to view the Charter - Kowhai Intermediate School

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to view the Charter - Kowhai Intermediate School

KOWHAI INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLC H A R T E R & STRATEGIC PLAN2013/14/15This document contains the Kowhai Intermediate School Charter,an outline of the strategic goals for the period 2013 - 2015and the 2013 Annual Plan, including targets.1


Our history and the commitments that motivate us to deliver high quality education• Kowhai is New Zealand’s first intermediate school (est. 1922). It was established in recognition of the particular educational needs ofemerging adolescents. For 90 years it has been meeting those changing needs and launching young people into life.• We provide forward-looking programmes that prepare students for the future with the attitudes, understanding, knowledge and skillsto build on in the decades ahead.• We are committed to raising the achievement levels of all our students.• We consider the education of students to be a shared responsibility between students, parents, teachers and community.• Research shows that the quality of the teacher has the biggest impact on how students achieve; therefore we are committed to ongoing, school-wide professionaldevelopment of teachers.• We align resources, programme plans, learning tasks and assessment to students’ learning goals.• We value a learning environment that is safe (emotionally, socially and physically), attractive, enriching and responsive.• We are leaders in Maori medium education, incorporating the provision of bi-lingual and full immersion classes—so that instruction in tikanga Maori and te reo Maori isavailable to those who want it.• The school aims to develop policies and practices that reflect New Zealand’s cultural diversity and the unique position of the Maoriculture. We are working towards the aims of the Ministry of Education’s Ka Hikitea strategy.• Given that Samoan is the most widely spoken Pasifika language in New Zealand and significant numbers of Samoan studentsenrol at Kowhai, we provide a Samoan/English bi-lingual class.• We believe that the integration and channelling of our diverse students’ backgrounds will benefit all who learn here.• We are an inclusive school that welcomes learners of all abilities and backgrounds, including those with special needs.• We have a special relationship with Eden Park one of our nation’s premier sporting facilities3


We understand our obligations to New Zealand’s National Education GoalsThe National Education Goals1. The highest standards of achievement, through programmes, which enable all students to realise their full potential as individuals and which develop the valuesneeded to become full members of New Zealand’s society.2. An equality of educational opportunity for all New Zealanders, to be attained by identifying and removing barriers to achievement.3. Development of the knowledge, understanding and skills needed by New Zealanders to compete successfully in the world.4. A sound foundation in the early years for future learning and achievement through programmes that include support for parents in their vital role as their children’sfirst teachers.5. A broad education through a balanced curriculum covering essential learning areas with high levels of competence in basic literacy and numeracy, science andtechnology.6. Excellence achieved through the establishment of clear learning objectives, monitoring student performance against those objectives and programmes to meetindividual need.7. Success in their learning for those with special needs by ensuring that they are identified and receive appropriate support.8. Access for students to a nationally and internationally recognised qualifications system to encourage a high level of participation in post-school education in NewZealand.9. Increased participation and success by Maori through the advancement of Maori education initiatives, including education in Te Reo Maori, consistent with theTreaty of Waitangi.10. Respect for the diverse ethnic and cultural heritage of New Zealand people, with acknowledgement of the unique place of Maori, and New Zealand’s role in thePacific and as a member of the international community of nations.National Administration Guideline 1Each board of trustees is required to foster student achievement by providing teaching and learning programmes which incorporate The National Curriculum as expressedin The New Zealand Curriculum 2007 or Te Marautanga o Aotearoa.Each board, through the principal and staff, is required to:(a) develop and implement teaching and learning programmes:4


i. to provide all students in years 1-10 with opportunities to achieve for success in all areas of the National Curriculum;ii. giving priority to student achievement in literacy and numeracy, especially in years 1-8;iii. giving priority to regular quality physical activity that develops movement skills for all students, especially in years 1-6.(b) through a range of assessment practices, gather information that is sufficiently comprehensive to enable the progress and achievement of students to be evaluated; givingpriority first to:i. student achievement in literacy and numeracy, especially in years 1-8; and then toii.breadth and depth of learning related to the needs, abilities and interests of students, the nature of the school's curriculum, and the scope of The NationalCurriculum as expressed in The New Zealand Curriculum or Te Marautanga o Aotearoa;(c) on the basis of good quality assessment information, identify students and groups of students:i. who are not achieving;ii.iii.iv.who are at risk of not achieving;who have special needs (including gifted and talented students); andaspects of the curriculum which require particular attention;(d) develop and implement teaching and learning strategies to address the needs of students and aspects of the curriculum identified in (c) above;(e) in consultation with the school's Māori community, develop and make known to the school's community policies, plans and targets for improving the achievement of Māoristudents; and(f) provide appropriate career education and guidance for all students in year 7 and above, with a particular emphasis on specific career guidance for those students who havebeen identified by the school as being at risk of leaving school unprepared for the transition to the workplace or further education/training.Each board of trustees, with the principal and teaching staff, is required to:National Administration Guideline 2(a) develop a strategic plan which documents how they are giving effect to the National Education Guidelines through their policies, plans and programmes, including those forcurriculum, National Standards, assessment and staff professional development;(b) maintain an on-going programme of self-review in relation to the above policies, plans and programmes, including evaluation of information on student achievement; and(c) report to students and their parents on the achievement of individual students, and to the school's community on the achievement of students as a whole and of groups(identified through NAG 1(c) above) including the achievement of Māori students against the plans and targets referred to in 1(e) above.5


National Administration Guideline 2AWhere a school has students enrolled in years 1-8, the board of trustees, with the principal and teaching staff, is required to use National Standards to:(a) report to students and their parents on the student’s progress and achievement in relation to National Standards. Reporting to parents in plain language in writing mustoccur at least twice a year;(b) report school-level data on National Standards in the board’s annual report under three headings:i. school strengths and identified areas for improvementii.iii.the basis for identifying areas for improvement; andplanned actions for lifting achievement.In addition to its inclusion in the board’s annual report, the NAG 2A (b) information is required to be provided to the Secretary for Education at the same time asthe updated school charter under NAG 7.(c) report in the board’s annual report on:i. the numbers and proportions of students at, above, below or well below National Standards, including by Māori, Pasifika, gender, and by year level (where thisdoes not breach an individual’s privacy); andii.how students are progressing against National Standards as well as how they are achieving.In addition to its inclusion in the board’s annual report, the NAG 2A (c) information is required to be provided to the Secretary for Education at the same time asthe updated school charter under NAG 7.(d) report the NAG 2A (c) information in the format prescribed by the Secretary for Education from time to time.National Administration Guideline 3According to the legislation on employment and personnel matters, each board of trustees is required in particular to:(a) develop and implement personnel and industrial policies, within policy and procedural frameworks set by the Government from time to time, which promote high levels ofstaff performance, use educational resources effectively and recognise the needs of students; and(b) be a good employer as defined in the State Sector Act 1988 and comply with the conditions contained in employment contracts applying to teaching and non-teaching staff.National Administration Guideline 4According to legislation on financial and property matters, each board of trustees is also required in particular to:6


(a) allocate funds to reflect the school's priorities as stated in the charter;(b) monitor and control school expenditure, and ensure that annual accounts are prepared and audited as required by the Public Finance Act 1989 and the Education Act 1989;and(c) comply with the negotiated conditions of any current asset management agreement, and implement a maintenance programme to ensure that the school's buildings andfacilities provide a safe, healthy learning environment for students.Each board of trustees is also required to:National Administration Guideline 5(a) provide a safe physical and emotional environment for students;(b) promote healthy food and nutrition for all students; and(c) comply in full with any legislation currently in force or that may be developed to ensure the safety of students and employees.National Administration Guideline 6Each board of trustees is also expected to comply with all general legislation concerning requirements such as attendance, the length of the school day, and the length of theschool year.National Administration Guideline 7Each board of trustees is required to complete an annual update of the school charter for each school it administers, and provide the Secretary for Education with a copy of theupdated school charter before 1 March of the relevant year.National Administration Guideline 8Each board of trustees is required to provide a statement providing an analysis of any variance between the school's performance and the relevant aims, objectives, directions,priorities, or targets set out in the school charter at the same time as the updated school charter provided to the Secretary for Education under NAG 7.NAG 8 applies in relation to schools with students enrolled in years 1-8 from the 2013 school year, and all schools from the 2014 school year.7


The New Zealand Curriculum at KowhaiConfident, Connected, Actively Involved, Lifelong LearnersOur curriculum properly reflects the New Zealand CurriculumOur children are developing the key competencies• managing self• relating to others• using languages, symbols and texts• participating and contributing• thinkingAt Kowhai, we call these LIFE KEYSEssential learning areas• English• mathematics• health and physical education• science• social studies• second languages• the arts• technologyKowhai’s Maori medium education classes (WhanauPounamu) follow Te Marautanga o Aotearoa. School-widethemes are adapted to reflect Maori contexts and beliefs.At Kowhai we regard these aslenses through which we viewthe world to understand it andinteract with it.8


Strategic Section [pages 9-19]Strategic PrioritiesThe strategic priorities of Kowhai Intermediate School over the next 3-5 years are to:‣ Stretch the performance expectations for high ability students, including Maori and Pasifika, in academic, creative, sporting and socialfields. (Goals 1,5,6)‣ Ensure our students have resources and opportunities to learn about and interact with the world through digital environments. (Goal 2)‣ Produce highly literate and numerate students who have a growing capacity take charge of their own learning. (Goals 3,4)‣ Eliminate the tail of underachievement. (Goals 3,4,5,6)These priorities reflect the vision of the NZ Curriculum, for learners who are confident, connected, actively involved, life-long learners.They are also true to the principles of the NZ Curriculum, for high expectations, acknowledgement of the Treaty of Waitangi, cultural diversity,inclusion, learning to learn, community engagement, coherence and future focus.The Kowhai Board of Trustees CommitmentTo support the implementation of these plans, the Kowhai Intermediate School Board of Trustees will‣ put the interests and needs of children's education first in its governance decisions‣ ensure they maintain a clear focus on improving student achievement‣ be a good employer‣ ensure that a viable budget supports the identified priorities‣ implement the 5 and 10 year property plans so as to ensure the school provides effective and safe learning environments.9


The following 6 strategic goals support the strategic priorities of Kowhai Intermediate School.Kowhai Intermediate Strategic Goals 2013-2015123456Progammes for gifted students are targeted to reach students with proven exceptional abilities (NAG 1).Teachers and students develop experience in using wireless devices and applications to enhance teaching and learning (NAG 1).Literacy and mathematics: Kowhai teachers develop their ‘teaching as inquiry’ skills with a view to employing the best strategies for highstudent achievement (NAG 1).Students become effective goal-setters, in the key competencies and curriculum learning areas (NAG 1).Kowhai’s Pasifika students make sustained progress in literacy and mathematics to match or exceed national expectations for year 7 /8students (NAG 1).Maori students make sustained gains in te reo Maori and te reo Pakeha literacy and in pangarau, to match or exceed national expectations foryear 7/8 students (NAG 1).The Review Process1. Monthly Principal’s reports on progress towards each strategic goal.2. Monthly financial reports.3. Cyclical review:10


Review Process and Board Work PlanYear: 2013Board meeting datesReview type Area 18 Feb 18 March 15 April 20 May 17 June 8 July 19 Aug 16 Sep 21 Oct 18 Nov 16 DecStrategicCharter &strategicplanStrategicgoalsConfirmCharter &send to MoEOngoingreport ofprogressOngoingreport ofprogressOngoingreport ofprogressOngoingreport ofprogressOngoingreport ofprogressReviewcharter &strategicplanOngoingreport ofprogressDraft nextyear’s charter& strategicplanOngoingreport ofprogressReview nextyear’s charter& strategicplanReview &resetRegularEmergentBoardprocessesPolicy &compliancePrincipalappraisalAppraisalagreementapprovedTargets &measuressetPersonnel:Appraisal &professionaldevelopmentPrincipal &appraiserongoingreviewCurriculum Technology SecondlanguagesBudget &FinancialReportCommunityWirelessnetwork &teachingReviewpreviousyear’s reportand approvethis year’sbudgetConfirmwirelessinfrastructureandresourcesPromoteMay electionAppointChairMonitor Monitor Mid-yearreviewPromoteMayelectionConfirm rollreturn sentto MoE.Annualstatementsto be sentto auditorReserved forProfessionaldevelopment(e-learning)PromoteMay electionMaoriEducationElection (30May)Annual Reportapproved &sent to MoE.AppointChair & newtrusteeinductionReserved forprofessionaldevelopment(Maori &PasifikaCommunities)Confirm rollreturn sent toMoE.NZSTAconference19-21 July(Auckland)InternationalStudentsEEOPrincipal &appraiserongoingreviewNationalStandardsCybersafetyAppraisalreportsummaryMonitor Monitor Monitor Monitor &review.Draft nextyear’s budgetSpecialNeedsProvisionsLMS & BYODproposal for2014Board selfreviewRevieweragreed fornext yearMonitor &reviewReview nextyear’s draftbudgetRenewNZSTAmembership11


Year: 2014Board meeting datesReview type Area xx Feb xx March xx April xx May xx June xx July xx Aug xx Sep xx Oct xx Nov xx DecStrategicCharter &strategicplanStrategicgoalsConfirmCharter &send to MoEOngoingreport ofprogressOngoingreport ofprogressOngoingreport ofprogressOngoingreport ofprogressOngoingreport ofprogressReviewcharter &strategicplanOngoingreport ofprogressDraft nextyear’s charter& strategicplanOngoingreport ofprogressReview nextyear’s charter& strategicplanReview &resetRegularEmergentBoardprocessesPolicy &compliancePrincipalappraisalAppraisalagreementapprovedGovernancepolicyTargets &measuressetPersonneldocumentationPrincipal &appraiserongoingreviewCurriculum English PasifikaEducationBudget &FinancialReportCommunityWirelessnetwork &teachingReviewpreviousyear’s reportand approvethis year’sbudgetConfirm LMS& BOYDusage andpolicies /proceduresMonitor Monitor Mid-yearreviewConfirm rollreturn sentto MoE.Annualstatementsto be sentto auditorReserved forProfessionaldevelopment(tbc)Annual Reportapproved &sent to MoE.Reserved forprofessionaldevelopment(tbc)Promoteelection (tbc)Confirm rollreturn sent toMoEInternationalStudentsPrincipal &appraiserongoingreviewMathematicsPropertyManagementAppraisalreportsummaryMonitor Monitor Monitor Monitor &review.Draft nextyear’s budgetPromoteelection(tbc)SchoolImage /CommunityRelationsPromoteelection(tbc)Election(dates tbc)Appoint Chair& new trusteeinductionRevieweragreed fornext yearMonitor &reviewReview nextyear’s draftbudgetBoard selfreviewRenewNZSTAmembership12


Year: 2015Board meeting datesReview type Area xx Feb xx March xx April xx May xx June xx July xx Aug xx Sep xx Oct xx Nov xx DecStrategicCharter &strategicplanStrategicgoalsConfirmCharter &send to MoEOngoingreport ofprogressOngoingreport ofprogressOngoingreport ofprogressOngoingreport ofprogressOngoingreport ofprogressReviewcharter &strategic planOngoingreport ofprogressDraft nextyear’s charter& strategicplanOngoingreport ofprogressReview nextyear’s charter& strategicplanReview &resetRegularEmergentBoardprocessesPolicy &compliancePrincipalappraisalAppraisalagreementapprovedEOTCTargets &measuressetOperationalPolicyPersonnel –jobsatisfactionPrincipal &appraiserongoingreviewInternationalStudentsPrincipal &appraiserongoingreviewCurriculum Science Health/PE Inquiry:SocialStudiesBudget &FinancialReportCommunityReviewpreviousyear’s reportand approvethis year’sbudgetEnrolmentprocessesAppointChairMonitor Monitor Mid-yearreviewConfirm rollreturn sentto MoE.Annualstatementsto be sentto auditorReserved forProfessionaldevelopment(tbc)AnnualReportapproved& sent toMoE.Reserved forprofessionaldevelopment(tbc)Confirm rollreturn sent toMoEArtsHealth &SafetyAppraisalreportsummaryMonitor Monitor Monitor Monitor &review.Draft nextyear’s budgetReporting toparentsBoard selfreviewRevieweragreed fornext yearMonitor &reviewReview nextyear’s draftbudgetRenewNZSTAmembership13


GOAL 1 Programmes for gifted students are targeted to reach students with proven exceptional abilities (NAG 1).RationaleWhen we surveyed our parent community about our school charter, the effectiveness of programmes extending gifted students received less positive responses. 32% ofrespondents felt that special abilities were being extended insufficiently. This goal is a response to that concern.Definition of giftedness is revisited and clarified on the basis of best research and current Ministry guidelines.Actions 2013 2014 2015Gifted students are identified as early as possible when enrolled at Kowhai. Y Y YTeachers receive necessary support for in-class differentiation of learning programmes for gifted students in their day to day learning. Y Y YFlexible withdrawal programmes are designed that meet the needs of currently enrolled gifted students. Y Y YYA model for delivering gifted education at Kowhai is reviewed and clarified.YSchool management monitor the progress of gifted students and the quality of programmes provided. Y Y YA satisfaction survey of gifted students is completed at the end of each year. Y Y YAchievement data of gifted students analysed annually to inform the design of on-going programmes. Y Y YProgrammes are designed for gifted Maori and Pasifika students that incorporate the notions of giftedness that are important to these communities. Y Y YHigh level learning tasks for extension are included in all curriculum plans. Y YINDICATORS OF SUCCESS Gifted students are identified on the basis of reliable information and assessments. Gifted students report that they are motivated and excited by learning opportunities. Gifted students continue to progress beyond expectation for their age level. Targets are set which sample the success of this goal.Y = expected period for actions14


GOAL 2Teachers and students develop experience in using wireless devices and applications to enhance teaching and learning (NAG 1).RationaleIn order to keep up with the needs of the 21 st Century learner, Kowhai needs to provide infrastructure and devices which will support learning, using the tools and applications that young people arefamiliar with. We want our students to be able to connect and interact with people and resources across the globe and for them, their teachers and parents to have access to their work andachievements from multiple locations.Actions 2013 2014 2015School-wide infrastructure is in place, including a wireless network, accessible from all learning spaces, plus hi-speed broadband. Y YDevices (e.g. tablets) and applications that allow for increased interactivity and use of internet resources are regularly available to all classes. Y Y YA platform that supports learning management (e.g. e-portolios, forums, student webpages, teacher access, parent interaction) is in place. Y YA selection of ‘bring your own devices’ is specified and infrastructure is in place for their integration and use by students. Y YTeachers receive appropriate professional development in the use and locating of applications that support high quality ICT learning experiences. Y Y YCurriculum planning is expanded to include greater use of internet based learning tasks and activities. Y Y YCybersafety protocols (e.g. digital citizenship) are developed to keep pace with the introduction of greater access to the internet. Y Y YDigital applications are located (or developed) for the learning of students with special educational needs Y Y YINDICATORS OF SUCCESSStudents are using digital resources extensively and effectively in their learning programmes.Students, teachers and parents are able to access their work and achievements from outside school.Learners with special education needs have access to and learn using IT devices and applications.Targets are set which sample the success of this goal.Y = expected period for actions15


GOAL 3 Literacy and mathematics: Kowhai teachers develop their ‘teaching as inquiry’ skills with a view to employing the best strategies for high studentachievement (NAG 1).RationaleSuccess in literacy and numeracy are national and school priorities. In professional discussions with ERO we agreed that school-wide professional development in ‘teaching as inquiry’ wouldfurther enhance our abilities to target the most relevant teaching strategies to the precise needs of students. We have Ministry provided support through the Learning and Change network toimprove intermediate school writing.Actions 2013 2014 2015Define ‘teaching as inquiry’ to ensure that we all have a common understanding of the concept.Establish a mathematics team that can guide the delivery of the maths curriculum in the absence of the maths lead teacher in 2013.Develop teacher familiarity with e-asttle assessment tool for literacy and maths.Programme of whanau and staff meetings throughout the year to discuss and problem-solve student learning/achievement issues. Y Y YExtend use of whanau achievement targets through the appraisal process. Y YFurther refine the process for developing accurate, consistent Overall Teacher Judgements in literacy and maths. Y YActivate the Learning and Change (Writing) action plan developed with sister intermediate schools. Y YEngage with contributing primary schools to moderate OTJs for writing. Y YSpecial needs students have clear individualised goals for written language, using the key competencies as markers. Y Y YYYYINDICATORS OF SUCCESSTeachers justify the success of literacy & maths programmes by the achievement data of theirstudents.Kowhai students reach National Standards at a rate comparable to the national rate.Learners with special education needs are making progress in the use of appropriate expressive anddescriptive language in range of forms.Targets are set which sample the success of this goal.Y = expected period for actions16


GOAL 4 Students become effective goal setters in the key competencies and curriculum learning areas. (NAG 1)RationaleA meta-analysis of what helps students achieve success in learning shows that goal setting is a vital strategy. An in-school investigation by the principal showed that ourstudents are not skilled in setting worthwhile goals, or in evaluating their own progress towards learning goals. We need to transition away from paper-based goal-settingprocedures and utilise on-line options.Actions 2013 2014 2015Develop a range of effective and manageable ways for students to record, maintain and reflect on goals for learning areas and Life Keys. Y YDevelop a digital platform to manage current and on-going goal-setting and reflection involving student, teacher and parents. Y YEngage teachers in discussion and sharing of goal-setting strategies for students to develop a goal-setting/reflection culture. Y YDeliberately teach students how to set specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and timely goals—and reflect on them meaningfully. Y YDeliberately link formative assessment practice with target/goal-setting. Y Y YINDICATORS OF SUCCESSStudents, teachers and parents are using the language of Key Competencies to describe success in learning.All students have a clear system for recording and evaluating their goal setting.Key Competencies are evident in all goal-setting and reporting contexts.Targets are set which sample the success of this goal.Y = expected period for actions17


GOAL 5Kowhai’s Pasifika students make sustained progress in literacy and mathematics to match or exceed national expectations f oryear 7/8 students (NAG 1).RationaleRaising Pasifika achievement is a national priority. We have a significant proportion of Pasifika students at our school and they reflect the national tendency to achieve at lower than national expectations.We are determined to unleash the academic potential of our Pasifika students. Kowhai is committed to supporting the Pasifika Education Plan which aims to improve progress and achievement of Pasifika students inliteracy and maths, improve the responsiveness of teachers and programmes to Pasifika needs and to engage with the Pasifika community to ensure that families are engaged in their children’s learning.Actions 2013 2014 2015Focus our ‘teaching as inquiry’ approach on target groups of Pasifika students. Y YEnsure gifted Pasifika students receive individual programmes that are relevant to their background experiences. Y YHold nation-specific meetings for Pasifika families to strengthen links between home and school. Y YEnsure that there are resources and strategies in place to increase the number of Pasifika students meeting National Standards. Y Y YEnhance bi-lingual teaching strategies used in Samoan class by assisting Samoan teacher to link with other bilingual experts. Y Y YContinue development of Samoan assessment tools for pre and post testing in reading, writing and oracy. Y YEnsure speedy and effective follow-up of Pasifika students’ lateness and absence. Y Y YDevelop a home language brochure that sets out school expectation and advice on how to make the most of school learning.YAccess motivating digital applications (especially in literacy) that may motivate and assist students with their reading. Y Y YRaise the status of Pasifika languages by encouraging and showcasing their use at school events. Y Y YWork with Year 8 students on developing learning pathways towards high school and beyond. Y Y YEnsure that transition to high school includes clear communication with families and secure processes with high schools. Y Y YINDICATORS OF SUCCESSPasifika families are engaging with the school at interviews and other learner-centred events.Pasifika students are able to talk about their progress in literacy, numeracy and Key Competencies.Kowhai Pasifika students are beginning to outstrip national achievement trends for Pasifika.Targets are set which sample the success of this goal.Y = expected period for actions18


GOAL 6Kowhai’s Maori students make sustained gains in te reo Maori and te reo pakeha literacy and in pangarauthat match or exceed national expectations for year 7/8 students (NAG 1).RationaleOur Maori students achieve at good levels – especially the majority of Maori students in Whanau Pounamu. We are concerned to ensure that students learning in Maori and English are makingappropriate progress in both languages. For Maori students in mainstream classes, our expectation is that their achievement levels are as close as possible to or exceed their non-Maori peers.Kowhai aims to work in support of the Maori Education Strategy (Ka Hikitia) – particularly the high expectation that Maori students will succeed in year 7 & 8 and be well prepared to advance intohigh school and beyond. Support in the use of Nga Whanaketanga has been accessed by teachers and the use of this framework now needs to be embedded. Students learning in the Maorimedium will follow Marautanga (Maori curriculum).Actions 2013 2014 2015Establish effective use by teachers of e-asstle ‘panui’ tool for diagnostic and summative assessments. Y YDevelop a suite of assessment tools for measuring te reo, panui and tuhituhi. Y Y YImplement the Marautanga (Maori curriculum) as the foundation for all curriculum decisions in Whanau Pounamu. Y YContinue to network with other Maori Medium Education schools to develop experience with Nga Whanaketanga. Y YEngage mainstream teachers in discussing and sharing integration strategies for te reo & tikanga in classes. Y YUtilise digital applications and resources that support Maori perspectives. Y Y YSurvey mainstream Maori parents to ensure their expectations are being heard. Y Y YWork with Year 8 students on developing learning pathways towards high school and beyond. Y Y YINDICATORS OF SUCCESSStudents in every class have opportunity to explore tikanga and te reo Maori.Maori students are able to describe their academic progress.Pounamu students are exceeding NZ wide Maori achievement levels in pangarau.Targets are set which sample the success of this goal.Y = expected period for actions19


Annual Section [pages 20-25]Strategic goal 1Programmes for gifted students are targeted to reach students with proven exceptional abilities (NAG 1).2013 AimTo introduce more elements of student choice in withdrawal programmes.Baseline data from survey at the end of 20128% of students identified as gifted, believed that they did not receive sufficient extension within their class programme.The surveyed students also offered a number of examples of areas they would like to be extended in (including: problem-solving, history, languages, science, law andmedicine).Targets98% of students identified as gifted, report that they are effectively challenged within their classroom programme and had high interest in their withdrawal programmes.Gifted students are identified as early as possible when enrolled at Kowhai.In-class differentiation for gifted students is explicit in all curriculum planning.Actions to achieve target Led by Budget Time frameCurriculum leaders provide advice and guidance for teachers in the delivery of extension within theclassroom.Louise & whanauleadersCurriculum leadersCurriculumbudgets.Week 6, Term 1, 2013Each termCurriculum leaders PD budget Needs basis through yearFlexible withdrawal programmes are designed which meet the needs of currently enrolled gifted students. Louise GT curric. Ongoing through yearNew topics based on student preferences are offered in Talent Development programmes. Louise Terms 2 & 3Model for delivery of GT programmes at Kowhai is published. Louise Term 2, 2013School management monitor the progress of gifted students and the quality of programmes provided. Louise/Paul Terms 2 and 4 201220


Strategic goal 2Teachers and students develop experience in using wireless devices and applications to enhance teaching and learning (NAG 1)2013 AimEstablish a wireless network and begin using tablet devices across the curriculum in classroom programmes.Baseline dataCurrently there is no wireless network and devices such as tablets are not in use at our school.TargetAll classes report use of tablets in Terms 2, 3 & 4 2013.Wireless network is established school-wide.Tablets are purchased and made available for classes to book on a rotation.Actions to achieve target Led by Budget Time frameTom MackintoshTom MackintoshFrom schoolsavings.From schoolsavings.Term 1 2013Term 1 2013Curriculum plans include suitable interactive tablet applications that support learning objectives. Curriculum leaders Curric. budgets Terms 2, 3, 4 2013Teachers receive professional development on the use of suitable applications.Students and teachers receive instruction on cybersafety protocols in use of tablets on wireless network.Evaluate the uptake and the effectiveness of tablet use.Curriculum leaders &outside expertise.Tom Mackintosh.Netsafe.Tom Mackintosh andWhanau leaders.PD budget. Terms 2,3,4 2013PD budget Terms 1 & 2013Term 4, 201321


Strategic goal 3Literacy and mathematics: Kowhai teachers develop their ‘teaching as inquiry’ skills--employing the best strategies for high student achievement (NAG 1).2013 AimsLiteracy: Begin a major focus on lifting writing achievement levels in all cohorts. Mathematics: To lift student achievement in strands other than numeracy.Baseline data (literacy)54% of 2012 Year 8 students achieved level 4a or higher in writing.47% of 2012 Year 7 students achieved level 4b or higher in writing.Baseline data (mathematics)53% of 2012 Year 8 students achieved level 4a or higher in maths.55% of 2012 Year 7 students achieved level 4b or higher in maths.Target (literacy)65% of 2013 Year 8 students will achieve at level 4a or higher in writing—i.e. we reduce the proportion below standard from 53% to 35%75% of 2013 Year 8 students will achieve at level 4a or higher in reading—i.e we reduce the proportion below the standard from 41% to 25%Target (mathematics)65% of 2013 Year 8 students will achieve at level 4a or higher in mathematics.Actions to achieve target Led by Budget Time frameMATHS: Establish a maths team to guide this curriculum in the absence of the maths lead teacher in 2013 Maths curric. team Term 4, 2012MATHS: Use teacher forums in which strand teaching approaches can be shared and developed. Maths curric. team Terms 1,2,3, 2013MATHS: Access outside expertise to expand options and approaches for strand teaching. Maths curric. team PD Budget Terms 2&3 2013MATHS: Connect with MAGS to align expectations for maths transitions between Years 8 & 9. Maths curric. team Term 2 2013Develop teacher familiarity with e-asttle assessment tool for literacy and maths.Maths team.Literacy director.Terms 1 & 3 2013Extend use of whanau achievement targets through the appraisal process. Whanau leaders. Terms 2,3,4 2013Further refine the process for developing accurate, consistent Overall Teacher Judgements in literacy and Principal.maths.Maths/Lit leadership.Terms 2 & 4 2013LITERACY: Activate the Learning and Change (Writing) action plan developed with sister intermediatePD Budget.Tanya Stanisichschools.MoE funding.Terms 1,2,3,4 2013LITERACY: Engage with contributing primary schools to moderate OTJs for writing. Tanya Stanisich Term 2 2013LITERACY: Special needs students have clear individualised goals for written language, using the keycompetencies as markers.Tanya Stanisich SEG funding Term 1,2,3,4 2013LITERACY: Connect with MAGS to align expectations for English transition to Year 9. Tanya Stanisich Term 2 201322


Strategic goal 4Students become effective goal-setters, in the key competencies and curriculum learning areas (NAG 1).2013 AimBegin the process of using portfolios to record and feedback on student goals, with the intention to migrate to Google drive for e-portfolios.Baseline dataVery uneven uptake on physical journals used for recording and feeding back on student goals. More immediacy of feedback by students and teachers required, alsobetter process for recording shorter term goals.Target95% of student portfolios include termly goals and reflections.Actions to achieve target Led by Budget TimeframeDevelop a range of effective and manageable ways for students to record, maintain and reflect ongoals for learning areas and Life Keys.Develop a digital platform to manage current and on-going goal-setting and reflection involvingstudent, teacher and parents.Engage teachers in discussion and sharing of goal-setting strategies for students to develop agoal-setting/reflection culture.Deliberate teaching of students how to set specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and timelygoals—and reflect on them meaningfully.Principal & whanauleadersTom MackintoshPrincipal & whanauleadersICTinfrastructureTerms 1,2,3 2013Terms 2 & 3 2013Curric budgets. Terms 1 & 2 2013Whanau leaders Terms 1 & 2 2013Deliberately link formative assessment practice with target/goal-setting. Whanau leaders Terms 1,2,3,4 2013Evaluate progress of goal-setting and reflection.Principal and whanauleadersTerm 4 201323


Strategic goal 5Kowhai’s Pasifika students make sustained progress in literacy and mathematics to match or exceed national expectations for year 7/8 students (NAG 1).2013 AimsEnsure that every Pasifika student has a teaching and learning programme that meets his or her needs.Continue to strengthen the effectiveness of the Samoan bilingual programme (Gafoa le Ata).Baseline data65% of Pasifika 2012 Year 8 students did not reach level 4a in writing—compared to 21% in reading.79% of Pasifika 2012 Year 8 students did not reach level 4a in mathematics.Targets45% of Pasifika 2013 Year 8 students reach level 4a in writing.35% of Pasifika 2013 Year 8 students reach level 4a in mathematicsActions to achieve target Led by Budget Time frameEnsure gifted Pasifika students receive individual programmes that are relevant to theirbackground experiences.Hold nation-specific meetings for Pasifika families to strengthen links between home and school.Ensure speedy and effective follow-up of Pasifika students’ lateness and absence.Develop a home language brochure that sets out school expectation and advice on how to makethe most of school learning.Access motivating digital applications (especially in literacy) that may motivate and assist studentswith their writing and reading.Expand the number of Pasifika students utilising the Learning Staircase for vocab development.Raise the status of Pasifika languages by encouraging and showcasing their use at schoolevents.Work with Year 8 students on developing learning pathways towards high school and beyond.Ensure that transition to high school includes clear communication with families and secureprocesses with high schools.Enhance bi-lingual teaching strategies used in Samoan class by assisting Samoan teacher to linkwith other bilingual experts.Continue development of Samoan assessment tools for pre and post testing in reading, writingand oracy.Louise Broad & whanauleadersPrincipals & whanauleaders.Louise Broad & schoolsecretaries.Principal &management team.Literacy director.Learning supportteacher.CurriculumbudgetsPasifikainitiatives.Administrationprinting.Curriculumbudgets.Terms 1,2,3,4 2013Term 1 2013Terms 1,2,3,4 2013Term 1 2013Terms 2& 3 2013Terms 1,2,3 2013Management team. Terms 1,2,3,4 2013Principals andmanagement team.Term 3 2013Associate Principal. Terms 3 & 4 2013Vau Peseta andmanagement team.Vau Peseta andmanagement team.Pasifikainitiatives.Pasifikainitiatives.Terms 1,2,3 2013Terms 1,2,3 201324


Strategic goal 6Kowhai’s Maori students make sustained gains in te reo Maori and te reo pakeha literacy and in pangarau that match or exceed national expectations for year 7/8students (NAG 1).2013 AimEmbed the use of Marautanga and Nga WhanaketangaBaseline data61% of 2012 Year 8 Maori students achieved at or above standard in tuhituhi (writing in Maori).72% of 2012 Year 7 Maori students achieved at or above standard in tuhituhi. 90% of 2012 Year 7 Maori students achieved at or above standard in panui.Targets2013 Year 8 Maori students’ tuhituhi matches their reading achievement more closesly—80% of Year 8 Maori students achieve at or above standard in tuhituhi.Actions to achieve target Led by Budget Time frameEstablish effective use by teachers of e-asstle ‘panui’ tool for diagnostic and summative assessments. Tere Tamarua MLF Terms 1 & 2 2013Develop a suite of assessment tools for measuring korero, panui, tuhituhi and pangarau—and gainexperience in forming overall teacher judgements against Nga Whanaketanga.Implement the Marautanga (Maori curriculum) as the foundation for all curriculum decisions in WhanauPounamu.Continue to network with other Maori Medium Education schools to develop experience with NgaWhanaketanga.Engage mainstream teachers in discussing and sharing integration of te reo & tikanga strategies inclasses.Utilise digital applications and resources that support Maori perspectives.Tere Tamarua& Huia Hawke(MoE)Tere Tamarua& Huia Hawke(MoE)Tere TamaruaWhanau leadersTere Tamarua &Tom MackintoshMLF+ Ministry support Terms 1,2,3,4 2013MLF+ Ministry support Terms 1,2,3,4 2013MLFTerms 2,3 2013Maori curriculumbudgetTerms 1 & 3 2013MLFTerms 2 & 3 2013Survey mainstream Maori parents to ensure their expectations are being heard. Management team Term 1 2013Work with Year 8 students on developing learning pathways towards high school and beyond.Tere Tamarua &Louise BroadMLFTerm 2 201325


National Standards Data26


Maori Medium Education NGA WHANAKETANGA 2012Ngawhanaketanga Year 8 2012Panui Tuhituhi Pangarau KoreroAbove 10 32% 2 6% 5 16% 9 29%At 19 62% 17 55% 17 55% 12 39%Below 2 6% 12 39% 8 26% 10 32%Well Below 0 0 1 3% 031 31 31 31Ngawhanaketanga Year 7 2012Panui Tuhituhi Pangarau KoreroAbove 12 42% 4 13% 8 28% 5 17%At 14 48% 17 59% 13 44% 19 66%Below 3 10% 8 28% 8 28% 5 17%Well Below 0 0 0 029 29 29 29Ngawhanaketanga All MME Maori students 2012Panui Tuhituhi Pangarau KoreroAbove 22 37% 6 10% 13 21% 14 23%At 33 55% 34 57% 30 50% 31 52%Below 5 8% 20 33% 16 27% 15 25%Well Below 0 0 1 2% 060 60 60 6029


Kowhai Intermediate School Analysis of Variance 2012Goal 1 Programmes for gifted students are targeted to reach those students with proven exceptional abilities (NAG 1).Targets1. 95% of students identified as gifted report their participation in withdrawal and/or in-class extension opportunities.2. 75% of students who achieved Level 4a at the end of Year 7 for writing have extended themselves into Level 5 by the end of 2012.Data1. Target: Met. A survey shows that of the 85 students identified on our gifted and talented register (which includes the arts and sports)92% reported their participation in withdrawal and/or in-class extension opportunities in 2013. (Of the 8% who believed they had notreceived opportunities for enrichment or extension inside their class, all of those students did receive withdrawal programmes.) Amongthe 85 surveyed students there were high levels of satisfaction and participation in both classroom and external opportunities that wereprovided. The survey also provided their feedback on the sort of topics they wished to learn more about.2. Target: Met. 80% of the twenty 2011 Year 7 students who achieved well above the writing standard (4b) extended themselves intoLevel 5 by the end of 2012 in Year 8CommentThis year an accurate register of gifted students in various learning areas was developed by the Associate Principal. These students were identifiedbased on reports from their previous schools, our own testing and teacher observations. Unit plans provided activities and approaches for use withgifted students in their classroom programmes. Various withdrawal programmes for extension were run throughout the year—especially during theTalent Development modules (e.g. book club, science, maths and English extension). Other special events such as Mathex, Lit Quiz, Lift Off andSports Camp catered for gifted and talented students. The latest Ministry of Education guidelines for gifted and talented education were provided toteachers and a review was carried out by the Associate Principal to ensure that our practices are a clear match with the guidelines.RecommendationThis strategic goal should be retained as there is still variability in teacher capability to differentiate the curriculum consistently for the highestachieving students. The bulk of the work of meeting the needs of GT students must occur every day in the classroom. For this reason, on-goingdevelopment of ideas and approaches is needed to ensure that the full capabilities of gifted and talented students are met daily.30


Goal 2 The health curriculum contributes effectively to the pro-social development of our students (NAGs 1&5).Targets1. 99% of students report that they always or usually feel safe at school.2. 75% of students report that they enjoy the health curriculum and believe it has helped them to develop as a successful person.Data1. Target: Virtually met. In a random survey of 302 students on 13 th November 2012, 95.8% of students reported that they usually feelsafe at school.2. Target: Exceeded. 99.3% of students surveyed said they enjoyed at least one of the 4 health units during the year. 67% enjoyed threeor more of them.CommentThe high proportion of students who feel safe at school is encouraging. We deal with the students who may from time to time report that they don’tfeel safe by ensuring that their vulnerabilities are dealt with personally and individually. Strong efforts and robust systems are in place to noticebullying, encourage reporting of it, respond to reports and deal with it promptly and fairly.Effective efforts were made to ensure that the health programmes are interesting and relevant to students. The topics were based on those thatchildren and their parents selected in the health survey last year. These topics have a clear focus on personal development and maturity along withsocial responsibility. Student safety audits were carried out twice during the year. Behaviour management was regularly raised for discussion,review and advice by the Associate Principal during staff development meetings. The Health Promoting School committee which has student repsfrom each class and which meets with the public health nurse and the Associate Principal to plan student-initiated health projects, has functioned well(for example the soup day and their summer hat-wearing promotion).RecommendationThis goal should be retired now as the health curriculum has over the past 3 years become established as a major contributor to the health, wellbeingand social cohesion of the school.31


Goal 3 Literacy and maths: Kowhai teachers develop their ‘teaching as inquiry’ abilities with a view to employing the best strategies for high studentachievement (NAG1).TargetsLiteracy: By the end of 2012 60% of the Year 8 cohort are at or above the National Standard for writing.Mathematics: By the end of 2012 60% of the Year 8 cohort are at or above the National Standard for mathematicsDataTarget: Not met. Literacy (Writing): By the end of 2012 54% of the Year 8 cohort reached the National Standard for writing.Target: Not met. Mathematics: By the end of 2012 53% of the Year 8 cohort reached the National Standard for maths.CommentThe achievement levels in writing are not yet at an acceptable level. (Reading levels are at a very acceptable 88% of Year 8 students at or above theNational Standard).The achievement levels in mathematics are not yet at an acceptable level. We have identified that students have insufficient experience inmathematics strands other than numeracy.We were successful in joining a Learning and Change network. This is a trial professional learning strategy funded by the Ministry of Education and itinvolves 13 intermediate schools from across Auckland all focused on improving student achievement in writing. The low levels of students’ writingabilities are a shared concern. This has ‘teaching as inquiry’ at its core; which is, to use good quality information about student achievement in ordershape teaching practice and strategies. During the year a situational analysis was carried out to probe questions about the levels of motivation onthe part of teachers and students towards writing. This professional learning has included close working relationships with two other intermediateschools and termly interaction with another 4 to 6 schools. Teachers have included maths and/or English target groups as part of their appraisal.They have also discussed, moderated and strategized about ‘overall teacher judgements’ in relation to the National Standards in writing and maths.E-asttle reading and maths assessments have been implemented this year, to replace asttle v4. Teachers had additional numeracy professionaldevelopment, particularly in relation to teaching fractions, provided by an outside expert along with regular training and observations from our inschoolexperts.RecommendationThis goal should be retained. Writing should continue as the main focus for literacy professional learning. The Literacy Director and Principal havedeveloped a professional development action plan in conjunction with the Learning and Change Network that will guide developments in this area.This year, the lead teacher of mathematics is on study leave. A representative team of teachers, led by an effective maths teacher, will oversee themaths curriculum for 2013.32


Goal 4 Students become effective goal-setters in the key competencies and curriculum learning areas (NAG1).TargetsBy the end of Term 3 all students will have an active goal-setting journal.DataTarget: Not met. As it became obvious that all students had not retained or maintained their goal-setting journal for the entire year, students wereasked:A. Did you find the goal-setting booklet helped you keep on track with your goals this year? 53% of students responded ‘yes’.B. Would you rather set your goals on-line, so you, your parents and teachers could read them and add comments? 53% of studentsresponded ‘yes’.CommentA bare majority of students maintained their goal-setting journal from beginning to end of the year. There was limited feedback from parents in thebooklets and the time-lag between achieving progress and commenting about it appeared to make reflections less meaningful. In a word, theshortcomings are about immediacy. While students need some broadly expressed ‘ big’ goals, the most meaningful one are those that they work onweek by week. The current pen and paper booklets don’t support that.RecommendationThe goal should remain, particularly because it provides an arena for Key Competencies to come to the fore and be reflected upon by students.However, the booklet format is problematical. We need to move towards a platform that will allow students to record goals and their reflections in away that is more immediate and which allows for parental and teacher comment independent of collecting up goal-setting booklets. A digitalplatform is an obvious answer.33


Goal 5 Kowhai’s Pasifika students make sustained progress in literacy and mathematics to match or exceed national expectations for Year 7/8students (NAG 1).Targets1. 60% of Pasifika students attain the National Standard for reading.2. 40% of Pasifika students attain the National Standard for writing.Data1. Target: Met. 66% of Pasifika students attained the National Standard or better for reading.2. Target: Not met. 33% of Pasifika students attained the National Standard or better for writing.CommentOur Pasifika students are making strong progress in reading—however, as with other groups, writing standards are not yet where we want them. Theproportion of Pasifika students at or above the standard at the end of 2012 was 12% higher than at the end of 2011—so the levels of achievementare moving significantly in the right direction.For many teachers, Pasifika achievement became the target group for their appraisal. Pasifika students received personalised teaching in literacy andmaths through group teaching within classes. Samoan parents met, with the assistance of the Pasifika Board representative, to strengthen home andschool links. Teachers have taken particular care to use resources, activities and contexts that Pasifika students in their classes will relate to. Writingworkshops have been held in staff meetings on how to target students who are progressing below expectation. In the Samoan class (Gafoa le Ata)the teacher has networked with bilingual literacy professionals who have been providing in-class advice. With parent help, a reading assessment toolhas been purchased and adapted for use in bilingual Samoan teaching. A watertight absence and lateness programme is in place and is carefullymonitored daily by the school secretaries and Associate Principal. The Associate Principal has also taken great care to ensure that all Year 8students, including Pasifika, make secure enrolments at high school for 2013, including meeting with Year 9 deans to discuss student needs in detail.RecommendationThis goal should remain. New actions can be developed—including those developed by the Pasifika think tank and the latest Pacific LanguagesFramework.34


Goal 6 Kowhai’s Maori students make sustained gains in te reo Maori and te reo Pakeha literacy and in pangarau that match national expectations forYear 7/8 studnts (NAG 1).Targets1. 40% of Year 8 Pounamu students reach level 4p or better in e-asttle panui.2. 65% of all Maori students reach stanine 4 in STAR or higher.Data1. Target met. 58% of Year 8 Maori Medium Education students (in Whanau Pounamu) reached Level 4p or better in e-asttle Panui.(92% attained the appropriate standard or better in Nga Whanaketanga).2. Target met. 95% of all Maori students reached stanine 4 or better in STAR—test of reading comprehension in English.CommentClearly, by these measures we are having success at ensuring our Maori students read at levels appropriate to their age and/or their years in Maoriimmersion settings.RecommendationE-asstle Panui is now established as an assessment tool for our Maori medium education students. The teaching team have networked this year withlocal schools and the University to establish appropriate assessment tools in reading, writing and oracy. The move to the Marautanga began this yearand from 2013, Pounamu will plan from the Maori curriculum (aligning and using mainstream topics and resources if appropriate). The University ofAuckland has provided guidance on the use of Nga Whanaketanga (Maori National Standards). Targets for Maori will be set against NgaWhanaketanga in 2013.35

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