀 ⸀ 甀 欀Brighton ad_Layout 瀀 漀 氀 礀 最 漀 渀 瀀 1 漀 瀀 23/01/2015 甀 瀀 䀀 最 洀 愀 椀 氀 ⸀ 17:03 挀 漀 洀 Page 110 - 11 Sep Bryony Kimmings19 Sep Seun Kuti and Egypt80 + Akala22 - 26 Sep Avenue QEst.1976www.hobgoblin.comNOW IN BRIGHTON!The ALADDIN’S CAVE of MUSICAL INSTRUMENTSGuitars, Banjos, Mandolins, Ukuleles, Harps, Fiddles,Autoharps, Dulcimers, Concertinas & Accordions,Woodwind & Brass, Huge whistle selection. Drums,Cajons, Bodhrans, Djembes, Shakers & much more,Keyboards, Amps, Accessories & Books for all.01273 709709brightondome.org108 Queens Rd, Brighton BN1 3XF01273 760022 | www.hobgoblin.com/brightonExpert staff are always on hand togive you free, friendly advice.


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column...........................................Amy HoltzThe truth is, I’m a Minnesotan‘Can I wear this one?’ he asks,a tube of ruffled aquamarinedangling between his fingers.I am simultaneously mortifiedto be housing such a blatantlyfeminine piece and worried, asthere are several more inchesof my neighbour’s torso thanthere are in the cheap spandexfabric he’s holding up like adead rat.I frown. If he wears it, I cannever wear it again. Although,right now, I can’t imagine ever wanting to wear it.In the living room, my roommate is using up myfavourite eyeliner on a boy, who, unfairly, doesn’tneed it. Xtina’s Dirrty is blaring on our stereo andproviding inspiration. I lean around my doorframeand watch as two boys try to recreate her recentboob hammock out of a lilac scarf. They’re gettingbogged down with the knot, sausage-fingersfumbling with the slippery material.Gender is a complex performance, a rigidlypatrolled set of ‘parodic repetitions’ said my secondfavourite queer theorist, Judith Butler. Whichmakes sense, because I’ve always felt like I’m playinga bit at being a woman. Those days, I dressedlike a colour-blind fourteen-year-old extra fromThe Bad News Bears (the spandex top was an aberration).I can remember the regularity with whichthe words ‘gender normativity’ and ‘the binary’were murmured seductively to me over a can ofHamm’s. It usually worked.But twice a year, attending the Queer Unionball, we really dismantled the trickier parts of ourgendered selves with theearnestness of universitykids, high on subversiveness.There was a freedomin this - dressing up,dressing other, imitation.No commitment,just a little flirtation withyour mistress while yourwife looked on. It wassanctioned experimentation,for me, but especiallyfor the straight men Iknew who, having recently left their mothers’freshly laundered care, their sweaty locker roomexistences, their baseball caps and Acqua Di Gio,could feel a breeze between their thighs for thevery first time.It’s bittersweet thinking back though - a few yearsof hammering at our glass boxes, only to have ourtools taken away and the glass reinforced. There’smore people on the outside who seem to care thatyou stay inside.On my cycle home the other day, just past PrestonPark, I watched a teenaged boy get off a bus. Helocked eyes with me, warning me not to run himover. I looked down as his hands met the bottom ofhis black mini-skirt and tugged. Good, I thought.Someone’s finding a way out.My neighbour saunters from my bedroom. There’sa gruesome amount of black armpit hair explodingbeneath the coquettish ruffle of my top. In a fewyears, he’ll work for a bank. Neither of us willcompletely remember what it was like when we gotto be those other people we once masqueraded as.....30....


column...........................................John HelmerPimp shoesIllustration by Joda, jonydaga.weebly.com‘I like your shoes’, I tell the man next to me at thebar. They certainly stand out: a black and whitebrogue known as a ‘spectator’ shoe.‘Hand-made,’ he says, not attempting to disguisehis satisfaction. He is large, in late middle age, witha claret flush and black and white hair to match hisfootwear. Which makes him look rather like a badger.He’s been at Ascot, and owns a castle.For reasons too complicated to explain I am outdrinking in Mayfair with an army colonel namedGarry. The Badger joins Garry and me on theoutdoor terrace. ‘I have had two wives and am aboutto take another, thirty years my junior,’ the Badgertells us, launching into a rambling monologue thatbetrays a degree of unease about this event.‘Are you sure she’s got the right skill-set for achatelaine?’ I say.‘You’ve put your finger on the problemthere.’Time for another round. Back at thebar, I meet a youth who has four pintsof Guinness lined up in front of him.‘Are those all yours?’He looks at me foggily. ‘Do youwant one?‘I wasn’t hinting.’With weaving step he follows meout onto the terrace. ‘I’m in privateequity,’ he says, then vomits, brieflybut explosively, on the base of a heatlamp. He is joined by a friend whoseshaved head, small teeth and biggums suggest Ridley Scott’s Alien. ‘I’mwriting a thesis on personal agency,’drawls the alien.His friend vomits again.The terrace closes and we’re moved indoors. TheBadger buys a bottle of champagne. The foggylookingyouth now seems to have five pints of Guinnessand is attempting to pick up a young womanin a frock and a fascinator – something that mightbe easier if he didn’t keep retching over her shoes.A boyfriend appears and demands that his friends(meaning us) do something about him: ‘he’s disgustinglydrunk’.The proper thing at this point, Badger avers, wouldbe to rally behind Foggy and give the boyfriendwhat for.Colonel Garry disagrees. ‘I think you should apologiseto that young woman,’ he tells Foggy. Garry hasa mild, softly-spoken manner, but you are never inany doubt that if pressed he could kill you with hisbare hands.The Badger makes an abrupt volte face. ‘Yes ofcourse he should’, then, changing the subject,launches into an impassioned pitch about the risingmarket, and how I would be a fool not to let himshow me a sure way to make a cool million.There is a fracas. It seems that Foggy’s apology hasbeen so cack-handedly delivered, and accompaniedby so much retching on shoes, that it has provedmore upsetting than the original offence. Securityis called, and Foggy and the Alien removed. TheBadger takes it on the toes.‘He was trying to sell me a dodgy property investment,’I tell Garry.‘Tell you what, let’s finish these.’We sit down and start on the abandoned Guinnesses.‘I should have known, really – he was wearing pimpshoes.’....31....


column......................................Chloë KingLess can be moreI wrote a note to self thisweek, in capital letters:GET RID OF SHIT.(NOT PEOPLE). Thisflash of brilliance came tome urgently while I wascleaning the toilet. I hadto hurry out and write itdown in my diary nextto a long list of friends towhom I owe contact.It was triggered by aninterview with Shaa WasmundMBE that I heardon BBC Radio 2. ShaaIllustration by Chloë KingWasmund – the bestselling author, serial entrepreneurand enemy of the idle - has a new book out entitled DoLess, Get More.“What’s happened to all of us,” Shaa tells SteveWright, “is we’ve got trapped in the busy trap”. Shaa’sbook teaches how ‘anything is possible when you stoptrying to do everything at the same time’. It’s sucha successful philosophy that Shaa wrote 70% of thebook in a few weeks. It’s essentially about adopting ahyper-specialised life in which you churn work outin the shortest timeframe possible (“write all of yourblog posts for three months on one day”), de-clutter,and delegate less-favoured tasks. The focal point ofShaa’s PR campaign is about reorganising personalrelationships.Instead of sharing our time equitably between ourfamily and friends, Shaa informs Steve Wright, “You’vegot to take a real hard look at it and say, what’s reallyimportant to me?” If you’re honest, she says, “you’drealise that probably 80% of your joy comes from20% of the people inyour life… prioritise thepeople who are in your20%.”But isn’t there a whiff ofobjectification about allthis? When I’m cleaningthe house I prioritise the20% that visitors willsee. It makes me content,but it doesn’t make mefeel any better long-termabout the festering,pest-ridden corners I’veneglected to bother with.When compiling our A-list, Shaa says, we shouldn’tjudge friends on what they can do for us, or their monetaryvalue. “It’s just, when you spend time with themdo you feel energised? Are you happy or are you justdrained and miserable at the end of it?” Being honest,I felt pretty drained and miserable spending time withmy dying mother. I’m glad, however, that I didn’t passup those last interactions on the basis they weren’t ‘energising’.At what stage does a friend in need become adrain that needs unblocking?The drive for efficiency, coupled with a dogged pursuitof happiness, is a fashionable thing. I’m sure Do Less,Get More will sell, and it’s certainly made me think.It’s made me think about the 80% of my friends Idon’t give time to because I’m at the supermarket, orstalking Facebook, or writing blog posts, or cleaning20% of my house. It’s made me think I need to spendless time tending to objects, so that I can pay moreattention to people. It’s made me think I need to DoLess, More.....32....


column.............................Lizzie EnfieldNotes from North Village“So and so’s family is so much better than ours,”is a familiar refrain.“So and so’s family is so much better becausethey have five parents and we only have two,”might be less familiar, unless you live in everywhich-wayBrighton and Hove where, with every-which-wayparent combinations, the numbersbegin to stack up.“Five?” Maths has never been middle child’sstrong point.“Four mums and one dad.” Ok. The numberswork, but four mums?“Yes, her mum and her partner who was with herwhen they had her and then the new partnersthey both have after those mums split up. Andtheir dad. Five parents at Christmas and birthdays.It’s so much better.”There are other ways to fail as a parent, than tobe straight and still together, and I fail in thoseways too. Middle child, the one who feels robbedof at least three parents, is limbering up for acareer in putting the world to rights, making ita better place, ironing out the injustices. So farshe’s campaigned successfully for theinstallation of a transgender toiletat the local comprehensive“because there aren’t any atschool.”“No transgender students?”“No toilets.”“And students?”“That’s hardly the point.”I’m not going to protest. I’vetried that before and been toldmy views are every which waybut strident enough. Itworks to my advantage sometimes.Middle child sends me a text message, whenI’m away working, complaining about having tomake and eat dinner by herself. I ask if ‘one ofher other parents’ isn’t looking after her but she’snot going to play the ‘pretending she has morethan two parents’ game, not even to humour me.“Dad is upstairs playing guitar.” She outlines theemergency situation which requires more thantwo parents - or another tack.“Now you’re making me feel guilty,” I say. “Andit’s not very feminist of you to make me feelguilty.”“No, no, no. It’s OK. It’s good that you work. Ilike it when you go on your trips. I can tell allmy friends about all the ridiculous things you getup to.”Ok, so that backfired a little, but it does stop hercomplaining about me being away with “onlyone” parent to fall back on.““Would it help if parent number two and I splitup and both found new partners?” I say to her,when I’m back.“That would still only be four parents andanyway, why is dad parent number two?”“Because, obviously, I am number one,obviously. Aren’t I?”“That’s why you insist on thistwo parent thing isn’t it?” shesays, shaking her head. “So youcan’t possibly fall lower downthe pecking order than numbertwo?”I’d thought of it as more of a justbeing straight and married kind ofthing. But every which way…....33....


history..........................................Part of ‘the family’The secret gay community of pre-1967 BrightonIf you were wise, you’d look up and down theroad before going into a club where your fellowlaw-breakers hung out. If the police raided,you’d give a false name. You’d use nicknameseven with associates, and avoid discussing yourday job. You’d speak in slang, to disguise thetopic of conversation. You’d avoid writing downphone numbers or keeping incriminating letters.You could identify members of the group bysubtle signs, like a handkerchief in their backpocket, or just a ‘language of the eyes’. Theywould refer to each other as ‘family’. After amember got prosecuted, it was later recalled, ‘forsome days afterwards the victim couldn’t go intoa pub or a club without being stood rounds byeverybody’.An unpublished Mass Observation report notedthe ‘exclusive nature of the group [nationally],’with its ‘isolationist activities and chance mannerof making contacts’. Those of the public who’dactually heard of the group largely consideredtheir behaviour ‘revolting or incomprehensible’.Ric Morris, who runs the Piers & Queers local-LGBT-history tour, says that “for gay men before1967, it really was a criminal underworld.”***“A lot of gay people just didn’t meet other gaypeople, and got married and led secret lives andmaybe once in a while had a chance encounterwith another man,” Ric says. “There were nonetworks; the ways of connecting with peoplewere very much restricted.Sometimes a gay man in a new town would “sortof trick the general population into revealingwhere the gay pub was,” Ric says; they’d go intoa normal bar and say they were embarrassed,they’d accidentally walked into a queer pubearlier – oh, what was its name?Brighton had various gay venues in the 50s and60s; it wasn’t illegal for gay men to hang outtogether. But police still took an interest in theplaces. The late Brian Ralfe once told Viva thatat the Curtain Club, on the seafront, “you’d havepolice raids every weekend.“It had two rooms; one for the girls and one forthe boys, and in between that there’d be a littledance floor,” Ralfe said. “We’d all be down theresocialising, the boys would be together and thegirls would be together, and we’d always have alookout, watching for the police. If they turnedup, usually a dozen of them at a time, somebodywould shout: ‘Quick, grab a dyke!’ Thepolice would come in and I’d be dancing with awoman; quite legit.”It’s not clear how much discretion clubs in generalinsisted on; at the Curtain Club, accordingto the My Brighton and Hove site, ‘if two men somuch as touched each other there was a monitoron duty who dashed towards them and separatedthem.’ But someone in oral history book DaringHearts recalled seeing, presumably not atthe same venue, ‘men dancing and kissing andcuddling one another, and screaming “darling”across the floor.’‘Queens in Brighton were so bold,’ anotherwitness remembered. ‘They would go into amixed pub… I’ve known them go straight up tosomebody in the front bar and say “oh, I fancyyou darling, you’ve got the most lovely eyes,can I buy you a drink?” They were very brazen,....34....


history..........................................to the extent that if somebodyhad said “piss off, you silly oldqueen”, they’d say “oh, get you,Ada”, and try somebody elsewithin a couple of yards.’You could maybe get away withthis kind of thing “if you hadyour own business or workedin the theatre,” Ric says. “Ifyou had any ordinary job itwasn’t possible to be out; evenin Brighton you had to lead adouble life.” You could get fired,blackmailed, imprisoned, kickedout of rented accommodation,or simply ostracised.Given all this, it’s easy tointerpret cottaging as an act ofdesperation. How else to meetpeople? Though someone saysin Daring Hearts that it wasregarded in a ‘sort of lightheartedway’. There was anotorious men’s toilet on BlackLion Street, and people wouldjoke about heading down ‘witha packed lunch to spend the daythere’.This is not to play down whatDaring Hearts called ‘thepsychological effects of livinglike a sexual criminal,’ or theexternal threats, including thenewspapers and police. “Certainignorant constables were verynasty to gay people,” an ex-policeman tells Viva. “They were alsopretty rough when they found men having sex in the gardens atBlack Rock. I won’t say no more about that.”But some men evidently found refuge in humour – when thugswould raid a gay club looking for a fight, patrons nicknamed them‘sightseers’. And some were less fearful than others. One guy, wholived on the seafront, “would fancy any ‘young’ policemen,” ourcontact says. “In the end it was always two policemen together whowent to the house to do any enquiries, for safety’s sake.”Generally in Brighton, Ric says, “it was better than the rest of thecountry, simply because there was a larger community. Probably betterthan anywhere outside of London. But it still wasn’t a paradise byany means - certainly not by today’s standards.”As Ralfe, a lifelong Brightonian, told us: “In the late 50s, early 60s,it was terrible to be gay, it really was. But we suffered through it. Wewent through hell to get where we are today.” Steve RamseyWith thanks to Ric Morris, whose Piers & Queers tour runs publicallyin Feb and May, and can be booked privately at other times. Seeonlyinbrighton.co.uk. Quotes without sources are from Daring Hearts(QueenSpark Books, 1992), an invaluable resource.Still from 2012 drama Tales from the Spotted Dog, taken by Nige Bflickr.com/photos/nigeyb....35....


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interview..........................................mybrighton: Boogaloo StuDisco DynamiteAre you local? I’m from Scotland, originally. Iwent to what was then Brighton Poly in the mideighties,and after I left college I started up a clubnight, Dynamite Boogaloo, influenced by the NewYork underground club scene. I moved to London,but continued the club night here, and then in 2001I moved back. It made sense: it was cheaper to buyhere, and a lot of my friends still lived here, or hadrecently moved here. Dynamite Boogaloo ran for17 years, until 2009: we revived it in the Spiegeltentat Brighton Fringe in May, and it may continue topop up here and there.Is Boogaloo Stu very different in character tothe real you? Very different! I’m actually quite ashy person, and as a character he’s much more outgoingand confident; more of a show off. He thinkshe still has hair. But being Boogaloo Stu nowadaysis quite physically demanding. At my advanced age,it’s harder walking around in platform heels andholding the wobbly bits in. Luckily, I can now let itall hang out as my new character Derek Daniels, awashed up TV host from the seventies.Do you enjoy Brighton Pride? I think it’s becomea little bit too corporate for my taste. The Parade isgreat. It’s free and there’s scope to remind people ofthe ongoing struggle for equality. I’m a regular hostat Bristol Pride, where all the entertainment is free,and I enjoy it hugely.What’s your favourite pub? I don’t go to pubs,unless it’s to perform! But I’m very fond of theMarlborough, which is one of the last remaininghubs for performers and artists who are on thefringes of the mainstream. It feels like a lovely sliceof old Brighton, which hasn’t been taken over bycorporate giants or turned into a coffee bar.What about restaurants? Well I do enjoy finedining, particularly French food. Show me anythingthat’s been cooked in half a pound of butter ordoused in cream, and I’ll shove it in my face. Iused to like The Meadow over in Hove, which islong gone, sadly. Nowadays it’s the Salt Room, orPlateau. Too often you’ll also find me eating cake,from the Real Patisserie, or i Gigi, or the Flour Pot.My favourite cake is a ‘religieuse’, which is shapedlike a nun but is utterly sinful.Is Brighton a good place for shopping? I designand make all my stage costumes, so you might findme scouring the North Laine for lengths of vintagecrimplene or lurex. For civilian attire, I do as littleshopping as possible. About once or twice a year,when I realise everything’s worn out and I needsome new clothes, I’ll go out and buy everything Ineed in about 40 minutes, hot-footing it around theLanes. I rather like Peggs & Son.How would you spend a typical Sunday afternoon?I’ll usually have done a show on Saturdaynight, so I’ll wake up quite late. I might go to thegym but it usually involves lazing around, drinkingwine, eating cakes and watching property porn onTV. I’m very boring.What could Brighton do with having? A properballroom. Until a few years ago I did a lot of LatinAmerican dancing. I used to compete in events atthe Tower Ballroom in Blackpool, which is justincredible. The Dome and the Pavilion are spectaularvenues, but it would be wonderful to have ahistoric purpose-built ballroom. All of ours weredemolished.When did you last swim in the sea? I don’t. You’llnever find me sunbathing, either. I do enjoy the oddcountry walk, though, particularly around Alfriston.But it always has to end with a cream tea. AL....37....


local musicians..........................................Ben Bailey rounds up the Brighton music sceneRIVIERA BREEZESun 2, The Volks, 10am, FreeIt’s the morning after Pride, you’ve woken up onthe beach and you’re hearing some strange etherealsounds drifting across Madeira Drive. Drawn in bythis hypnotic music you find yourself in The Volksat a daytime nightclub listening to the experimentalelectronica of Japanese Sweets. “Hey, isn’t that theguy from Brighton krautrock band Speak Galacticwho also plays synths for Gazelle Twin and MerlinTonto?” you ask, amazed at your ability to recall localmusic trivia. Moments later you’re overwhelmedby the gently rising crescendo of a mellow andmournful ambient drone. All this and more.MISHKIN FITZGERALDThu 20, The Brunswick, 8pm, £5/4Give a lifelong fanof Queen and Musesome classical trainingand raise them ona diet of Europeancabaret and gothicrock and you’d endwith somethingresembling Brighton‘noir rock’ band Birdeatsbaby.This fusionof unlikely influenceshas worked well forthe ever-evolving four-piece who, over the last sixyears, have built a wide fanbase here and elsewhere,apparently known as ‘the flock’. Tonight the singerand pianist is doing a solo set, which means morepiano ballads and quirky showtunes. While the rocktheatrics might be toned down, the macabre dramaand sinister storytelling will be right to the fore.KILL ALL HIPSTERS!Sat 22, Cowley Club, 7.30pm, £5After a fewweeks ofdowntime, theCowley Clubreopens with asix-band bill ofpunk and skaand a warningto those whomight havestrayed too far from nearby hipster hangout MeatLiquor. Headlining the night are Primeval Soup, alocal dub-punk trio who are far more likely to befound out on a hunt-sab mission than chompingdown at a trendy burger bar. Carrying the batonof 80s bands like Culture Shock who blended thespirit of punk with an upbeat reggae vibe, PrimevalSoup offer a fresh and energetic take on politicisedpogo punk.TWO THREE FOUR FESTIVALSat 29 & Sun 30, Green Door Store, 2pm, FreeNamed after the address of the venue, this two-dayfestival is a great chance to catch up on a whole newcrop of bands that would probably be headliningthere on any other weekend. When the festivalstarted two years ago it was back-to-back Brightonbands, but this time they’ve let some Londoners inon the act. So alongside the likes of locals BIRD-SKULLS and Morning Smoke you get YAK, Oscarand Skinny Diet Girl. Brighton headliner TheoVerney has moved well up the bill since his explosiveset in 2013, and he’s off on a tour of Europenext month, so if you want a blast of his infectiousguitar grunge, do it now.....38....


local musicians..........................................BloomBack in flower againThings had alwaysbeen sunny for Brightonfolk-pop outfitThe Beautiful Word,but this time last yearone of the band’s leadsingers realised somethingwas up. Duringa tour of the UK shefound herself unableto sing and eventuallyended up in hospital.This month they’ve bounced back with new songs,a new name and a gig at The Albert.So what happened last year? Megan: I could tellback in March that something had gone wrong butI couldn’t work out what was happening. I thoughtmaybe my voice was just growing up as it startedgetting husky – but by the end of the August tourI could hardly get through a show hitting all thenotes I needed to before it gave up. It turns out Ihad a huge cyst that had grown in my vocal cord.I had to have an operation and afterwards I wasn’tallowed to speak for 12 days, which was interesting!Why did the band decide to change the nameto Bloom? Emily: We’re all into the science andbeauty of nature, the excitement of life in general,and more recently we’ve been writing musicinspired by that. There’s also a fun and excited elementof the concept of ‘Bloom-ing’ … somethingabout a new lease of life!Does it feel like you’re starting afresh? Emily:Having some time off performing has given us anopportunity to go in a slightly different directionunder a new name, but we are still the same people...just with more life experiences to sing about!Has the music changed as well? Megan: We’vechanged a lot since wefirst started releasingmusic back in 2007and we’ve been thinkingabout changingthe name for a littlewhile. We’ve gone towardsa more synthysound and away fromfolk, but still retainingthe songwritingelements and closeharmony that characterised our earlier stuff.Has the throat problem affected you in otherways? Megan: In so many ways. It was really hardbut taught me loads. Being honest now lookingback, I am grateful for the cyst and everything thathas happened. I’ve always been quite a loud personso spending more time on my own being mute wasdefinitely good for me. We all appreciated howmuch we love being in the band and performing. Iwas going mad without it! My speaking voice willalways be different, it’s a bit higher and smaller, butI’m just so happy I can sing again.What can we expect at your gig this month?Megan: Well, we haven’t had a chance to put on aparty in ages so I’m overexcited with the planning.I won’t say loads but I was googling diagrams ofneurons last night and sound sensitive lights!What makes you so happy? Emily: The wondersof life! Friendships, parties, sunshine and thebreathtaking concept of being something microscopicin a vast and potentially infinite universe.Megan: Yeah, pretty much that.Interview by Ben BaileyBloom are playing The Prince Albert on Thursday20th August, 7.30pm, £5....39....


hove’s independent, high qualitylive theatre and venueWHAT’s ON:SEP:Oct:PLUS:ROMEO & JULIETThe Times:“Fizzling adaptation”23-24 Sep Ages 5-12Long nose puppets’ show for ages 2-7:flyaway katie [23 Aug, 11am & 2:00pm]Digital ‘supergroup’ of 200+ Artists:orchestra of samples [19 sep] [pic, L]music videos on the big screen:adam buxton’s BUG [02 SEP]+ MORE: theoldmarket.com


music...........................Billy BraggProtest zagger“At the beginning of 1984 I was on the cusp of abreakthrough. By the end of 1984 I owned moresocks and underpants than I’d ever had in my life. Icouldn’t fit any more in the drawer, and I knew thiswas significant.”This is Billy Bragg, who calls 1984 “the year thatsorted me out.” That January, the NME put him onthe cover, and Melody Maker claimed ‘Braggmaniais sweeping the nation’. And that was before theMiners’ Strike, which would firm up his socialistviews and make him a leading anti-Thatcher agitator.This magazine’s editor, who was a student at thetime, remembers Bragg as having been ‘sort of thevoice of a generation... ish’.“Well, I certainly was talking about politics... Iwouldn’t say I was trying to become the voice of mygeneration, that’s kind of a spurious idea, notwithstandingwhat your boss says. But I was trying toconnect with that singer-songwriter tradition, thefather of which is Woody Guthrie, the idea of a soloperformer standing there trying to speak the truth:three chords and the truth, and that kind of stuff. Iwas definitely trying to be that person.”This was a time when suave synth bands were infashion, and Bragg’s confrontational punk-folkstood out. “The New Romantics… their whole ideawas that style was more important than content,and anyone who’s seen any photographs of me fromthe 1980s will know that content was much moreimportant to me than style. Particularly when itcame to haircuts, which I make no apologies for.“It’s a very basic marketing plan that says wheneveryone’s zigging, zag. And I was a classic zag. Aseverything went back to style over content andwacky haircuts, I came in with a buzzcut and atuneless voice and a grungy guitar, and absolutelyPhoto by Ziggyno light show.“I was very fortunate to come out around the sametime as the Smiths and the Pogues, because theywere both bands that represented a return to songswith great lyrics. There’s a wry humour in Morrissey’slyrics back then, and I was kind of comingfrom the same place.”Bragg had gone into music with three ambitions,according to his official biography: ‘1. Make analbum. 2. Tour America. 3. Be on the cover of theNME.’ Having made an album the previous year, heachieved the other two in 1984, and tried to makethe most of a success which he believed would betemporary.“I thought ‘this is probably it, I’d better get all thisdone now, because this might be the only chance Iget to say this and do this, and be this person’. Andbecause of the Miners’ Strike I was kind of swept upin the whole thing, and before I knew where I wasit was 1985 and my second album was out and wewere off and running. It wasn’t just something thatwas momentary.” Steve RamseyBilly Bragg plays at the Together the People festival,Preston Park, Sept 5-6. togetherthepeople.co.uk....41....


music.........................................Samantha CrainPlaying a waiting gameFor about six months of the year, Samantha Crainis a highly-rated singer-songwriter on tour. Forthe other six months, she waits tables. Sometimesshe gets customers who ask: ‘Does anyone ever tellyou that you look like Samantha Crain?’Growing up in small-town, blue-collar Oklahoma,Crain was writing short stories from the age ofseven or eight. Nine years later, she switched tomusic, after picking up a Songs: Ohia record froma bargain bin, which she bought because she likedthe cover art. “I listened to it on my way home.It was just really moving and affecting to me,and I thought: ‘I want to be able to speak in thislanguage’.”It must have seemed like a reckless move whenCrain dropped out of college to pursue music seriously,but “I am kind of a person who just throwsmyself into something, and plans and makes thingsup as I go along. I’ve never really been somebodythat was afraid of failing. I have failed at plenty,but I’ve never really been afraid of it.“When I got into music, it was really the kindof golden age for DIY; all these people wereopening up venues and coffee shops, they werejust booking anybody whose music they liked. It’sa completely different world now. So I was justlucky in my naïvety; I was naïve enough to thinkit would work, and just happened to be doing it atthe right time.”She’s since been called an ‘artist to watch’ by RollingStone, ‘a powerful new talent’ by the Times, and‘a promising talent’ by the Observer. She’s touredBritain and Europe, and just released her fourthalbum. Yet she still waits tables. “Mainly just to payfor records. Touring kind of pays for itself thesedays, but records don’t, so I pretty much have tosave up half of the year to pay for records.”Is that a strange situation: the acclaim and theday-job? “Yeah, I think it’s strange. I wish I understoodanything about this crazy business of music.I guess in my head it doesn’t make a lot of sense,but I’ve just gotten used to it. But I’m sure thereare lots of bands that have to do the same thing.”If a customer says she looks like Samantha Crain,“sometimes I’m just like: ‘Yeah, I get that a lot’.Or if I’m feeling up to it, I’ll say: ‘Well, I am’. It’skind of funny, they feel bad for me, or something.I wouldn’t want anybody to feel bad for me; thingsare going well. I make records, people like them…“I don’t really know how things are going to shakedown, but I do know that when I started I justreally liked making records and travelling, andten years later, that’s still how I feel about things.”Steve RamseyFri 7th, Latest Music Bar, 8pm, £10/£8....42....


dance.........................................Cancion GitanaBack to flamenco’s rootsThe history of flamencogoes back probablyabout 1,000 yearsto Northern India, whenthe gypsies were expelledby the then rulers, whodidn’t care for the factthese clowns and dancersand singers and jugglerslived in their midst, andbasically evicted them all. And gradually theytravelled westwards, picking up all of these musicalinfluences as they went, through the Middle East,North Africa and so on. Flamenco as it is now is amixture of many cultures, many styles, and muchof the music the gypsies were hearing in Spain,folkloric music.Café Cantante culture is something that reallysprang up in the latter part of the 1850s.Some of the gypsies were quite entrepreneurialand realised that the music they were presentinghad a popular appeal and could reach an audiencethat previously it hadn’t. So they started openingsmaller clubs, which became increasingly largeconcert halls as they became more successful, andout of that grew, if you like, a particular style offlamenco, which was very much of its time, in theearly 1900s. That’s what we’re trying to createin this show. We’re trying to make a faithful andauthentic recreation of that period.That was one great watershed period inflamenco, when it was hugely popular, muchlike perhaps music halls became popular in Paris.There was a period where gypsy performers werefêted, and invited into the homes of people to giveprivate concerts and so on. It became very fashionableto host a soirée in your palace, with two orthree gypsy performers.In the late 1920s, itstarted to go into a bitof a decline again, thenafter the Civil Warwas really regarded assomething disgusting -decent people wouldn’tgo and watch flamenco,nobody was interested.It sort of hid, it became more or less anunderground art form, until the early 1960s,when all of those gypsy families who had kept theflavour of flamenco alive, suddenly they were indemand again. Franco wanted to start attractingtourists into his country, and the Brits went in theearly 60s, and what they were seeing was a sort ofpastiche of flamenco which was made up, really,for the audiences.We’ve since moved on to, particularly in the70s, 80s and 90s, flamenco going back to itsroots, exploring the great singers, dancers, andguitarists of the past. We now have a more completeunderstanding.Our company, Cancion Gitana, is made upof Spanish performers who make a kind offlamenco dance theatre; shows which are stories,which take elements of flamenco and put them togetherand perform a storyline with them. Hardlyanybody but us does that in the UK, and therearen’t many companies that do it in Spain. If youthink that you’ve seen flamenco on your holidaysin Torremolinos in the 1980s, you’ll find we’redoing something a little different.Steve Ramsey was talking to Graham BengeCafé de Chinitas, by Cancion Gitana, Aug 29th, TheRialto, 7.30pm, £15/£12.50....43....


theatre...........................Our Mutual FriendStaging the unstageable“We’d kind of agreed to do it before I’d read thenovel,” says Frank McCabe, who adapted CharlesDickens’ Our Mutual Friend for a Brighton theatregroup in the late 90s. “I read it with a mix of fascination,joy and terror.”An ambitious, panoramic-look-at-society typenovel, it’s divided critics, but McCabe says it’s great:vivid characters, an absorbing story, humourous,psychological, disturbingly dark in places. It’s alsovirtually impossible to stage.More than 800 pages long, it has “three or fourmain plots and probably eight or nine sub-plots,but they’re not separate, they all weave into oneanother,” McCabe says. “It was criticised at the timeas being labyrinthine and not what we’re used tofrom Dickens, to an extent… in common with a lotof writers in their later years, he’s aiming for a realsense of breadth and universality; he wants to writeabout a society and a nation.“Also, at this point… he wrote almost all of hiswork in monthly episodes for a journal, and there’dbe a dozen or 20 theatre companies around Englandthat would wait for these episodes, and thendramatize them within three days, and mount thesekind of crappy productions of the latest episode.This got under Dickens’ skin after a while.“One of the things he’s doing in Our Mutual Friend,he’s writing a novel that’s unstageable, deliberately,to thumb his nose at these companies that were, ashe thought of it, exploiting him and his work. A lotof the chapters end with a great big set piece like asteamboat sinking on the Thames, just so it couldn’tbe staged.”So McCabe’s challenge was to cut vast chunks froma web of interconnected plots and subplots, whileretaining the book’s grand scope, and finding a wayround the great-big-set-piece problem. It took sixmonths to get a workable version together. Thatversion was seven hours long.The resulting production, in 1998, was ‘muchloved’, according to the write-up of a revival beingstaged at the Brighton Open Air Theatre. They’venow got it down to five hours, to be played in twoparts, by a cast of 18 actors. Just putting together arehearsal schedule was “a bit like the Enigma code,really, we were there for the best part of a day justtrying to fit everything together.“We’ve found in rehearsals that we’ve spent anentire day covering quite a lot of ground, then youlook at it in the context of the whole and it doesn’tfeel like you’ve scratched the surface. There are 89scenes in the show, so you do three or four scenes ina day and they’re looking good, and you think, ‘well,there’s 85 more’. So it is a vast undertaking; you canonly really work on what’s in front of your nose andnot worry about it too much, I think.” Steve RamseyBrighton Open Air Theatre, Wed 19th-Mon 31stAug. See brightonopenairtheatre.co.uk....44....


£75£39.50£40£20Free!Free!


comedy...........................Pete BennettBig Brother winner turned compere“I’ve been talking to the other acts to learn stuff offthem. They say ‘just think of something funny andwrite it down’ and I’ve thought ‘oh, is it that easy?’”I’m talking to Pete Bennett, the 2007 Big Brotherwinner, that one with Tourette’s, who has ridden adown-on-his-luck period (punctuated by periodsof ketamine abuse and homelessness) and is nowhatching a new career as a comedian. We’re sittingin the plush refurbed Nightingale Theatre, in theall-new Grand Central, where he’s currently comperinga weekly show, Comedy Capers.“So I got myself a notepad, but all I could do wasdraw pictures of penises.”His Tourette’s is much better than when he brieflybecame an unlikely national treasure, winning themost votes in Big Brother history. “The doctorssaid that it would start to get better after I turned30,” he says. “For once they were right. I used to say‘wankers’ all the time. I’ve shortened that to ‘wank’.People don’t feel it’s aimed at them, so they don’tget so offended.”He is accompanied on stage by self-made puppets,who he has conversations with. “It’s a vent for myTourette’s,” he says. “They can say things that Iwouldn’t get away with. I first started making themwhen I got married.”He used to film late-night conversations betweenthe first two he made, Gubbage and Spit, puttingthe videos on YouTube. He sees me hesitating whenwriting down the first name, and spells it out forme. “G.U.B.B.A.G.E. That’s the shit on the cornerof the mouth that drug users get. Spit is just spit.”Big Brother, it seems, was good preparation for hisnew career. “I used to bounce ideas off Big Brotherin the diary room,” he says. “But it didn’t help meget rid of stage fright. It was being in a band thathelped me get over that.” The band in questionwas called Pete Bennett and the Love Dogs; he hasrecently stated that he has given up music in orderto concentrate on his comedy career.In April he appeared on the Jeremy Kyle Show, andon a Big Brother reunion show, and he is gettingrecognised in the street again. “It died down for abit, but now it’s bedlam again.” He likes the attention,he says.But where does he get the material for his act, if hedoesn’t write notes? “I store ideas in my head,” hesays. “One gig a few weeks ago I realised I didn’thave any ideas left to do,” he says. “So I ad-libbed.It was a great gig. I’ll have to think up some more:most of my material comes from things that havehappened in my mad life. Still I can’t use all of it.One of my mates died, and he owed me a tenner.That wasn’t funny.” Alex LeithPete’s Comedy Caper every Friday night, 8pm atGrand Central, grandcentralbrighton.co.uk....46....


adio...........................Out in Brighton‘A balance between fibre and sugar’“The ultimate objective of a show like this is thatone day it will be unnecessary and obsolete,” saysKathy Caton, who hosts Out in Brighton, RadioReverb’s weekly LGBT talk show.Once gay people don’t have to worry about walkinginto the wrong pub and getting “a mouthfulof abuse or worse”, or having problems at work,or coming out, or getting isolated or excluded orwhatever, then maybe Caton will stop hosting Outin Brighton. But she doesn’t expect it any time soon,even for those “fortunate enough to live within theBrighton bubble,” where there’s “plenty of work todo,” but also “shitloads to celebrate and be reallyproud about”.Sitting in on a broadcast in July, I started outobserving the guests, but then got absorbed bywatching Caton – her obvious interest in whatguests were saying, whether or not it was actuallyinteresting; her encouraging facial expressions andnodding; her near-permanent eye contact, brokenreluctantly to glance at the monitor now and then;her willingness to let guests just talk; her tolerancefor pauses; and her reluctance to cut them off ifthey overran. She remained largely silent – perhapsa surprising trait in a talk-show host, but that’s kindof the point of the show.“I’ve got access to a platform, and one that noteveryone can access, and I’m definitely really interestedin that thing - I wish there was a non-wankyway to describe it - of giving people a voice, wherethey’re not necessarily heard, and where they canbe heard in detail as well. Today was a bit of a contradiction,because we had six guests squished in,but often we might do a show that focuses on oneperson for half an hour, or even do a whole profilepiece for an hour.”The show’s remit is whatever might be of interestto LGBT people, “so anything from mental healthand stigma, living with HIV, to lots of arts andculture, music…” When I hesitantly suggest thatpeople might imagine the show is a bit worthy, Catonsays: “There’s usually a fairly hefty mix, sometimeswith some slightly odd sudden gear changesbetween mental health in the LGBT communityto ‘it’s the Pride dog show!’ I try and have a balancebetween fibre and sugar, put it that way.”Does she think any straight people listen? “I knowthey do, actually. One of the things I really love iswhen I get emails from people saying ‘I know I’mnot the target audience for your show, but I reallyenjoy it’. I wouldn’t want to be doing anythingthat’s like: ‘I’m here with my arm around my homework,no one else is to come in.’ Yeah… it makesme laugh that people feel they have to assert ‘I’mnot gay or anything’ in their emails. I’m not goingto judge you if you are!” Steve RamseyRadio Reverb hosts the Alternative PerformanceStage at Pride. Out in Brighton is broadcast live onWednesdays from 5-6pm, and then available as apodcast....47....


22 August to 6 SeptemberOPEN STUDIOS • EXHIBITIONSARTISTS’ OPEN HOUSES • EVENTSArt trails across Lewes, Seaford,Newhaven and the rural areaswww.artwavefestival.org


ART..............................Walter Sickert‘The Canaletto of Dieppe’In the ‘fin de siecle’ yearspreceding and following theturn of the twentieth centurya colony of decadentwriters and artists formed inDieppe, bringing togethersome of the greatest aesthetictalents either side of thechannel, including JamesMcNeill Whistler, AubreyBeardsley, Oscar Wilde, Edgar Degas, HenriMatisse, Claude Monet, Paul-Emile Pissarro andWalter Sickert.This summer, Pallant House Gallery in Chichesteris looking at the influence the group – andthe port – had on the work of the latter artist,and how he carried this influence back over theChannel, helping infuse French Impressionist andPost-Impressionist ideas into the British art scene.I’m invited to the press viewing of the exhibition,in which curator Katy Norris talks us round 80or so Dieppe-set paintings by Sickert, who wasa regular visitor to the town between 1885 and1920, and who lived there permanently for a totalof ten years either side of WW1.She paints an intriguing picture of the artist,who was noted for his charm and charisma, andwho took two English wives with him to settle inDieppe, as well as living with a local fisherwomanfor several years. Sickert took to painting the localsat work in the town, and he was fond of donningfisherman-type clothes to get into characterwhile he worked: he also learnt the local dialect tocommunicate better with his subjects.The exhibition is set out chronologically, andKaty takes us through the changes in Sickert’sstyle as the influence of his tutor, Whistler, wanesand that of his French mentor,Degas, takes hold. His paintingbecomes bolder, denserand more colourful as he takeson ideas of using colour ratherthan tone to depict shadow,paints ordinary people at workand play, and plans out hispaintings using a grid systemapplied to detailed sketches.Sickert has been called ‘The British Impressionist’,but he didn’t wholly adhere to the principlesof that movement, particularly as he almost alwayspainted from these sketches in the studio, ratherthan ‘en plein air’.Another nickname he acquired while living inFrance, given to him by his great friend JacquesEmile-Blanche, was ‘The Canaletto of Dieppe’.Dieppe comes to life in his paintings, and as wellas being a lesson in the progression of technique,the exhibition takes us on a journey through thetown during its heyday. In that era Dieppe wasan elegant tourist destination, popular with boththe French and the English, who, then as now,travelled by ferry from Newhaven. Sickert accompaniesus to several lively bars, to the circus, to theraces and to the casino.But most of all he takes us to Dieppe’s mainsquare, and particularly the façade of St JacquesChurch, which he paints over and over again,displaying a range of styles and techniques helearnt while honing his craft over his long-termacquaintance with the port, before he returned toEngland for good after the sad death of his secondwife in 1920. Alex LeithSickert in Dieppe, Pallant House Gallery, Chichester,till 5th October....49....


ART..................................50....


ART..............................JanaNicoleUpcycler extraordinaireI meet JanaNicole in herstudio, a building that meritsan article in its own right.She is cheerful, and American,and has long dark hair cascadingout of a US Cavalry cap.She’s based in Wilmington,that small village near Eastbourne,of Long Man fame.It’s a long way to travel foran interview, but going theextra yard has rarely been soworthwhile.The studio is full of colourfulthree-dimensional artwork. There’s a doll on acrucifix, a frame full of tiny shrines, an effigy in abox with a rabbit skull for a head, a stars and stripesmade out of hundreds of spray-painted toy cars, andmuch, much more. It’s difficult to know where tolook, there’s so much to look at.Her MO is to upcycle materials, in the most imaginativeway I’ve seen any artist upcycle materials.She has a ‘technical director’ called Pete, who’s onhand to explain the nuances about how her stuff isput together, which is always complicated, as everysingle bit of every piece, frame, base and all, is createdfrom second-hand materials. These, where possible,are locally sourced. She spends a lot of time,she says, at car boot sales, and jumble sales, and incharity shops, a process she calls ‘treasure hunting’.We examine her A-Z of Swearing piece (picturedleft) which is a hoot.This piece is composed of 26 square panels, each ofwhich has a letter on it, in the body of which youcan see a cartoon character. Each letter correspondsto a swear word, which appearsbelow. The cartoon characterscorrespond with the letter theyare inhabiting. Thus ‘A’ has anastronaut, and the word ‘Asshole’.‘B’ shows Enid Blyton’sFamous Five, with the legend‘Bollox’. ‘C’ shows a checkyshirtedcowboy, with a wordunderneath we have decidednot to print in this magazine.It’s one of a series of painstakinglyput-together A-Z piecesshe’s working on: there’s oneabout religion (A is for Amish, B is for Buddhismetc) which beggars belief, there’s so much detail init. Another shows police mugshots of celebrities.“One of the hardest things,” she says, “is to find anexample for every letter. I have had to abandon anumber of potential projects because I haven’t beenable to complete the list.” ‘X’ and ‘Z’, apparently,require a lot of thought.There’s much more: a piece exploring MarilynMonroe’s obsession with mysticism, a black dollwearing a dress made from lucky charms, severalframes filled with scores of toy ships, which I don’teven get round to asking about. By the time I leavethe studio – whose façade, I’ve learnt, was once thefront of an Alexander Pope-built folly in Twickenham– I feel like Alice coming out of the rabbit-holeagain, back to normality. I’m offered a cup of tea inthe garden, and I need it.JanaNicole’s work will be exhibited at Artwave (22Aug – 6 Sept/artwavefestival.org ) and in the BrightonArt Fair (24-27 Sept/brightonartfair.co.uk)....51....


伀 刀 䤀 䜀 䤀 一 䄀 䰀 䄀 刀 吀 䄀 吀䄀 䘀 䘀 伀 刀 䐀 䄀 䈀 䰀 䔀 倀 刀 䤀 䌀 䔀 匀匀 吀 唀 一 一 䤀 一 䜀 匀 䔀 䰀 䔀 䌀 吀 䤀 伀 一 伀 䘀䌀 伀 一 吀 䔀 䴀 倀 伀 刀 䄀 刀 夀 圀 伀 刀 䬀 ⸀䘀 刀 䔀 䔀 䠀 伀 䴀 䔀 䄀 一 䐀 䈀 唀 匀 䤀 一 䔀 匀 匀䌀 伀 一 匀 唀 䰀 吀 䄀 一 䌀 夀 匀 䔀 刀 嘀 䤀 䌀 䔀 ⸀䄀 爀 琀 㔀 䜀 愀 氀 氀 攀 爀 礀 Ⰰ 㔀 䈀 愀 爀 琀 栀 漀 氀 漀 洀 攀 眀 猀 Ⰰ䈀 爀 椀 最 栀 琀 漀 渀 Ⰰ 䈀 一 䠀 䜀琀 㨀 ㈀ 㜀 アパート 㜀 㜀 㐀 ㈀㈀㈀ 攀 㨀 椀 渀 昀 漀 䀀 愀 爀 琀 㔀 最 愀 氀 氀 攀 爀 礀 ⸀ 挀 漀 洀愀 爀 琀 㔀 最 愀 氀 氀 攀 爀 礀 ⸀ 挀 漀 洀䬀 䔀 刀 䔀 一䈀 䔀 嘀 䤀 匀䤀 栀 愀 瘀 攀 戀 攀 攀 渀 愀 渀 愀 爀 琀 椀 猀 琀 昀 漀 爀 ㈀ 㔀 礀 攀 愀 爀 猀 愀 渀 搀 氀 漀 瘀 攀 琀 漀 挀 爀 攀 愀 琀 攀戀 攀 愀 甀 琀 椀 昀 甀 氀 眀 漀 爀 欀 猀 漀 昀 愀 爀 琀 ⸀ 䤀 栀 愀 瘀 攀 愀 瀀 愀 猀 猀 椀 漀 渀 昀 漀 爀 瀀 愀 椀 渀 琀 椀 渀 最 愀 渀 搀愀 洀 猀 攀 氀 昀 琀 愀 甀 最 栀 琀 ⸀ 倀 氀 攀 愀 猀 攀 猀 攀 攀 洀 礀 眀 攀 戀 猀 椀 琀 攀 琀 漀 栀 愀 瘀 攀 愀 氀 漀 漀 欀 愀 琀洀 礀 搀 椀 瘀 攀 爀 猀 攀 瀀 漀 爀 琀 昀 漀 氀 椀 漀 ⸀ 䌀 漀 洀 洀 椀 猀 猀 椀 漀 渀 猀 愀 氀 眀 愀 礀 猀 眀 攀 氀 挀 漀 洀 攀 ⸀吀 眀 椀 琀 琀 攀 爀 㨀 䀀 昀 椀 昀 昀 椀 昀 氀 甀 昀 昀 礀 戀 甀 渀 渀 礀䘀 愀 挀 攀 戀 漀 漀 欀 㨀 䬀 攀 爀 攀 渀 䴀 愀 爀 椀 愀 䈀 攀 瘀 椀 猀 䄀 爀 琀 ⼀ 䄀 爀 琀 愀 琀 匀 攀 瘀 攀 渀眀 眀 眀 ⸀ 愀 爀 琀 漀 昀 欀 攀 爀 攀 渀 戀 攀 瘀 椀 猀 ⸀ 挀 漀 洀㜀 㜀 ㈀ 㔀 㐀 㜀 㠀 㐀


design.....................................Andy DoigLight fantasticI put a bag of doughnuts onthe table in front of neon artistAndy Doig as a gesture ofthanks as he is clearly inundated.He says the demand forneon has gone right up sincehe started in Brighton over 20years ago. I ask if it’s his doing,and he replies, quietly confidently,“I like to think so”.I’m keen to see how the processworks, so Andy, relaxed whenbusy, fires up his ‘blower’ andlights the propane. He takes atube of glass from his stock ofmany colours - “a picture initself” - and heats it over the nakedflame, explaining how neonbegan as a commercial industryin the 20s and had been adoptedby artists by the middle 50s.The hot glass is bent to fit a 2Dtemplate, or 3D object, frommemory, and Andy has justthree seconds before it hardens.At intervals the tube is offeredup to a drawing, soon coveredin scorches, to see if it fits. “Youcreate it all in space,” Andy explains. “It involves yourwhole body… I find that quite therapeutic.”When he shows me how he wraps neon around a pairof animal horns, it makes me think of that fairgroundbuzzer game where you can’t let the hoop touch thewire. He agrees, “You have to work yourself up into asea of concentration”.“Neon is about atmosphere,” says Andy, who, likemany street artists, enjoys seeing his work in unexpectedplaces. “The [installations] I like best are the onesthat swallow you up… it’s notjust a picture right in front ofyou with studio lighting. It totallyencompasses you. It tricksyour brain, tricks your retina.”“[My] most ambitious projectswere the ones I did whenI didn’t know what the hell Iwas doing! I always say a milestonewas the Komedia sign;because of its audacity… I didall that on my own, more orless. And now for me to walkby and see the whole street litup... that’s probably my mostrewarding job.”Brighton is made for peoplelike Andy. “There’s nowherelike Brighton. In that, it’s gotthe commerce and the craziness…you can be a bit crazybecause there’s another crazyperson that will egg you on.”The many passers-by of hisglowing seafront studio arealso an inspiration. “You meetpeople who have workedwith neon; others that havebeen engineers; or others that have had careers andthen retired… I’m really interested in how their livesare panning out. It’s interesting to think that, after 40years of work, some still search for other things tointerest them. I know I’ll be happy doing what I donow. If what I make ends up unsold, it doesn’t matter.You’re still doing what your body’s been happy doingall those years, and that’s important.” Chloë Kingandydoig.com - see website for details of Andy’s forthcomingneon workshopsPhotos by Alex Leith....53....


PRESENTSPOP-UP FLOWERWORKSHOPSLook out for themed events popping upover Brighton or book your own for ahen party or any occasion.We find a venue, you choose a themeand create your own Flower Show.For more information and prices emailkatie@flowershowpresents.comor call 07861730925www.flowershowpresents.comꌀ 㘀 ⸀ 㔀䄀 䐀 䴀 䤀 匀 匀 䤀 伀 一伀 倀 吀 䤀 伀 一 䄀 䰀ꌀ 㔀 䘀 䤀 刀 䤀 一 䜀䘀 䔀 䔀㜀 㠀 㜀 㐀 ㈀㈀ 㔀 㤀 㐀 㘀 ∠ 挀 攀 爀 愀 洀 椀 挀 猀 䀀 昀 椀 渀 漀 氀 愀 洀 愀 礀 渀 愀 爀 搀 ⸀ 挀 漀 洀眀 眀 眀 ⸀ 昀 椀 渀 漀 氀 愀 洀 愀 礀 渀 愀 爀 搀 ⸀ 挀 漀 洀


ighton maker................................Coco SatoOrigami: the art of polypropylene foldingWhy did you decide to transformyour origami into lamps?What I’m trying to do is reinventclassic origami in uniquelymodern ways. I like what I maketo be not only beautiful but alsofunctional. It might be becauseI live in such a small apartment,I can’t have things just to lookpretty, they have to do somethingas well. I get distracted by clutter.How closely does the makingprocess resemble traditionalorigami? The process is almostthe same, but I use a laser cutterto score the edges, because theplastic doesn’t fold like paper. Imade the first ones using paper,but there was an incident at afestival… there’s so much rain inEngland that the paper origami absorbed the moistureand collapsed, so I started making them usingpolypropylene.What is ‘Roborigami’? The origami creatureslook just like my giant origami lamps, but theyrespond to sound and they can talk back to you –not in words, but with noises. It naturally came tome: I loved the origami I had made but I thought itwas so static and plain, I wanted to add human-likecharacteristics and hoped that it would encouragepeople to start a conversation. I’m running workshopswith MakerClub (pg 83) to enable childrento experiment with the simple technologies I use tomake Roborigami. By learning the techniques, theycan go on to make their own origami robots.Why did you want to combine origami withtechnology? By making the look of the robotspretty and colourful, I hoped tomake the technology more accessibleto those who otherwisewould not have an interest in it,especially girls. Technology actuallyisn’t scary or complicated andthey can learn how to use it in away that will improve whateverthey want to do.Do you think origami couldbecome popular in England?I think it already is? I see iteverywhere. As an art form it’svery simple – you just need a pieceof paper – and it’s a great way toexperiment with colour. Colour isa very emotional thing: it can besoothing, uplifting, inspiring, or itcan be simply pretty.What age group does it appealto? I get a response from very young people toolder people – it can appeal to any generation inthe way it’s presented. In Japan, origami is generallyfor kids. It’s something you’d do with familyand friends, until you become a teenager andthink, ‘oh, it looks childish’. What I’m trying todo is redefine the stereotypical image of origamiwith a contemporary twist. There is a free tutorialon my website where you can learn to make thelittle pieces which make up the wall art. You don’tneed any equipment, just paper and your hands,although I recommend you use folding bones tostop your fingers getting sore. I sometimes use acutlery knife which works just as well. Interview byRebecca Cunninghamcocosato.co.uk. Coco will be speaking at the PechaKucha night on 3rd September. See page 23.....55....


literature.........................................John Gordon‘Sexuality isn’t a choice; but to act boldly on it is’John Gordon is the outspoken author of six novelson black gay life. He is also one of the drivingforces behind Team Angelica, a multi-talentedsquad that will try anything, from staging danceshows to publishing books. Gordon script-editedtwo seasons of the world’s first black gay TVshow, Noah’s Arc, and wrote the script for the 2010spin-off movie Jumping the Broom. His short filmSouljah, won the prestigious Soho Rushes BestFilm award in 2007.Your interest in black culture started in yourteens. As a white person from a wealthywhite suburb, why did you find it so alluring?Growing up in the suburbs, I felt that real life waselsewhere – as Quentin Crisp said, ‘a landscape ina state of pause without the least hint of expectancy’.Black culture became my elsewhere. I’vealways related to reality through books and I wasinstinctively unorthodox and anti-establishment.I was drawn to voices and subjects I wasn’t beingtold about. At that time – the late 70s and early80s – many writings from black American radicalswere out of print, so I would search out crumblingmass-market 60s paperbacks in second-handbookshops. Each writer and activist I discoveredcontained connections to another – JamesBaldwin to Amiri Baraka, Malcolm X to StokelyCarmichael, and so on. I found all of it incrediblyexciting. Profoundly erotic, almost. Theiropinions constructed my understanding of howsociety works. Black Power and Black Nationalistdiscourses became the first way I framed thinkingabout being a gay man in the world.Tell me about your experience of growing upas a gay young adult. Pretty much a nullity ofdistant longing, and that common feeling of beingwholly alone. I went to a private school, whichcertainly wasn’t the hotbed of homo sex people oftenimagine – though when I think back on it nowI can see undercurrents I didn’t see then. I hatedschool: it gave me a life-long sympathy for prisoners,and I became fascinated by African-Americanprison activists like George Jackson, GeronimoPratt and Angela Davis.Do you think the legal recognition of gay partnershipshas altered Britain’s perception of gaycouples? For the better, though it’s hard to sayhow much. The fact that gay partnerships are nowvalidated by the state is a transformative event thatshould improve people’s attitudes over time. Whenmy parents got married, homosexuality was stillillegal in the UK. Once a whole generation recognizesmarriage equality, a certain level of bullshitwill disappear. People feel threatened by anyonewho makes different choices from themselves (notthat sexuality is a choice; but to act boldly on itis). They fear that it somehow invalidates theirown choices. To give an old-fashioned example: ifI don’t bother to get married, your own burningneed to get married might seem less valid, necessaryand humanly central. You may become angryand upset. Feminism has the same effect.Your work takes a constant look at the interplaybetween race and sexuality. Why is thisexploration so important to you? I only reallyunderstand the one in terms of the other, so to methey’re not really separable. My significant romanticrelationships have all been with black partners,and those partners have all been male. That’s whatromantic love is for me. I believe race is a foun-....56....


literature..........................................dational element in emotionaland sexual same-gender-lovinginteractions.Your partnership with RikkiBeadle-Blair (Team Angelica’screative director) has beenfruitful and supportive. Howdid the two of you meet? Wemet about 27 years ago, when Icame to see a friend’s girlfriendin Wild at Heart, a musical Rikkiwrote, directed and starred in,at the Riverside Studios in London.On the closing night, Rikkibroke his foot mid-show (duringa dance-routine on the bonnetof a Thunderbird). Being atrooper, he kept dancing tillthe curtain came down and thebows were done. We got talkingafterwards, as he sat with a bagof frozen peas on his swellingfoot. Rikki was the first personto read the manuscript of myfirst novel, Black Butterflies.Would you say Rikki helpedyou discover the writing styleyou are known for today?Black Butterflies has a somewhatliterary style influenced byFaulkner and Baldwin. Whenhe read it, Rikki asked me if Ithought the sort of people itwas about (black working-classfolks) would find it particularlyreadable. I lied and said, ‘Yes’,as it was then the only style Icould write in. But the thoughtreverberated with me, and I’veworked my way towards a writingstyle that is muscular, directand stripped of any allusionsever since.What’s the most extremestreet-level writing you haveproduced so far? ProbablyYemi & Femi’s Fun Night Out,my latest venture. It’s a graphicnovella about two black gayLondon youths, sex, romanceand worries about HIV. Usingtheir voices, all the debates andwrangles about safe-sex issuesbecome vivid and funny. BMJohn Gordon will appear at Pridereading from his anthology Blackand Gay in the UK on Saturday1st August in Preston Park. Emailrachel.whitbread@brighton-hove.gov.uk for more information.....57....


Wedding FairSunday 20th September11am-3pm Free entryLong Furlong Barn is delighted to announce theywill be hosting a wedding fair.Come along to meet with a range of suppliersand get inspiration for your special day.Sunday 20th September11am-3pm Free entryCall us: 01903 871594Email us: enquiries@longfurlongbarn.co.ukVisit us: www.LongFurlongbarn.co.ukFind us: Clapham | Worthing | West sussex | Bn13 3xnFREENARRATIVE WORKSHOPSat the Brighton Health and Wellbeing CentreThe BHWC on Western Road is one of the first NHS GP surgeries in the country tointegrate alternative therapists within the practice, as well as offering a HealingArts programme.Narrative Workshops involve writing exercises, reading and group discussions,encouraging self-reflection and personal development. Describing events, thoughtsand feelings can have a surprising effect on your wellbeing. The physical act ofwriting acts on the mind like meditation. Your breathing slows down and words flowfreely from your head. Writing can relieve stress and boost your immune system,helping you cope with illness, trauma, addiction, depression or anxiety.NEW TERM STARTS 15th OCTOBER 2015 • Thursdays 10am-12pmLed by authors Imogen Lycett Green and Barbara Doherty at BHWCCall 07702 036735 or email barbara@blackmustard.co.uk for more informationBrighton Health and Wellbeing CentreAn integrated NHS GP Practice and Healing Arts CentreWinner ‘Innovators of the Year’ General Practice Awards 2014www.brightonhealthandwellbeingcentre.co.ukwww.blackmustard.co.uk


flash fact..........................................HolidayBy Andy PlayerI’ve only been to Ibiza once. I was twelve yearsold and spent a couple of hours in the airportwith my mum and my sister.We’d woken up in Mallorca, the final morningof what had been a fabulous holiday of snorkelling,water-skiing and messing around with newfriends I’d never see again.With suitcases packed, me and my dad went tofind a taxi. Usually a mild-mannered man, mydad always got nervous and tetchy on the wayhome from a holiday. And that meant we’d headoff to the airport ridiculously early.In those days the taxi was probably an oldbanger, double my age with dodgy suspensionand squeaky brakes. Nevertheless, the tripthrough coastal resorts and the city was one lastchance to soak up the Mediterranean sights,sounds and smells.Already a simmering pressure cooker of emotions,my dad exploded at the check-in desk. Therest of the airport must have heard him. Theproblem was that our plane was over-bookedand we’d have to wait nearly twelve hours for anight flight.After an embarrassingly long and loud exchange,a compromise was reached. My dad was offereda seat on the original flight and the rest of us -me, my sister and my mum - would fly to Ibizaand then to the UK via Barcelona.Pretty much everyone in the terminal was followingwhat was going on and when my dad returnedto where we were sitting, we became partof the drama too. Whether our fellow travellersfelt pity for us or not, I don’t know. But once mydad had left, the airline staff couldn’t do enoughto make our journey luxurious.First we ate a memorable meal, on the house, inthe posh airport restaurant. My mum had Chateaubriand.Arriving in Ibiza, we were whiskedthrough to the air-conditioned first-class lounge.And our scheduled flight back to London wascertainly a cut above the usual tourist fare.We’d really enjoyed our adventure and as weapproached home in our taxi, we felt pamperedand relaxed.Of course, when we walked through the door,we didn’t let on what an excellent day we’d had.It was important to my dad that we’d all had amiserable time. He always enjoyed a good moanto round off a holiday, so that year truly hit thespot.This is the last in the series of readers’ short storiesfor the time being. Big thanks to Barbara andImogen of Black Mustard for organising it.Illustration by Lucy Williams....59....


talking shop................................Hobgoblin MusicFrom guitars to guzhengsWhat type of instruments do you stock? We arefolk and acoustic music specialists. Our USP is thatwe stock instruments you won’t find anywhere else.We stock numerous dulcimers, which I doubt you’llfind in any other shops in Brighton, alongside thebanjos, ukuleles and mandolins. When the ownerstarted the company 40 years ago, his idea was todevelop a folk supermarket. Ten years ago, you’dhave been hard pushed to find a ukulele in a guitarshop, so we’ve had a big head start. We’ve been doingcountry since way before it was cool.What’s your favourite instrument? The guzheng.It’s a Chinese harp, like a log with trestle bridges. Ican’t play it for anything. It sounds just like sunriseon every kung fu movie but because it’s tuned to thescale D major pentatonic, you can very easily playVoodoo Child on it.How has the shop had to adapt over the years?Music is not what it was ten years ago; it’s fractured.When I started selling guitars in a little shopin Durham, my only knowledge came from otherguitar shops and from reading Guitarist magazine.I used to buy a record by a band, recommendedby another band that I liked, and that was how Ilearnt. Now, with the internet, no one is ignorantunless they choose to be. Now people can write analbum and get it to the people who want to hear it,without going near anyone who wants to make anymoney out of it. That’s why all the record labelshave crashed; now there are only three music labels,like there are only three car manufacturers.Has this change been positive or negative foryour business? I think the challenges are findinga way to reach your market. With the advent ofthe internet, most guitar shops have closed, but theones that closed are the ones that had their eyesclosed. We’ve embraced it and done our best to beopen to it: that’s why we give information resourcesaway for free, and that’s why our customer service isso important. Otherwise those people will go away,buy a latte and order something off Amazon withtheir smartphone.Who are your customers? The six-year-old kidbuying their first guitar, to the 66-year-old womanwho’s always wanted to try the accordion, andeveryone in between. A large number of peoplebuy their first instrument from us and we want tosupport all of those people to the best of our abilities.It’s quite a modern approach from one pointof view, but it’s just carrying on the folk tradition.Otherwise they will just buy something online andstruggle along on their own, and eventually therewill be no specialists left.Rebecca Cunningham interviewed Mike Ross108 Queens Road, 01273 760022, hobgoblin.com....61....


the way we workThis month, Adam Bronkhorst met some of our city’s most glamorous drag artists,in full make-up and costume (minus the shoes). But what about whenthey’re not on stage? We asked each of them:What do you wear when you’re doing the housework?www.adambronkhorst.com | 07879 401 333Lola Lasagne, @MissLolaLasagne“I have a cleaner – what queen doesn’t?”....63....


the way we workCrystal Lubrikunt, @CrystaLubrikunt, facebook.com/CrystaLubrikunt“I don’t do housework.”....64....


the way we workMister Joe Black, @misterjoeblack, misterjoeblack.com“A lovely gold and black silk kimono and a turban, of course!”....65....


THEATRE | COMEDY | CABARETNOW OPENUPSTAIRS AT THE29 – 30 Surrey St, BN1 3PA01273 329 086 | www.thenightingaleroom.co.uk/TheNightingaleRoomBN1 | @NightingaleBN1


the way we workDavina Sparkle, @DavinaSparkle, davinasparkle.com“I don’t do housework.”....67....


the way we workStephanie Von Clitz, @VonClitz“Glittery gloves and sequined hotpants.”....69....


Food & Drink directoryRaise BakeryOur well-established, family-run bakery has opened its first shop offeringa wide range of sweet treats, breads, lunches, coffees, breakfast options,smoothies and milkshakes. Everything in store is handmade in Sussex witha modern British/American style. We also stock a range of baking suppliesfor the avid baker. Free Wi-Fi and power points. Join us in our friendly,relaxed environment, open seven days a week.facebook.com/raisebakerytwitter.com/raisebakery100 Church Road, Hove, 01273 778808, raisebakery.comNo.32No.32 has it all andmore in this all-in-onevenue. A restaurant, barand club in the heart ofBrighton, serving freshlymade food and drinkseven days a week. From traditional grills tofashionable burgers to freshly made cocktails.With the sound of great music from local DJsyou can eat, drink and dance at this all-encompassingmodern setting, so come and visit us foran evening to remember!Burgers, grills, bites, platters, sandwiches, salads.Modern & classic cocktails. Craft & draughtbeers. Happy hour Sundays - Fridays 5-7pm.No.32 is a restaurant, bar and exclusive latenight venue in Brighton with regular livemusic and special events.32 Duke Street, 01273 773388, no32dukestreet.com71 East Street, 01273 729051, terreaterre.co.ukTerre à TerreAl fresco diningon the terrace andnow street diningon East Street atweekends availableat Terre à Terre,the local go-to forthe most creativevegetarian food inBrighton and alwaysdelivered with a cheeky little pun! Open sevendays a week offering brunch, lunch and dinneroptions from small plates, sharing tapasto three-course set meals and not forgettingtheir magnificent afternoon-tea menu, multitieredsavoury, sweet and traditional delightsavailable from 3 till 5pm daily, and lots oforganic wines, beers and juices! Summer, trueBrighton style!MARKETOPENING EARLY SEPTEMBERSituated in the heart of Brunswick village, MARKET Restaurant Bar will beall about the very best of Sussex. MARKET is to be a Marketplace; a place forgreat people, for great food and for great drink. MARKET will be a hub, a hiveof activity and the setting for many good times. Sharing is very much a themeof MARKET with a wide variety of Small Plates on offer plusMARKET Classics, Sunday roasts and the weekend Big MARKET Brunch.Sit at one of the many stools at the kitchen bar that overlooks the chefs, take atable or book the upmarket private dining room, ‘DownMARKET’.42 Western Road, 01273823707, market-restaurantbar.co.uk


advertorialBoho Gelato6 Pool Valley, 01273 727205, bohogelato.co.ukRanging from Vanilla to Violet, Mango to Mojito and Appleto Avocado, Boho’s flavours are made daily on the premisesusing locally produced milk and cream and fresh ingredients.24 flavours are available at any time (taken from theirlist of now over 400) and for vegans, Boho Gelato alwaysstock at least five non-dairy flavours. Gelato and sorbetis served in cups or cones or take away boxes.They wererecently included in the Telegraph’s top 10 ice creams in theUK and last summer were featured in Waitrose magazine.bohogelato.co.ukSaint Andrew’s Lane, Lewes, 01273 488600209 High Street, Lewes, 01273 472769Pelham House, LewesA beautiful 16th-century four-star town househotel that has been exquisitely restored to createan elegant venue. With beautiful gardens, astylish restaurant and plenty of private diningand meeting rooms it is the perfect venue forboth small and larger parties.www.pelhamhouse.comFacebook: Pelham.houseTwitter: @pelhamlewesFlint Owl Bakery, LewesOur breads contain Organic stoneground flours,spring water, sea salt and that’s it. No improvers ofany kind. Long fermentations bring characteristicflavours and a natural shelf life.We wholesale our craft breads and viennoiserie inBrighton & Hove and deliver 6 days a week. Formore info contact: info@flintowlbakery.comCome and visit us at our shop/cafe on Lewes HighSt where you can buy our full range of breads,croissants, cakes, salads and enjoy square mile coffeein our courtyard garden.Ten Green BottlesWine shop or bar? Both, actually... wine to take awayor drink in, nibbles and food available. Many winesimported direct from artisan producers. We also offerrelaxed, fun, informal private wine-tasting sessions fromjust two people up to 30 and for any level of wine knowledge - we encourage youto ask questions and set the pace. We also offer tastings in your home or office,and will come to you with everything you’ll need for a fun, informative and evencompetitive evening. The best-value destination for great wine in Brighton!9 Jubilee Street, 01273 567176, tengreenbottles.com


food review...........................................NeighbourhoodAl fresco burger and stinky pig friesWe walk off thenoisy barminess ofSt James Street andinto the calm solaceof Neighbourhood,through the bar areaand down to oneof Brighton’s mostrelaxing al frescospaces, a surprisinglylarge yard withabout ten tables fordiners, laid out between a stuccoed white wall and abamboo thicket.Looking around me, I ask Gertrude and Ursula, today’slunch companions, what country it looks likewe’re in, pointing out a palm tree, and a sycamore.The 30-degree sun beats down. Seagulls cackle upabove. Victorian rooftops loom over. “Brighton,”says Ursula. “Couldn’t be anywhere else.”The girls are both vegetarian, and both have fairCeltic skin, so we find a green garden-style irontable where they can sit in the shade while I takein the full force of the sun. Then we choose pintsfrom the bar – a stout, an Aspall’s cider and anAsahi lager – and diet-appropriate fare from themenu. I go for the standard burger, with Scotchbonnet chilli sauce and relish, and some ‘stinkypig’ fries, which are served with bits of ‘candiedback bacon’ and blue cheese. Gertrude goes for ahalloumi burger, Ursula for a ‘Portobello’ burger,which as far as I can see, consists of a mushroomin a bap. Their chips are ‘Lord of the Fries’ withAmerican cheese, raw onion and a house sauce.Burgers cost £6.50, which seems cheap; the friesare £4.50, which seems dear.The place is full, but not packed. It’s maybe too hotfor many peopleto consider alfresco dining. Sohot, that we keeptalking abouthow hot it is. Thefood arrives fairlyquickly, on blackslates, and goesdown even quicker.My burgertastes pleasantlyhome-made (apparently all their burgers are freshlyminced daily) and is given a nice kick by the chilli.It’s not the biggest burger I’ve ever had, but neitheris it the smallest. The burger buns are briochestyle,ie soft and undemanding on the molars. Thechips are more fun than chips normally are. There’sno danger of the other two trying mine out.Ursula, I suspect, is disappointed by the lack of heftin her Portobello burger, but Gertrude is delightedby the Halloumi one. Like many vegetarians sheeats a lot of the stuff, and she says that it’s softerthan normal, that there’s no squeakiness, that itdoesn’t make your teeth feel gritty. It’s covered inbreadcrumbs, which she says is a novelty. There’sa ‘mystery yellow sauce’, which she loves. We talkabout Halloumi for some time, actually: Ursula announcesshe has reached Peak Halloumi she’s eatenso much of the stuff.What do you do on the hottest day of the year,when you’ve had a lunchtime pint and a burger in alovely sunny garden? You have another pint, is theanswer. Which pretty much puts paid to the ideaof getting much work done in the afternoon, butwhatever. Alex Leith101 St James’s St, 01273 673 891....73....


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ecipe..........................................Thai green curry with a side of satayFabio Lauro founded Asian-fusion restaurant Rickshaw Oriental to combinehis two passions: design and food. He gives us an insight into his philosophyand introduces one of the restaurant’s chefs, with a recipe for his favourite dishI love the plating of food, it is such a seductive formof design. I see the restaurant as a ‘house of design’where our guests can be inspired by the detailsand immerse themselves in a culinary experience,inspired by Asian cuisine.We have six chefs who have moved here from Indonesia,Thailand and Japan, as well as a few studentswho come in and learn. Joining our kitchen isn’teasy: even the most experienced of chefs must stepback and leave behind their ego and pride, beforethey can express themselves and interpret theirknowledge through plating. They each bring thethree most important things I look for in a goodchef: a smile, positive vibes and respect.I don’t ask them to follow a recipe gram for gram; Ilike to give our chefs a recipe which they can adapt.People might notice that the dish is a little spicierone day or a little more gingery the next, but that’sok. I don’t want the experience to be like eating at achain restaurant where each dish is exactly the sameevery time you visit.Carlos, one of our chefs, comes from East Timor.This is his interpretation of our Thai green curryrecipe, with a side order of our satay chicken:“First the Thai green curry sauce: cook the onion- white onion - in the frying pan in vegetable oil.After three minutes, it’s done. Add a scoop of Thaigreen curry paste. Mine is made with green chillies,lemongrass, garlic, salt, galangal and shrimp paste.After two or three minutes, put in fresh coconutmilk and season with sugar, salt and chicken bouillon.The next ingredient is fig sauce. To make thisI cook together white onion, lemongrass, ginger,red chilli and fresh figs, and then blend it. I onlyadd about half a scoop to the Thai green curry, andthen half a scoop of soy sauce. Put in a teaspoon ofChinese five spice and half a scoop of white sugar.To make the curry, put vegetable cooking oil intothe wok. I use green beans, carrots, courgettes andred and yellow peppers. Put the vegetables into theoil, with small pieces of cooked chicken, and fry formaybe two minutes. Pour out the oil and add theThai green curry sauce, about two scoops for oneperson. Then cook it on a very high heat for about50 seconds. I serve the Thai green curry up withplain rice.One of my favourite things to eat is the chickensatay. To make the marinade I use shallot, garlic,groundnut (peanut), turmeric powder, lemon juice,one teaspoon of chicken bouillon, salt and corianderseed. Blend together – it’s best not to cook first, justblend – and use it to marinade chicken breast cutinto small pieces. Sometimes I marinade for onehour or two hours. After, I put the chicken onto theskewers and cook in a hot oven for three minutes.When it’s ready to serve, grill it on a very hot grillfor three minutes. To make a peanut sauce, blendthe peanuts. Cook red curry paste in the pan withvegetable cooking oil and add coconut milk. Whenthe coconut is boiling, put the peanuts in, then afterthat, some lemongrass and lime leaf, and cook forone and a half hours. Normally as a starter I givethree skewers and as a main course I give five, witha scoop of peanut sauce and a drizzle of soy sauce.”RC, photo by Lisa Devlin, cakefordinner.co.uk36 Ship Street, rickshaw-oriental.com....75....


food...........................................Pavilion Tea RoomCream tea, Regency stylePhoto by Alex LeithUnfortunately it’s raining when we visit thePavilion to try out the Pavilion Tea Rooms, andmuch as we beg the charismatic manager there, hestands firm that it’s not a good idea to sup tea andeat scones al fresco in a cloud of drizzle. “Everyonewill want to go,” he says. “I’ve got to think of thecarpets downstairs.”No worries; we approach a counter which is heavingwith cakes and other sweet-tooth delicacies andchoose from the ample menu: two of us go for thecream tea, the other for a Bakewell Tart.The tea arrives in ornate cast-iron pots, the cakes ona three-tiered tray contraption that screams ‘specialoccasion’, and (the following verb seems particularlyapt in this case) we tuck in. Yum. The large sconesare freshly home-made, there’s plenty of clottedcream, and the jam comes in little pots. There followsthe inevitable discussion about jam or creamfirst: I favour the latter option, damn me if you will.There’s an amiable decadence about the ritual ofcrafting every bite with a silver knife, and washing itdown with tea kept hot in a period pot.You have to pay to visit the Pavilion to visit its tearooms, which, the Pavilion being the Pavilion, isno bad thing. I get the chance to go again the following(sunny) day to take the photo you can seeabove. On this occasion I do sit outside, and repeatthe process again, with a much better view, idlywondering whether to buy myself an annual membership,so I can make this a monthly treat. AL....76....


伀 瀀 攀 渀 㜀 搀 愀 礀 猀 愀 眀 攀 攀 欀㈀ 瀀 洀 琀 漀 ⸀アパート 瀀 洀吀 漀 戀 漀 漀 欀 瀀 氀 攀 愀 猀 攀 挀 愀 氀 氀㈀ 㜀 アパート ㈀ 㜀 㐀 㐀 㐀㔀 ☀ ㈀ 䈀 爀 椀 最 栀 琀 漀 渀 匀 焀 甀 愀 爀 攀 Ⰰ䈀 爀 椀 最 栀 琀 漀 渀 Ⰰ 䈀 一 䠀 䐀眀 眀 眀 ⸀ 猀 琀 爀 攀 攀 琀 琀 栀 愀 椀 ⸀ 挀 漀 ⸀ 甀 欀匀 瀀 攀 挀 椀 愀 氀㈀ⴀ 挀 漀 甀 爀 猀 攀 洀 攀 渀 甀ꌀ 㤀 ⸀ 㤀 㔀アパートⴀ 挀 漀 甀 爀 猀 攀 洀 攀 渀 甀ꌀ⸀ 㤀 㔀⠀ 渀 漀 琀 愀 瘀 愀 椀 氀 愀 戀 氀 攀 匀 愀 琀 甀 爀 搀 愀 礀 ⤀ ─ 搀 椀 猀 挀 漀 甀 渀 琀 椀 昀 礀 漀 甀 洀 攀 渀 琀 椀 漀 渀 嘀 椀 瘀 愀 䈀 爀 椀 最 栀 琀 漀 渀 洀 愀 最 愀 稀 椀 渀 攀


䈀 唀 夀 伀 一 䔀 䌀 伀 䌀 䬀 吀 䄀 䤀 䰀䜀 䔀 吀 伀 一 䔀 䘀 刀 䔀 䔀圀 䤀 吀 䠀 吀 䠀 䤀 匀 嘀 伀 唀 䌀 䠀 䔀 刀⨀ 一 攀 眀 挀 甀 琀 漀 洀 攀 爀 猀 漀 渀 氀 礀 ⸀ 倀 氀 攀 愀 猀 攀 焀 甀 漀 琀 攀 ᠠ 嘀 䤀 䈀 ᤠ....78....


food news...........................................Edible Updateswww.hastingsfestivals.comThe promisedregeneration ofthe London Roadarea continues,with two newrestaurant openingsthis month.Señor Buddha will offer an ever-changing menuof tapas-style dishes, crafted in the restaurant’sopen kitchen, with a heavy East Asian influence.Lee, the man behind the concept, says “I wantedto push the boundaries using some of the triedand-testedSpanish classics, but with East Asianflavours. These cuisines both rely heavily onfresh ingredients and big, contrasting flavours,meaning they effortlessly complement eachother when fused together.” Expect mountainmutton stew along with confit duck leg withspring onion puree, sherry & hoisin poachedplum, octopus tentacles with squid ink caviarand coriander aioli, with a beautifully curatedwine list from their in-house sommelier.The area is also being treated to a properlyauthentic pizzeria: Fatto a Mano. The restaurantwill have Naples-born pizzaiolo Andrea Basilicata,formerly of The Hearth, and Franco Mancaat the helm, so think wood-fired, hand-stretchedpizzas made from 18-hour double-rise dough - atraditional Neapolitan recipe using importedcaputo flour, San Marzano tomato sauce andmozzarella fior di latte. Kids under ten will geta free pizza, meaning more money for thirstyadults to spend on wine. With a great drinksmenu and outdoor seating, it sounds just like alittle slice of Italy. Antonia Phillips @PigeonPRMohammed - Spice of LifeFresh, home-cooked Bangladeshi and Goan speciality dishesmohammedspiceooife.co.ukUnit 19, e Open Market07985176812• Daily lunchbox specials.• Served hot and ready to eat or‘take and heat’ chilled / frozen.• Healthy cooking lessons.• Freshly mixed spices, Banglasnacks, sweets and desserts.• Ethnic groceries and spices.From 11am - 6pm music until 7pmStade Open Space, Hastings Old TownA feast of food, drink and musicwith special guest celebrity chef,Jean Christophe NovelliSaturday 19 & Sunday 20September 2015Tickets also available for Friday’s Super SkaNight & The Liane Carroll Jazz Breakfaston Sunday from the Tourist Information CentreAdmission bywristband:£1 in advance,£2 on the dayexceptassistdogs


a cuppa with...................................Chris RiddellChildren’s LaureateThere’s a note by the front door reading‘DOORBELL NOT WORKING PLEASEKNOCK’ and from the elegant, spindly, Gothicnature of the handwriting, I know I’ve come tothe right place. I do knock, and within seconds akindly-looking, grey-haired, middle-aged man isbeckoning me inside. This is Chris Riddell, thetremendously successful children’s book illustratorand author, long-term political cartoonist forthe Observer, and, as of May this year, Children’sLaureate.He leads me to a large table in the garden, andoffs to make tea. It’s a big garden. There looksto be a secret bit at the back. This idyllic scene isBrightonised by the cawing of seagulls above.I soon learn that Chris is a man of words, as wellas pictures, and with the aid of a few questionsand prompts on my part, thousands and thousandsof them, phrased in a gentle, mellifluousvoice, tumble out of him.We start on his love for Brighton, where hestudied illustration (under the tutelage ofRaymond Briggs), where he and his wife Jomoved to, and had kids, after a decade or soof early-adult London life, and where, I sense,he will always be based: “every time I go to dosomething in London,” he says, “and I comeback to Brighton, I feel my spirits lift. I think‘I’m going to the seaside.’”Sometimes the obvious question is the best oneto get going with, so I ask him how he jugglescreating sharp political satire with his mainstay,the illustration, and often also the writing, ofchildren’s picture books. He has worked onseveral best-selling series such as Goth Girl,The Edge, and Ottoline, as well as a number ofwell-loved one-offs, the latest of which, TheSleeper and the Spindle, I have brought for himto sign. It’s a magnificent Gothic folly of a book,a ‘retwisting’ of the Sleeping Beauty fairy tale,written by Neil Gaiman and lavishly illustratedby Chris.Stylistically, it seems, there is little difference.“I don’t become suddenly spiky and fling inkaround when I’m doing a political cartoon,” hesays. “I think David Cameron could walk intoa [children’s] picture book. I’m not quite surewhat he’d do there, but he wouldn’t change.”Then he gets onto metaphor, which oozes outof all his work. “Reading a picture is a subtlething and there are all sorts of ways somethingcan mean one thing or another. Or it can meantwo things at once. And I think that’s somethingI’m constantly playing with in both fields.”Thus, in the Observer, he’s recently been usingclassical Greek figures - Achilles, Sisyphus, theMinotaur – to illustrate the economic crisis inGreece; The Sleeper and the Spindle hinges on abeautifully illustrated double-page spread of twobeautiful women kissing. Did he intend Sapphicundertones? “It could be anything. I mean that’swhat I like about it… It didn’t seem prurientbecause it was serving the story [and] giving asubtext, but at the same time there was an innocenceabout it.”On to his Children’s Laureateship, which hesees as both a huge honour and a huge responsibility.“Rather than just self-evidently wanderaround being eminent,” he says, “I’ve got toactually get out there and demonstrate why on....80....


a pint with.................................earth there is such a thing as a Children’s Laureate,and the way I want to do that is to palpablydemonstrate what it is a children’s illustrator does,and why illustration and particularly children’sillustration is important.”In a nutshell, this involves actively encouragingchildren (and their parents) to draw more, and toread more. Of the former: “[I want to] promulgatethat drawing is an activity, not an end result.Drawing as a verb and not a noun, as it were.Forget the [physical] drawing itself, but draw.” Asfar as reading is concerned, he is determined topromote school libraries, and if a school doesn’thave this facility, to encourage them to create one:“children really respond to the notion of readingfor pleasure… it’s where readers begin, and as awriter and illustrator, I need readers. You know,when readers disappear, my job disappears.”We talk about many things: his peripateticchildhood, down to his vicar father’s propensityfor upping sticks and moving to a new parish inlocations as diverse as the Cotswolds and Brixton;his fondness of inserting in-jokes and flights offancy into his work, and how he doesn’t mind ifthese fly over the head of his reader; his love ofgraphic novels, and his ambition, one day, to writeone. At a certain point we move into the secret bitof the garden, where Chris shows me an outhousethat he has converted into a Spartan studio wherehe spends most of his days. There I throw himthe (multi) million dollar question: has the filmindustry ever come calling?He reveals that a studio is currently considering‘Hollywoodising’ The Sleeper and the Spindle,though from previous experience with filmexecutives, he isn’t holding his breath. “I’m not ontenterhooks about this one,” he says. “What willbe will be. I’m having a nice time at the end of mygarden, and going out on great Laureate business.Hollywood can look after itself.” Alex Leith....81....


You can fosterif you aresingle or in arelationship;if you ownor rent yourhome.fosteringrecruitment@brighton-hove.gov.ukwww.fosteringinbrightonandhove.org.ukPlease contact Brighton & Hovefostering on 01273 295444Find us on:Brighton & Hove City Councilare actively recruiting foster carersfrom our LGBT communities.Our current LGBT foster carers and adopters have helped totransform many children’s lives and we are keen to build ontheir success.You will need a spare room and childcare experience and beable to give children and young people the care and supportthey need to be happy and fulfilled.


maker club...........................................Big Tech SummerMaking technology funTo say that DeclanCassidy of MakerClubis a live-wire would beboth a cliché and anunderstatement. Wemeet in PresumingEd’s on London Road;MakerClub havingmade their home upstairs.He orders freshmint tea and revealsthat he can’t have caffeine. I’m not surprised. Declanis one of those people who vibrate on an entirely differentfrequency to the rest of us (I’m guessing at leastdouble). You can gauge the speed of the ideas in orbitas his fingers trace their trajectories in the air.I quickly establish that he studied Anthropology andPolitics at Sussex, set up and ran the Playgroup FestivalCompany for seven years, and then the hugelypopular and much missed Blind Tiger Club. He sayshe realised that he needed to slow down when hisbeard fell out. Next he joined ranks with Simon Rileywho, with an electronic-engineering backgroundand a passion for unlocking the technological talentsin young people, had already created Carduino (a3D-printed car that can be customized, printed,and controlled via a smartphone). Far from slowingdown, the two of them spent six months in Fusebox24 (a Wired Sussex incubator), then kick-started andcrowd-funded their way to MakerClub with just£4,500. They’ve created a space worthy of the maddestprofessor: equipped with computers, 3D printersand all the kit they need to teach kids programming,product design, electronics and engineering.We meet as they are putting together the finalpreparations for Big Tech Summer – a series of 60workshops for kids aged six plus. Spread over sixweeks, and taught bytheir tech-savvy teamand industry professionals,the packedschedule includesRoborigami (see page55), 3D printing andprogramming robots,videogame design, codingLego robots, realworldMinecraft andmuch more besides. There’s plenty of analogue funtoo – lots of cardboard, sticky tape and playdough.Although, naturally, the playdough – by some supersalty and sugary trickery – is rendered conductive,creating ‘squishy circuits’.I voice my concern that the neighbourhoods of thefuture will be all grey blocks, square trees and cuboidpigs but Declan informs me that the UN have beenusing Minecraft in city planning for ages and that arecent re-imagining of London Road was assistedby local kids using the game. With young peopleincreasingly consuming their world through technology,MakerClub is on a mission to ensure that theyknow how to control it whilst having as much fun aspossible. They do this by working jointly on creativeprojects and learning computational thinking – somethingdifficult to fit into a rigid school curriculum –combining art, coding, electronics, design technologyand teamwork. “These kids are the big dreamers andthey are going to change the world.” Declan muses.“We want them to have the skills and opportunitiesto do it.” There are some courses for adults on thetimetable but I leave wishing I was ten years old andthat my parents would drop me off at MakerClub andpick me up six weeks later. Lizzie Lowermakerclub.org / 01273 915133....83....


the lowdown on..............................................LGBT adoptionParents and children brought togetherI started working for PACT after adopting achild myself. I’d talked about adoption with mypartner, in the abstract, for some time, withoutrealising quite how possible it was. Then we metanother gay couple who’d adopted a child, anddecided to go for it ourselves. We finally adoptedour son, now five, in August 2013.PACT is one of the UK’s largest voluntaryadoption agencies, with offices in Reading, Oxford,London, and, most recently Brighton. TheBrighton office, which opened up in September2014, specialises in LGBT adoption. PACT alsooffers long-term fostering and our unique fosterto-adoptservice Dual Approval.There are many different stages to adoptinga child. It’s a tighter process than when we didit, which took 12 months: nowadays, if they getthrough all the steps, couples or single parents can beready to adopt within six months of contacting us.The first stage is a simple enquiry, in whichwould-be adopters find out about the process anddecide whether to start their journey. Then there isan interview with us, after which PACTruns checks and gets references onthe potential parents, whilst theapplicants do background reading.After that we move into StageTwo, where the adopters andsocial workers work togetherto ready themselves forthe adoption panel, wherethe prospective parents areapproved to adopt. Somepeople can find this quiteinvasive: but it’s all for thepurpose of building yourfamily. I thought of it as free therapy!Once adopters have been approved it’s a questionof finding the right match for both thechild and parent. One benefit of choosing PACTover a local authority adoption service is thatwe have a nationwide operation, which providesmore potential matches, and alleviates potentialproblems from having the birth family in the samelocal district. PACT also offers award winning specialistsupport and therapeutic services if needed.With heterosexual couples, adoption can be athird choice after trying naturally, and fertilitytreatment. With LGBT adopters, although thereare other options, it is generally the first choice,which can be beneficial in many ways.We’ve never had any problems in our localcommunity with being same-sex parents; infact we feel we’ve been more accepted since wehad our child. We’ve been very open to talking toour child about the fact that he has two fathers,and we have made sure that there are strong femalerole models in his life: my mother, my sisterand his foster mother all playing very supportiveroles. We know that the outcome forchildren in LGBT families is just as positiveas those placed in heterosexual families.Whilst our family is different from thenorm, our son has it all figured out. OnMother’s Day he said “I know you’re not mymums, but you are my mums really,” and gaveus both a card! Then we also got one eachon Father’s Day. However, no-one got alie-in…Alex Leith talked to PACT AdopterChampion Team Leader Simon Nuddspactcharity.org....85....


圀 栀 攀 渀 琀 栀 椀 渀 最 猀 愀 爀 攀 琀 漀 甀 最 栀 眀 攀 愀 氀 氀 渀 攀 攀 搀 愀 昀 爀 椀 攀 渀 搀 ⸀⸀⸀䘀 甀 渀 椀 渀 䄀 挀 挀 漀 渀 昀 漀 爀 䌀 栀 椀 氀 搀 爀 攀 渀 Ⰰ 愀 䈀 爀 椀 最 栀 琀 漀 渀 挀 栀 愀 爀 椀 琀 礀 Ⰰ 椀 猀 氀 漀 漀 欀 椀 渀 最 昀 漀 爀愀 搀 甀 氀 琀 瘀 漀 氀 甀 渀 琀 攀 攀 爀 猀 愀 最 攀 搀 ㈀アパート⬀ 琀 漀 戀 攀 昀 爀 椀 攀 渀 搀 猀 挀 栀 漀 漀 氀 愀 最 攀 搀挀 栀 椀 氀 搀 爀 攀 渀 昀 爀 漀 洀 搀 椀 猀 愀 搀 瘀 愀 渀 琀 愀 最 攀 搀 氀 漀 渀 攀 瀀 愀 爀 攀 渀 琀 昀 愀 洀 椀 氀 椀 攀 猀 ⸀ 圀 攀眀 愀 渀 琀 琀 漀 栀 攀 愀 爀 昀 爀 漀 洀 洀 愀 琀 甀 爀 攀 Ⰰ 琀 爀 甀 猀 琀 眀 漀 爀 琀 栀 礀 愀 渀 搀 爀 攀 氀 椀 愀 戀 氀 攀 愀 搀 甀 氀 琀 猀眀 栀 漀 挀 愀 渀 爀 攀 最 甀 氀 愀 爀 氀 礀 猀 瀀 攀 渀 搀 アパートⴀ 㐀 栀 漀 甀 爀 猀 愀 眀 攀 攀 欀 眀 椀 琀 栀 愀 挀 栀 椀 氀 搀漀 瘀 攀 爀 愀 渀 攀 砀 琀 攀 渀 搀 攀 搀 瀀 攀 爀 椀 漀 搀 ⸀ 圀 攀 渀 攀 攀 搀 瀀 攀 漀 瀀 氀 攀 眀 栀 漀 挀 愀 爀 攀愀 戀 漀 甀 琀 挀 栀 椀 氀 搀 爀 攀 渀 ᤠ 猀 眀 攀 氀 氀 ⴀ 戀 攀 椀 渀 最 愀 渀 搀 眀 栀 漀 愀 爀 攀 眀 椀 氀 氀 椀 渀 最 琀 漀 眀 漀 爀 欀 椀 渀瀀 愀 爀 琀 渀 攀 爀 猀 栀 椀 瀀 眀 椀 琀 栀 瀀 愀 爀 攀 渀 琀 猀 愀 渀 搀 挀 栀 愀 爀 椀 琀 礀 猀 琀 愀 û 琀 漀 椀 洀 瀀 爀 漀 瘀 攀礀 漀 甀 渀 最 氀 椀 瘀 攀 猀 ⸀∠ 渀 漀 攀 砀 瀀 攀 爀 椀 攀 渀 挀 攀 渀 攀 挀 攀 猀 猀 愀 爀 礀 Ⰰ 昀 甀 氀 氀 琀 爀 愀 椀 渀 椀 渀 最 最 椀 瘀 攀 渀∠ 漀 渀 ⴀ 最 漀 椀 渀 最 猀 甀 瀀 攀 爀 瘀 椀 猀 椀 漀 渀 愀 渀 搀 猀 甀 瀀 瀀 漀 爀 琀 昀 爀 漀 洀 愀 渀攀 砀 瀀 攀 爀 椀 攀 渀 挀 攀 搀 Ⰰ 瀀 爀 漀 昀 攀 猀 猀 椀 漀 渀 愀 氀 琀 攀 愀 洀∠ 椀 渀 琀 攀 渀 猀 椀 瘀 攀 瘀 攀 攀 渀 最 漀 昀 愀 氀 氀 愀 瀀 瀀 氀 椀 挀 愀 渀 琀 猀 椀 渀 挀 氀 甀 搀 椀 渀 最 愀 昀 甀 氀 氀瀀 爀 漀 昀 攀 猀 猀 椀 漀 渀 愀 氀 愀 瀀 瀀 爀 愀 椀 猀 愀 氀 愀 渀 搀 䐀 椀 猀 挀 氀 漀 猀 甀 爀 攀 愀 渀 搀 䈀 愀 爀 爀 椀 渀 最猀 攀 爀 瘀 椀 挀 攀 挀 栀 攀 挀 欀 ⠀ 䐀 䈀 匀 ⤀∠ ㈀ 礀 攀 愀 爀 挀 漀 洀 洀 椀 琀 洀 攀 渀 琀 爀 攀 焀 甀 椀 爀 攀 搀 Ⰰ 瘀 漀 氀 甀 渀 琀 攀 攀 爀 攀 砀 瀀 攀 渀 猀 攀 猀 瀀 愀 椀 搀∠ 攀 渀 焀 甀 椀 爀 椀 攀 猀 昀 爀 漀 洀 瀀 攀 漀 瀀 氀 攀 昀 爀 漀 洀 搀 椀 瘀 攀 爀 猀 攀 戀 愀 挀 欀 最 爀 漀 甀 渀 搀 猀眀 攀 氀 挀 漀 洀 攀 搀䈀 攀 昀 爀 椀 攀 渀 搀 椀 渀 最 瀀 爀 漀 瘀 椀 搀 攀 猀 愀 渀 漀 瀀 瀀 漀 爀 琀 甀 渀 椀 琀 礀 琀 漀 爀 攀 愀 氀 氀 礀 挀 栀 愀 渀 最 攀 愀挀 栀 椀 氀 搀 ᤠ 猀 氀 椀 昀 攀 昀 漀 爀 琀 栀 攀 戀 攀 攀 攀 爀 ⸀ 䤀 昀 礀 漀 甀 愀 爀 攀 氀 漀 漀 欀 椀 渀 最 琀 漀 眀 漀 爀 欀 椀 渀 琀 栀 攀挀 愀 爀 椀 渀 最 瀀 爀 漀 昀 攀 猀 猀 椀 漀 渀 猀 椀 琀 眀 椀 氀 氀 愀 氀 猀 漀 瀀 爀 漀 瘀 椀 搀 攀 瘀 愀 氀 甀 愀 戀 氀 攀 眀 漀 爀 欀攀 砀 瀀 攀 爀 椀 攀 渀 挀 攀 ⸀ 䄀 渀 搀 昀 漀 爀 琀 栀 漀 猀 攀 愀 氀 爀 攀 愀 搀 礀 攀 砀 瀀 攀 爀 椀 攀 渀 挀 攀 搀 眀 椀 琀 栀挀 栀 椀 氀 搀 爀 攀 渀 Ⰰ 戀 攀 昀 爀 椀 攀 渀 搀 椀 渀 最 瀀 爀 攀 猀 攀 渀 琀 猀 愀 渀 椀 搀 攀 愀 氀 漀 瀀 瀀 漀 爀 琀 甀 渀 椀 琀 礀 琀 漀 甀 甀 氀 椀 猀 攀礀 漀 甀 爀 洀 愀 渀 礀 猀 欀 椀 氀 氀 猀 昀 漀 爀 琀 栀 攀 戀 攀 渀 攀 ǻ 琀 漀 昀 礀 漀 甀 爀 氀 漀 挀 愀 氀 挀 漀 洀 洀 甀 渀 椀 琀 礀 ⸀吀 漀 ǻ 渀 搀 漀 甀 琀 洀 漀 爀 攀 挀 愀 氀 氀 ㈀ 㜀 アパート 㔀 㔀 㤀 㜀 㤀 㐀 漀 爀猀 攀 攀 漀 甀 爀 眀 攀 戀 猀 椀 琀 攀 眀 眀 眀 ⸀ 昀 甀 渀 椀 渀 愀 挀 挀 漀 渀 ⸀ 漀 爀 最 ⸀ 甀 欀A sponsored cycle ridethrough stunning Sussexcountryside103km 64km31kmSUNDAY27 SEPT 2015Bentley Wildfowl and Motor MuseumKindly supported by:Shoreham01903 706354www.chestnut-tree-house.org.uk/sussex100Registered Charity Number: 256789


cycling......................................Bikeability‘Cycle training for the 21st century’In some ways Brighton is acyclists’ city. The networkof cycle lanes mean that,if you plan ahead, youcan make a journey fromone side of town to theother without having tospend much time in traffic.When I first startedcycle commuting, frommy home in deepest Hoveto the old Viva office on Ship Street in the centreof Brighton, I did exactly this: straight line to theseafront, along the cycle path and one left turn.This suited me just fine.I was thrown a huge curveball when we relocatedto Isetta Square, just behind Brighton Station.Suddenly my commute involved rush-hour traffic,turns (left and right) and scariest of all, the SevenDials roundabout. Like many cyclists, I’ve nevertaken driving lessons, so I didn’t know about roadsigns, or roundabout etiquette, or which set oftraffic lights applied to which lane of traffic, and abusy road with only a cycling helmet for protectionis a pretty scary place to learn.Luckily, thanks to an initiative run by the council,new cyclists needn’t go through the same experience.Bikeability is similar to the cycling proficiencycourses that a lot of people may have taken aschildren, but it’s also open to adults of all abilities.Funded by the Local Sustainable Transport Fund,the scheme is free to anyone who lives or works inthe selected area of town.I meet Terry Nye, one of the trainers, in PrestonPark to find out what is covered during the threelevels of training. “Level One takes you throughthe basics: starting, stopping, braking, signalling,in a non-traffic environment,”explains Terry, “andLevel Two moves on to basicon-road journeys, includingjunctions, give-ways and priorities,and how to positionyourself on the road.” LevelThree is more advanced,and only open to cyclistsover eleven years of age. “InLevel Three we cover hazardperception, filtering and moving across lanes,roundabouts, bus lanes and traveling on roads withspeed limits above 30mph.”Terry believes that being more assertive on theroad can help you to cycle more safely. “Traditionallythe way cycling was taught was quitesubmissive – hug the kerb, keep out of the way –but this puts you at risk of car doors opening intoyou, and can make you less visible.” Sometimes, heexplains, you need to position yourself in line withthe traffic or give yourself more space, to makesure you can be seen and to allow yourself to seefurther ahead. “The more confident you are ridingaround, the more respect you’ll get from otherroad users.”The rain looks like it will hold off long enoughfor a few laps around the velodrome, which givesme a welcome chance to stretch my legs withoutworrying about any of the hazards we’ve discussed.It also gives a worrying indication of my vintagebike’s braking distance, but fortunately they offerfree bike maintenance courses as well. RCTo find out more about cycle safety training foradults or kids, visit bikeability.org.uk. For bookings,e-mail Emily.Tester@brighton-hove.gov.uk or call01273 293847....87....


We asked a few of our students what they like about theCounselling and Psychotherapy training at The Link Centre...“the training... it’s interactive, thought-provokingand challenging as well as supportive and fun!”“a fabulous learning environment - the tutors are inspiringand the people I have met come from all walks of life,which adds to the richness of the learning experience.”Counselling and Psychotherapy TrainingPart-Time courses in Newick, East Sussexleading to national and international accreditationThis counselling and psychotherapy course provides you withtheoretical understanding, practical skills and personal insight toenable you to practise as a professional with a range of client groups.Each year runs for 10 weekends between October and Julyat our training rooms in lovely surroundings in Newick, East Sussex,which is in easy driving distance from Brighton.Apply now for courses starting in October 2015.Visit our website or contact us for further information.01892 652 487www.thelinkcentre.co.ukemail: leilani@thelinkcentre.co.ukCounselling and Psychotherapy TrainingRelax in the latest state-of-the-art podOcoonA Healing Arts Centre4 energises 4 rejuvinates4 revitalises 4 promotes calm4 increases creativity4 allieviates stressOur new state-of-the-art healing arts centre alsooffers a wide range of natural therapies which include:Allergy Testing | Beauty Therapy | CounsellingHypnotherapy | Massage | PhysiotherapyReflexology | Reconnective Healing | and more!+ Studio for Yoga / Pilates / Creative ArtsOPEN 7 DAYS01273 686882www.cocoonhealthcare.co.uk20-22 GLOUCESTER PLACE, BRIGHTON BN1 4AA


health......................................Ben MurphySpiritual boxerAt the first sign of halfdecentweather, the fitnessbootcamps start to coloniseHove Lawns, with their flags,bibs and calisthenics. Occupyingthe same space, butof another stripe altogether,is Ben Murphy. At 5.30 am,whatever the month, he leadsa session combining yoga,martial arts, meditation andchanting that culminates in a sea swim. Later inthe day, he’ll do more yoga and boxing classes, onthe lawns and at other local venues.“Put that man back in the cage. He should be inchains” was the comment from one of his boxingopponent’s trainers, and you can see his point.Twice coming within a whisper of winning a Britishtitle, and never one to take a backwards step inthe ring, he’s in the permanently built-and-rippedstate desired by most gym-goers. But that’s notwhat any of this is about. Think more the openinglines of Enter The Dragon, when Bruce Lee’s characteris addressed by his teacher: ‘‘I see your talentshave gone beyond the mere physical level. Yourskills are now at the point of spiritual insight.”In 1999, aged 19, Ben was in South Korea, trainingin taekwondo.“Someone gave me the book Surfing The Himalayasby Frederick Lenz, all about a guy who’s a snowboarderwho gets into meditation and spirituality.I learned some meditation techniques, andeverything developed from there. When I cameback to the west, I wanted to be like a martial-artsmonk, and boxing was the only route to take whereI could earn some money. I increasingly came tosee boxing as being a way of accessing somethingdeeper in myself, aninternal power, bringingit from within.”He was given just fourdays’ notice before oneof his title fights.‘I’d met this shamanicguy in Brighton aroundthis time, and I didshamanic journeyingwith him, and that justblew me open. He was way out there, and beforethe fight, me and my trainer walked with him intothe woods near the hotel, and he read a poem andgot my trainer looking at the moon. It was suchdifferent worlds coming together!’Holding yoga and martial arts postures for longperiods is a central plank in this nonduality approach.‘Intention is crucial, but I’m saying let goof your rational mind, kick out your thoughts andfree yourself to go deeper into your body than youever thought possible. The strength, flexibility andbalance will shock you. Your restrictions placedupon yourself by yourself slowly become burnedby the power of your focus and intention.’The sea at 5.30am in midwinter might feel restrictingto most.‘It’s about not fighting it, and bringing somethingfrom within. I stopped telling myself a story abouthow cold it feels, and I focused on my breath. Icame to understand that the energy inside is themost beautiful thing, better than the material stuff,the muscles. I feel all obstacles can be overcomethrough training of this kind.’Andy DarlingBen Murphy, 07824 470 006facebook.com/TigerTempleUK....89....


Exploration begins with E10 yearanniversaryOFFer10% OffALL BIKES*E-asily the best and cheapest E-Bikes in BrightonE-power allows you to do things otherbicycles can’t. The extra speed andacceleration means you can get awayfrom junctions at traffic lights easily, theextra power means you can flatten hills,rediscover peaceful backwaters, andcover distances you’ve only dreamed of.All without tax, insurance, MOT or licence.The ABC of everything EE-bikes from £499 to £3,500E-asily the biggest online retailerE-asily the lowest prices guaranteed.E-asily the most comprehensive range.E-asily delivered and pre-assembled.E-asily the best finance.*On purchases between 15th July and August 15th 2015 ** Terms and conditions apply. Please Quote: EB1615www.e-bikesdirect.co.uk Tel: 01580830959E-bikes Direct Unit 6. Midicy Oast. Bodiam Business Park. Bodiam. E. Sussex TN32 5UP.TM


we try.........................................Electric mountain-bikingGoing uphill fastDo you remember that bit inThe Great Escape where SteveMcQueen is trying to jumphis motorbike over the borderfences to get into Switzerland?Well, for a brief moment oneJuly lunchtime, racing up thegrassy hill towards the woodsin Stanmer Park, I felt just likethat. Only I was pedalling, andon a mountain-bike. An electricmountain-bike. It’s the mostfun I’ve had in ages.I meet Josh from E-bikesDirect half an hour beforethis – he’s taking a break fromdelivering such vehicles round Sussex to give mea lesson in how to use one. He gets two out of theback of his truck, explaining one – the GreenedgeCS2 – is better for beginners, and that’s whatI’m starting on. He’s riding a Haibike Sduro HardsevenSL, and it’s for more advanced riders.We start riding on the roads and muddy tracksnear the Tea Rooms, and I work out how mymachine works. It’s a hub-drive bike, meaning theengine is in the middle of the back wheel. Thebattery, which is about the size and shape of a largeThermos flask, is on the down-tube of the bike. It’sgot gears near the right handlebar, and the powercontrols are on the left. There are three settings,for more or less help, and a thumb control whichmakes the motor run without you even pedalling.This is fun – at times rather like riding a minimoped – and it’s interesting going up hills withoutstraining the leg muscles. We cycle up to thewoods, and ride along a few of the single tracks soPhoto by Josh Malyonpopular among non-electricmountain-bikers, weaving inand out of trees.We stop, and I ask Josh howmuch the bikes cost. Minecomes to £649, he says. Hiscosts £1,849. My next questionis inevitable. Um… canI have a go on yours?The Sduro Hardseven SL isa crank drive model, meaningthe motor, as well as the(significantly larger) batteryis all on the down-tube. Asfar as I can fathom it has nogears, the motor just augmentsthe power of your pedalling, until it reaches15mph, when it becomes all down to you. Thiswon’t do you much good down hills, where thisspeed isn’t difficult to attain. But have you evermanaged 15mph up a hill? I have. And, becausethe motor made no noise, and there was thus noindication of the help I was being given, I felt likesuperman. Or Steve McQueen at least.Electric mountain bikes, I conclude, aren’t fortriathlete types, who want to use their vehiclesto attain super fitness. But the sweat I’ve brokeninto proves, despite all the help I’m getting, thisisn’t cheating, it’s actual exercise, just at a slightlyhigher speed than normal. Afterwards, after Joshdrives off, I get on my traditional old street bike,and cycle back to Brighton, feeling there’s somethingslightly missing.Alex Leithe-bikesdirect.co.uk, 01580 830 959, Unit 6, MidicyOast, Bodiam Business Park, Bodiam, TN32 5UP....91....


*Based on an adult ticket at £465 on our 12 month free direct debit scheme.**On public transport within our extended travel zone.


football......................................The Albion: Behind the scenesLottie Kemp, Brighton & Hove Albion Head ChefI’d argue that football matchescan be won in the players’dining room. We’re really bigon nutrition here, and the playersare getting more and morereceptive to how important it isto their game.The kitchen facilities at theAlbion’s new training groundin Lancing are a dream.There’s a big kitchen in themiddle of the buildings withhatches opening onto two spaciousdining rooms, one for theAcademy players, and one forthe first team squad.I used to work in Michelin Star restaurants,then six years ago I was approached to work at theChelsea FC training ground. I learnt everythingI know from the sports nutritionist there, NickBroad, who has sadly since passed away. He wasan exceptional man, a true professional in his field.Over these now seven years my own experiencehas grown and we now produce this same templateat the Albion’s training ground.This is based on the importance of a balancedmeal consisting of one third protein, one thirdcarbohydrate, and one third fruit and vegetables.There’s no calorie counting here, we try to encouragefull fat in moderation.The players train hard on a nearly daily basis,and need to eat the right balance of carbohydratesfor the session they are undertaking.On a training day myself and my team will behere at 7am to start preparations for breakfastuntil 4 or 5pm, having given the players theirlunch. On match days we also prepare a pre-matchPhoto by Piers Fearickmeal. There are four of us in thekitchen, catering for around 200people, six days a week.The players come in forbreakfast between 8-9.30am.We serve scrambled or poachedeggs, smoked salmon, organicgranola, fresh fruit and ‘supershot’ fruit & veg drinks. Lunchis after training, and the mealsget more complex. Butternutsquash and turkey lasagne.Glazed duck legs, beef steakswith shallots and mushrooms.The first team get a choicebetween fish or two meat dishes;the Academy have one less option. Keeping theiraspirations up, you see?Pre-match meals are eaten three hours beforethe game, and don’t contain anything too spicy.We want a slow release of energy: the same rule ofthirds applies.It’s important that the ingredients we use areall good quality. I source locally where I can: weget our fish from FISH and we’re going to get ourvegetables from Ashurst Organics.None of our players are vegetarian, thoughsome require kosher food or halal meat. We caterfor every player’s needs.We can’t control what the players eat in theevenings, but they’re all willing to learn what’sbest for them. We can give them recipe cards forsnacks; one-on-one nutritional advice; walk themround supermarkets showing them what’s goodand what’s not. They know that if they listen to us,they’re more likely to succeed… and have longercareers. As told to Alex Leith....93....


Summit2015_VIVA ad128x94 AW.indd 1 22/07/2015 15:09㜀 㜀 㠀 㘀 㔀 㔀 㜀 㤀 㤀 㠀䤀 一 䘀 伀 䀀 䈀 伀 䐀 夀 ⴀ 䠀 䄀 倀 倀 夀 ⸀ 䌀 伀 ⸀ 唀 䬀圀 圀 圀 ⸀ 䈀 伀 䐀 夀 ⴀ 䠀 䄀 倀 倀 夀 ⸀ 䌀 伀 ⸀ 唀 䬀倀 䔀 刀 匀 伀 一 䄀 䰀 吀 刀 䄀 䤀 一 䤀 一 䜀 䤀 一 䄀倀 刀 䤀 嘀 䄀 吀 䔀 Ⰰ 䘀 唀 䰀 䰀 夀 ⴀ 䔀 儀 唀 䤀 倀 倀 䔀 䐀匀 吀 唀 䐀 䤀 伀 䤀 一 䌀 䔀 一 吀 刀 䄀 䰀 䠀 伀 嘀 䔀∠ 䘀 刀 䔀 䔀 䤀 一 䤀 吀 䤀 䄀 䰀 䌀 伀 一 匀 唀 䰀 吀 䄀 吀 䤀 伀 一∠ 䠀 䤀 䜀 䠀 䰀 夀 ⴀ 儀 唀 䄀 䰀 䤀 䘀 䤀 䔀 䐀 䄀 一 䐀唀 一 䐀 䔀 刀 匀 吀 䄀 一 䐀 䤀 一 䜀 吀 刀 䄀 䤀 一 䔀 刀 匀Whatever your business story, the Brighton Summit is made for you.You might be starting out as a freelancer. You might be a CEO.It’s a day for anyone with big ideas that deserve to be made real.It’s a business conference you’ll come away from excited andready to work.You’ll be inspired by others’ growth stories and challengedto write your own.Book your ticket,from £75:www.brightonsummit.comTHE BRIGHTON SUMMIT,FRIDAY 16 OCTOBER9 .1 5 AM TO 6 PM, THECLARENDON CENTRESPONSORSDesign by Pario One | www.pario-one.comCopy by Cuninghame Copywritingwww.cuninghamecopywriting.co.uk


trade secrets......................................Detective Inspector Andy HaslamSurrey & Sussex Cyber Crime UnitOnline crime is an industry. It’s organised, it’sabout money and so the threat is persistent. Ourunit is one of the first dedicated teams in theSouth East. We’ve made some big breakthroughsin the six months that we’ve been active and betterunderstand the complexity of these crimes.With the internet, we’re policing a user-spacewhich has been considered benign but it’s likeany real-world neighbourhood. We want peopleto enjoy the space whilst adapting their behaviourto be safe.A business affected by cyber crime just wantsto get back to normal service as soon as possible.We can’t put a cordon around their websiteand call it a crime scene, and so we work withthem to understand how the attack happened,whilst trying to catch the perpetrator.I’m definitely more careful online and moreaware about my own data security. I use significantlystronger passwords. My tip is to thinkof memorable phrase – like a film title - thenre-write it using a jumble of letters, numbers andsymbols. Also run the updates from your softwarecompany when prompted. They’re designed to addressdetected vulnerabilities.Our team is as much about being proactiveas about dealing with the aftermath. We workwith businesses and community groups to educatethem. We’ll be holding a free talk as part of theBrighton Digital Festival where SME’s can comealong to learn how to better protect themselves.My Hotel 1-5pm, 2nd September,visit brightondigitalfestival.co.uk for detailsHello art meetmy friendtechnologyOver 100 events all overBrighton all of September#BDF15brightondigitalfestival.co.uk


icks and mortar..........................................ProudCabaret in a mausoleumI wonder how many of the performerswho colourfully treadthe stage of Proud Cabaretevery weekend – all those dragqueens and burlesque dancersand strip teasers and 21stcenturyvaudevillians – realisethat they are doing their thingdirectly over the tomb of twomembers of one of the richestfamilies in Victorian/EdwardianEngland.Proud, until recently known asthe Hanbury Ballroom, is theincorporation of two buildings,a pub, and a mausoleum, thelatter built by the merchant and philanthropistSir Albert (born Abdullah) Sassoon, to be his finalresting place.Albert was born in Baghdad, into a family of BaghdadiJews from that region. His father was knownas ‘the Rothschild of India’, having built an areaof dockland in Bombay, and then made a fortunebuying imported goods from the Middle East andselling them on to England.He moved to England in 1876, and was soongranted a baronetcy by Queen Victoria. He tookup residence at 1 Eastern Terrace in Kemptown,building the mausoleum, in 1892, at the back of hishouse. The architectural guide Pevsner calls it a‘curious little building, square with a circular tentlantern roof, originally covered in gold leaf, andIndian details including a trilobed arched entranceand blind arches of the same form and a lotus-leafparapet.’ Anglo-Jewish historian Marcus Robertsdeems it ‘more curry house than sepulchre’.It is commonly assumed Albert wished the buildingto echo the style of the Royal Pavilion,but, as Pevsner points out,this building had a much moreserious purpose, and ‘Albertcould claim connection with India,which the Regent could not’.He was buried there after hisdeath in 1896. His son Edward,who also lived in Brighton, andwho married a Rothschild, wasalso buried there 16 years later.Edward’s son Sir Philip Sassoonsold the building in 1933, andmoved his father and grandfather’sremains to the Jewishcemetery in Willesden. Thespace was used as an air-raid shelter in WW2, thenas a furniture store, a decorator’s, a restaurant andfinally, after 1953, as a function room, called theBombay Bar, after the next-door Hanbury Armsbought it, and amalgamated the two spaces.More latterly the venue was known as the HanburyBallroom, which was closed down in 2006, whenit underwent a £100,000 restoration in orderto become a cabaret club; this was helped by a£56,000 grant from the Arts Council to restore the(non-original) murals on the inside of the dome. Ichat to Proud Cabaret manager Adam Webb sittingunder that dome: among many other things hetells me that the windows are a bitch to clean, thatit’s a very popular spot for same-sex (and other)marriages, and the night to go to the show if you’rea Brightonian is Thursday, before the place getsfilled with whooping weekender stags and hens. IfSir Albert and Sir Edward hadn’t been moved onback in 1933, they would presumably be (literally?)turning in their graves. Alex LeithPhoto by Paul Marc Mitchell....97....


inside left: ‘blacksanders’, jan 1936...................................................................................What are these people doing in between the piers? Well, it’s January 1936, times are tough, andthey’re beachcombing, hoping to find money or other valuables that have been left on the beach,sucked up by the sea, then relinquished after a storm. ‘During the depression years of the ‘Thirties,this was a common sight,’ wrote James Gray, from whose collection we have sourced this picture. ByJanuary 1936 the national rate of unemployment had dropped to 13% from its 22% height in 1932,but in Brighton, and most of the other South Coast towns, it was worse than it had ever been; a photographas late as 1939 in the social history book Underdog Brighton shows unemployed men demonstratingin Western Road with placards, one reading ‘JOB SCHEMES FOR BRIGHTON’, another‘JOIN THE NUWM’ [National Unemployed Workers’ Movement]. With no unemploymentbenefits from the government, it’s not surprising there are so many on the beach. Do a bit of diggingaround yourself and you can find a fascinating Pathé newsreel from the same year, describing thispastime, or job, in some cases. Many of the beachcombers, it seems, are fishermen ‘during slacknessat the nets’. They were nicknamed ‘blacksanders’ and could earn quite a bit of money if they wereeagle-eyed: one blacksander is reported to have found 17 shillings, three pennies and three farthingsin a single day (roughly equivalent to £64 in today’s money). Others are reported as having found‘watches, bracelets and rings’. The news reporter, in a plum RP accent, describes the blacksandersas having ‘several minds, and but a shingle thought’ and makes another joke about mother-in-lawsbeing left on the beach. Many of these men would soon find themselves a job, like it or not, withWW2 looming. And after the war came unemployment benefits. ‘The Welfare State of later years,’concluded James Gray, ‘seems to have done away with all this.’ Check out the James Gray collectionof pictures of Brighton from between the 1880s and the 1980s at regencysociety-jamesgray.com. AL....98....


eeze upto the Downs77kids goFREE!See leafletsfor detailsYou can now breeze up to Devil’s Dykeon an open top bus.Go to Stanmer Park and Devil’s Dyke by bus seven days a week,and up to Ditchling Beacon at weekends.www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/breezebusesfor times, fares, leaflets and walk ideasor call 01273 292480Or visit www.traveline.info/seto plan all your journeys.5564

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