Welcome to GateWay Community College

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2013-2014 - GateWay Community College

Welcome to GateWay Community CollegeLetter from the PresidentWelcome to GateWay Community College, one of the 10 Maricopa CommunityColleges! For the past 45 years, GateWay has served the community and helpedthousands of students, like you, achieve their educational and career goals.Driven by its Vision, Mission, Goals, and Values, the college is committed toproviding high-quality education through comprehensive services and innovativeacademic programs. Whether you plan to transfer to a university, enter theworkforce with newly attained skills or take classes for personal enrichment,GateWay offers more than 125 associate degrees and certificates.Last fall, the college opened the Integrated Education (IE) Building, a one-stopcenter where you can take classes in cutting-edge math and science labs, an artstudio, and other classrooms equipped with the latest media technologies. In theIE Building, you can also visit the college’s Library, Learning Center, Counseling,Disability Resources, Career Center and Enrollment Services.Ensuring that you are prepared to enter the workforce or even start your ownbusiness, GateWay offers a variety of experiential learning opportunities via itsaward-winning Center for Health Careers Education, Honda and Toyota trainingfacility, and a student incubator that is managed jointly by Maricopa CorporateCollege’s Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation and the Maricopa Small BusinessDevelopment Center.From service learning and volunteerism to getting involved in causes you arepassionate about, I encourage you to become involved at GateWay by joining aclub, attending an athletic event, or participating in one of the many student-lifeactivities held on campus throughout the year.At GateWay, we truly believe that you are the primary reason we exist. Onbehalf of the faculty and staff, I want to thank you for choosing GateWay. Wefeel honored that you have selected GateWay among the many other choices. Iassure you that a friendly and knowledgeable faculty and staff stand ready toassist you in your pursuit of higher education.Go Geckos!Sincerely,Steven R. Gonzales, Ed.D.President


Table of Contents3Refund Policy (A.R. 2.2.10) ..................................................91Student Financial Assistance (A.R. 2.2.11)....................... 92Vaccinations (A.R. 2.2.12) ...................................................96Veterans Services (A.R. 2.9) ..............................................96SCHOLASTIC STANDARDSAcademic Load (A.R. 2.3.1) ................................................ 97Attendance (A.R. 2.3.2)....................................................... 97Grading (A.R. 2.3.3) ............................................................. 98COLLEGE ENVIRONMENTSexual Harassment Policy for Employeesand Students (A.R. 2.4.4) ..............................................99Examples of Policy Violations (A.R. 5.1.9) .................... 100Additional Policy Violations (A.R. 5.1.10) ...................... 100Responsibility for Policy Enforcement (A.R. 5.1.11) ..... 100Complaints (A.R. 5.1.12) ..................................................... 100Confidentiality (A.R. 5.1.13) ............................................... 101Violations of Law (A.R. 5.1.14) .......................................... 101False Statements Prohibited (A.R. 5.1.15) ....................... 101Retaliation Prohibited (A.R. 5.1.16) .................................. 101GRADUATION REQUIREMENTSGeneral Graduation Requirements (A.R. 2.3.9) ............ 101Catalog Under Which a Student Graduates (A.R. 2.2.5)... 103Transcripts for Transfer (A.R. 2.3.10) ............................. 104Degrees and CertificatesArizona General Education Curriculum(AGEC)–A, B, S ............................................................................106Associate in General Studies (AGS) Degree ....................111Associate in Applied Science GeneralEducation Requirements (AAS GE) ..............................114Associate in Science Degree (AS).....................................116Associate in Arts, Elementary EducationDegree (AAEE) .................................................................119Associate in Arts (AA) Degree .........................................122Associate in Arts, Fine Arts (AAFA)–Art ........................125Associate in Arts, Fine Arts (AAFA)–Dance ..................128Associate in Arts, Fine Arts (AAFA)–Theatre................132Associate in Business (ABUS) Degree,General Requirements (GR) .........................................135Associate in Business (ABUS) Degree,Special Requirements (SR) ...........................................138Academic Certificate ......................................................... 140Transferable Courses .......................................................... 141Maricopa Skill Center .........................................................143Average Length of Completion....................................... 144OCCUPATIONAL/DEGREE CERTIFICATE PROGRAMSAccounting .......................................................................................... 146Administration of Justice Studies ...................................147Administrative Technology ...............................................147Air Conditioning/Refrigeration/Facilities ......................148Automotive Technology ................................................... 150Biomedical Research Technology ....................................151Business Technology Specialist .......................................152Clinical Research .................................................................153Computed Tomography .....................................................153Computer Information Systems ...................................... 154Court Reporting ...................................................................155Diagnostic Medical Sonography ......................................157Electrical Technology .........................................................159Electroneurodiagnostic (END) Technology ................. 160General Business ..................................................................161Health Services Management ...........................................162Health Unit Coordinating/Patient Care Associate .......163Healthcare Compliance ..................................................... 164Hospital Central Service Technology .............................165Industrial Design Technology ...........................................165Magnetic Resonance Imaging ...........................................167Management of Clinical and Bioscience Informatics ..167Management of Clinical Information Technology (McIT) ..170Medical Radiography .........................................................175Medical Transcription .........................................................177Networking Administration and Technology ................179Nuclear Medicine Technology ..........................................184Nursing: Maricopa Nursing at GatewayCommunity College .......................................................185Occupational Safety and Health Technology ...............189Office Technology ................................................................191Organizational Leadership and Management ...............191Physical Therapist Assisting .............................................192Polysomnographic Technology ........................................193Production Technology .................................................... 194Radiation Therapy ...............................................................196Respiratory Care .................................................................197Retail Management .............................................................198Small Business Entrepreuneurship ..................................199Surgical Technology ...........................................................199Surgical Technology for the Operating Room Nurse ....202Water Resources Technologies ......................................202APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAMSConstruction Trades: Bricklaying and Tilesetting ........206Construction Trades: Carpentry .......................................207Construction Trades: Concrete Form Builder ...............208Construction Trades: Construction Management .........209Construction Trades: Electricity ......................................209Construction Trades: General Construction Worker .....211Construction Trades: Heat and Frost Insulation ............212Construction Trades: Heavy Equipment Operations .....213Construction Trades: Ironworking ....................................214Construction Trades: Mechanical Trades: HVAC .............215Construction Trades: Mechanical Trades: Pipefitting ......217Construction Trades: Mechanical Trades: Plumbing .......218Construction Trades: Mechanical Trades: Sheet Metal ...219Construction Trades: Millwrighting .................................220Construction Trades: Painting and Drywalling ..............221Construction Trades: Pipe Trades - Pipefitter-Refrigeration .................................................................. 222Construction Trades: Plastering and Cement Masonry ..224Construction Trades: Plumbing ........................................224Construction Trades: Pre-Apprenticeship .................... 225Construction Trades: Sheet Metal ....................................226Construction Trades: Steamfitting .................................. 227Power Plant Technology ...................................................229Course Listings ...............................................................231Faculty and Staff...........................................................342Index ...................................................................................350Map ............................................................Inside Back Cover


4Vision, Mission, Goals and ValuesVISIONGateWay Community College seeks to developopportunities that are innovative and responsive to thediverse learning needs of our changing community.MISSIONGateWay Community College provides effective,accessible, and responsive educational services ina multicultural environment resulting in studentdevelopment and success.GOALSAccessProvide access to high-quality education for allstudents and strengthen educational pathwaysthrough increased educational and businesspartnerships.RetentionImprove the retention of students through theachievement of their education or training goals.SuccessIncrease the number of students who achieve theireducation or training goals, complete a degree orcertificate, transfer to a university, and/or complete aworkforce credential.Community EngagementEnhance civic, social, and cultural engagementopportunities by serving as the community’s college.VALUESStudents are the primary reason we exist. We value ourdiverse learning community and respect our studentsfor their life experiences, their achievements, and weappreciate their contributions. For these reasons,GateWay is committed to the following values:Learningas a lifelong endeavor of growth and self-discovery.Diversityas a celebration of the unique richness that allindividuals bring to our community and to the learningopportunity it provides.Serviceto students, to each other, and to the community.Teamworkas a commitment to working together toward studentsuccess.Integrityas an essential element in our learning environment.We strive to be honest, authentic, consistent, andrespectful in our words and actions.Entrepreneurial Spiritas critical in accomplishing our mission and goals.Through calculated risk-taking, we see possibilities . . .not limitations.EntrepreneurismExpand and leverage resources that enhance thecollege’s impact in the community through economicand workforce development.StewardshipStrategically leverage, grow and utilize resources toensure student success, responsible stewardship, andsustainability.AccreditationGateWay Community College is a Maricopa Community College, accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, a Commissionof the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (230 South LaSalle St, Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL. 60604-1413, Tel#1-800-621-7440), and its courses are approved by the Social Security Administration for Veterans Training. This school isauthorized under federal law to enroll nonimmigrant alien students. (http://www.ncahlc.org/)Nondiscrimination PolicyThe Maricopa County Community College District does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexualorientation, gender identity, national origin, citizenship status (including document abuse), age, disability, veteran status,or genetic information in employment or in the application, admission, participation, access, and treatment of persons ininstructional or employment programs and activities.


Achieve Success5ACHIEVE SUCCESSPlease take the time to read carefully and reflect on the Achieve Success steps identified below. The objective ofthis document is to inform students of their personal responsibilities for their own education and to focus facultyand staff on what they should expect of students wishing to maximize their higher education experience.Attendance............Critical Thinking ...Honesty ..................Intensity ..................Expectation ...........Value ........................Enlightenment ......Students are expected to attend all classes, to come to class prepared,to be on time, to have all required materials, to complete all homework,and to be prepared to participate in classroom discussions and learningactivities. Being absent does not excuse you from your responsibilitiesregarding material covered, quizzes, exams, homework, experiments orprojects.Today’s workplace requires employees who can systematically applyknowledge and critical thinking skills. It is not enough to memorizefacts or figures; students must be able to use information to furtherinvestigate their workplace as well as world events.There is no substitute for honesty. Students are responsible for knowingthe standards of conduct and student policies found in the GateWayCommunity College Catalog and Student Handbook, and must adhere tothese standards at all times.Attitude is everything! Education is important for personal success todaymore than ever before. Make education a priority. Success demandspersistence and the intense commitment of time and talent.Expect to be taught well, but also accept your personal responsibility tolearn. Faculty can expose you to an abundance of information, and theycan provide you with opportunities and activities that are conduciveto learning. As a student, you must seize opportunities to apply thatinformation to specific situations that confront you in your everyday life.Value your education. Make it your personal goal to graduate with theknowledge and skills necessary to be one of the best at what you do.Ask yourself why you are seeking a higher education. Challenge yourselfto achieve success at the highest level possible.S U C C E S S


6Academic Calendar 2013-2014ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2013-2014All dates subject to change.See college class schedule for specific dates for registration and schedule adjustment.* Some classes start before this date; check student schedule for exact class start date(s).** Summer start dates, end dates and class lengths vary+ See your student schedule on my.maricopa.edu for the Last Day to Withdraw Without an Instructor Signature for eachclass that you are enrolled.Fall Semester 2013Registration for Continuing Students Begins .......................................................................................March 4, 2013New Student Orientations ........................................................................................................... August 7, 13 & 17, 2013Saturday Registration (8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.) ....................................................................................August 17, 2013Classes Begin (Saturday) – Official Start Date of Semester* .......................................................August 17, 2013Classes Begin (Day and Evening)* ........................................................................................................ August 19, 2013Labor Day Observance – Campus Closed ....................................................................................September 2, 2013Last Day for Withdrawal without Instructor’s Signature +New Student Orientations ....................................................................................... September 10 & October 1, 2013Veterans Day Observance – Campus Closed ...............................................................................November 11, 2013Graduation and Certificate Application Deadline ....................................................................November 25, 2013Thanksgiving Holiday – Campus Closed ..........................................................November 28 - December 1, 2013Final Exams ..........................................................................................................................................December 9-12, 2013Mid-Year Recess Begins for Students.............................................................................................December 13, 2013Grades Due ............................................................................................................................................... December 17, 2013Winter Break – Campus Closed .................................................... December 24, 2013 (noon) – January 1, 2014Spring Semester 2014Registration Begins .....................................................................................................................................October 7, 2013Campus Re-Opens .......................................................................................................................................January 2, 2014New Student Orientations ................................................................................................................January 8 & 11, 2014Saturday Registration (8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.) .................................................................................. January 11, 2014Classes Begin (Saturday) – Official Start Date of Semester* ..................................................... January 11, 2014Classes Begin (Day and Evening)* ...................................................................................................... January 13, 2014Martin Luther King Day Observance – Campus Closed ............................................................. January 20, 2014New Student Orientations ................................................................................................February 4 & March 4, 2014President’s Day Observance – Campus Closed .............................................................................February 17, 2014Last Day for Withdrawal Without Instructor’s Signature +Spring Break – No Classes Scheduled ............................................................................................. March 10-16, 2014Spring Break – Campus Closed ...........................................................................................................March 13-16, 2014Graduation and Certificate Application Deadline ............................................................................ March 28, 2014Final Exams ........................................................................................................................................................May 5-8, 2013Commencement ...................................................................................................................................................May 9, 2014Grades Due ........................................................................................................................................................... May 13, 2014Summer Term 2014Registration Begins ........................................................................................................................................March 17, 2014Memorial Day Observance – Campus Closed ........................................................................................ May 26, 2014Classes Begin** ...................................................................................................................................................May 27, 2014Independence Day Observance – Campus Closed .................................................................................July 3, 2014Classes End** ....................................................................................................................................................... July 31, 2014Grades Due ...................................................................................................................................................... August 5, 2014


INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS, ACADEMICPOLICIES AND STUDENT SERVICES


8 Instructional Divisions 2013-2014INSTRUCTIONAL DIVISIONS/DEPARTMENTSAPPRENTICESHIPS/CONSTRUCTION TRADESCoordinator: Anna Lopez(602) 286-8676ABA - Arizona Builders AllianceABC - Associated Builders &ContractorsBKL - BricklayingBLT - Building Safety &Construction TechnologyCRP - CarpentryELA - Electrician: ApprenticeshipHEO - Heavy Equipment OperationsHFA - Heat and Frost TechnologyIND - IndustryIRW - Ironworking: ApprenticeshipMEC - Mechanical ApprenticeshipMWR - Millwright: ApprenticeshipPCM - Plastering/Cementing:ApprenticeshipPFT - Plumbing/Pipefitting:ApprenticeshipPNT - Painting/Decorating:ApprenticeshipROF - Roofing: ApprenticeshipSML - Sheet Metal: ApprenticeshipSUN - SundtcorpTDR - Trade RelatedTTD - Tractor-Trailer DrivingWLD - WeldingBUSINESS AND INFORMATIONTECHNOLOGIESChair: S. Annette Torrey(602) 286-8583ACC - AccountingAJS - Administration of JusticeStudiesBPC - Business-Personal ComputersCCE - Court Reporting ContinuingEducationCIS - Computer InformationSystemsCNT - CISCO NetworkingTechnologyCTR - Court ReportingDFT - DraftingECN - EconomicsEPS - Entrepreneurial StudiesGBS - General BusinessIBS - International BusinessITS - Information TechnologySecurityLAS - Legal AssistingMGT - ManagementMKT - MarketingMMT - Multimedia TechnologyMST - Microsoft TechnologyOAS - Office Automation SystemsREA - Real EstateSBU - Society & BusinessTQM - Total Quality ManagementCOUNSELINGChair: Frank Zamora(602) 286-8127AAA -Advancing AcademicAchievementCPD - Counseling/PersonalDevelopmentEXS - Exercise ScienceHES - Health SciencePED - Physical Activities/LifetimeFitnessWED -Wellness EducationHEALTH SCIENCESChair: Edward Hoskins(602) 286-8503CRA - Clinical Research AssociateCRC - Clinical ResearchCoordinatingDMI - Diagnostic Medical ImagingDMS - Diagnostic MedicalSonographyEEG - Electroneurodiagnostic(END) TechnologyHCC - Health Core CurriculumHCE - Health Care EducationHCS - Hospital Central ServiceHES - Health ScienceHLR - Health RelatedHRC - Healthcare RegulatoryComplianceHSE - Health Science EducationHSM - Health Services ManagementHUC - Health Unit CoordinatorICE - Imaging - ContinuingEducationMTR - Medical TranscriptionNUC - Nuclear Medicine TechnologyPON - Perioperative NursingPSGPolysomnographicTechnologyPTA - Physical Therapist AssistingRES - Respiratory CareRTT - Radiation TherapySGT - Surgical TechnologyINDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGYChair: John Kelly(602) 286-8647ATP - Automation TechnologyAUT - Automotive TechnologyELC - Electrical TechnologyELE - Electrical TechnologyFAC - Facilities MaintenanceTechnologyGTC - General TechnologyHVA - Heating, Ventilating, AirConditioning & RefrigerationIEC - Independent ElectricalContractorsIMC - Interstate MechanicalContractorsJCI - Johnson Controls InstituteMET - Manufacturing TechnologyOSH - Occupational Safety andHealth TechnologyWRT - Hydrologic Studies-WaterPurification TechnologyLIBERAL ARTSChair: Kerry Vrabel(602) 286-8728AIS - American Indian StudiesARH - Art HumanitiesART - ArtASB - AnthropologyASM - AnthropologyCOM - CommunicationCRE - Critical ReadingCRW - Creative WritingCWE - Career Work ExperienceEDU - EducationENG - EnglishENH - English HumanitiesESL - English as a SecondLanguageFRE - FrenchGPH - GeographyHIS - HistoryHUM - HumanitiesIFS - Information StudiesLBS - Library SkillsLRS - Leadership SkillsMHL - Music: History/LiteraturePHI - PhilosophyPOS - Political SciencePSY - PsychologyRDG - ReadingREC - RecreationREL - Religious StudiesSOC - SociologySPA - SpanishSWU - Social WorkTHP - Theater Performance/ProductionWST - Women’s StudiesMATH AND SCIENCESChair: James Crimando(602) 286-8699BIO - BiologyCHM - ChemistryFON - Food and NutritionGLG - GeologyGPH - Physical GeographyMAT - MathematicsPHY - PhysicsNURSINGDirector: Margi Schultz(602) 286-8530HCR - Health Care RelatedNCE - Nursing - ContinuingEducationNUR - Nursing


Instructional Programs 2013-20149INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMSGateWay Community College is a comprehensive community college with an emphasis on both academicand occupational programs. The college offers the Associate in Applied Science, Associate in Arts, Associatein Business, Associate in General Studies, and Associate in Science degrees. Courses, certificate and degreeprograms are available in the following areas.CCL - Certificate of CompletionAAS - Associate in Applied ScienceAccounting - CCL, AAS ...................................................................................... 146Administration of Justice Studies* - AAS ....................................................147Administrative Technology - AAS...................................................................147Air Conditioning and Electrical Accessories - CCL ................................. 150Air Conditioning/Refrigeration/Facilities - CCL, AAS ............................ 148Automotive Drive Trains - CCL ....................................................................... 150Automotive Suspension, Steering and Brakes - CCL ............................. 150Automotive Technology - CCL, AAS ............................................................ 150Biomedical Research Technology - AAS .......................................................151Business Technology Specialist - CCL ...........................................................152Clinical Research Associate - CCL ..................................................................153Clinical Research Coordinating - CCL ............................................................153Computed Tomography - CCL .........................................................................153Computer Information Systems - CCL, AAS ...............................................154Construction Trades/Apprenticeship Programs:C onst. Trades: Bricklaying - AAS ............................................................ 206C onst. Trades: Bricklaying and Tilesetting - CCL ............................. 206C onst. Trades: Carpentry - CCL, AAS ................................................... 207C onst. Trades: Concrete Form Builder - CCL .................................... 208C onst. Trades: Construction Management - CCL ............................. 209C onst. Trades: Electricity - CCL, AAS ................................................... 209C onst. Trades: General Construction Worker - CCL ..........................211C onst. Trades: Heat and Frost Insulation - CCL, AAS ......................212C onst. Trades: Heavy Equipment Operations - CCL, AAS ..............213C onst. Trades: Ironworking - CCL, AAS .................................................214C onst. Trades - Mechanical Trades: HVAC - CCL, AAS ...................215C onst. Trades - Mechanical Trades: Pipefitting - CCL ......................217C onst. Trades - Mechanical Trades: Plumbing - CCL, AAS .............218Const. Trades - Mechanical Trades: Sheet Metal - CCL, AAS ........219C onst. Trades: Millwrighting - CCL, AAS ............................................. 220C onst. Trades: Painting and Drywalling - CCL, AAS .........................221C onst. Trades: Pipe Trades-Pipefitter-Refrigeration - CCL, AAS ....222C onst. Trades: Plastering & Cement Masonry - CCL ........................224C onst. Trades: Plumbing - CCL, AAS .....................................................224C onst. Trades: Pre-Apprenticeship - CCL ............................................225C onst. Trades: Sheet Metal - CCL, AAS .................................................226C onst. Trades: Steamfitting - CCL, AAS ...............................................227Court Reporting - Judicial - CCL, AAS ..........................................................155Court Reporting – Scoping/Transcription - CCL .......................................156Diagnostic Medical Sonography - CCL, AAS ..............................................157Electrical Technology - CCL, AAS ...................................................................159Electroneurodiagnostic (END) Technology – AAS.................................. 160Engine Performance and Diagnosis - CCL ....................................................151Fast Track Practical Nursing - CCL .................................................................187General Business - CCL, AAS .............................................................................161Health Services Management - CCL, AAS ....................................................162Health Unit Coordinating/Patient Care Associate - CCL .......................163Healthcare Compliance - CCL .......................................................................... 164Homeland Security* - CCL ................................................................................147Hospital Central Service Technology - CCL ................................................165Industrial Design Technology - AAS ..............................................................166Industrial Design Technology: Design Specialist: SolidWorks - CCL .... 165Linux Professional - CCL .....................................................................................179Magnetic Resonance Imaging - CCL ..............................................................167Management of Clinical and Bioscience Informatics (MCBI) - AAS .....169MCBI: Business and Project Management - CCL ......................................167MCBI: Clinical Informatics Technology - CCL .............................................168MCBI: Public Health - CCL ..................................................................................168Management of Clinical Information Technology (McIT) - AAS .........172McIT: Clinical Technology Consulting - CCL ................................................171McIT: Health Info. Technology Implementation Support - CCL ............171McIT: Health Info. Technology Technical Support - CCL ........................171McIT: Health Info. Technology Training - CCL .............................................171McIT: Implementation Management - CCL ..................................................172McIT: Practice Workflow & Info. Management Redesign - CCL...........172Medical Radiography - AAS...............................................................................175Medical Transcription - CCL, AAS ...................................................................177Microsoft Networking Technology - AAS .....................................................181Microsoft Cert. Info. Tech. Professional Administrator - CCL ..............179Microsoft Technical Specialist - CCL ............................................................. 180Network Administration: Microsoft Windows Server - CCL ................ 180Networking Administration: Cisco - CCL..................................................... 180Networking Technology: Cisco - CCL, AAS .................................................181Nuclear Medicine Technology - AAS ............................................................ 184Nurse Assisting - CCL ..........................................................................................186Nursing - AAS ..........................................................................................................188Nursing Refresher - CCL .....................................................................................186Occupational Safety & Health Technology - CCL, AAS ..........................189Office Technology - CCL .....................................................................................191Organizational Leadership - CCL......................................................................191Organizational Management - AAS .................................................................191Physical Therapist Assisting - AAS .................................................................192Polysomnographic Technology - CCL, AAS ................................................193Power Plant Technology - AAS .......................................................................229Practical Nursing - CCL .......................................................................................187Production Technology - AAS ..........................................................................195Production Technology: CNC Technology - CCL ..................................... 194Production Technology: Quality Assurance - CCL ...................................195Radiation Therapy - CCL .....................................................................................196Residential & Light Commercial Air Conditioning - CCL ....................... 148Respiratory Care - AAS .......................................................................................197Retail Management - CCL, AAS .......................................................................198Small Business Entrepreneurship* - CCL ......................................................199Surgical Technology - CCL, AAS .....................................................................199Surgical Technology for the Operating Nurse - CCL ............................. 202Wastewater Treatment - CCL ......................................................................... 202Water Resources Technologies - AAS ........................................................ 204Water Resources Technologies: Hydrologic Studies - CCL ................ 203Water Treatment - CCL ..................................................................................... 203College Transfer Programs and CoursesPrograms:Academic Certificate ........................................................................................... 140Arizona General Education Curriculum (AGEC) - A, B, S ..................... 106Associate in Applied Science General Education Requirements(AAS GE) .............................................................................................................114Associate in Arts (AA) .........................................................................................122Associate in Arts, Elementary Education: (AAEE) ....................................119Associate in Arts, Fine Arts: (AAFA) - Art ...................................................125Associate in Arts, Fine Arts: (AAFA) - Dance ............................................128Associate in Arts, Fine Arts: (AAFA) - Theatre ..........................................132Associate in Business (ABus) Gen Requirements (GR) ..........................135Associate in Business (ABus) Spec Requirements (SR) .........................138Associate in General Studies (AGS) Degree .................................................111Associate in Science (AS) ...................................................................................116Transferable Courses:Anthropology ...........................................................................................................141Biology ........................................................................................................................141Chemistry ...................................................................................................................141Communication .......................................................................................................141English .........................................................................................................................141History .........................................................................................................................141Humanities .................................................................................................................141Mathematics ..............................................................................................................141Physics .......................................................................................................................142Social Work/Sociology ........................................................................................142Spanish ......................................................................................................................142Women’s Studies ...................................................................................................142*Program is open to Corporate Training and Development clients only.


10 Occupational Program Matrix 2013-2014OCCUPATIONAL PROGRAM MATRIX—MCCCD 2013-2014The Maricopa County Community College Occupational Program Matrix identifies all programs currentlyavailable within the 10 community colleges and two skill centers of the district. The programs are grouped underbroad occupational areas as requested by the colleges. For specific information regarding individual programs,contact the college(s) listed as participating institutions.College Acronyms/Name:CG: Chandler Gilbert Community College PC: Phoenix CollegeEM: Estrella Mountain Community College PV: Paradise Valley Community CollegeGC: Glendale Community CollegeRS: Rio Salado CollegeGW: GateWay Community CollegeSC: Scottsdale Community CollegeMC: Mesa Community CollegeSM: South Mountain Community CollegeAGRICULTURE, FOOD AND NATURAL RESOURCESAgribusiness Sales and ServiceAgricultural Production and ManagementUrban Horticulture ......................................................................MC(See Horticulture section for additional programs and relatedareas)Equine Training and ManagementEquine Science ..............................................................................SCVeterinary Technology/Animal Health ................................MCHorticultureLandscape Aide ...........................................................................MCLandscape Specialist .................................................................MC(See Agricultural Production and Management section foradditional programs and related areas)Workforce Development: Horticulture ................................RSWorkforce Development: Landscape Technology .........RSARCHITECTURE AND CONSTRUCTIONAir Conditioning and RefrigerationAir Conditioning/Refrigeration/Facilities .........................GWResidential and Light Commercial Air Conditioning ....GWApprenticeship Related InstructionConstruction Management .....................................................PCConstruction Trades: Bricklaying and Tilesetting ..........GWConstruction Trades: Carpentry ...........................................GWConstruction Trades: Concrete Form Builder .................GWConstruction Trades: Construction Management ..........GWConstruction Trades: Electricity ...........................................GWConstruction Trades: General Construction Worker ....GWConstruction Trades: Heat and Frost Insulation .............GWConstruction Trades: Heavy Equipment Operations ....GWConstruction Trades: Ironworking .......................................GWConstruction Trades – Mechanical Trades: Heating,Ventilating and Air Conditioning ....................................GWConstruction Trades – Mechanical Trades:Pipefitting ................................................................................GWConstruction Trades – Mechanical Trades:Plumbing ..................................................................................GWConstruction Trades – Mechanical Trades:Sheet Metal .............................................................................GWConstruction Trades: Millwrighting .....................................GWConstruction Trades: Painting and Drywalling ...............GWConstruction Trades: Pipe Trades – Pipefitter-Refrigeration ...........................................................................GWConstruction Trades: Plastering and Cement Masonry .....GWConstruction Trades: Plumbing ............................................GWConstruction Trades: Pre-Apprenticeship ........................GWConstruction Trades: Sheet Metal........................................GWConstruction Trades: Steamfitting ......................................GWPower Plant Technology ................................................ EM, GWBuilding and ConstructionArchitecture ..................................................................................MCArchitectural CADD Level III ...................................................MCArchitectural Detailing CADD Level III ...............................MCArchitectural CAD Technology .......................................PC, SCArchitectural Technology ..........................................................SCBuilding Inspection ....................................................................MCBuilding Safety Technology .....................................................SCCarpentry ......................................................................................GWCivil Engineering Technology ..................................................PCConstruction .................................................................................MCConstruction Drafting CADD Level III .................................MCConstruction Management .....................................................PCPlan Review ...................................................................................MCPre-Contractor Licensing .........................................................MCResidential Drafting CADD Level II ......................................MCSurvey and Civil Drafting - CADD Level II .........................MCWorkforce Development: Carpentry Level I ......................RSWorkforce Development: Carpentry Level II .....................RSWorkforce Development: Furniture Construction/Refinishing Level I ...................................................................RSWorkforce Development: Furniture Construction/Refinishing Level II..................................................................RSART, A/V TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATIONHome EconomicsAdolescent Development .................................................GC, RSAdult Development and Aging .......................................GC, RSAdvanced Interior Design .........................................................PCAlteration Specialist ...................................................................MCApparel Construction .................................................................PCCostume Design and Production ..........................................MCCostuming ......................................................................................PCFamily Development ...................................................................PCFamily Life Education ................................................ GC, RC, SCFashion Design ............................................................................PCFashion Design Level I ...............................................................PCFashion Design Level II ..............................................................PCFashion Illustration ......................................................................PCInterior Merchandising ..................................... EM, GC, MC, PCInterior Design ............................................................. MC, PC, SCInterior Design: Advanced .......................................................MCInterior Design: Professional Level ........................................SCParent Education .........................................................GC, RS, SCPattern Design Level I ................................................................PCPattern Design Level II ...............................................................PCMerchandisingFashion Merchandising ..............................................................PCFashion Merchandising & Design ..........................................MCImage Consultant ........................................................................MCMusicAudio Production Technologies ............ GC, MC, PC, PV, SCDance Technology .......................................................................SCMusic Business .............................CG, GC, MC, PC, PV, SC, SMCommercial Art/Advertising ArtComputer Graphic Design ........................................................PC(See Media Technology section for additional programs andrelated areas)Digital Media Arts ...................................................................... GCGraphic Design: Visual Communication ..............................SCJournalism ..................................................... GC, MC, PC, PV, SCWorkforce Development: Graphic Arts Level I .................RSWorkforce Development: Graphic Arts Level II ................RS


Occupational Program Matrix 2013-201411AEROSPACE AND AVIATIONAviation and AeronauticsAircraft Maintenance Technology ......................................... CGAircraft Maintenance Technology (Part 147) .................... CGAirframe Maintenance (Part 147) .......................................... CGAirway Science Technology, Flight Emphasis .................. CGFlight Technology ....................................................................... CGPowerplant Maintenance (Part 147) ..................................... CGBIOSCIENCEBiomedical Research Technology .......................CG, GW, SMBiotechnology ..............................................................................MCBiotechnology and Molecular Biosciences ....................... GCManagement of Clinical and Bioscience Informatics ...GWBUSINESS, MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATIONAccountingAccounting ..................................CG, EM, GC, GW, PC, RS, SMAccounting – Specialized Para-Professional .....................PVBookkeeping ..................................................................................SCMicrocomputer Accounting ....................................................PVSoftware Quality Assurance ...................................................MC(See Business Administration for additional programs andrelated areas)Accounting Paraprofessional ................................................. GCBusiness AdministrationBusiness .................................................................................. MC, SCBusiness (Fastrack) .....................................................................SCGeneral Business ...............CG, GC, GW, MC, PC, RS, SC, SM(See Management and Finance section for additional programsand related areas)Import/Export Trade ................................................................. PVInternational Business ............................................................... PVInternational Trade .....................................................................MCManagementBusiness Management .............................................................. SMGeneral Business Specialized ..................................................PVHuman Resources Management ............................................PCManagement .................................................GC, MC, PC, PV, SMMiddle Management .......................................................... GC, PVMilitary Leadership ......................................................................RSProject Management .................................................................MCPublic Relations ........................................................................... GC(See Middle Management section for additional programsand related areas)Retail Management ........................ CG, EM, GC, GW, MC, PC,PV, RS, SC, SMRetail Management and Marketing .......................................SCRetail Sales Manager .................................................................MCSmall Business ..............................................................................MCSmall Business Entrepreneurship ....................... GC, GW, SMSmall Business Management .......................................... EM, SCSmall Business Start-Up ...........CG, GC, MC, PC, PV, RS, SMSupervision and Management I ............................................. SMSupervision and Management II ............................................ SMSupervision .................................................................................... GCMiddle ManagementPublic Relations ...........................................................................MC(See Management section for additional programs and relatedareas)Office OccupationsAdministrative Office Coordinator ....................................... GCAdministrative Office Professional ........................................PVAdministrative Technology ....................................................GWAdministrative Professional .....................................................PCBusiness Technology Specialist ............................................GWComputer Applications .............................................................PCComputer Software Applications ..........................................PVCourt Reporting: Judicial ........................................................GWCourt Reporting: Scoping/Transcription ..........................GWData Entry Clerk .......................................................................... EMGeneral Office Secretary ..................................................EM, GCOffice Coordinator ...................................................................... GCOffice Technology......................................................................GWParalegal Studies ..........................................................................PCReceptionist .................................................................................. EMManagement of Clinical Information Technology..........GWManagement of Clinical Information Technology:Clinical Technology Consulting .......................................GWManagement of Clinical Information Technology:Health Info. Technology Implementation Support ...GWManagement of Clinical Information Technology:Health Info. Technology Technical Support ................GWManagement of Clinical Information Technology:Practice Workflow & Info. Management Redesign ...GWManagement of Clinical Information Technology:Implementation Management ..........................................GWManagement of Clinical Information Technology:Health Information Technology Training .....................GWTechnology Support Analyst Level I ....................................MCTotal Quality ManagementAutomobile Insurance: Customer Service ..........................RSAutomobile Policy: Customer Service .................................RSAutomobile Insurance Claims: Customer Service ...........RSBroadband Telecommunications: Account Services ......RSBroadband Telecommunications ...........................................RSBroadband Telecommunications: Field Operations .......RSBroadband Telecommunications: Technical SupportServices .....................................................................................RSCredit Counseling: Customer Service ..................................RSCustomer Service Management ............................................ EMHuman Services Assistance: Public AssistanceEligibility .....................................................................................RSHuman Services-Specialist: Customer Service .................RSInsurance-Customer Service ....................................................RSHuman Services - Unemployment Insurance:Customer Service....................................................................RSMotor Vehicle: Customer Service ..........................................RSOrganizational Leadership ............ CG, EM, GW, MC, PV, RSOrganizational Management ........ CG, EM, GW, MC, PV, RSPharmacy: Customer Service ................................................. SMQuality Customer Service .........................................................RSUtilities Customer Service ........................................................RSEDUCATION AND TRAININGEarly Childhood EducationChild and Family Organizations Managementand Administration .........................................................GC, RSChild Development Associate (CDA) Preparation . GC, PVCurriculum for Young Children ...............................................PCEarly Care Specialist ..................................................................MCEarly Childhood Education and Administration...............PCEarly Childhood Classroom Management ..........................PCEarly Childhood Development ........................................RS, SMEarly Childhood Education ............................................. GC, PVEarly Childhood Administration andManagement ................................................ GC, MC, RSC, SMEarly Learning and Development .................CG, MC, RS, SCFamily Child Care Management ..................................... RS, SCInfant and Toddler Development ................................... RS, SCWorkforce DevelopmentWorkforce Development and Community Re-Entry ......RSEducationGifted Education ......................................................................... EMReading Specialist Endorsement ..........................................MCTeacher Assisting ........................................................................ EMFoundations of Student Services ......................................... EMLibrary Media TechnologyLibrary Information Technology ............................................MCLibrary Information Technology: Advanced .....................MCLibrary Information Technology: Basic ...............................MCLibrary Information Technology: School LibraryMedia Center ................................................................................MC


12 Occupational Program Matrix 2013-2014ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGYEnvironmental TechnologyGeospatial Technologies ..........................................................MCOccupational Safety and Health Technology..................GWRadiation Protection Technology ......................................... EMSafety, Health and Environmental Studies .........................PVWastewater Treatment.............................................................GWWater Resources Technologies ............................................GWWater Resources Technologies: Hydrologic Studies ....GWWater Treatment ........................................................................GWFINANCEFinanceBanking and Finance ......................................................... EM, PCCertified Residential Appraiser .............................................MCHome Inspection .........................................................................MCLicensed Real Estate Appraiser.............................................MCReal Estate .............................................................................MC, PCReal Estate: Prelicense ...............................................................PCResidential Appraisal Trainee .................................................MCBank Account Management: Customer Service ..............RSGOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATIONPublic Administration .................................................................RSTribal Development .....................................................................SCHEALTH SCIENCEAllied HealthAdvanced Behavioral Health Sciences .......................GC, SMBasic Behavioral Health ....................................................GC, SMClinical Laboratory Sciences ...................................................PCClinical Research Associate ...................................................GWClinical Research Coordinating ............................................GWCommunity Health Worker ..................................................... SMDevelopmental Disabilities Specialist ................................. GCDiagnostic Medical Sonography ..........................................GWElectroneurodiagnostic (END) Technology .....................GWHealth Information: Long Term Care Settings ..................PCHealth Information Technology ..............................................PCHealth Services Management ................................................GWHealth Unit Coordinating/Patient Care Associate ........GWHistologic Technology ................................................................PCHospital Central Service Technology .................................GWLaboratory Assisting ..................................................................PCComputed Tomography ..........................................................GWMagnetic Resonance Imaging ...............................................GWMedical Assisting .........................................................................PCMedical Coding: Hospital-Based ............................................PCMedical Billing and Coding: Physician-Based ...................PCMedical Front Office ...................................................................PCMedical Radiography ................................................................GWMedical Transcription ...............................................................GWNuclear Medicine Technology ...............................................GWPhlebotomy ....................................................................................PCPhysical Therapist Assisting ..................................................GWPolysomnographic Technology ............................................GWRadiation Therapy .....................................................................GWRecovery Support ....................................................................... SMRespiratory Care ........................................................................GWSpeech Language Pathology Assistant ............................. EMSurgical Technology..................................................................GWSurgical Technology for the Operating Nurse ................GWEmergency Medical TechnologyAdvanced Emergency Medical Technology(Paramedic) ......................................................................PC, PVCommunity Emergency Response Team (CERT):Level I ..........................................................................................PCEmergency Communications and Deployment ...............PCIntermediate Emergency Medical Technology .................PCDentalClinical Dental Assisting ............................................................RSDental Assisting ............................................................................PCDental Hygiene ............................................................ MC, PC, RSDental Office Management ......................................................RSDental Assisting Technology ...................................................RSCommunity Dental Health Coordination.............................RSNursingFast Track Practical Nursing ..................................................GWNursing ..................................CG, EM, GC, GW, MC, PC, PV, SCNurse Assisting .......... CG, GC, GW, MC, PC, PV, SC, RS, EMPractical Nursing ....... CG, GC, GW, MC, PC, PV, SC, RS, EMNursing Refresher .............................................................GW, MCHOSPITALITY AND TOURISMFood and NutritionAdvanced Professional Culinary Arts ...................................SCBaking and Pastry ............................................................... EM, PCBasic Culinary Studies ............................................................... EMCommercial Baking .....................................................................PCCommercial Food Preparation ................................................PCCulinary Arts ..................................................................................SCCulinary Studies...........................................................EM, MC, PCCulinary Fundamentals ..............................................................SC(See Hospitality section for additional programs and relatedareas)Dietetic Technology ........................................................... CG, PVFood Service Administration ...................................................PCProfessional Food and Beverage Service ...........................PCSustainable Food Systems .............................................. MC, RSHospitalityAirline Operations: Ground Operations ...............................RSAirline Operations: Initial Flight Attendant ........................RSAirline Operations: Passenger Services ...............................RSAirline Operations: Reservations ...........................................RSAirline Operations: Vacations ..................................................RSAirline Operations: Reservations & Ticketing Services ..RSCulinary Arts ..................................................................................SC(See Food & Nutrition section for additional programs andrelated areas)Hospitality and Tourism/Golf Management .......................SCHospitality and Tourism/Hotel Management ....................SCHospitality and Tourism/Restaurant Management .........SCHospitality and Tourism/Spa and WellnessCenter Management ..............................................................SCHospitality/Hotel Management ............................................. EMHospitality and Tourism/Tourism Developmentand Management ....................................................................SCHUMAN SERVICESParks, Recreation, Leisure and Fitness StudiesRecreation Management .................................................. MC, SCHealth and Physical Education/FitnessGroup Fitness Instructor ..................................................GC, MCPersonal Trainer ...................................................................GC, MCPersonal Training Specialist ...CG, EM, GC, MC, PV, SC, SMStrength, Nutrition and PersonalTraining .....................................CG, EM, GC, MC, PV, SC, SMTeaching, Healing, Meditation & Stress Management ....PVTherapeutic Massage ......................................................... CG, PCYoga Instruction ...........................................................................SCFamily and Consumer ScienceNutrition for Fitness and Wellness .......................GC, MC, SCSocial SciencesAddictions and Substance Use Disorders Level I ............RSAddictions and Substance Use Disorders Level II ...........RSAddictions and Substance Use Disorders ..........................RSDeaf Studies ...................................................................................PCInterpreter Preparation ..............................................................PCProfessional Addictions Counseling .....................................RS


Occupational Program Matrix 2013-201413Social ServicesAdolescent Studies .....................................................................PCFamily Support .............................................................................PCFamily Development ...................................................................PCMortuary ScienceMortuary Science ........................................................................MCINFORMATION TECHNOLOGYComputer ScienceAdvanced Computer Usage and Applications .................RSAdvanced Web Designer .........................................................MCComputer Applications Technology .................................... EMComputer Applications: Microsoft OfficeSpecialist/Advanced .............................................................MCComputer Applications: Microsoft OfficeSpecialist/Basic ......................................................................MCComputer Hardware and Desktop Support ......CG, EM, SCComputer Hardware and Network Support ......................SCComputer Information Systems ...........GC, GW, PC, SC, SMComputer Information Technology .......................................PVComputer Networking Technology .......................................PVComputer Programming ..........................................................MCComputer Systems Maintenance ...........................................PVComputer Technology ...............................................................RSComputer Usage and Applications .......................................RSComputer and Information Technologies .......................... SMDatabase Development .............................................................SCDesktop Publishing .................................................................... EMEngineering Technology ......................................... CG, GC, EMGame Technology .......................................................................MCGeographic Information Systems .........................................MCInformation Security .................................................................. GCInformation Security Administration ................................... GCInformation Security Technology ......................................... GCInformation Security Wireless Networks ........................... GCInformation Technology ........................................................... CGInformation Technology: Programming andSystems Analysis .................................................................... SMInformation Technology: Web and Graphic Design ....... SMInformation Technology: Cisco Networking ..................... SMInformation Technology: Computer ApplicationsSpecialist ................................................................................... SMInformation Technology: Network Server ......................... SMInformation Technology: Network Security ...................... SMInformation Technology Support.......................................... SMLinux Associate...................................................CG, EM, GC, MCLinux Networking Administration........................EM, GC, MCLinux Professional .....CG, EM, GC, GW, MC, PC, PV, SC, SMMicrocomputer Applications .................................................GC*Computer Applications: Office Specialist/Core Level ................................................................................CG*Computer Applications: Office Specialist/Expert Level ............................................................................CG*Computer Business Applications ................................ CG, GC*(*See Office Occupations section for additional programs andrelated areas)Microsoft Desktop Support Technology ............EM, GC, PVMicrosoft Networking Technology ............. EM, GC, GW, PVMicrosoft Technical Specialist ...................... EM, GC, GW, PVMicrosoft Applications Development...................................PVMicrosoft Server Administration ...........................EM, GC, PVMicrosoft Certified Information TechnologyProfessional (MCITP) Administrator ..... EM, GC, GW, PVMultimedia and Business Technology .................................MCNetwork Administration ............................................................SCNetwork Administration: CISCO NetworkProfessional ............................................................. CG, MC, SMNetwork Administration: Microsoft WindowsServer ....................................................................... CG, GW, MCNetworking: Design and System Support ..........................RSNetworking Administration: Cisco ............CG, EM, GC, GW,MC, SMNetworking System Administration .....................................MCNetworking Technology: Cisco ....................CG, EM, GC, GWOracle Database Administration ........................................... EMOracle Database Operations .................................................. CGProgramming .................................................................................RSProgramming and System Analysis ...........CG, EM, GC, MC,PC, PV, SC, SMSoftware Development ..............................................................SCWeb Design ...........................................................EM, GC, PC, PVWeb Design Technologies ........................................................SCWeb Design: User Interface .....................................................RSWeb Designer ...............................................................................MCWeb Developer ........................................... EM, GC, MC, PC, PVWeb Development .......................................................................SCWeb Server Administrator .......................................................MCWeb Technology .........................................................................MCMEDIA TECHNOLOGYAnimation ...................................................................................... GCAnimation: Imaging and Design Foundation ................... GCBroadcast Production ................................................................SCComic and Sequential Art ........................................................PCDigital Arts ....................................................................................MCDigital Design ................................................................................RSDigital Photography ....................................................................PCDigital Arts: Digital Illustration ...............................................MCDigital Arts: Digital Photography..........................................MCDigital Arts: Graphic Design ...................................................MCDigital Arts: Web Design ..........................................................MCEditing ..............................................................................................SCeLearning Design Specialist.....................................................RSFilm Production ............................................................................SCGame Technology .......................................................................MCGraphic Design ............................................................................ GCMedia Arts: Computer Art/Illustration ........................ CG, PCMedia Arts: Digital Animation .................................................PCMedia Arts: Digital Imaging ............................................ CG, PCMedia Arts: Web Design ............................................................PCMotion Picture/Television Production..................................SCMultimedia ..................................................................................... GCMultimedia Technology ............................................................MCScreenwriting ................................................................................SCTechnical Theatre .................................................................PC, SCVideo Production Technology ............................................... GCMANUFACTURINGDrafting TechnologyCAD Technology ......................................................................... GCBasic CAD ...................................................................................... GCCAD/CAM/CNC I .........................................................................MCCAD/CAM/CNC II ........................................................................MCCAD Application ......................................................................... GCCommercial Drafting CADD Level II ....................................MCComputer Aided Design and Drafting CADD Level I ....MCComputer Aided Drafting ........................................................MCCAD-BIM Technology.................................................................PCElectro/Mechanical Drafting ...................................................MCElectromechanical Manufacturing Technology ...............MCIndustrial Design Technology ................................................GWIndustrial Design Technology: Design Specialist:SolidWorks ..............................................................................GWMachining I ....................................................................................MCMachining II ...................................................................................MCManufacturing Engineering Technology ............................MCManufacturing Management ...................................................MCProduction Technology ...................................................GW, MCProduction Technology: CNC Technology .......................GWProduction Technology: Quality Assurance ....................GWManufacturing Welding ............................................................MCMechanical Drafting ...................................................................MCMicro Circuit Mask Design .......................................................MCMicrocomputer Servicing......................................................... GCPublic Works Leadership ......................................................... EM


14 Occupational Program Matrix 2013-2014Electronics/Electrical TechnologyAutomation Technology ...........................................................MCAutomation Technology Level I.............................................MCAutomation Technology Level II ...........................................MCAutomation Technology Level III ..........................................MCComputer and Networking Technology ............................. GCElectric Utility Technology ...................................................... CGElectric Utility Design Technology ....................................... CGElectrical Technology ...............................................................GWElectromechanical Automation Technology ....................MCElectronics Engineering Technology ...................................MCElectronics Manufacturing Technology .............................. GCElectronics Technology ............................................................MCMeter Technology ....................................................................... CGNetwork Maintenance ............................................................... GCWorkforce Development: Electrical Level I ........................RSWorkforce Development: Electrical Level II .....................RSEngineeringSurveying Technology ................................................................PCWelding TechnologyWelding ...........................................................................................MC(See Manufacturing section for additional programs andrelated areas)MARKETING, SALES AND SERVICEMarketingMarketing ........................................................GC, PC, PV, SC, SMSalesmanship ................................................................................MCLAW, PUBLIC SAFETY, CORRECTIONS, ANDSECURITYEmergency Medical TechnologyEmergency Medical Technology ...CG, GC, MC, PC, PV, SC(See Allied Health section for additional programs and relatedareas)Fire Investigation ....................... CG, EM, GC, MC, PC, PV, SCParamedicine ................................................ GC, PC, PV, SC, MCAdministration of JusticeAdministration of Justice ....................... EM, GC, GW, PC, PVAdministration of Justice-Comprehensive .........................PCAdministration of Justice-Fundamentals ...........................PCAdministration of Justice Studies ............... CG, GW, MC, SCAdvanced Corrections ...............................................................RSBasic Corrections .........................................................................RSCorrections .....................................................................................RSCrime and Accident Scene Photography ...................PC, SCCrime and Intelligence Analysis ............................................ CGCrime Scene Investigation ................................................PC, SCCrime Scene Technology ..................................................PC, SCDetention Services ......................................................................RSDomestic Preparedness and Homeland Security ............PCEvidence Technology .................................................................PCEvidence Technology ............................................................... EMFingerprint Classification and Identification .............PC, SCForensic Investigation ...............................................................MCForensic Science ......................................................................... CGForensic Technology ...................................................................PCForensic Science: Crime Lab ...................................................SCGlobal Citizenship .......................................................................MCHomeland Security ............................................................CG, GWInformation Security Forensics ............................................. GCJudicial Studies ............................................................................MCJustice and Government Agency AdministrationLevel I .........................................................................................MCJustice and Government Agency AdministrationLevel II ........................................................................................MCJustice and Government Agency Administration ..........MCJustice Studies .............................................................CG, MC, SCLaw Enforcement Investigator ............................................... GCLaw Enforcement Technology ................................................RSLaw Enforcement .........................................................................SCLaw Enforcement Training Academy ..........................CG, GCLegal Studies ................................................................................MCParalegal .........................................................................................RSPolice Academy Preparation Level I .....................................SCPolice Science ...................................................................... MC, SCPolice Supervision ...................................................................... GCPublic Safety Technology .........................................................RSVictimology ...................................................................................MCFire ScienceDriver Operator...................................CG, EM, GC, MC, PC, PVEmergency Management .................................................. GC, PV, SMEmergency Response and Operations ............. CG, EM, GC,MC, PC, PV, RS, SCFire Academy ............................................................................... GCFire Officer............................................CG, EM, GC, MC, PC, PVFire Science ........................................................... EM, MC, PV, RSFire Science Technology ..........................................EM, GC, SCFirefighter Operations .............. CG, EM, GC, MC, PC, PV, SCHazardous Materials Response ...............................................PCSCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING ANDMATHEMATICSAGEC-S ......................................................................................... ALLAerospace and Aviation/Aviation and AeronauticsAircraft Maintenance Technology ......................................... CGAircraft Maintenance Technology (Part 147) .................... CGAirframe Maintenance (Part 147) .......................................... CGAirway Science Technology, Flight Emphasis .................. CGFlight Technology ....................................................................... CGPowerplant Maintenance (Part 147) ..................................... CGBioscienceBiomedical Research Technology ...............................GW, SMBiotechnology ..............................................................................MCBiotechnology and Molecular Biosciences ....................... GCManagement of Clinical and Bioscience Informatics ...GWTRANSPORTATION, DISTRIBUTION AND LOGISTICSAutomotive TechnologyAir Conditioning and Electrical Accessories ...................GWAir Conditioning ..........................................................................MCAutomotive Chassis ................................................................... GCAutomotive Drive Trains ..........................................................GWAutomotive Electrical Systems ..............................................MCAutomotive Engines and Drive Trains ................................. GCAutomotive Engine Performance Diagnosis& Air Conditioning ................................................................. GCAutomotive Performance Technology ................................MCAutomotive Suspension, Steering and Brakes ...............GWAutomotive Technology ................................................. GC, GWBrakes, Alignment, Suspension and Steering ..................MCEngine Performance and Diagnosis............................GW, MCTransmissions and Power Trains ............................................MCWorkforce Development: AutomotiveTechnology Level I ..................................................................RSWorkforce Development: Automotive TechnologyLevel II .........................................................................................RS


Important Deadlines 2013-201415IMPORTANT DEADLINES FOR STUDENTSClass LengthDeadline forStudents toWithdraw withGuaranteedGrade of WDeadline forStudents toWithdrawFrom a Course(Instructor SignatureRequired)Deadline forStudentsto RequestCompleteWithdrawalDeadline toChange Type ofGrading (A-F toP/Z, or P/Z toA-F)Deadline toChange fromAudit Grade toCredit GradeDeadline toChange fromCredit Grade toAudit GradeOne Week or less(1 to 7 days)1st Day of Class1st Day of Class orPrior to the LastDay of Class1st Day of Class orPrior to the LastDay of Class1st Day of Class 1st Day of Class 1st Day of ClassTwo Weeks(8 to 14 days)Three Weeks(15 to 21 Days)Four Weeks(22 to 28 days)Five Weeks(29 to 35 days)Six Weeks(36 to 42 days)Seven Weeks(43 to 49 days)Eight Weeks(50 to 56 days)Nine Weeks(57 to 63 days)Ten Weeks(64 to 70 days)Eleven Weeks(71 to 77 days)Twelve Weeks(78 to 84 days)Thirteen Weeks(85 to 91 days)Fourteen Weeks(92 to 98 days)Fifteen Weeks(99 to 105 days)3rd Calendar Day 6th Calendar Day 6th Calendar Day 1st Day of Class 1st Day of Class 3rd Calendar Day6th Calendar Day 12th Calendar Day 12th Calendar Day 2nd Calendar Day 1st Day of Class 5th Calendar Day9th Calendar Day 17th Calendar Day 17th Calendar Day 3rd Calendar Day 2nd Calendar Day 7th Calendar Day12th Calendar Day 23rd Calendar Day 23rd Calendar Day 4th Calendar Day 2nd Calendar Day 9th Calendar Day14th Calendar Day 29th Calendar Day 29th Calendar Day 5th Calendar Day 3rd Calendar Day 11th Calendar Day17th Calendar Day 35th Calendar Day 35th Calendar Day 5th Calendar Day 3rd Calendar Day 12th Calendar Day20th Calendar Day 41st Calendar Day 41st Calendar Day 6th Calendar Day 3rd Calendar Day 15th Calendar Day23rd Calendar Day 46th Calendar Day 46th Calendar Day 7th Calendar Day 4th Calendar Day 17th Calendar Day26th Calendar Day 52nd Calendar Day 52nd Calendar Day 8th Calendar Day 4th Calendar Day 19th Calendar Day29th Calendar Day 58th Calendar Day 58th Calendar Day 9th Calendar Day 5th Calendar Day 21st Calendar Day32nd Calendar Day 63rd Calendar Day 63rd Calendar Day 10th Calendar Day 5th Calendar Day 23rd Calendar Day35th Calendar Day 70th Calendar Day 70th Calendar Day 10th Calendar Day 5th Calendar Day 25th Calendar Day38th Calendar Day 76th Calendar Day 76th Calendar Day 11th Calendar Day 6th Calendar Day 27th Calendar Day41st Calendar Day 82nd Calendar Day 82nd Calendar Day 12th Calendar Day 6th Calendar Day 28th Calendar DaySixteen Weeks ormore(106 or more days)End of theseventh weekTwo weeks beforethe last classperiodTwo weeks beforethe last classperiodWithin 14 daysincluding the firstclass periodDeadlines are based on calendar days and begin with the first day of class.Within first weekof classWithin first fiveweeks


16 Academic Policies 2013-2014Academic Probation (Progress)(A.R. 2.3.4)1. ProbationA student will be placed on academic probationif, after completion of 12 or more credit hours, thestudent’s cumulative grade point average is lessthan:Credit Hours for WhichGrade Points are Computedat Resident MaricopaCommunity College(A, B, C ,D, F, and Y)Minimum GradePoint AverageRequired12-15 1.6016-30 1.7531-45 1.9046+ 2.00(Students should also be aware that graduationrequires a cumulative minimum grade pointaverage of 2.00.)Students on academic probation may take nomore than 12 credit hours per semester unlessapproved by the Admissions and StandardsCommittee.2. Continued ProbationA student on academic probation who fails to raisethe cumulative grade point average to the requiredminimum standards (see above) will be placed oncontinued probation and may be limited to takingsix credit hours. Regulations regarding continuedprobation do not apply to the summer session.Credit hours earned in summer sessions will beincluded in the cumulative grade point average.Instructional Grievance Process(A.R. 2.3.5)A student who feels that he or she has been treatedunfairly or unjustly by a faculty member with regardto an academic process such as grading, testing, orassignments, has the right to appeal according to theapproved procedures.The appeal process for grades must be initiated nolater than sixty (60) calendar days from the date thegrade was issued. Steps outlining the process areavailable in Appendix S-6.Appendix S-6: Instructional GrievanceProcessA student who feels that he/she has been treated unfairlyor unjustly by a faculty member (full-time or part-time)with regard to an academic process such as grading,testing or assignments, shall discuss the issue first withthe faculty member involved. This conference shall berequested by the student within 15 working days from thetime the student knew or reasonably should have knownabout the unfair or unjust treatment.ACADEMIC POLICIESThis instructional grievance process should not beutilized in a case in which a student feels he/shehas experienced discrimination. If the student feelsthat he/she has experienced discrimination on thebasis of race, color, religion, sex, gender identity,national origin, citizenship status (including documentabuse), gender, age, disability, veteran status, geneticinformation or sexual orientation, the student shouldrefer to the Discrimination Complaint Procedures forStudents as administered by the Vice President forStudent Affairs.Steps for students to follow:1. If, within 10 working days of the request for theconference with faculty member, the problemis not resolved or the faculty member has beenunable to meet with the student, the student maycontinue the process by filing a written grievancewith the Department/Division Chairperson andappropriate administrative officer at the college/center. This written grievance must be filed within10 working days following the previous deadline.The written grievance will be given to the facultymember five days before any official meetings areconvened.2. Upon receipt of a written grievance, theDepartment/Division Chair or appropriatecollege administrative officer will work with theparties in an attempt to resolve the conflict. Thefaculty may ask that the College Faculty SenatePresident be in attendance. Every attempt willbe made to maintain confidentiality during thisprocess. A faculty member will not be requiredto respond to a grievance that is not in writingand, when appropriate, that did not have specificdocumentation including dates, times, materials,etc. The written grievance will be made availableto the faculty member.3. If the grievance is not resolved at this level within10 working days, the student should forward to vicepresident of academic affairs or designee, a copy ofthe original written grievance with an explanationregarding action taken at each prior level. Thedean of instruction or appropriate college/centeradministrative officer will meet with the student,faculty member, the College Faculty SenatePresident if requested by the faculty member, andDepartment/Division Chair and attempt to resolvethe issues. This level will be the final step in anygrievance process regarding grades.4. If the grievance, other than those concerninggrades, is not resolved by the vice president ofacademic affairs or designee, it may be forwardedin writing by the student to the college presidentfor final resolution. The college president ordesignee will issue a final written determination inthe grievance process.5. Instructional grievances are resolved at the collegelevel. The district office is not an avenue of appealfor the instructional grievance process.Note: The grievance process for grades must be initiated nolater than sixty (60) calendar days from the date the gradewas issued.


Academic Policies 2013-201417Non-Instructional Complaint ResolutionProcess (A.R. 2.3.12)A student who feels that he or she has been treatedunfairly or unjustly by any employee with regardto a non-instructional process such as a student oradministrative services has the right to file a formaland written complaint according to the approvedprocedures. See Appendix S-8.Appendix S-8: Non-Instructional ComplaintResolution ProcessA student who feels that he or she has been treatedunfairly or unjustly by any employee with regardto a non-instructional process such as a student oradministrative services has the right to file a formaland written complaint according to the approvedprocedures. Steps for students to follow:1. Discuss the issue with the employee involved. Thestudent should request this conference within 15working days from the time the student knew orreasonably should have known about the unfair orunjust treatment.2. If, within 10 working days of the request for theconference with the employee, the problem isnot resolved or the employee has been unable tomeet with the student, the student may continuethe process by filing a written complaint with theappropriate supervisor of the employee whereauthority exists to take corrective action. Thiswritten complaint must be filed within 10 workingdays following the previous deadline. The writtencomplaint will be given to the employee fiveworking days before any official meetings areconvened.3. Upon receipt of a written complaint, theappropriate supervisor will work with the parties inan attempt to resolve the conflict. Every attemptwill be made to maintain confidentiality duringthis process. An employee will not be required torespond to a complaint which is not in writing andwhich, when appropriate, does not have specificdocumentation including dates, times, actions,supporting documents, etc. The written complaintwill be made available to the employee.4. If the complaint is not resolved at this level within10 working days, the student should forward tothe vice president of student affairs or designeea copy of the original written complaint with anexplanation regarding action taken at each priorlevel. The dean and/or associate dean will meetwith the student, the employee, and the relevantsupervisor and attempt to resolve the issues.5. If the associate dean and/or dean do not resolvethe complaint, the student may forward it inwriting to the college president for final resolution.The college president or designee will issue a finalwritten determination in the complaint process.Withdrawal (A.R. 2.3.6)To withdraw from a course or courses from thecollege, students must follow approved procedures(See Appendix S-7). The Office of Admissions andRecords provides information about the withdrawalprocess. The official date of withdrawal is the date thewithdrawal is received in the Admissions and RecordsOffice/Office of Student Enrollment Services.Never attending is not an allowable refund exceptionor an excuse of the debt incurred through registration.Please see the refund policy.Appendix S-7: Student and FacultyWithdrawal ProceduresStudent Withdrawal Procedures1. Withdrawal from Specific CoursesA student may officially withdraw from specificcourses in the following ways:A. Through the 7th week*, a student may initiatean official withdrawal from any course bycompleting the withdrawal process onlineusing the student self service system or bysubmitting a course withdrawal form to theAdmissions and Records Office/Office ofStudent Enrollment Services in accordancewith the published deadlines. A grade of W(withdrawn, passing – not computed in thegrade point average) will be assigned.B. After the 7th week*, a student must initiate awithdrawal request with the faculty member.If, after consultation with the student, thefaculty member approves the request, a gradeof W (withdrawn, passing—not computed inthe grade point average) or Y (withdrawn,failing—computed in the grade point averageas a failing grade) will be assigned. If therequest is not approved, the student willremain in the course.C. A student has the right to appeal a withdrawaldecision according to the approvedprocedures. Steps outlining the process areavailable in Appendix S-6.*The prescribed time limits are for full semesterclasses. Time limits for classes which meet fewerthan 16 weeks are adjusted accordingly. SeeImportant Deadlines for Students. Failure to filean official withdrawal form may result in failinggrades and responsibility for course tuition andfees. Refunds will only be processed within therefund period.2. Complete Withdrawal from CollegeStudents electing to withdraw from the collegemust contact the Admissions and Records Office/Office of Enrollment Services no later than twoweeks* before the end of the last class meetingand may be required to file a written request.A grade of W will be assigned in all courses forstudents who withdraw by the end of the 7thweek* of classes. Withdrawals completed afterthis time will result in a grade of W (withdrawn,passing – not computed in the grade pointaverage) or Y (withdrawn, failing – computed inthe GPA as a failing grade).


18 Academic Policies 2013-2014*The prescribed time limits are for full semesterclasses. Time limits for classes that meet fewerthan 16 weeks are adjusted accordingly. SeeImportant Deadlines for Students. Failure to filean official withdrawal form may result in failinggrades and responsibility for course tuition andfees. Refunds will only be processed within therefund period.3. Withdrawal of Financial Aid StudentsIn accordance with federal regulations (34CFR668.22), a student may be required to repayfederal financial aid funds if they completelywithdraw or are withdrawn, or fail to earn apassing grade from all classes during a semester.Further information is available at the collegeOffice of Student Financial Aid. This could affecta student’s ability to receive Financial Aid in thefuture at any school.Faculty Withdrawal ProceduresA faculty member has the option of withdrawing astudent who has accumulated unofficial absences inexcess of the number of times indicated in that facultymember’s attendance policy in the course syllabus(see A.R. 2.3.2). Students withdrawn for excessiveabsences may be reinstated only with the approval ofthe faculty member. A grade of W will be assignedthrough the 7th week*. After the 7th week*, a grade ofW or Y will be assigned. Faculty members electing towithdraw students must record the withdrawal throughthe online system, including last date of attendanceand withdrawal code.*The prescribed time limits are for full semesterclasses. Time limits for classes that meet fewer than16 weeks are adjusted accordingly. See ImportantDeadlines for Students. Failure to file an officialwithdrawal form may result in failing grades andresponsibility for course tuition and fees. Refunds willonly be processed within the refund period.2. Upon approval, all courses taken prior toreenrollment with a grade of “A,” “B,” “C,” “D,”“F,” and “Y” will be annotated as academicrenewal on the student’s permanent record. Allcourse work affected by academic renewal willnot be computed in the grade point average.Courses with grades “A,” “B,” or “C” will have theassociated credit hours counted in the total credithours earned. Such credit will not be computed inthe grade point average.3. All course work will remain on the student’spermanent academic record, ensuring a true andaccurate academic history.4. The academic renewal policy may be used onlyonce at each college and cannot be revoked onceapproved.5. Students who have been granted AcademicRenewal must also meet the Financial AidStandards of Academic Progress if they wish toreceive financial aid.Honors Program (A.R. 2.3.8)Each of the Maricopa Community Colleges has anhonors program. Interested students should contactthe college honors coordinator for information aboutthe program and available scholarships, includingthe Chancellor’s, Foundation’s, and President’sScholarships.President’s Honor ListThe President’s Honor List for each college consistsof all students who complete 12 or more credit hoursin residence in courses numbered 100 or higher in agiven semester with a college semester grade pointaverage of 3.75 or higher.Academic Renewal (A.R. 2.3.7)Students who are returning to this college after aseparation of five years or more from the MaricopaCommunity College District, may petition for academicrenewal. The request must be in writing and submittedto the Admissions and Records Office/Office ofStudent Enrollment Services at the college where thegrades were earned.Academic renewal at one of the Maricopa CommunityColleges does not guarantee that colleges outside theMaricopa Colleges will accept this action. Acceptanceof academic renewal is at the discretion of thereceiving institution.1. Prior to petitioning for academic renewal, thestudent must demonstrate a renewed academicperformance by earning a minimum of twelve (12)credit hours and a cumulative grade point averageof 2.5 or higher within Maricopa Colleges afterreenrollment.


Student Services 2013-201419Enrollment ServicesThe Department of Enrollment Services at GateWayCommunity College strives to provide effective andreliable service in support of the academic mission ofthis institution. Enrollment Services staff facilitates andsupports student admission, enrollment, retention andgraduation.STUDENT SERVICESverifications; and administers selective admissions.This office is also responsible for monitoring FERPA,complying with parts of the Solomon Amendment,and verifying citizenship and residency for tuitionpurposes. In addition, this office processes alltranscript evaluations, graduation reviews andcheckouts.Location: Integrated Education Building,Room IE-1215, with advisors also locatedin the Center for Health Careers Education(CHCE)Telephone: (602) 286-8200Website: www.gatewaycc.edu/enrollmentEmail: enroll@gatewaycc.eduFall and Spring Semester HoursMonday - Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.Friday8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.Summer HoursMonday - ThursdayClosed on Friday8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.Enrollment Services is designed to serve the needsof students by providing a one-stop service centerfor admissions, registration, records, financial aid,cashiering and advisement. GateWay Central assistswith a variety of registration and enrollment servicesand provides computer access for self-service and onsiteassistance.Student ID CardsStudent identification cards are available at GateWayCentral. A picture ID is required before a student IDis issued. The first ID is free; replacement cost is $5.The following is the policy for obtaining an officialGateWay student ID:• Student ID’s will only be issued prior to thestart of the semester in which the student isregistered if payment of tuition and fees orfinancial aid/deferment is in place.My.maricopa.eduMy.maricopa.edu provides access for students, facultyand staff into the course management systems,the student self-serve functions for all MaricopaCommunity Colleges, and the GoogleApps for email.Through the Student Center, students can registerfor classes, print class schedules, make a payment,view grades, request transcripts, update contact andaddress information, and apply for graduation.Admissions, Registration and RecordsThe Admissions, Registration and Records departmentperforms the following functions: processes theStudent Information Form (admission); determinesresidency for tuition payment purposes; registersstudents in classes; maintains student records;processes transcript requests and enrollmentAdvisingAcademic Advising provides students with guidance inidentifying and developing suitable programs of study,encourages persistence, and helps identify and assessalternatives and consequences of those decisions byhelping students:• Understand the college environment• Clarify educational and career goals• Develop educational plans• Interpret individual assessment information• Explain college requirements• Select appropriate courses• Increase student awareness of educationalresources available• Develop decision-making skills• Transfer to or from another institutionAssessment/Testing CenterThe Assessment/Testing Center staff administersEnglish, Reading and Mathematical assessmentplacement tests, CELSA (English as a secondlanguage), GED, HESI A2, HESI PN, credit by examfor health curriculum courses, high stakes testing forKryterion and NIMS, and individual student make-upexams (per instructor request).Cashier’s ServicesGWCC’s Enrollment Services team is committed toproviding students and employees with financialand cashiering services. Some examples of studentservices provided are:• Tuition Payment Processing• Tuition Refunds• Financial Aid Refund Verification• Payroll Check Processing• Tuition Installment Plan (TIP)• Third-party Payment CoordinationMethod of PaymentStudents can pay by cash, check, VISA, DISCOVERCARD, MASTERCARD, or AMERICAN EXPRESS.Payment by check will require proper I.D. An exampleis a bank guarantee card and an AZ Driver’s License.Payment by credit card can be made by calling(602) 286-8100. Payment also can be made online atMy.maricopa.edu.Returned ChecksA fee of $15 will be charged for each returned check.


20 Student Services 2013-2014Payment Due DatesIn accordance with the Arizona Community CollegeBoard adopted Tuition and Fees Schedule, all tuition,fees, assessments and deposits must be paid in fullat the time of registration and/or by the due dateindicated on your on-line student account accessiblevia My.maricopa.edu. No student is properly enrolledunless he/she has completed this requirement.If you are receiving some form of financial assistance,it is your responsibility to have your tuition and feespaid by your due date to prevent being dropped fornon-payment of tuition of fees.Veteran ServicesVeteran Services provides the Veteran student andeligible dependents with information concerningcurrent G.I. Bill benefits. A Veteran Affairs certifyingofficial will assist the student in applying for theireducational benefits. Veteran Services worksclosely with the state, regional and national VeteranAdministration offices to ensure that valid informationis current. Students must make a formal request fromthis office each semester to be certified to use theirbenefits. Veterans Services staff can be reached at(602) 286-8076 or veterans@gatewaycc.edu.Financial AidFinancial assistance is available to eligible GateWayCommunity College students in the form of grants,scholarships, employment, tuition payment plans orfederal loans. Students may receive assistance fromonly one funding source, or aid may be offered in apackage from multiple sources. The student awarddepends on eligibility, level of need, packaging policyand availability of funds.Under federal regulations, students have theprimary responsibility for funding their education.For dependent students, their parents share thatresponsibility. All student awards are based on “need”after consideration of student and (where required)parental contribution. Refer to the Free Application forFederal Student Aid (FAFSA) for the federal definitionof dependency.EligibilityStudents must meet ALL of the following requirementsto be eligible for federal student aid: US citizen oreligible non-citizen; enrolled as a regular student inan eligible program and in classes that pertain tothat program only; making satisfactory academicprogress; have a high school diploma or GED; apply bycompleting the Free Application for Federal StudentAid (FAFSA), using the student’s legal name and validSocial Security Number; show financial “need” perfederal regulation (for need-based aid, such as grantsand work study); be registered with Selective Service,if required to do so; not concurrently enrolled in highschool; not be in default on any Title IV student loanor owe repayment on any Title IV student grant; notbe convicted of certain drug trafficking or possessionlaws; must provide all documentation requested; andmust use any funds received for educational purposesonly. Federal aid is also affected by lifetime aggregatesand must not have met or exceeded them in order toreceive aid.Some programs of study and continuing educationclasses offered by GateWay Community Collegeare not eligible for federal student aid. An eligibleprogram of study leads to a certificate or degree aftersuccessful completion of at least 16 credit hours, withinstruction provided over a minimum of 15 weeks.The program must be listed on GateWay CommunityCollege’s Program Participation Agreement with theDepartment of Education.Enrolling in some classes could limit the amount offunding or the types of assistance available. Attendingless than 12 credit hours in a semester will normallyreduce the amount of the award. Withdrawing fromclasses may affect the amount of aid received andstudents may be billed back for adjusted aid. Studentsshould refer to their academic transcripts to see underwhich semester a particular class will be funded.Students are required to be enrolled and attendingcredit hours equal with their level of award beforefinancial aid funds (Title IV) can be disbursed.Staggered start dates, including programs of studyhaving classes that start later in the semester, will besubject to delayed disbursement until the appropriatenumber of credit hours has started, per beginning dateon file with the Admissions, Registration and RecordsOffice. Students receiving loans will not receive theirfirst loan disbursements until seven days after the startof their sixth credit. If level of enrollment is reducedafter financial aid has been disbursed, award must berecalculated and the student may owe a repayment.Effective July 1, 2012, new federal regulations limit thereceipt of a Pell Grant for all students to a lifetime limitof six full-time years or 600%. This includes Pell Grantreceived at other community colleges, vocationalschools and four year public and private universities.This limit will be tracked by the U.S. Department ofEducation. Students can view their award history at:www.nslds.ed.gov/nslds_SA/.How to ApplyStudents are encouraged to apply early. Priorityconsideration for limited financial aid funds may begiven to those completing the application process infull prior to April 1. Continuing students must reapplyfor each academic year. Students enrolling for the firsttime during spring or summer should apply as early aspossible prior to the beginning of the semester theyplan to attend.Students requesting financial assistance may beginthe application process by completing the FreeApplication for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Toexpedite processing, designate GateWay CommunityCollege (code 008303) in step six. Students apply


Student Services 2013-201421electronically at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Students canreceive assistance with their federal aid application inEnrollment Services.After submitting the FAFSA to the processor, studentswill receive a Student Aid Report (SAR). If the code(008303) for GateWay Community College wasentered on the FAFSA, we also will receive the resultselectronically. After application is submitted online,students must monitor their My.maricopa.edu accountand their Maricopa gmail account frequently asadditional documents may be required to completetheir application or resolve any inconsistencies thatmay arise, though students may also receive US postalmail and or phone communications. It is importantthat the student keep Enrollment Services apprisedof his/her current phone numbers and email andmailing addresses. Aid application may be denied ifmail is returned due to a bad mailing address. Studentfinancial aid applications cannot be reviewed until allrequested documents have been received. Review ofdocuments originally submitted sometimes triggersthe need for additional information, which in turncould require further documentation or clarification.Therefore, it is important for the student to apply early.GrantsGrants are funds that do not have to be repaid, as longas the class is listed in the student’s Program of Studyand the student finishes the classes for which thegrant was received. Students who withdraw or ceaseto attend may have to repay all or some of the grant.Federal Pell GrantEligibility for Pell Grant must be determined first. Pellawards are based on need, with amounts dependenton congressional appropriations and cost ofattendance. Enrollment status (full-time, three-quartertime,half-time or less than half-time) also affects theamount of the Pell award. As of July 1, 2012, studentshave a lifetime limitation of 600% Pell Grant which isthe equivalent of 12 full-time semesters. Reaching thatmaximum may affect eligibility for assistance in otherfederal student aid programs.Federal Supplemental Educational OpportunityGrants (FSEOG)FSEOG awards are subject to fund availability, studentneed, packaging policy, and enrollment status. Perfederal regulation, priority is given to students whohave exceptional financial need, and who are alsoeligible for Pell. Award amounts may vary according tofund availability, student need, packaging policy andenrollment status.Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership(LEAP)LEAP recipients must be Arizona state residentsenrolled at least half-time. Award amounts also varyaccording to fund availability, student need, packagingpolicy and enrollment status.ScholarshipsScholarships generally do not require repayment.Scholarships come from a variety of sources and areawarded based on criteria specific to a particularscholarship. By federal regulation, scholarships mustbe considered as a resource in determining eligibilityfor federal student aid. Receipt of a scholarship couldcause a reduction in federal funds already awarded.Students are responsible to report any scholarshipsreceived.Students are encouraged to apply for any and allscholarships for which they meet qualifications.Scholarships are posted on the Scholarship Blogwhich can be found at: http://gatewayccfinancialaid.blogspot.com/. New scholarships become availablethroughout the year, so students should monitor thissite on a regular basis. GateWay Community Collegedoes not recommend any agency that charges a fee toprovide scholarship leads. Free scholarship informationand searches are also available at this site. Stateregulations (HB2008) require that all scholarshipsawarded and disbursed through the GateWayCommunity Scholarship Office also be accompaniedby documentation of proof of lawful presence in theUnited States as well as a signed perjury statementprovided on the scholarship application or atEnrollment Services. Students who have not submittedthe required information will be contacted andcannot be awarded the scholarship until all requireddocuments have been received.EmploymentStudents who are looking for employment at GateWayCommunity College may be offered part-timeemployment on campus, with work hours structuredaround the student’s class schedule. Students lookingfor part-time jobs on campus should begin their searchwith the job postings found in Career Services.Federal Work-Study (FWS)FWS awards are based on fund availability, studentneed, and enrollment status. Students must applyfor positions through Career Services. Students maygo through an interviewing process and there is noguarantee that students will be placed, or that they willearn the entire amount of their awards.Non-Work Study EmploymentSome departments on campus may have institutionalfunds to hire student employees. Positions for thesework opportunities may be posted in Career Services.LoansSince loans always require repayment, students areencouraged to take a loan only after exploring allother funding possibilities. Awarding is subject tostudent eligibility, including program of study andexisting debt level, as well as subject to terms ofdefault management plan. All student borrowers arerequired to attend an entrance counseling session aswell as an exit interview to ensure full understandingof rights and responsibilities associated with a student


22 Student Services 2013-2014loan. Accepting all loans offered may negatively affecteligibility for need-based scholarships and federalwork study opportunities.Federal Perkins LoansEligibility for this loan program depends on fundavailability, student need, enrollment status andprior student debt. Priority is given to students withexceptional need. First-time borrowers have a ninemonthgrace period. The interest rate is 5%.Direct Loan ProgramDirect Loans are low-interest loans for studentsand parents to help pay for the cost of a student’seducation after high school. The lender is the U.S.Department of Education rather than a bank or otherfinancial institution. With the Direct Loan, eligiblestudents borrow directly from the federal governmentand have a single contact—their loan servicer—foreverything related to the repayment of their loans.Additionally, the student will have online access totheir Direct Loan account information at www.nslds.ed.gov/nslds_SA/. The interest rate is variable, but willnever exceed 8.25%. Eligible students who meet thefederal definition of “need” may receive subsidizedloans, whereby the federal government pays intereston the loan until the student enters repaymentfollowing a six (6) month grace period. Studentswho are otherwise eligible, but do not qualify for theinterest subsidy, would be immediately responsiblefor the interest from the moment the loan is disburseduntil it is paid in full.Short-term Loans and Tuition Installment(Payment Plan)GateWay Community College offers an online paymentoption called “eCASHIER” to help the student meettheir educational expenses. Students who choose touse eCASHIER may select installment plans that arespread over several months, depending on the lengthof the semester. Enrollment in the payment plan isnot cancelled once federal aid has been disbursed forthe semester contracted. If student aid is reduced, oradditional charges are made to the student’s account,the contract will reactivate the payment plan andfunds could be extracted from the student’s personalbank account or credit cards. Contact the Cashier’sOffice for additional information at (602) 286-8277.Financial Aid Refund/Repayment InformationStudents are affected by this policy if completelywithdrawn from all credits before completing 60%of the semester, or if a withdrawal from a class (orclasses) reduces the length of time they will attendduring the semester, and they have received federalfinancial aid (referred to as Title IV funds) for thatsame period. Aid may be recalculated and anyadjusted award can be found at My.maricopa.eduunder the student’s account. Calculation examples areavailable from the school’s Office of Student FinancialAssistance. Students are referred to the MaricopaCommunity Colleges’ withdrawal policy concerningprocedures for withdrawal.I. DefinitionsA. Calculations are based upon the percentageof aid earned. For students who officiallywithdraw from school or during the semester,the percentage of aid earned is based uponthe number of days completed during thesemester. For students who unofficiallywithdraw from school, the mid-point of thesemester is used for calculation purposes.B. Amount of aid earned by the student isdetermined by taking the aid disbursed (plusaid that could have been disbursed) andmultiplying by the percentage of aid earned.C. Amount of Title IV aid to be returned is thedifference between the total aid disbursed andthe amount of aid earned by the student.D. Amount of unearned Title IV aid due fromthe school is calculated by taking thetotal institutional costs multiplied by thepercentage of unearned Title IV aid. If loanfunds were included in the disbursement,unearned Title IV aid due from the schoolwould first be returned to the loan program(s).E. Amount of unearned Title IV aid due from thestudent is calculated by taking the previouslycalculated Title IV aid to be returned andsubtracting the amount of unearned aidreturned by the school. Title IV loans arereimbursed first. Since loan repaymentis subject to the terms of the promissorynote, the student is not required to makeimmediate repayment. The school will billthe student for amounts requiring immediaterepayment. Student may pay in full or makesatisfactory repayment arrangements. Failureby the student to repay or make satisfactoryrepayment arrangements will result in thereporting of the debt to the U.S. Departmentof Education and the student will be ineligiblefor further Title IV assistance. Funds owedback to GateWay Community College, by thestudent, will be reported for collection to theState of Arizona Department of Revenue andmay result in the garnishment of the student’sArizona State income tax returns.II. Funds must be returned to the source(s) fromwhich they were paid.A. School return of funds must be distributed inthe following order:1. Unsubsidized Direct Loan2. Subsidized Direct Loan3. Federal Perkins Loan4. Direct PLUS Loan5. Federal Pell Grant6. Federal Supplemental EducationalOpportunity Grant (FSEOG)7. Other Title IV programsB. Student return of funds must be distributed inthe following order:1. Unsubsidized Direct Loan*2. Subsidized Direct Loan*3. Federal Perkins Loan*4. Direct PLUS Loan*5. Federal Pell Grant


Student Services 2013-2014236. Federal Supplemental EducationalOpportunity Grant (FSEOG)7. Other Title IV programs*Loan amounts are returned in accordancewith the terms of the promissory note.Maricopa Community CollegesStandards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)for Financial Aid Eligibility Federal regulations (CFR668.32(f) and 668.34) require a student to movetoward the completion of a degree or certificatewithin an eligible program when receiving financialaid. Specific requirements for academic progress forfinancial aid recipients are applied differently thanScholastic Standards. Federal regulations state thatAcademic Progress Standards must include a review ofall periods of enrollment, regardless of whether or notaid was received. The student must meet the followingminimum standards in order to receive financial aid.I. Evaluation of Financial Aid EligibilityA. Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress(SAP) are applied at the end of every semesterto determine the eligibility for the followingacademic semester.B. The evaluation period will be based onattendance in the immediate prior semesterand will include all classes attempted whetherfederal aid was received or not.C. Credits evaluated will include creditsattempted at the evaluating school andcourses funded through consortiumagreement.D. Students who do not meet SAP requirementswill be notified in their Message Center in theirMy.maricopa.edu account. The student mayfollow the appeal process or the reinstatementprocedures as outlined in V and VI. Studentswill not have eligibility for any further federalaid until they have successfully completed oneof the two reinstatement procedures.II. EligibilityA. Students must meet the following criteria:1. Students who have attempted at least sixcredit hours in the last evaluation periodmust complete with a passing grade2/3 of all credits attempted within thatevaluation period, OR2. Students who have NOT attempted atleast six credit hours in the last evaluationperiod must complete with passing grades2/3 of ALL credits attempted. ANDB. All students must meet the following minimumcredit hour/cumulative GPA requirement:Credits Attempted* Min GPA12-15 1.6016-30 1.7531-45 1.9046 + 2.00*for which grade points are computedNote: Grades of F,I,N,W,X,Y,Z, and courses not yet gradedare considered attempted but not meeting progressstandards for the purposes of financial aid.III. Maximum Timeframe EligibilityA. Students who have attempted more than150% of the credits required for their programof study are not considered to be makingSatisfactory Academic Progress and therefore,are ineligible for financial aid funds. Astudent may lose eligibility at any time if it isdetermined that they cannot complete theirprogram within the 150% timeline provided bythe federal government.B. All evaluated transfer credits will be includedwhen determining maximum timeframeeligibility.C. A student with a Bachelor’s degree orhigher will be considered to have exhaustedmaximum timeframe eligibility.D. A student may appeal as outlined in V.Reinstatement procedures as outlined in VI are notapplicable to Maximum Timeframe Eligibility.IV. Repeated, Audited, Consortium, Remedial,Summer CoursesA. Financial aid may be used to cover the cost ofrepeated courses for a better grade two times.B. Audited courses, non-credit courses, creditby examination, and any credit for priorlearning option (as outlined in the catalog)are excluded when determining eligibility forfinancial aid.C. Courses funded through a consortiumagreement are included in determiningacademic progress.D. All attempted remedial credits will be includedwhen evaluating SAP. (A maximum of 30credit hours may be funded for both remedialand ESL coursework.)E. Enrollment in any or all Summer sessionswithin the same calendar year will beconsidered one term.V. Appeal ProcessA student who has lost financial aid eligibilitydue to extenuating circumstances may appeal.Documentation of extenuating circumstancesshould be provided with the student’s appeal.A. Extenuating circumstances that may beconsidered include: personal illness oraccident, serious illness or death withinimmediate family, or other circumstancesbeyond the reasonable control of the studentthat occurred during the period in question.B. All appeals must be in writing to the Officeof Student Financial Assistance and includeappropriate documentation.C. Examples of documentation could includean obituary notice, divorce decree, or a letterfrom a physician, attorney, social servicesagency, parole officer, etc.D. The condition or situation must be resolvedthat will allow the student the ability tocomplete course work successfully or anappeal will not be granted.E. The outcome of an appeal may includeapproval of a probationary period forreinstatement of federal aid, denial of federal


24 Student Services 2013-2014aid with funding from a scholarship source fortuition, fees and books for one semester only,or denial of all forms of funding.F. A student will be notified in writing of theresults of the appeal, and of any restrictions orconditions pertaining to their appeal.G. Students, whose initial SAP or Requestsfor Continued Funding appeals are denied,may submit a request for permission tomeet with the Financial Aid Office SAPAppeal Committee. All requests must includedocumentation of extenuating circumstances.The Committee’s decision is final. If theCommittee’s decision is to uphold the denial,the student may not submit any subsequentrequests for funding consideration. In order toregain eligibility for financial aid, the studentwould need to meet Satisfactory AcademicProgress Standards if possible (2/3 successfulcompletion of all coursework and 2.0 GPA).Students who have been denied by thecommittee due to failure to meet SAP while ona Restricted Courselist (Maximum TimeframeExhaustion) will no longer be eligible forfederal student aid at GateWay CommunityCollege.VI. Reinstatement of Financial Aid EligibilityA. A student who has lost financial aid eligibility(SAP), and who qualifies for reinstatement,may be reinstated after the student has taken(without federal funds) at least six credithours in a semester, passed all attemptedcredit hours, met minimum cumulative GPArequirements of 2.0 (for all academic termscombined), meets minimum SAP standards of2/3 over all coursework, and falls within 150%of their program’s timeline.B. If the student attempts more than six hours,the student will be evaluated on all attemptedcredit hours within that term.C. Classes taken at other colleges may be takeninto consideration when determining whetheraid will be reinstated at GateWay CommunityCollege.D. It is the student’s responsibility to notify theOffice of Student Financial Assistance whenthis condition has been met.For more information, please contact the Office ofStudent Financial Assistance at finaid@gatewaycc.edu,or at (602) 286-8300.AthleticsLocation: Main Building, Room MA-1133Telephone: (602) 286-8142Website: http://athletics.gatewaycc.eduFall and Spring Semester HoursMonday - Friday 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.Summer HoursMonday – ThursdayClosed Friday7:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.The Athletic Department provides student-athletesthe guidance and resources to pursue their academicand athletic goals. Through the support and directionof their coaches, student-athletes are encouraged toexcel in both the classroom and on their respectiveplaying fields. Combining academics and athleticsprovides student-athletes the opportunity toparticipate in athletics beyond high school.Additionally, student-athletes will be given theopportunity to develop leadership and life skills,improve their athletic performance, and in most cases,supplement funding of their college education. GateWayoffers the following intercollegiate athletic programs:men’s soccer, women’s soccer, baseball and softball.Bookstore (Follett)Location: Main Building, Room MA-1200Telephone: (602) 286-8400Website: www.efollett.com orwww.gatewaycc.edu/bookstoreFall and Spring Semester HoursMonday - Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.Friday8:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.Summer HoursMonday - ThursdayClosed Friday8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.Textbooks (purchase, rental, and digital), supplementalreading material, apparel, gifts, and supplies areavailable at the bookstore for all classes.Rent-a-TextGateWay participates in the Follett book rentalprogram. This means students can save money byrenting course textbooks. For rental details, stop by thecampus bookstore or visit www.rent-a-text.com.Refunds: No refunds or exchanges will be made onbooks or supplies without a current cash registerreceipt. Refunds or exchanges will be made for a oneweekperiod after the first day of classes for fall, springand summer semesters. Starting the second week ofclasses, the bookstore will resume its two-day refundpolicy.


Student Services 2013-201425Career CenterLocation: Integrated Education Building,Room IE-1234Telephone: (602) 286-8500Fax: (602) 286-8151Website: www.gatewaycc.edu/career-centerFall and Spring Semester HoursMonday - Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.Friday8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.Summer HoursMonday - ThursdayClosed Fridays8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.Career CenterThe Career Center is open to students, alumni, andcommunity jobseekers who are deciding on a career,looking for work or both. The Career Center offersindividualized assistance in the following areas:• Career Planning and Assessment• Determination of a Major• Resume Development• Interview Preparation• Job Search ResourcesStudents and jobseekers also may benefit from accessto job postings and tips to navigate an Internetbasedjob search. Other services include workshopson employability factors, on-campus employerrecruitment and job fairs, and access to Federal WorkStudy positions for those who qualify. All studentsare encouraged to visit the Career Center duringtheir first semester at GateWay to start building theirprofessional portfolio. All services are open to thepublic and free of charge.Employment ResourcesFor students and community jobseekers whoneed assistance in obtaining part-time or full-timeemployment, a variety of job resources and servicesare available. Job resources include: a multitude ofinternet based job boards, including the MCCCDMaricopa Career Network, as well as traditional jobpostings. Other job search services are: resumecritique, interview skills, career planning andcounseling, internet searches and internet access topotential employment with local, state and nationalemployers.Other services include:• Annual Fall & Spring Job Fairs• On-Campus Employer Recruitment• Workshops on Job Search, Resume Writing,Interviewing and Employability SkillsUnder the Federal Work Study (FWS) program,qualified students are awarded federal funding in orderto work on campus on a part-time basis while pursuingtheir education. Other jobs are available for studentworkers as well. All students are encouraged to dropby the Career Center to take advantage of all theseservices.Center for Student Life/LeadershipLocation: Main Building, Room MA-1132Telephone: (602) 286-8700Website: www.gatewaycc.edu/student-lifeFall and Spring Semester HoursMonday - Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.Friday8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.Summer HoursMonday - ThursdayClosed Fridays7:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.The GateWay Community College Center for StudentLife/Leadership makes the educational program arich, exciting, and enjoyable experience. The office isdesigned to provide a full schedule of traditional andspecial events, student leadership workshops, culturalprograms, student organization activities, publications,volunteer program, and a variety of free services.The office is designed for all students at GateWayCommunity College.One of the prime responsibilities of the Center forStudent Life/Leadership is to develop, implementand evaluate educational, cultural and socialprograms which reflect the needs of a diversestudent population; it teaches and trains students toimplement and evaluate the same. The center alsochallenges awareness and encourages students toexperience another dimension of student life based onresponsibility and commitment.Associated StudentsEvery student who is taking a class and has paid theregistration fee is a member of the Associated Studentsof GateWay Community College (ASGWCC).Associated Student Council (ASC)The Associated Student Council (ASC) serves asa communication link between students and theadministration, voicing concerns and ideas relative tostudent success. The ASC is the governing body of theAssociated Students of GateWay Community College(ASGWCC). The purposes of this organization include,but are not limited to the following:• To increase student involvement in allappropriate facets of college operations• To enhance communication and cooperationamong all segments of the college community• To promote other activities which enhance theacademic, social, and cultural growth ofstudents.InterClub Council Membership: The membership ofthe InterClub Council will include the ASC Executivecouncil and one student representative from eachcollege-recognized student organization.Special Events/ActivitiesThroughout the year at GateWay Community College,the Center for Student Life/Leadership providesspecial events and activities for the students. Thoseactivities and events include but are not limited to:


26 Student Services 2013-2014GateWay Introduces Volunteer Excellence (G.I.V.E.)volunteer projects, multicultural celebrations, blooddrives, Discovery Series, Commencement, and theHonors and Awards Banquet.The events the Associated Student Council plans forthe students include: Welcome Back Activities, SpringGeckoLand, Alcohol Awareness Week, Great AmericanSmoke Out and Holiday Buffet.Student Representatives on College CommitteesStudent representatives serve on various campuscommittees, including the following: GraduationCommittee, Honors and Awards Committee, FinancialAid Committee, Strategic Planning Committee,GateWay Community College Tribunal, Service-Learning Committee, and GateWay CommunityCollege Cultural Diversity Committee. Studentsare appointed to serve on each committee by thechairperson. Students are asked for input in mattersof student affairs, publications, admissions, marketingand public relations, and retention of current students.Student OrganizationsThere are many student organizations that areavailable at GateWay and are associated with aparticular career field. GateWay also has severalcultural clubs available for those interested students.GWCC student organizations are as follows:• ACE Club• Associated Student Council (ASC)• Associated Students in Surgical Technology(ASSIST)• Association of Respiratory Care Students(ARCS)• Black Student Union• Chess Club• Club INSITE - Inspiring and Nurturing Studentsin Total Education• Club Nuc Med• Creative Writing Club/Out of Ink• GateWay’s Women’s Forum• Gay Straight Alliance (GSA)• Geckos In Action - Community Builders (GIA)• Go Green• GWCC SkillsUSA• Hispanic Student Organization (HSO)• InterClub Council• Inter-Tribal Club• Male Empowerment Network (MEN)• Parents Learning About Youth (P.L.A.Y.)• Phi Theta Kappa - Alpha Alpha EpsilonChapter• Safety Club• Student Association of RadiologicTechnologists (StART)• Student Association of Sonographers (SAS)• Student Nurses Association (SNA)• Students with the Ability to Learn Succeedand Achieve (SALSA)• Veterans Club• Water and Various Environmental SciencesAssociation (WAVES)• World Explorers ClubChartered student organizations are a vital part ofthe educational opportunities offered by GateWayCommunity College. Through these organizations,students may participate in programs that enhancetheir occupational training or social activities thatreflect special interests including cultural heritageevents, community service projects and forums dealingwith today’s issues.Advisors to Student OrganizationsEvery GWCC student organization MUST have anadvisor and the primary advisor MUST be a facultymember. In order to conduct official business, advisorsMUST attend all meetings.Student Leadership ProgramsIn the Center for Student Life/Leadership, leadershipprograms are provided throughout the year. There is aretreat held in the summer for all new officers and thedepartment staff. During the fall semester a studentorganizational workshop is held in which all officers andadvisors are urged to attend; a district wide StudentLeadership Retreat is provided for all MCCCD studentleaders. During the academic year, regional, national,and local student leadership conferences, seminars andworkshops are available to keep the student leadersabreast of new programs, services and changes.Posting PolicyIn an effort to preserve our walls and the beauty ofour buildings, the following posting regulations are ineffect:1. Posting is limited to the inside of the buildings.2. Posting on all walls is strictly prohibited.3. Post information on bulletin boards only.4. All posted information must bear the nameof the sponsoring organization and displaythe Student Life stamp. You may have yourinformation stamped in the Center for StudentLife, located in Room MA1132 of the MainBuilding.When posting materials, keep the following in mind:1. Use thumb tacks; no staples please.2. Do not post your material over someone else’sinformation.3. Do not remove or discard any informationother than your own.The Center for Student Life/Leadership will remove allposted bulletin board information after two weeks ofdisplay or the day following the date of the scheduledevent. Please adhere to the information above or yourmaterial will be removed and taken to the Center forStudent Life.


Student Services 2013-201427Children’s Learning CenterLocation: Children’s Learning CenterTelephone: (602) 286-8130Website: www.gatewaycc.edu/childcareHoursMonday - Friday6:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.We are a state licensed, DES authorized facility.Enrollment is on a first-come, first served basis.Ages of ChildrenChildren 30 months through 12 years are accepted forenrollment. All children must be able to take care oftheir own toileting needs.Requirements• Current Immunization Records• Birth Certificate• Completed Enrollment FormsChildren are accepted on a drop-in basis. To insurethat space is available you MUST call first to makereservations. Above requirements must be met.FeesThere is a $15 non-refundable registration fee due atthe time of registration, for each child, each semester(maximum of $30 per family). The hourly fees are:Students Enrolled in the center for40 + hours $2.25/hour30 – 39 hours $2.50/hour20- 29 hours $2.75/hourLess than 20 hours $3.00/hourDrop in rate of $ 3.50/hourStaffEnrolled in the center for40 + hours $3.25/hour30 – 39 hours $3.50/hour20 – 29 hours $3.75/hourLess than 20 hours $4.00/hourDrop in rate of $ 4.50/hour. Must call first to ensure space.Computer CommonsLocation: Main Building, Room MA-2122Telephone: (602) 286-8411Website: www.gatewaycc.edu/computercommonsFall and Spring Semester HoursMonday - Thursday 7:30 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.Friday7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.Summer HoursMonday - ThursdayClosed Fridays7:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.The Computer Commons provides computer accessfor GateWay Community College students. Studentsare required to use their MEID for computer access.Listed below are some of the services offered by theComputer Commons.Open Computer UseComputer Commons is equipped with Microsoft Officesoftware including Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint.All computers are connected to the Internet. Printers arealso available. (See Pay for Printing on page 34.)Computer-Based LearningEducational software that facilitates learning invarious subject areas is available for student use in theComputer Commons.Student SupportAreas of expertise for student support include:• My.maricopa.edu Student Login Issues(Student Center, Gmail, Canvas)• SPAT (Student Personal Administration Tool)used for resetting (Student Center, Gmail,Canvas) passwords.Copy/Mail Center (Ricoh)Location: Main Building, Room MA-1210Telephone: (602) 286-8313Website: www.gatewaycc.edu/copy-servicesFall and Spring Semester HoursMonday - Thursday 7:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.Friday7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.Summer HoursMonday - ThursdayClosed Fridays7:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.Fee-based student services include: black and whiteand color copying, binding, laminating, transparencies,and other specialty work upon request. Please stopby the Copy/Mail Center or call for current priceinformation. The Copy Center accepts cash only.Counseling DepartmentLocation:Integrated Education Building,Room IE-1208Telephone: (602) 286-8900Website: www.gatewaycc.edu/counselingFall and Spring Semester HoursMonday - Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.Friday8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.Summer HoursMonday - Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.Closed FridaysThe mission of the Counseling & Adult Re-entryDepartment is to address students’ personal,academic, and career needs that impact the learningprocess. Counselors are committed to serving theGateWay community with responsive educationaland counseling services in order to improve studentretention, academic services and quality of life.Students can also access services which includeacademic advising, educational planning, careercounseling, career and personal assessment tools,and personal counseling. Counseling can also link


28 Student Services 2013-2014students with resources both on and off campus tohelp students reach their potential. Furthermore,Counseling and Personal Development [CPD] coursesare offered each semester with a variety of specificthemes designed to help students develop effectivelife skills. Course descriptions for Counseling andPersonal Development (CPD) classes are listed in theclass schedule and GateWay Catalog and StudentHandbook.Disability Resources & ServicesLocation: Integrated Education Building,Room IE-1208Telephone: (602) 286-8170Website: www.gatewaycc.edu/disabilityresourcesFall and Spring Semester HoursMonday - Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.*Fridays8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.*Summer HoursMonday - Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.*Closed Fridays*Special arrangements may be made for after-hoursappointments.The Disability Resources Office works on a caseby-casebasis on the provision of reasonableaccommodations for students with disabilities whohave documentation.Food ServiceGecko CaféLocation: Main Building (Southeast corner)Telephone: (602) 286-8308Website: www.gatewaycc.edu/diningFall and Spring Semester HoursMonday - Thursday 7:30 a.m. - 7:30 p.m.Friday7:30 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.Summer HoursMonday - ThursdayClosed Friday7:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.**Grill closes at 2:00 p.m. Mon-ThurA variety of menu items and beverages are availableat reasonable prices. Breakfast items include: eggs,bacon, ham, toast, bagels, donuts, etc. Lunch anddinner items include: burgers, fries, soup, sandwiches,desserts, salads and daily entrees.Coffee CartLocation:Integrated Education Building,Room IE-1140 (next to Library)Fall and Spring Semester HoursMonday - Thursday 7:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.Friday7:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.A variety of hot and cold coffee and tea beveragesare available. Food items include bagels, grab-and-gosandwiches and salads, scones, danishes, and cookies.Honors ProgramWebsite: www.gatewaycc.edu/honors-programThe Honors for Excellence program is designed toenhance students’ intellectual growth by offeringchallenging opportunities for increased contact withleading teachers in all divisions of study. The programincludes independent study with faculty mentors, specialactivities, and the Humanities Forum Series which permitsstudents to interact with distinguished lecturers. Eachhonors course is designated honors under “notes” onthe student’s official college transcript which indicatesexcellence and commitment to prospective employersand admissions offices at other post-secondaryinstitutions. Honors students enjoy:• Honors sections of regular classes• Individualized instruction through specialprojects• Faculty mentors• Tuition rebates and scholarships• Cultural and social activities• Special recognition on transcripts anddiplomasStudents with a grade point average of 3.25 or betteron a 4.0=A scale (based on at least 12 credit hours ofprevious college coursework), or students in the top15% of their graduating high school class, are invitedto apply for the Honors for Excellence Program. Thoseadmitted to the program qualify for Tuition Rebatesof up to $325 or certain Scholarships given to honorsstudents in good standing. For full details, consult theHonors Coordinator, Lauren Yena, (602) 286-8731.Learning CenterLocation:Integrated Education Building,Room IE-2108Telephone: (602) 286-8800Website: www.gatewaycc.edu/learning-centerFall and Spring Semester HoursMonday – Thursday 7:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.Friday7:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.Saturday8:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.Summer HoursMonday - ThursdayClosed Fridays7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.The Learning Center provides free academic supportservices for GateWay Community College studentsand faculty. Listed below are some of the servicesoffered by the Learning Center.TutoringTutoring is available for currently enrolled GateWayCommunity College students by appointment, on aone-to-one basis or in small groups. Drop-in tutoringfor math, chemistry, biology, physics and writing isavailable during designated hours. One-on-one andgroup tutoring is provided in, but not limited to, thefollowing subject areas:• Accounting• Anatomy and Physiology• Biology


Student Services 2013-201429• Chemistry• Cisco• English/Writing• English as a Second Language• Health Sciences• Industrial Technology• Math• Nursing• Physics• Psychology• Reading• SpanishIn addition, online support is available for a variety ofacademic writing tasks.Learning and Study StrategiesConsultation and instructional materials are availableto assist students in the development and refinementof effective strategies for:• Memory improvement• Note-taking• Problem solving• Test taking• Textbook reading• Time management• Vocabulary developmentComputer-Based LearningEducational software that facilitates learning invarious subject areas is available for student use inthe Learning Center. This includes textbook-basedsoftware, supplemental software, and other e-learningresources.Open Computer UseComputer labs and laptop computers are availablefor student use. They are equipped with MicrosoftOffice software including Word, Excel, Access andPowerPoint. All computers are connected to theInternet. The lab is on the GateWay Pay-for-Printprogram.Learning ToolsThe following learning tools learning materials areavailable for student use in the Learning Center:• DVDs• Supplemental books• Anatomical models• Microscopes & slidesPrivate and Group Study RoomsThe Learning Center houses three private study rooms,and four large group study rooms which can bereserved for two hours at a time.Library“From Information to Inspiration: Connect @ the Library”Location: Integrated Education Building,Room IE-1115, next to the CaféTelephone:Circulation/Account Information: (602) 286-8454Reference/Research Assistance: (602) 286-8458Website: www.gatewaycc.edu/libraryFall and Spring Semester HoursMonday - Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.Friday8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.Saturday9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.Summer HoursMonday - Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.Closed FridaysNote: Hours subject to change and may vary when classesare not in session.The GateWay Library supports the College’s educationalprograms and culturally diverse community byproviding responsive service and accessible resources ina learner-centered environment.In-Person Services• Reference and research assistance• Locate and check-out books• Course reserves• Account setup and verification• Computer access, including WiFi• Group and individual learning spacesOnline Services (Available 24/7)• 24/7 “Ask a Librarian” chat reference service• Web-based Catalog: Find books, eBooks,DVDs, streaming media, and more• Full-text databases of magazines, journals,newspapers, encyclopedias, and images*• Full-text eBooks*• Streaming Media**Access to these services requires login with MEID andMy.maricopa.edu password.Living AccommodationsGateWay Community College does not providedormitory accommodations. The Center for StudentLife has provided an information board of varioushousing locations. For further assistance, contact theCenter for Student Life at (602) 286-8700.Public Safety/ParkingLocation: College Safety BuildingTelephone: (602) 286-8911Website: www.gatewaycc.edu/public-safetyDepartment HoursSecurity staff is on-site 24 hours a day, seven days aweek.Office Hours for parking permits and other requests:Monday - Friday 6:30 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.Saturday6:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.General InformationThe GateWay Public Safety Department (PSD) islocated in the Public Safety Building which is inoperation 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Thetelephone number is (602) 286-8911. Students mayutilize the on-campus extension number 6-8911.


30 Student Services 2013-2014The primary role of the department is to provideassistance and protection of people on campus andthe protection of district and personal property.Reporting Crimes and EmergenciesStudents, faculty and staff are encouraged to reportall criminal activity and emergencies that occur oncampus. A report may be filed through a PublicSafety officer, in person, by phone or through emailat safety@gatewaycc.edu. In case of emergency,individuals may utilize (602) 286-8911 or 9-1-1 ifexceptional circumstances exist. Reports of a nonemergencynature may be reported via the phone ormade in person at the Public Safety Office.Student Responsibility in Crime PreventionThe cooperation and personal support of students iscrucial to the success of safety and security programswith regard to the campus community. Studentsmust assume some responsibility for their ownsafety and the security of their personal property. Bytaking common sense precautions and adopting anawareness of their surroundings and environment,students can greatly reduce the probability ofbecoming a victim of a crime. To assist the studentin becoming better informed, the Public SafetyDepartment provides the following information:1. Certain types of crimes may pose an on-goingthreat to the campus community. Notificationof an immediate or on-going threat may bedisseminated through text messaging and emailthrough the use of the emergency notificationsystem commonly referred to as RAVENotification, public address system or face-toface.The Public Safety Department may use anyor all means available to make the necessarynotifications.2. Public Safety publishes an annual reportidentifying the types of crime that have occurredon campus during the fiscal year. The type ofcrime reported is defined by the FBI in the UniformCrime Reporting System. The report is preparedannually and is available on the GateWay web siteat www.gatewaycc.edu/Disclosure/Crime.3. The Public Safety Department publishes a weeklyblog which provides information on activity thatis reported to the Department. The blog may beviewed at gatewayccpublicsafety.blogspot.com.Emergency EvacuationsWhenever the evacuation alarm or fire alarm sounds oryou are verbally informed to evacuate:1. Remain calm. Do not call the Public SafetyDepartment to ascertain if the alarm is false or not.The phone lines will be needed to contact assistingagencies.2. Leave the building, following the evacuation routeposted in your area or classroom in an orderlymanner.3. While leaving:a. Assist disabled persons or others requiringassistance.b. Shut all doors behind you as you go. Closeddoors tend to slow the spread of fire, smokeand water.c. Proceed quickly, but in an orderly manner.Hold onto handrails while on the stairway.d. Do not use elevators.4. Follow the instructions of instructors and staff.5. Once outside, proceed to the designated assemblyarea. Follow the instructions of emergencypersonnel at the scene.Areas of RefugeAreas of Refuge for disabled persons are located inthe following areas:• In the Main Building, second floor (southwestside) in the vicinity of Room MA2305.• In the Main Building, second floor (southeastside) in the vicinity of Room MA-2111.• In the Center for Health Careers Education,west of Room 2153 in the north wing.• In the Center for Health Careers Education onthe opposite side of Room CH-2035 in thesouth wing.• In the Integrated Education Building, secondfloor (east side) by the elevators near theLearning Center.• In the Integrated Education Building, secondfloor (west side) in the vicinity ofRoom IE-2214.• In the Integrated Education Building, thirdfloor (east side) by the elevators near thefaculty offices.• In the Integrated Education Building, third floor(west side) in the vicinity of Room IE-3209.During evacuations, disabled persons should beassisted to these locations for evacuation by PublicSafety, police or fire personnel.Safety EscortsA safety escort is available to students, faculty andstaff who wish to be accompanied to any location oncampus. Students may request an escort in person atthe Public Safety Building or by calling (602) 286-8911(ext. 6-8911). A Public Safety officer will accompanyyou to your on-campus destination.Lost and Found PropertyThe Public Safety Department maintains a lost andfound section. Students who lose property on campusmay check with Public Safety to determine if an itemhas been found. Found items brought to the PublicSafety Department will be held for 30 days. Items notclaimed within this period of time will be disposed ofin accordance to established procedures.Parking PermitsAll vehicles that are parked on the college campusmust be registered with the Public Safety Department.A parking permit is required for each registeredvehicle used by a student. Parking permits are issuedat no charge to students. The issued parking permit isvalid for five years and should be placed on the lowerleft front windshield (driver’s side). On motorizedcycles, the permit shall be affixed where it can be seenwithout difficulty on the front fender.


Student Services 2013-201431A state issued handicapped license plate or disabledparking permit is required for parking in designatedhandicapped parking spaces.As of January 1, 1989, all out-of-state and out-ofcountystudents must sign an affidavit at the timeof registration indicating that their vehicle is incompliance with emissions inspections guidelines.Assistance with Disabled Motor VehiclesReasonable attempts will be made to assistpersons who lock their keys inside of their vehiclesor are experiencing vehicle problems, such as a deadbattery, flat tire or similar issue.Persons experiencing such problems should proceedto the Public Safety Department. A valid driver’slicense, proof of vehicle ownership and a collegevehicle parking permit are required to receive vehicleassistance. Those individuals receiving assistancefor entering their vehicle or a battery boost will alsobe required to sign a waiver form in the event thatdamage occurs as a result of the attempted assistance.Vehicle Traffic and Parking RegulationsTraffic• All Arizona state laws governing themovement and operation of motor vehicleshave been adopted by the MCCCD GoverningBoard for control of vehicles on collegeproperty.• The maximum speed limit in all college parkinglots is 15 mph.• Driving motor vehicles, motorized cycles, andbicycles on pedestrian paths and sidewalks isprohibited.• All accidents involving vehicles which occuron college property should be reported to thePublic Safety Department.Parking• Vehicles parked in a parking space whichdisplays a disabled parking sign, a painteddisabled insignia, or both, must display acurrent disabled parking permit issued by thestate of Arizona.• Red curbs are no-parking zones. Parking inRed zones, entrances to buildings, driveways,in front of garbage dumpsters, barricades, firelanes and fire hydrants is prohibited.• Driving into or parking in an area notdesignated for use or closed by the use ofbarricades, chains, or other vehicle controldevices is prohibited.• Parking on or blocking pedestrian paths,sidewalks, crosswalks, striped safety zones,and bicycle paths are prohibited.• Vehicles which bear a valid college parkingpermit may not park in spaces designated forvisitor parking.Students who violate the Traffic and Parking Regulationsmay be fined and/or disciplined in accordance to theguidelines established by the MCCCD Governing Board.Examples of the scheduled fines are as follows:Displaying an altered or subsituted permit ................ $50Failure to register a vehicle and display a parkingpermit ................................................................................ $30Falsifying information on registration application ... $50Parking in a Fire Lane .......................................................... $50Violating disabled parking stall or access ................... $50Improperly displaying a parking permit .........................$15Obstructing a properly parked/moving vehicle ..........$15Parking beyond posted time limit ....................................$15Parking by a college employee or student in avistor area ..........................................................................$15Parking on or blocking a pedestrian path .....................$15Parking outside stall lines ....................................................$15Parking in an unauthorized parking area ......................$25Removing barricade or failure to obey vehiclecontrol device ..................................................................$25(All fines are doubled if not paid within 15 working days)WeaponsThe possession or use of firearms or other dangerousweapons is strictly forbidden on campus. All weapons,regardless of type, are prohibited by the MCCCD and/or state and local law. In accordance with state lawand MCCCD policy, weapons may be left in a vehicleprovided the weapon is out of sight and the vehicle issecured.SmokingIn order to promote a healthy learning and workenvironment, the Chancellor has directed that theMaricopa County Community College District serveas a total smoke-free and tobacco-free environment,effective July 1, 2012. Smoking (including the use of“e-cigs”) and all uses of tobacco shall be prohibitedfrom all District owned and leased property andfacilities, including but not limited to parking lots,rooftops, courtyards, plazas, entrance and exit ways,vehicles, sidewalks, common areas, grounds, athleticfacilities and libraries.Questions?If you need more information about safety at GateWayCommunity College, please contact the Public SafetyDepartment at (602) 286-8911. Public Safety personnelwill address your questions and concerns in a promptand courteous manner.


32 Student Services 2013-2014Pay for PrintingQ&A for StudentsStudents will be charged for printing from collegecomputers. Students will receive a $20 credit for thefiscal year (July 1-June 30). This will allow for 200 freepages ($0.10 per page for black-and-white copies).How do I know how much credit or how manypages I have remaining?After a print job is requested, the print assistant on thecomputer will calculate how much your print job willcost and display how much money you have remainingon your account. You will have two options: 1) continueto print, or 2) cancel the print request. Let the assistantfinish calculating before you accept the charge toavoid mistakes in printing costs. If the cost of a printrequest exceeds the balance in your account, you willnot be allowed to complete the print job.How do I pay for printing after I use up my freeprinting?Once you have used all your free prints, additionalfunds can be added to your GateWay MEID FundAccount.How do I add money to my GateWay MEID FundAccount?You add money to your account by visiting EnrollmentServices on the first floor of the Integrated EducationBuilding. You may add money to your account onlyduring the hours that Enrollment Services is open:• Email documents to professors or colleagues.• Print only the pages you need, instead of theentire document.• Preview what you are printing to ensure you onlysend the print job one time and are only printingwhat you need.Pay-for-Print Benefits• Increases life of campus printers.• Ensures working and reliable printers.• Improves management of printing services.• Significantly reduces waste (paper and toner).• All funds are placed back into the program forprinter maintenance, paper and toner.Ricoh Copy CenterStudents and community users can also take copy jobsto the Ricoh center in MA-1210 (cash only). Black andwhite copies are $.10 per page; color copies are $1 perpage. Note: For community users, documents must besaved to a flash drive and hand-delivered to the Ricohcounter in MA-1210.Ricoh Fall & Spring HoursMonday – Thursday 7:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.Friday7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.Saturday – Sunday ClosedRicoh Summer HoursMonday – ThursdayFriday – Sunday7:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.ClosedFall & Spring Semester HoursMonday – Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.Friday8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.Saturday – Sunday ClosedSummer HoursMonday – ThursdayFriday – Sunday8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.ClosedWill any unused money in my print accountrollover or be refunded?Unused funds in your print account cannot be rolledover or refunded at the end of the school year.Accounts will be cleared on July 1.What do I do if the printer malfunctions?If a school printer malfunctions, notify a staff memberimmediately. If a staff member cannot fix the problem,the student will be given a credit within 24 hours (thestaff member will initiate the credit request). Staffcannot add funds to your account.How can I reduce my costs or the amount that Iprint?• Download information and save it to a USB drive.• Save your downloaded file to an online storageprovider, such as Box.com, 4shared.com,ADrive.com, FreeDrive.com, etc.• Email information to yourself; print at home orretain the file for reference.


STUDENT HANDBOOKSTUDENT HANDBOOK


34 Student Handbook 2013-2014STUDENT RIGHTS ANDRESPONSIBILITIESDiscrimination Complaint Procedures forStudentsThis procedure provides a means for resolvingcomplaints by students who believe they havebeen adversely affected by illegal or prohibiteddiscrimination by the Maricopa County CommunityCollege District (MCCCD), a member college or center,or their students or employees.Complaints may be brought under this procedure fordiscrimination based on race, color, religion, nationalorigin, citizenship status (including document abuse),sex (including pregnancy and sexual harassment),sexual orientation, gender identity, age, veteran status,physical or mental disability, or genetic information.The entire college community should act promptlyupon receipt of an allegation of conduct that mightconstitute discrimination. Any member of the collegecommunity should refer a person who might be avictim of such conduct to these procedures, as well asto the college officials responsible for conducting aninvestigation pursuant to these procedures.Students who believe they are experiencing sexualharassment may utilize the Report process (asdescribed below) in addition to the Informal andFormal Resolution processes. If a student has been avictim of sexual assault, a complaint may also be filedwith College Public Safety (CPS).All deadlines prescribed for Report, InformalResolution and Formal Resolution processes may beextended by the Vice President of Student Affairs forgood reason, such as (but not limited to) when classesare not in session or upon mutual agreement by theparties. Notwithstanding any deadline extension,college officials should take all necessary stepsto ensure prompt and equitable resolution of anycomplaint of discrimination.Information related to MCCCD's DiscriminationComplaint Procedure for Students is also availablefrom the Office of General Counsel’s Office of PublicStewardship at (480) 731-8880.Informal Resolution of DiscriminationComplaintsBefore filing a formal complaint under this procedure,a student may attempt to resolve the problem throughinformal discussions with the person claimed tohave engaged in discriminatory conduct and thatperson’s supervisor or department head. The studentmay choose to ask the Vice President of StudentAffairs to assist in the informal resolution process.The Vice President of Student Affairs may designatean employee to provide such assistance. The VicePresident of Student Affairs may modify or reject aninformal resolution of a complaint of discriminatoryconduct under this process if, in the judgment ofthe Vice President, the resolution that is proposed isnot in the best interests of both the student and theinstitution. The Vice President shall take such actionno later than fifteen (15) calendar days after receivingnotice of the informal resolution.Attempts to informally resolve alleged discriminationshould occur within ninety (90) calendar days of themost recent alleged discriminatory act. The collegeofficial responsible for this informal resolution processshould ensure that the process is concluded promptly.For complaints dealing with alleged discriminationbeyond the 90-day timeframe, a student must submita written complaint under the formal resolutionprocedure of this policy.If the complaint cannot be informally resolved to thesatisfaction of the complainant, the complainant hasthe right to file a written complaint within 300 daysof the most recent alleged discriminatory act and toproceed under formal resolution procedures.Formal Resolution of DiscriminationComplaintsA student who contends that unlawful or MCCCDprohibiteddiscrimination has occurred may file aformal complaint by contacting the Vice President ofStudent Affairs at each respective college or center.The Vice President of Student Affairs will acceptcomplaint filings within 300 calendar days of the mostrecent occurrence of the alleged discriminatory act.A complaint must be signed by the student andfiled on the form prescribed by the Office of GeneralCounsel. A student may also contact the Office ofGeneral Counsel to obtain the name and phonenumber of the college or center official designated torespond to discrimination complaints.The complaint must identify the action, decision,conduct, or other basis that constituted an allegedact or practice of unlawful or MCCCD-prohibiteddiscrimination. The complaint must also allege thatthe action, decision, or occurrence was taken or basedon the complainant’s race, color, religion, sex, sexualorientation, gender identity, national origin, citizenshipstatus (including document abuse), age, physical ormental disability, veteran status, genetic information,or any other unlawful discriminatory grounds.Upon receipt of a complaint, the Vice President ofStudent Affairs will notify the college president orprovost and the Office of General Counsel. The Officeof General Counsel will assign a case number to thecomplaint.A copy of the complaint will be shared with therespondent within five (5) working days of receiptby the Vice President of Student Affairs Respondentwill be put on notice that retaliation against thecomplainant or potential witnesses will not betolerated and that an investigation will be conducted.


Student Handbook 2013-201435Respondent must provide a written response to thecomplaint within fifteen (15) calendar days of his or herreceipt of the complaint.After accepting a complaint, the Vice President ofStudent Affairs will designate a complaint investigatorto conduct a fact-finding investigation, which willinclude, at a minimum, a review of written evidence(including the complaint and response), and interviewswith appropriate employees and students. The VicePresident of Student Affairs may serve as complaintinvestigator. The complaint investigator shall promptlycomplete the investigation and deliver to the VicePresident of Student Affairs the investigator’s writtenfindings and the results of the investigation, includingsummaries of all interviews and all documents receivedas part of the investigation. In no event shall thisoccur later than ninety (90) calendar days followingreceipt of the complaint. Within ten (10) working daysfollowing receipt of the results of the investigationfrom the complaint investigator, the Vice Presidentof Student Affairs will submit to the President orProvost the investigator’s written findings and the VicePresident’s recommendations as to the disposition ofthe complaint.The president or provost will accept, reject, or modifythe recommendations and will provide a writtennotification of his or her action to the complainantand respondent within fifteen (15) calendar days ofreceiving the written findings and recommendationsfrom the Vice President of Student Affairs.When the investigation confirms the allegations,appropriate corrective action will be taken. Evidencewhich is collateral to the allegations of discriminationand/or sexual harassment and which was obtainedduring an investigation may be used in subsequentgrievance or disciplinary procedures. Both complainantand respondent receive notice of the outcome. Theinstitution will take appropriate steps to preventfurther occurrences.MCCCD Administrative Review ProcessRequest for ReconsiderationA complainant or respondent who is not satisfied withthe decision of the president or provost has ten (10)working days to request, in writing, administrativereview of the decision by his or her college presidentor provost. The request for administrative reviewmust state specific reasons why the complainant orrespondent believes the finding was improper. Thepresident or provost will review the results of theinvestigation and written findings and respond to therequest within ten (10) working days from receipt ofthe request. If the president or provost determinesthat the decision is not supported by the evidence,the case file will be reopened and assigned for furtherinvestigation. If the president or provost determinesthat the investigation was thorough and complete andthat the decision is supported by the evidence, he orshe will deny the request for administrative review. Atthis point, the complainant has exhausted the InternalDiscrimination Complaint Procedure.Complaint ProcessFaculty, staff and all other college officials shouldrefer any student seeking to make a complaint ofdiscrimination to the Vice President of StudentAffairs. Every student complaint of discriminationshall be investigated under the authority of the VicePresident of Student Affairs in accordance with theseProcedures. The Vice President of Student Affairsand any complaint investigator who participates in acomplaint resolution pursuant to these Proceduresshall administer every resolution process in animpartial manner, and shall fully consider all factsdiscovered in the course of any investigation beforea resolution is reached. Each party in any complaintresolution shall have full opportunity to present allinformation and documentation the party feels isgermane to the complaint. At no time shall a studentwho has made an allegation of discrimination underthese Procedures be asked or required in any way bya college official to engage in any direct confrontationwith any person alleged to have committed an act ofdiscrimination. The Vice President shall ensure thatevery effort is made to obtain information from eachwitness to every act of alleged discrimination or fromany other person possessed of information that isrelevant and material to the complaint resolution. TheVice President of Student Affairs shall ensure that allappropriate corrective action that is warranted as aresult of any complaint resolution will be taken, andshall employ best efforts to ensure that the collegeprevents recurrence of discrimination in the future.Maintenance of DocumentationDocumentation resulting from each level in the FormalResolution Process (including witness statements,investigative notes, etc.) will be forwarded toand maintained by the Office of General Counsel.Investigative records are not to be maintainedwith or considered as a part of a student record.Documentation regarding corrective action isconsidered part of the student’s record.Right to AssistanceA complainant or respondent may receive theassistance of an attorney or other person at any stageof a complaint filed under this Internal DiscriminationComplaint Procedure. Such person may attend anyinvestigative interview and advise the complainantor respondent but shall not otherwise participate inthe interview. The complaint investigator shall directcommunications directly to the complainant andrespondent, and not through such individual’s attorneyor other person providing assistance.Confidentiality of ProceedingsEvery effort will be made by the college and MCCCDto protect the confidentiality of the parties duringthe processing of complaints under this procedure.Records will be maintained in a confidential manner tothe extent permitted by law and insofar as they do notinterfere with MCCCD’s legal obligation to investigateand resolve issues of discrimination.


36 Student Handbook 2013-2014Retaliation ProhibitedRetaliation against a person who has filed acomplaint or against any witness questioned duringan investigation is strictly prohibited. Any retaliatoryaction by instructors, supervisors, managers, academicprofessionals, administrators, or other employeeswho have the authority to take adverse action againsta complainant or witness is prohibited and may begrounds for disciplinary action.False Statements ProhibitedAny individual who knowingly provides falseinformation pursuant to filing a discrimination chargeor during the investigation of a discrimination chargewill be subject to appropriate discipline.Filing a Report of Sexual HarassmentA student who believes that he or she is, or has been,the victim of sexual harassment as prohibited byMCCCD policy may Report (either orally or in writing)the harassment to the Vice President of StudentAffairs at each college or center. The Report shouldbe made within 180 calendar days of the most recentalleged incident of sexual harassment. A student whois or has been the victim of a sexual assault, or witnessto a sexual assault on campus, may also report theincident to College Public Safety (CPS). In this case,the Title IX Coordinator and College Public Safety willeach conduct an investigation, sharing information asappropriate.Upon receipt of the Report, the Title IX Coordinatorwill have a meeting with the alleged harasser. Themeeting shall include: identifying the behavior asdescribed in the Report, alerting the alleged harasserto the perception of the impact of his or her behavior,providing the individual with a copy of the MCCCDSexual Harassment Policy, encouraging completionof the Office of General Counsel’s Sexual HarassmentOnline Tutorial, and encouraging greater awarenessof behaviors that may lead to perceptions of sexualharassment. Neither the Report nor the meetingwith the alleged harasser shall in any way constitutea finding of sexual harassment. The name of thecomplainant shall not be identified to the respondentduring the Report process; however, complainantsshould be aware that they may be called as witnessesin subsequent disciplinary or due process proceedings,as well as in litigation. The meeting with the allegedharasser must be conducted within ten (10) workingdays of receipt of the Report.External Filing of Discrimination ComplaintMCCCD encourages students to use the MCCCDDiscrimination Complaint Procedure for students toresolve discrimination concerns. Students also havethe right to file civil rights complaints with appropriateexternal agencies. No retaliation will be taken againsta person for filing a complaint with an external agency.The following agency accepts discrimination chargesfiled by, or on behalf of, students:Office for Civil Rights, Region VIII (OCR)Denver OfficeU.S. Department of EducationFederal Building1244 Speer Boulevard, Suite 310Denver, Colorado 80204-3582Phone: 303-844-5695Fax: 303-844-4303TDD: 303-844-3417E-mail: OCR_Denver@ed.govEmissions Control Compliance (A.R. 2.4.6)Pursuant to ARS §15-1444 C. no vehicle shall beallowed to park in any college parking lot unlessit complies with ARS §49-542 (the annual vehicleemissions inspection program). At the time of courseregistration, every out-of-county and out-of-statestudent will be required to sign an affidavit statingthat the student’s vehicle meets the requirements ofARS §49-542. Vehicles that are not in compliance aresubject to being towed at the owner’s expense.Petition Signature Solicitation (A.R. 2.4.8)1. This regulation shall govern access to collegepremises by representatives who wish to solicitsignatures on petitions for the purpose ofsubmission of a ballot proposition to voters, ornomination of a candidate for elective office, in acity-, county-, or state-wide election.2. Each college president shall designate generalhours of accessibility for solicitation and a locationon college premises where all representativeson behalf of any candidate or ballot propositionmay solicit signatures. The location shall be ina common area where the solicitation will notserve as an obstruction to student activities orotherwise disrupt the college environment.3. All solicitation must take place in designatedareas. Standard space may include one or twotables and chairs. Campus restrictions regardingamplification will apply. Representatives maynot distribute or make available to students,employees, or college visitors any tangible item,except for informational literature about theproposed candidate or ballot initiative.4. Representatives shall notify the designated officialat each college or center for their intent to bepresent on college premises no fewer than threeworking days prior to soliciting signatures. Uponobtaining authorization, representatives shall beprovided a written version of this regulation.Specific procedures on how to implement the PetitionSignature regulation can be found in appendix S-14.


Student Handbook 2013-201437Use of College Grounds by Non-MCCCD-Affiliated Users (A.R. 2.4.9)In contrast to traditional public forums such as a publicsquare, park, or right of way, Maricopa’s campuses arededicated by law to the purpose of formal education.They are, and have been since their creation, for theuse and benefit of prospective and enrolled students,the Maricopa employees who serve them, and thosewho are invited to campus by members of the Collegecommunity to attend or participate in sponsoredevents. The Maricopa County Community CollegeDistrict (MCCCD) has a long history of regulating thetime, place, and manner in which expressive activitiesare conducted on campuses, for the purposes ofavoiding disruption or interference with its educationalactivities, and protecting the rights of the membersof the campus community and their invited gueststo express themselves and access information. Whilemembers of the general community always havebeen welcome to share their ideas with the campuscommunity, they are subject to reasonable, contentneutralregulation of the time, place and manner of theevent and to the institution’s mission-based priorities– including but not limited to the need to provide anenvironment conducive to teaching and learning.This administrative regulation governs use of thecollege grounds, defined as the open areas andwalkways of the campus by non-MCCCD-affiliatedusers. Use of college facilities is governed by aseparate administrative regulation. Parking lots arenot available for events and activities other than thosesponsored and authorized by the College president.Camping is not permitted anywhere on the campuses.Camping is defined as the use of college groundsor facilities for living accommodations or housingpurposes such as overnight sleeping or makingpreparations for overnight sleeping (including thelaying down of bedding for the purpose of sleeping),the making of any fire for cooking, lighting or warmth,or the erection or use of tents, motor vehicles, orother structures for living or shelter. These activitiesconstitute camping when it reasonably appears,in light of all the circumstances, the participantsconducting these activities intend to use or are usingthe facilities or grounds for living accommodations orhousing, regardless of the duration or other purpose ofthe use.Lawful use of college grounds for events or expressiveactivities by individuals, groups, and organizationsmay be authorized by college officials when the eventsand activities are lawful and consistent with the nonprofit,educational nature of the campus, authorizedand conducted in accordance with MCCCD policies,administrative regulations and priorities, and compliantwith reasonable restrictions as to time, place, andmanner. The content of the expression will not be afactor in authorizing, locating, or scheduling decisions.However, events and activities will not be permittedto disrupt or obstruct the teaching, research, oradministrative functioning of the College by meansof physical obstacles and crowds, by the creation ofsound or noise that would interfere with teaching,learning, and the conduct of College business, or by anyother means. Each College president will designate aResponsible College Official with delegable authority toapprove, locate, and schedule use of college grounds.Permit Application: Any non-MCCCD-affiliatedorganization, group, or individual desiring to usecampus grounds for an event or activity must submita request form to the Responsible College Official inadvance of the use date.If the activities proposed in the application are limitedto low-impact, non-commercial activities the requestform shall be submitted at least two business daysin advance of the expected use date. For purposesof this administrative regulation, “low-impact, noncommercialactivities” are defined as: (1) activities thatdo not seek to sell or promote a product or service fordirect or indirect financial gain; (2) activities that arelimited to gatherings of five people or less at any giventime; and (3) activities that do not involve machinery,temporary structures, tables, chairs, displays orelectronic equipment, including amplifiers, or thedistribution of food products.For events that are not low-impact, non-commercialactivities, the request form shall be submitted atleast seven business days before the expected use.The additional advance time is required to allow theCollege to prepare for conditions that may affect theflow of foot traffic, involve signs and displays, createcrowds, involve significant numbers of participants, orrequire the use of significant amounts of space and/oruse of equipment and resources.Designated Areas: Because each College has alimited amount of outdoor space, activities and eventssponsored by non-MCCCD-affiliated users, includingspeech and literature distribution, shall be restricted todesignated areas. For each College, the ResponsibleCollege Official shall establish specific designatedareas for such activities. A written description of theseareas shall be maintained at the office of Student Lifeand Leadership for each College. Consistent withthe goal of providing a healthy, comfortable, andeducationally productive environment, the ResponsibleCollege Official should attempt to locate thedesignated areas in prominent locations on campuswhere there is a likelihood of significant pedestriantraffic. The designated areas shall not be located inbuilding stairways and entryways, parking lots, orcongested areas. The Responsible College Official willmake every effort to assign users to their requestedspace when a specific space is desired. However, inorder to ensure the potential success of all scheduledevents, the College reserves the right to assign anevent or activity to the area the College deems mostappropriate in light of the campus capacity, otheractivities scheduled, and the type of event or activitybeing planned.


38 Student Handbook 2013-2014Use Fees and Proof of Insurance: To offset thecosts associated with the use of college grounds, non-MCCCD-affiliated users shall be required to pay a feeof $50 per day or $125 per week. In order to protectthe health and safety of College students, faculty andstaff and to protect MCCCD resources, non-MCCCDaffiliatedusers shall also be required to provideproof of insurance that indicates at least $1 million ingeneral liability coverage and names the MCCCD as anadditional insured for the anticipated use date.The fee and proof-of-insurance provisions of thisAdministrative Regulation shall not be applied to lowimpact,non-commercial users. A user may requestdesignation as a low-impact, non-commercial userfrom the applicable College’s Responsible CollegeOfficial. Any questions or comments about the criteriafor approval or denial of such request shall be directedto the District Ombudsman.Permits: The approved request form will describethe location of the authorized activity and any otherrestrictions specific to the event. Violation of the termsof the permit, District policy, administrative regulationor law shall be grounds for immediate revocationof the permit, and the individual violators and theirorganizations may be banned from the campus.Priorities and Criteria for Approval of Permits:The content or subject of the proposed expressiveactivity or event will not affect approval of theapplication. Availability of space is not guaranteed.Reservations shall be approved on a space-availablebasis and will be addressed on a first come-first servedbasis, subject to the following priorities and criteria forthe use and scheduling of space on campus grounds:Scheduling Priorities (in order)1. The use of facilities and grounds for theoperations of the College. For example, thereare times when the college is unusually crowdedby members of the campus community, suchas registration and orientation at the beginningof the semester. Other uses may reasonably beprecluded during those times.2. Activities and events sponsored by the Collegeadministration.3. Activities and events sponsored by MCCCDstudent organizations or employee groups.4. Activities of non-MCCCD-affiliated individuals andorganizations.5. Commercial advertising or activities.Criteria1. Capacity of college grounds to accommodate thenumber of participants at the scheduled time andproposed location.2. Capacity of College Safety staff to providesecurity for all events and activities scheduled atthe time.3. Possible interference or conflict with Collegeoperations or other scheduled activities andevents on the grounds.4. General feasibility of hosting the event asproposed.Other Policies: This administrative regulation will beapplied in conjunction and coordination with all otherMCCCD policies and administrative regulations andCollege processes and procedures, including but notlimited to regulations on facilities use, signage, sales ofalcohol and/or food, and solicitation of donations.Specific procedures on how to implement the Use ofCollege Grounds regulation can be found in AppendixS-15.Children on Campus (A.R. 2.4.10)Children (younger than 18) may not attend any classunless they are officially registered for the class.Children will not be allowed on campus unlessparticipating in an authorized college program orunder the supervision of an adult.Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act(A.R. 2.4.11)Federal legislation requires the college to maintaindata on the types and number of crimes on collegeproperty as well as policies dealing with campussecurity. To obtain additional information on thissubject, contact the college Safety and SecurityDepartment.Workplace Violence Prevention (A.R. 2.4.12)PurposeIt is the policy of the Maricopa County CommunityCollege District to promote a safe environment forits employees, students, contractors, and visitors.MCCCD is committed to working with its employeesto maintain an environment free from violence, threatsof violence, harassment, intimidation, and otherdisruptive behavior.PolicyViolence, threats, harassment, intimidation, and otherdisruptive behavior in our facilities is prohibitedand will not be tolerated. It is the responsibility ofall employees, students, contractors, and visitors ofMCCCD to report any occurrence of such conductto MCCCD Public Safety. Every employee, student,contractor, and visitor on MCCCD property shouldreport threats or acts of physical violence and actsof harassment, intimidation, and other disruptivebehavior of which he/she is aware. All reports willbe taken seriously and will be investigated by publicsafety immediately in order to protect everyone fromdanger. Such behavior can include oral or writtenstatements, gestures, or expressions that communicatea direct or indirect threat of physical harm.


Student Handbook 2013-201439Prohibited BehaviorFor example, and without limiting the generality of theforegoing statement, this policy prohibits:• direct threats or physical intimidation• implications or suggestions of violence• stalking• assault of any form• physical restraint, confinement• dangerous or threatening horseplay• loud, disruptive, or angry behavior or languagethat is clearly not part of the typical workenvironment• blatant or intentional disregard for the safety orwell-being of others• commission of a violent felony or misdemeanor onMCCCD property• abuse• violation of a protective order or restraining order• any other act that a reasonable person wouldperceive as constituting a threat of violenceThis list is illustrative only and not exhaustive.Future ViolenceEmployees, students, and visitors who have reason tobelieve they, or others, may be victimized by a violentact or sometime in the future, at the workplace or asa direct result of their relationship with MCCCD, shallinform a supervisor or manager as soon as possible.The supervisor or manager shall inform the PublicSafety Department. Students, contractors, and visitorsshall contact the Public Safety Department as soon aspossible.Employees who have signed and filed a restrainingorder, temporary or permanent, against an individualdue to a potential act of violence, who would be inviolation of the order by coming near them at work,shall immediately supply a copy to the DepartmentDirector, Human Resources, and Public Safety.Students shall supply a copy of the signed order to thePublic Safety Department.This policy applies to employees and students, as wellas independent contractors and other non-employeesdoing business with the MCCCD. Individuals whocommit such acts may be removed from the premisesand may be subject to disciplinary action, criminalpenalties, or both. The Chancellor is hereby instructedto enact all administrative regulations necessary toimplement this policy.Student Right to Know (A.R. 2.4.13)Under the terms of the Student Right To Know Act,the college must maintain and report statistics onthe number of students receiving athletically relatedstudent aid reported by race and sex, the graduationrate for athletes participating in specific sportsreported by race and sex, the graduation rate forstudents in general, reported by race and sex andother similar statistics. To obtain copies of thesereports, contact the Office of Admissions and Records.Copyright Act Compliance (A.R. 2.4.5)Students are expected to comply with theprovisions of the Copyright Act of 1976 pertainingto photocopying of printed materials, copying ofcomputer software and videotaping. In order toassist students in complying with the CopyrightLaw, appropriate notices shall be placed on or nearall equipment capable of duplicating copyrightedmaterials.Copyright Regulation (A.R. 3.2)1. It is the intent of the Governing Board of theMaricopa County Community College District toadhere to the provisions of the U.S. CopyrightLaw (Title 17, United States Code Section 101 etseq.). Though there continues to be controversyregarding interpretation of the Copyright Law, thispolicy represents a sincere effort by the Board tooperate legally within the District.2. The Governing Board directs the Chancelloror his designee(s) to develop and distribute toemployees guidelines that (1) clearly discourageviolation of the Copyright Law and (2) informemployees of their rights and responsibilitiesunder the Copyright Law.3. Each college president or provost and theChancellor shall name an individual(s) ateach district location who will assume theresponsibilities of distributing copyrightguidelines, act as a resource person regardingcopyright matter and provide training programson current copyright laws.4. Employees are prohibited from copying materialsnot specifically allowed by the (1) copyright Law,(2) fair use guidelines, (3) Licenses or contractualagreements, or (4) other permission.5. The Governing Board disapproves of unauthorizedduplication in any form. Employees whowillfully disregard this Board policy and/or theaforementioned copyright guidelines do so attheir own risk and assume all liability for theiractions.6. In order to assist employees and students incomplying with the Copyright Law, appropriatenotices shall be placed on or near all equipmentcapable of duplicating copyrighted materials.What Students Should Know AboutCopyrightWhat is copyright?Copyright is a protection afforded under federallaw for various types of creative works. A work iscopyrightable if it is an original work of authorshipfixed in a tangible medium of expression.Copyrightable works include literary, musical ordramatic works; motion pictures and other audiovisualworks; choreographic works and pantomimes; soundrecordings; and architectural works.The owner of a copyright in a particular work has theexclusive right to copy, display, perform, distribute, andcreate a derivative version of the work. Generally, then,this means that you may not do things like duplicate,


40 Student Handbook 2013-2014show or perform a copyrighted work unless it isexpressly allowed under the Copyright Act or you havethe prior permission of the copyright holder.A copyright exists in a work at the time it becomesfixed in some tangible medium of expression.Neither registration of the copyright with the federalgovernment nor a copyright notice on the work itself isrequired for copyright protection.What is copyright infringement?Generally, copyright infringement occurs when youcopy, display, perform, distribute or create a derivativeversion of a copyrightable work either withoutthe permission of the copyright holder or when suchactivity is not otherwise allowed under an exceptionprovided by federal copyright law. The penalties forinfringement include significant damages-potentiallyin excess of $100,000 for each work infringed as wellas criminal penalties, which may include fines and evenincarceration.How does copyright law affect information Iobtain off the Internet?Copyright law covers works in both traditional andnew media, including digital media. Copyrightablematerials are often available on the Internet withoutany indication of their copyrighted status. As a rule ofthumb, you should assume that everything you find onthe Internet is copyrighted, unless otherwise labeled.Even popular activities, such as file swapping orcopying software or pictures from the Internet, may becopyright infringement and should be avoided.The Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which Congressenacted in 2000, affords greater protection forcopyright holders of digital works. Generally, then,even if a work appears solely in a digital form, it islikely subject to copyright law protections.New technology has made many creative workswidely available through the Internet. For example, thetechnology known as Peer to Peer (P2P) allows for thetransmission of music, videos, movies, software, videogames and other materials-most of which is subject tocopyright protection.Remember that a copyright exists in a work at thetime it becomes fixed in some tangible mediumof expression. That means that an image you havedownloaded from the Internet, as well as a videoor musical performance is almost certainly subjectto copyright protection. When you download theseworks, transfer them to a disk or other medium, orsend them to a friend, you are infringing on the rightsof the copyright holder. Trafficking in such materialwithout the permission of the copyright holder, then,violates copyright law. This includes unauthorizedmusic file sharing over the Internet.According to a statement recently issued byrepresentatives of the motion picture, recording andsongwriting industries, uploading and downloadingcopyrighted works over the Internet is theft: “It is nodifferent from walking into the campus bookstore andin a clandestine manner walking out with a textbookwithout paying for it.”Why is it important for a student to be aware ofcopyright law?Copyright infringement is expressly prohibited by theUS Copyright Act. Anyone who infringes another’scopyright in a creative work is subject to liability, andcould be required to pay large sums in damages.In addition, as the law clearly prohibits copyrightinfringement, using any college resources-such asphotocopiers, desktop and laptop computers, printers,central computing facilities, local-area or collegewidenetworks, Internet access, or electronic mail-forthe purpose of infringing a copyright in any workmay be grounds for student discipline. According toMaricopa Community College District administrativeregulation, “students are expected to comply withthe provisions of the Copyright Act of 1976 pertainingto photocopying of printed materials, copying ofcomputer software and videotaping.”Moreover, under the Maricopa Community CollegesComputing Resource Standards, a student isprohibited from the “use of software, graphics,photographs, or any other tangible form of expressionthat would violate or infringe any copyright orsimilar legally-recognized protection of intellectualproperty rights.” The Standards also prohibit“transmitting, storing, or receiving data, or otherwiseusing computing resources in a manner that wouldconstitute a violation of state or federal law . . . .”A student who violates these policies, then, can bedisciplined at any of the Maricopa Community Colleges.This discipline could include suspension or even expulsion.Does copyright law allow me to download filesfrom a college web site?Thanks to recent changes to copyright law, collegesand universities are allowed to transmit copyrightedimages, recordings, and other materials over theInternet in connection with distance learning offerings.These changes allow for the performance of nondramaticliterary works or musical works, as well asthe display of “reasonable and limited portions” ofany work in an amount comparable to that typicallydisplayed in a live classroom setting. Use of the worksmust, however, be “an integral part” of the distancelearningclass session, and available solely to studentsenrolled in the class. In addition, the transmission ofthe copyrighted works must be under the direction oractual supervision of an instructor.Even though the college does not hold the copyrightto these works, or even have the express permission ofthe copyright holder, they may be delivered over theInternet to students in distance learning classes.The fact that the law authorizes such use ofcopyrighted materials, though, does not allow a


Student Handbook 2013-201441student in these classes to freely download, copy, orre-transmit the works. They are intended solely foruse by the institution in connection with distanceinstruction; any other use would likely constitute aviolation of copyright law.Taping of Faculty Lectures (A.R. 3.4)MCCCD acknowledges that faculty members are, bylaw, afforded copyright protection in their classroomlectures and, therefore, may limit the circumstancesunder which students may tape (audio/visual) theirclasses.Each faculty member shall inform his/her studentswithin the first week of classes to his/her policy withregard to taping. Failure to do so will accord studentsthe right to tape lectures.Students with disabilities that render them unableto take adequate lecture notes are entitled toreasonable accommodation to remedy this inability.Accommodation may require a faculty member toexempt a student from his/her taping policy.Technology Resource Standards (A.R. 4.4)IntroductionThe Maricopa County Community College District(MCCCD) provides its students, employees, GoverningBoard members and the public with access toinformation resources and technologies. MCCCDrecognizes that the free exchange of opinions andideas is essential to academic freedom, and theadvancement of educational, research, service,operational, and management purposes, is furtheredby making these resources accessible.Arizona constitutional and statutory mandates requirethat MCCCD resources, including technology, be usedonly for the public’s business, and not for privatepurposes. Those mandates apply to all MCCCD publicofficials–employees of every kind and the GoverningBoard. The aim of those laws is to safeguard the useof resources, including technology resources, acquiredand maintained with public funds. Compliance withother laws–both federal and state–also dictates theneed for standards for the use of MCCCD technologyresources. In some cases, the Governing Board policiesemphasize the importance of compliance with the lawsuch as the requirement to adhere to copyright laws.Governing Board policies also establish MCCCD’s ownstandards, such as the directive that all persons withinthe MCCCD community be treated in a manner that ishumane, fair and dignified.This administrative regulations established standardsfor the use of MCCCD technology resources.They should be seen as supplementing, and notin lieu of, Governing Board policy, applicable lawand other applicable administrative regulationssuch as Administrative Regulation 4.3 “ElectronicCommunications.”General ResponsibilitiesTechnology resources (including, but not limitedto, desktop and laptop systems, printers, centralcomputing facilities, MCCCD-wide or college-widenetworks, local-area networks, telephones, facsimilemachines, scanners, access to the Internet, electronicmail and similar electronic devices and information)of the MCCCD are available to MCCCD GoverningBoard members, employees, students and, in a limitednumber of cases, MCCCD contractors and the public.Use of all those resources is subject to the standardsset forth in this regulation (Standards).The first screen that each MCCCD computer exhibitson starting up advises users of these Standards andrequires an acknowledgment before the user mayproceed to the next screen. Additionally, all MCCCDemployees are responsible for annually acknowledgingreceipt of the Blue Book, which contains thisregulation. So all users of MCCCD technologyresources are presumed to have read and understoodthe Standards. While the Standards govern use oftechnology resources MCCCD-wide, an individualcommunity college or center may establish guidelinesfor technology resource usage that supplement, butdo not replace or waive, these Standards.Use of Non-MCCCD TechnologyUnder Arizona’s public records law, MCCCD is requiredto transact business so that its records are accessibleand retrievable. The policy underlying the law is thatwork done in the name of the public be transparent.Thus, any member of the public may request publicrecords and, except in a few specific instances, areentitled to get copies of them.Each individual employee or Governing Board memberis responsible for ensuring that MCCCD records thathe or she initiates or receives are retained for theperiod of time required by and disposed of accordingto mandates established by Arizona State Library,Archives and Public Records–the state agency taskedwith setting standards for record retention. Therefore,an employee’s or Governing Board member’s use ofnon-MCCCD technology resources for communicationof any type of MCCCD business is heavily discouragedbecause those records are less capable of beingmanaged according to MCCCD’s process for ensuringretention, retrieval and disclosure set forth inAdministrative Regulation 4.15 “Retrieval, Disclosureand Retention of Records.”Additionally, an MCCCD employee who receivesa communication allegedly from another MCCCDemployee using a non-MCCCD e-mail address is notrequired to respond substantively to that e-mail. Theemployee receiving the e-mail is entitled to verify thatthe sender is whom he or she says that he or she is.The employee receiving the e-mail may request thatthe sender provide the information or inquiry set forthin the e-mail via hard-copy form.


42 Student Handbook 2013-2014Acceptable UseUse of MCCCD’s technology resources, includingwebsites created by MCCCD employees and students,is limited to educational, research, service, operationaland management purposes of the MCCCD and itsmember institutions. Likewise, data, voice, images andlinks to external sites posted on or transmitted viaMCCCD’s technology resources are limited to the samepurposes.Frequently, access to MCCCD’s technology resourcescan be obtained only through use of a passwordknown exclusively to the MCCCD employees,Governing Board members or students. It is thoseusers’ responsibility to keep a password confidential.While MCCCD takes reasonable measures to ensurenetwork security, it cannot be held accountable forunauthorized access to its technology resources byother persons, both within and outside the MCCCDcommunity. Moreover, it cannot guarantee employees,Governing Board members and students protectionagainst reasonable failures. Finally, under certainlimited circumstances defined in AdministrativeRegulation 4.15 “Retrieval, Disclosure and Retention ofRecords,” certain MCCCD employees are authorized toaccess information on an MCCCD technology device.It is not Maricopa’s practice to monitor the contentof electronic mail transmissions, files, images, links orother data stored on or transmitted through Maricopa’stechnology resources. The maintenance, operationand security of Maricopa’s technology resources,however, require that network administrators and otherauthorized personnel have access to those resourcesand, on occasion, review the content of data andcommunications stored on or transmittted throughthose resources. Any other review may be performedexclusively by persons expressly authorized for suchpurpose and only for cause. To the extent possiblein the electronic environment and in a public setting,a user’s privacy will be honored. Nevertheless, thatprivacy is subject to Arizona’s public records lawsand other applicable state and federal laws, as well aspolicies of Maricopa’s Governing Board all of whichmay supersede a user’s interests in maintaining privacyin information contained in Maricopa’s technologyresources.Incidental Computer and Technology UsageLimited incidental personal use of MCCCD technologyresources including through use of personal e-mailsystems is permitted, except as described in item16 under “Prohibited Conduct.” MCCCD employeesare responsible for exercising good judgment aboutpersonal use in accordance with this regulation,Colleges’ consistent local guidelines and MCCCDethical standards. Personal use refers to activitieswhich only affect the individual and that are notrelated to an employee’s outside business. MCCCDemployees are required to conduct themselves in amanner which will not raise concern that they are ormight be engaged in acts in violations of the publictrust. Refer to the Guidelines for Incidental ComputerUsage for the Maricopa Community Colleges(Appendix AS-8) and Guidelines for IncidentalTelephone Usage for the Maricopa CommunityColleges (Appendix AS-9).Prohibited ConductThe following is prohibited conduct in the use ofMCCCD’s technology resources1. Posting to the network, downloading ortransporting any material that would constitute aviolation of MCCCD contracts.2. Unauthorized attempts to monitor anotheruser’s password protected data or electroniccommunication, or delete another user’s passwordprotected data, electronic communications orsoftware, without that person’s permission.3. Installing or running on any system a programthat is intended to or is likely to result in eventualdamage to a file or computer system.4. Performing acts that would unfairly monopolizetechnology resources to the exclusion of otherusers, including (but not limited to) unauthorizedinstallation of server system software.5. Hosting an unauthorized website that violates the.EDU domain request.6. Use of technology resources for non-MCCCDcommercial purposes, including to advertisepersonal services, whether or not for financial gain.7. Use of software, graphics, photographs, or anyother tangible form of expression that wouldviolate or infringe any copyright or similar legallyrecognizedprotection of intellectual propertyrights.8. Activities that would constitute a violation of anypolicy of MCCCD’s Governing Board, including, butnot limited to, MCCCD’s non-discrimination policyand its policy against sexual harassment.9. Transmitting, storing, or receiving data, orotherwise using technology resources in a mannerthat would constitute a violation of state or federallaw, or MCCCD policy or administrative regulationincluding, but not limited to, obscenity, defamation,threats, harassment, and theft.10. Attempting to gain unauthorized access to aremote network or remote computer system.11. Exploiting any technology resources by attemptingto prevent or circumvent access, or usingunauthorized data protection schemes.12. Performing any act that would disrupt normaloperations of computers, workstations, terminals,peripherals, or networks.13. Using technology resources in such a way as towrongfully hide the identity of the user or pose asanother person.14. Allowing any unauthorized access to MCCCD’stechnology and non-technology resources.15. Making personal long distance or other tollcalls, except where the charges for the calls areincurred directly by the caller or arrangements areotherwise made at the time of the call to directlybill the caller.16. Intermittent use of technology resources thatinterferes with the performance of an employee’smain responsibilities.


Student Handbook 2013-20144317. Use of technology resources to market or conductother activities on behalf of a third-party regardingthe “hosting” of an event that is prohibited underMCCCD’s Use of College Facilities administrativeregulation.18. Conducting District or college-related businessusing any electronic mail account other than onehosted or provided by MCCCD, and approved bythe Vice Chancellor of Information TechnologyServices, even when the e-mail account copies alloutgoing and incoming messages to the MCCCDhosted account.19. Deleting or altering a technology public record inviolation of public records retention requirements,or in anticipation of receiving or after receipt of apublic records request, subpoena or a complaintfiled as part of an MCCCD grievance, investigationor review, or other lawful request for the record.20. Deleting or altering a technology record on anMCCCD device in anticipation or after receipt of apublic records request, subpoena or a complaintfiled as part of an MCCCD grievance, investigationor review, or other lawful request for the recordswhere the record may demonstrate a misuse oftechnology resources under this regulation.Review and Approval of Alternate E-MailAccount SystemsThe prior review and approval by the Vice Chancellorof Information Technology is required for theimplementation of alternate College electronic mailaccount systems. Requests will be evaluated basedupon the following considerations:1. The system must be compatible and interoperablewith the MCCCD e-mail system. All informationwithin the e-mail system must meet the standardsand authorize District Office access as specifiedin Administrative Regulation 4.15, “Retrieval,Disclosure and Retention of Records.”2. Any proposed changes to an MCCCD’s entity’se-mail system with e-discovery implications mustbe approved in advance during the planning stagesas specified in Administrative Regulation 4.15,“Retrieval, Disclosure and Retention of Records.”DisclaimerThe home page of an MCCCD web site must display,or link to, the following disclaimer in a conspicuousmanner:All information published online by MCCCD is subjectto change without notice. MCCCD is not responsiblefor errors or damages of any kind resulting from accessto its internet resources or use of the informationcontained therein. Every effort has been made toensure the accuracy of information presented asfactual; however errors may exist. Users are directed tocountercheck facts when considering their use in otherapplications. MCCCD is not responsible for the contentor functionality of any technology resource not ownedby the institution.The statements, comments, or opinions expressed byusers through use of Maricopa’s technology resourcesare those of their respective authors, who are solelyresponsible for them, and do not necessarily representthe views of the Maricopa County Community CollegeDistrict.Information Accuracy and Marketing StandardsIn order to help ensure that the most accurateinformation sources are reflected on web pages,information should be cited, sourced or linked fromthe website of the official District or college custodianresponsible for the particular subject. In addition,the design of web pages shall reflect establishedmarketing standards with respect to the imaging andusing of MCCCD marks as outlined in the marketingstandards handbook and Use of Marks administrativeregulation.Complaints and ViolationsComplaints or allegations of a violation of thesestandards will be processed through Maricopa’sarticulated grievance procedures or resolution ofcontroversy.Upon determination of a violation of these standards,MCCCD may unilaterally delete any violativecontent and terminate the user’s access to MCCCD’stechnology resources. It is the user’s responsibilityto demonstrate and/or establish the relevance ofcontent in the event that a content complaint ismade official. Users retain the right to appeal actionsthrough MCCCD’s grievance procedures or resolutionof controversy.Hazing Prevention Regulation (A.R. 2.6)The Maricopa County Community College District(MCCCD) strives to exceed the changing expectationsof our many communities for effective, innovative,student-centered, flexible and lifelong educationalopportunities. Our employees are committed torespecting diversity, continuous quality improvementand the efficient use of resources. We are a learningorganization guided by our shared values of:education, students, employees, excellence, diversity,honesty and integrity, freedom, fairness, responsibilityand public trust.Central to the vitality and dignity of our communityof learners is an environment that produces broadlyeducated responsible citizens, who are prepared toserve and lead in a free society. Academic instruction,co-curricular activities and community involvementcome together to meet this goal. All members of theMCCCD community, through the best of their abilities,must be provided the opportunity to contribute in asafe, orderly, civil and positive learning environment.One factor that inhibits the achievement of the abovestated purpose is the practice of hazing.1. Hazing by any student, employee or other personaffiliated with MCCCD is prohibited.


44 Student Handbook 2013-20142. “Hazing” is defined as any intentional, knowingor reckless act committed by a student orother person in any MCCCD college or affiliatededucational setting, whether individually or inconcert with other persons, against anotherstudent, and in which both of the following apply:A. The act was committed in connection withan initiation into, an affiliation with or themaintenance of membership in any club/organization that is affiliated with MCCCD; andB. The act contributes to a substantial risk ofpotential physical injury, mental harm orpersonal degradation, or causes physicalinjury, mental harm or personal degradation.3. Any solicitation to engage in hazing is prohibited.4. Aiding and abetting another person who isengaged in hazing is prohibited.5. Victim consent is not a defense for violation of theMaricopa Community Colleges Hazing PreventionRegulation.6. All students, faculty and staff must take reasonablemeasures within the scope of their individualauthority to prevent violations of the MCCCDHazing Prevention Regulation.7. Hazing activities and situations include, but are notlimited to, the following:A. Pre-pledging, illegal pledging or undergroundactivities.B. Acts of metal and physical abuse, including,but not limited to: paddling, slapping, kicking,pushing, yelling, biting, duck-walking, lineups,tuck-ins, belittling, excessive exercise,beating or physical abuse of any kind, and thepotentially forced consumption of any foodor beverage that contributes to or causesphysical injury, mental harm or personaldegradation.C. Sleep deprivation (activities that depriveprospective and/or current students and/ormembers of the opportunity of a minimum ofsix hours sufficient sleep each day).D. Encouraging or forcing use of alcohol or drugs.E. Any type of student club/organizationscavenger hunt, quest, road trip orother activity that would physically orpsychologically endanger prospective and/orcurrent students and/or members or others.F. Stroking or physically touching in anindecent or inappropriate manner. See SexualHarassment Policy 5.1.8G. Student club/organization activities thatsubject prospective and/or current studentsand/or members or others to public nuisanceor spectacle.H. Aiding or abetting theft, fraud, embezzlementof funds, destruction of public, personal orprivate property, or academic misconduct.I. Being required to wear odd or look-alikeapparel that contributes to or causes physicalinjury, mental harm or personal degradation.J. Personal services that contribute to or causephysical injury, mental harm or personaldegradation.8. Alleged violations of this regulation by students orstudent organizations can be reported to the vicepresident of student affairs’ office for investigationby any member of the college community. The vicepresident of student affairs’ office will investigatethe complaint in accordance with the studentdisciplinary code, all other college and MCCCDpolicies, and local and state laws. Alleged violationsof the MCCCD hazing prevention regulation orinterference with an investigation under thisregulation by students or student organizations aresubject to sanctions under the student disciplinarycode. The student disciplinary code shall govern allproceedings involving such a complaint. Decisionsarrived at as outcomes of the proceedings shall befinal, pending the normal appeal process.9. Alleged violations of the MCCCD hazing preventionregulation by any faculty or staff member can bereported to the vice president of student affairs’office for investigation by any member of thecollege community. The vice president of studentaffairs’ office will investigate the complaint inaccordance with college and MCCCD policies, andlocal and state laws. Any MCCCD faculty or staffmember who knowingly permitted, authorized orcondoned the alleged hazing activity is subject todisciplinary action in accordance with college andMCCCD policies, and local and state laws.10. If the vice president of student affairs’ officereceives a report or complaint of an allegedhazing activity involving physical injury, threatsof physical injury, intimidation, harassment orproperty damage, or any other conduct thatappears to violate Arizona state law, thecollege will report such conduct to the appropriatecollege safety office. The said college safety officewill investigate, respond to and report on thealleged hazing activity in accordance with allcollege, district, local, state and federal guidelines,policies and laws.11. Should the proceedings outlined abovesubstantiate an occurrence of hazing activitywherestudents or student organizations knowinglypermitted, authorized or condoned the hazingactivity-the college can recommend the followingsanctions against student clubs/organizations:A. CENSURE: Censure can include the requiredcompletion of a program designed with theintent of eliminating the hazing activity. Theprograms will be devised with the cooperationof all involved parties and monitored by thevice president of student affairs’ office.B. PROBATION: The student club(s)/organization(s) will be placed on probation for aspecified period of time. Conditions of probationwill be determined by the vice president ofstudent affairs’ office and outlined in writingto the student club(s)/organization(s). Theprobationary term will be monitored by the vicepresident of student affairs.C. SUSPENSION: The student club(s)/organization(s) will be suspended. The termsof the suspension can be defined in thesanction, including criteria the student club(s)/


Student Handbook 2013-201445organization(s) must meet within a specifiedtime to be considered for admission or renewalof college recognition status.D. REVOCATION: The student club(s)/organization(s) will have its status revoked,with the loss of all college associations,recognitions and privileges. The national orinternational office of an organization, if soaffiliated, will be requested to revoke thecharter of an organization.12. The MCCCD hazing prevention regulation is notintended to prohibit or sanction the followingconduct:A. Customary athletic events, contests orcompetitions that are sponsored by thecollege or MCCCD.B. Any activity or conduct that furthers thegoals of a legitimate educational curriculum,a legitimate co-curricular experience or alegitimate military training program.13. For the purposes of the MCCCD hazing preventionregulation: “Organization” is defined as anathletic team, association, order, society, corps,cooperative, club or other similar group that isaffiliated with MCCCD, whose membership consistsprimarily of students enrolled at MCCCD and thatmay also be classroom-related or co-curricular innature.Abuse-Free Environment (A.R. 2.4.7)See also the Auxiliary Services section (4.12) Smoke-Free/Tobacco-Free Environment and the Appendices/Student Section (S-16) Medical Marijuana Act of theAdministrative Regulations.1. Substance Abuse/Misuse StatementDrug abuse and misuse has become a nationalissue and is receiving national attention,particularly in the academic community. Theinsidious effects of the abuse of these agents arealso felt by all walks of life and economic levels.Therefore, as an education providing institution,we are responsible to provide knowledgeand guidelines about prevention, control, andtreatment of the abuse/misuse of alcohol,illegal and legal drug uses and misuses. Annualacknowledgements for students and employeesare provided through the online messagingaccounts.Students who experiment with drugs, alcohol,and illegal substances or use them recreationallymay develop a pattern of use that leads to abuseand addiction. Maricopa Community Collegesrecognized drug and alcohol abuse as an illnessand a major health problem as well as a potentialsafety and security issue.Part of the educational mission of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges is to educate students aboutpositive self-development, the benefits of a healthylifestyle and the health risks associated withsubstance abuse. This mission closely aligns withthe Drug-Free School and Communities Act of1989, and other relevant substance abuse laws.2. Student Program to Prevent Illicit Use ofDrugs and Abuse of AlcoholThe Maricopa Community College District fullysupports disciplinary action for misconduct andthe enforcement of state laws governing theuse of alcohol and the use, abuse, possession ordistribution of controlled substances or illegaldrugs.A. Introduction and PurposeThe Federal Drug-Free Schools andCommunities Act of 1989 (Public Law101-226) requires federal contractors andgrantees to certify that they will provide adrug-free school. As a recipient of federalgrants, the District must adopt a programtoward accomplishing this goal. While federallegislation has been the impetus for creation ofthe program, the administration and GoverningBoard recognize that substance abuse is aproblem of national proportions that alsoaffect students at the Maricopa CommunityColleges.The Maricopa Community Collegesare committed to maintaining learningenvironments that enhance the full benefitsof a student’s educational experience. TheMaricopa County Community College Districtwill make every effort to provide students withoptimal conditions for learning that are free ofthe problems associated with the unauthorizeduse and abuse of alcohol and drugs.B. Standards of ConductIn the student handbooks of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges under codes of conduct,the following are examples of behavior thatis prohibited by law and/or college rules andpolicies:i. Drinking or possession of alcoholicbeverages on the college campus.ii. Misuse of narcotics or drugs.C. Sanctions for Violation of Standards ofConductDisciplinary actions include, but are not limited to:i. Warning,ii. Loss of privileges,iii. Suspension, oriv. Expulsion.D. Legal SanctionsLocal, state, and federal law prohibit theunlawful possession, use or distribution of illicitdrugs and alcohol. Conviction for violatingthese laws can lead to imprisonment, fines,probation, and/or assigned community service.Persons convicted of a drug- and/or alcoholrelatedoffense will be ineligible to receivefederally funded or subsidized grants, loans,scholarships, or employment.Any employee is subject to disciplinary action,up to and including employment termination,for any of the following: reporting to workunder the influence of alcohol and/or illegaldrugs or narcotics; the use, sale, dispensing,


46 Student Handbook 2013-2014or possession of alcohol and/or illegal drugsor narcotics on MCCCD premises, whileconducting MCCCD business, or at any timewhich would interfere with the effectiveconduct of the employee’s work for theMCCCD; and use of illegal drugs.3. MCCCD Program StandardsThe Maricopa Community College Districtis committed to establishing a preventativesubstance abuse program at each collegedesigned to affect positively the problems ofirresponsible use of alcohol and the use and abuseof illegal substances. A main focus of the programwill be on education of the campus communityand assistance to individuals.A. Identify a key individual, at each college, toprovide emergency services and/or to contactand work with outside agencies that providedrug and alcohol counseling, treatment orrehabilitation programs that may be availableto students and employees.B. Support disciplinary action for misconduct andthe enforcement of state laws governing theuse of alcohol and the use, abuse, possessionor distribution of controlled substances orillegal drugs.C. Establish a preventative substance abuseprogram at each college designed to affectpositively the problems of irresponsible useof alcohol and the use and abuse of illegalsubstances.4. Alcoholic Beverages—Usage Regulation(A.R. 4.13)This Administrative Regulation prohibits the use ofDistrict funds to purchase alcoholic beverages orservices related to them except in small amountsto be used in cooking for the District’s culinaryprograms. Additionally, it generally prohibits thepresence of alcoholic beverages on premisesowned by the District, or those leased or rented bythe institution. It permits a few, narrow exceptionsto that latter prohibition. The exceptions are notavailable to the general population of Districtemployees or officials. More importantly, they areestablished to ensure that the District’s actionsstay within the boundaries of state law and theDistrict’s insurance coverage. Therefore, strictcompliance with this regulation is essential.A. No Funds. No funds under the jurisdictionof the governing board of the District maybe used to purchase alcoholic beverages,except for the limited purposes of purchasingsmall amounts of them for use solely asingredients in food preparation for classes andat the District’s culinary institutes. Alcoholicbeverages may not be stored on premisesowned, leased, or rented by MCCCD except asprovided in Paragraph H.B. No Service or Sale of Alcoholic Beverages.The law of the state of Arizona strictlyregulates the service, sale, distribution andconsumption of alcoholic beverages. In light ofthat law, the District does not permit alcoholicbeverages to be served, sold or distributedon or in the premises owned by the District orleased or rented by the Maricopa CommunityColleges for District-approved educational,fund-raising or other community purposes,except as provided in Paragraphs C and G.C. Service at District Events on District-ownedProperty. The Chancellor has the sole authorityto approve the service, but not the sale orother distribution, of wine or beer at Districtevents on district-owned property that theChancellor either sponsors or approves.The only District employees authorized torequest the Chancellor’s approval are theCollege Presidents and the Vice Chancellors.Additionally, the law strictly limits the serviceof wine or beer by the District on Districtownedproperty, and those restrictions arespecified in Paragraph E. Unless approved bythe Chancellor in compliance with the law andthis regulation, alcoholic beverages may notbe served on District-owned property.D. Event Form Required. A College Presidentor Vice Chancellor who wishes to obtain theChancellor’s approval for the service of wine orbeer at a District-sponsored event on Districtownedproperty shall forward a completedwritten request to the Chancellor no laterthan 30 days before the event. The requestform is available at: www.maricopa.edu/publicstewardship/governance/adminregs/appendices/print/AS-6.doc. On signing theform, the Chancellor will provide a copy of it tothe requestor and to the MCCCD Risk Manager.For events that the Chancellor sponsors, he orshe will complete the form, sign it and provideit to the MCCCD Risk Manager no later than 10business days before the event.E. Service restrictions required by law. Anevent approved under Paragraph D must,by law, comply with the all of the followingrestrictions:i. The only alcoholic beverages that may beserved and consumed are wine and beer.Wine consumption is limited to 6 oz. perperson, and beer consumption is limited to24 oz;ii.The gathering must be by invitation only,and not open to the public;iii. The gathering may not exceed 300;iv. Invitees may not be charged any fee foreither the event or the beer or wine; andv. The consumption may only take placebetween noon and 10:00 p.m.Additionally, beer and wine may only beserved by a beverage service contractorwhose liquor license with the state of Arizonais in good standing, except as provided inParagraph F. The contractor must provide all ofthe beverages served and well as the servers


Student Handbook 2013-201447or bartender. Before the event, the contractormust provide a certificate of insurance thatmeets the requirements of the District’s RiskManager and that adds the District as anadditional insured. The contractor must alsoagree in writing to indemnify the Districtregarding the service of the beverages.F. Culinary Institutes. The Chancellor maysponsor or approve an event at one of theDistrict’s culinary institutes. Students mayserve wine and beer at the event as partof their class requirements, subject to thelimitations of Paragraph E. Any student servingthose beverages must, by law, be 19 years orolder.G. Third-Party Event. The Maricopa CountyCommunity College District Foundation andthe Friends of Public Radio Arizona may, withthe approval of the Chancellor, sponsor anevent on District-owned property under thisregulation. The City of Phoenix and the Friendsof the Phoenix Public Library may also do so,with the approval of the Chancellor, at thejoint library on the campus of South MountainCommunity College. These third-party, nondistrictentities are solely responsible fordetermining the steps that they are requiredto take to comply with Arizona’s alcoholicbeverages laws. Additionally, they mustcomply with the following steps:i. The entity obtains a liquor license,if required by law, from the ArizonaDepartment of Liquor Licenses and controlfor each event and fully complies withthe laws, rules and other requirementsapplicable to that license;ii.The entity completes the form available atwww.maricopa.edu/publicstewardship/governance/adminregs/appendices/print/AS-7.doc. And provides it to theChancellor for approval along with a copyof the liquor license no later than 30 daysbefore the event, unless the Chancellorapproves a shorter period of time in aparticular case;iii. The entity provides or currently has on filewith the District a certificate of insurancedemonstrating that it has liquor liabilitycoverage and that adds the District as anadditional insured;iv. The entity agrees in writing to indemnifythe District from any claims of any kindarising out of the event;v. Beer and wine are the only alcoholicbeverages served and only served througha beverage service contractor whoseliquor license with the state of Arizona is ingood standing;vi. The contractor provides all of thebeverages served and well as the serversor bartenders;vii. Before the event, the contractor providesa certificate of insurance that meets therequirements of the District’s Risk Managerand that adds the District as an additionalinsured; andviii. The contractor agrees in writing toindemnify the District regarding theservice of the beverages.H. Receipt of beverages; storage. It is notpermissible to store wine or beer on premisesowned, leased or rented by MCCCD, exceptas provided in this paragraph. Alcoholicbeverages purchased for use in cooking inDistrict culinary courses must be stored insuch a way that it is inaccessible to anyoneexcept the Director or designee of the culinaryprogram. For wine and beer to be used forreceptions at the district’s culinary institutes,as authorized by this administrative regulation,the following storage requirements apply:i. Wine and beer to be served may only bebrought to MCCCD property no soonerthan four hours prior to the event, andremain there no longer than four hoursafter the event; andii.Once the wine and beer arrives onMCCCD property, the Director the culinaryprogram shall assign an MCCCD employeeto ensure that it is not stolen or that it isnot opened until ready to be served.I. Compliance with law. In compliance withapplicable law, any persons planning anevent under this administrative regulationare required to familiarize themselves withthe pertinent laws and other requirementsestablished by the state of Arizona for theservice of alcoholic beverages, particularlythose in Arizona Revised Statutes Title 4(Alcoholic Beverages) Chapters 1 (GeneralProvisions), 2 (Regulations and Prohibitions)and 3 (Civil Liability of Licensees and OtherPersons) as well as Arizona AdministrativeCode Title 19, Articles 1 (State Liquor Board)and 3 (Unlicensed Premises Definitions andLicensing Time-Frames).J. Residential Housing. Lawful occupants ofresidential housing under the jurisdiction ofthe Governing Board, if over the age of 21years and not otherwise lawfully barred fromsuch practice, may possess and consumealcoholic beverages in the privacy of theirrespective leased housing facility. Guestsof such occupants over the age of 21 yearsshall have the same privilege. No alcohol ispermitted in public areas (nor common areasof a dormitory) at any time.K. Personal Responsibility. The personal orindividual purchase of alcoholic beveragesby individuals attending District-approvedfunctions held in places serving alcoholicbeverages is a personal and individualresponsibility. Administrative discretion shallbe exercised in the approval of the location ofsuch activities, as such decision pertains to thenature of the group involved.


48 Student Handbook 2013-2014L. Miscellaneous Usage Issues. Any issuesthat are not specifically addressed withinthis regulation require the review anddetermination by the Chancellor or ExecutiveVice Chancellor and Provost on matters relatedto culinary programs, academic or studentaffairs.4. Other Health ConcernsGeneral Guidelines Concerning AIDSNeither a diagnosis of AIDS nor a positive HIVantibody test will be part of the initial admissiondecision for those applying to attend any of theMaricopa Community Colleges. The MaricopaCommunity Colleges will not require screening ofstudents for antibody to HIV.Students with AIDS or a positive HIV antibodytest will not be restricted from access tostudent unions, theaters, cafeterias, snack bars,gymnasiums, swimming pools, recreationalfacilities, restrooms, or other common areas, asthere is not current medical justification for doingso.Where academically and logistically feasible,students who have medical conditions, includingAIDS, may seek accommodation in order to remainenrolled. Medical documentation will be needed tosupport requests for accommodation through theOffice of Disabled Resources and Services or theOffice of Vice President of Student Affairs.The Maricopa Community Colleges acknowledgethe importance of privacy considerations withregard to persons with AIDS. The number ofpeople who are aware of the existence and/oridentity of students who have AIDS or a positiveHIV antibody test should be kept to a minimum.When a student confides in an faculty member,knowledge of the condition should be transmittedto the appropriate vice president or designee whowill make the determination if the informationshould be further disseminated. It should beremembered that mere exposure to the personin a classroom does not constitute a need toknow the diagnosis. It is, therefore, unnecessaryto document in a student’s file the fact that he orshe has AIDS unless the information is to be usedfor accommodation reasons. Sharing confidentialinformation without consent may create legalliability.Students are encouraged to contact the Officeof Disabled Resources and Services and/or thevice president of student affairs or designee forthe types of services available in the district orcommunity on matters regarding AIDS or the HIVvirus.Smoke-Free/Tobacco-Free Environment(A.R. 4.12)The Maricopa County Community College District isdedicated to providing a healthy, comfortable, andeducationally productive environment for students,employees, and visitors. In order to promote a healthylearning and work environment, the Chancellor hasdirected that the Maricopa County Community CollegeDistrict serve as a total smoke free and tobacco freeenvironment, effective July 1, 2012. Smoking (includingthe use of “e-cigs”) and all uses of tobacco shall beprohibited from all District owned and leased propertyand facilities, including but not limited to parking lots,rooftops, courtyards, plazas, entrance and exit ways,vehicles, sidewalks, common areas, grounds, athleticfacilities, and libraries.Support signage prohibiting the use of smokinginstruments and tobacco shall be placed throughoutall college and District locations.Continued violations by an employee or studentshall be handled through the respective conductprocedures established for employees and students.Appendix S-16: Statement on the ArizonaMedical Marijuana Act (Proposition 203)In 2010, Arizona voters approved the ArizonaMedical Marijuana Act (Propositions 203), a statelaw permitting individuals to possess and use limitedquantities of marijuana for medical purposes. Becauseof its obligations under federal law, however, theMaricopa Community Colleges will continue to prohibitmarijuana possession and use on campus for anypurpose.Under the Drug Free Workplace Act of 1988, and theDrug Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989, “…no institution of higher education shall be eligible toreceive funds or any other form of financial assistanceunder any federal program, including participationin any federally funded or guaranteed student loanprogram, unless it has adopted and has implementeda program to prevent the use of illicit drugs and abuseof alcohol by students and employees.” Anotherfederal law, the Controlled Substances Act, prohibitsthe possession, use, production, and distribution ofmarijuana for any and all uses, including medicinal use.This law is not affected by the passage of the ArizonaMedical Marijuana Act. Because Maricopa CommunityColleges could lose its eligibility for federal funds ifit fails to prohibit marijuana, it is exempt from therequirements of the Arizona Medical Marijuana Act.Therefore, Maricopa Community Colleges will continueto enforce its current policies prohibiting the unlawfulmanufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, oruse of a controlled substance on its property or as partof any of its activities.Employees and students who violate MaricopaCommunity Colleges policy prohibiting the use orpossession of illegal drugs on campus will continue tobe subject to disciplinary action, up to and includingexpulsion from school and termination of employment.


Student Handbook 2013-201449Eligibility for Accommodations & RequiredDisability Documentation (A.R. 2.8.1)PurposeTo specify the disability documentation requirementsthat will qualify (i.e., support current and essentialneeds) Maricopa County Community College Districtstudents for reasonable and appropriate academicadjustments through each college’s DisabilityResources and Services (DRS) office or designatedprofessional.General Eligibility RequirementsDRS applicants must be admitted or enrolled as anMCCCD student, and must provide the DisabilityResources and Services (DRS) office with qualifyingdisability documentation, verifying the nature andextent of the disability prior to requesting or receivingany academic adjustment.Who Is Eligible for Services?To be eligible for DRS support services, a student musthave a disability as it defined by federal law (section504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act, the Americans withDisabilities Act OF 1990 (ADA), and the Americanswith Disabilities Act Amendments Act of 2008(ADAAA)).Definitions• Disability: A disability is any physical or mentalcondition which causes substantial limitation to theability to perform one or more major life activities.• Academic adjustment: An academic adjustmentis a modification of a non-essential academicrequirement, an examination, or an institutionalrule that is necessary to avoid discriminating onthe basis of handicap against qualified studentswith disabilities. Modifications may includechanges in the length of time permitted for thecompletion of degree requirements, substitutionof specific courses required for the completionof degree requirements, and adaptation of themanner in which specific courses are conducted.**Documentation can be transferred within MCCCD forcurrent consideration for eligibility.**Determination made by another institution ororganization does not guarantee eligibility.Special ConsiderationsAny employee who receives a request for academicadjustment must refer the student to the DRSOffice. The DRS Office alone is responsible forevaluating documentation and determining eligibilityand academic adjustments. All situations shall beconsidered on an individual, case-by-case basis, andall requests for academic adjustments from qualifiedstudents with a disability shall be considered byDRS. DRS may exercise its right to require additionaldocumentation.Academic adjustments are determined by the DRSOffice through an interactive exchange with theeligible student. The DRS Office will give priorityto the request of the student, but will also considerthe instructor’s perspective when it is offered. Theinteractive exchange may continue during the courseof the year, and the DRS may make reasonablealterations in approved academic adjustmentsbased on input from the student and the facultymember. Academic adjustments determined by theDRS Office are required except when the institutionsubsequently determines that an adjustment wouldalter an academic requirement that is essentialto the instruction being pursued by the student,or to a directly related licensing requirement.MCCCD is not required to provide “best” or “mostdesired” accommodations but rather a reasonableaccommodation sufficient to meet accessibility needs.In the event the instructor believes the modificationdetermined by DRS would alter an academicrequirement that is essential to the instruction beingpursued by the student, or to a directly relatedlicensing requirement, the instructor will first meetwith the director of the DRS office within threeworking days of receipt of the determination andattempt to resolve the issue informally. If the facultymember’s concern remains unresolved, within threedays of the above meeting he or she may submit awritten request to the college’s chief academic officer(or a comparably qualified administrator designatedby the college president) for his or her academicjudgment on the question.Any change in the DRS Office’s initial recommendationresulting from the above meeting or the ChiefAcademic Officer’s decision will be communicatedto the student by the DRS Office. The interactiveexchange with the student will continue in an effort toachieve a mutually satisfactory outcome.If a student is not satisfied with the academicadjustment provided, he or she may file a complaintunder the Discrimination Complaint Procedures forStudents. In such cases, the Vice President for StudentAffairs will assign an investigator whose qualificationsand experience include curriculum developmentand educational accommodations for students withdisabilities.In all cases in which academic adjustments are incontroversy, whether as a student discriminationcomplaint or a faculty member’s appeal to the ChiefAcademic Officer, the ultimate decision will beinformed by consultation with the duly appointedfaculty representatives who serve in the developmentof the curriculum for the institution and the program.The committee will study the requested academicadjustment and alternatives, their feasibility, costand effect on the academic program, and come toa rationally justifiable conclusion as to whether theavailable alternatives would result either in loweringacademic standards or requiring substantial programalteration. This conclusion will be submitted in writingto the Chief Academic Officer, who will consult withthe Vice Chancellor and the Office of General Counselbefore making the final determination.


50 Student Handbook 2013-2014Nothing in this policy prohibits a faculty member frommaking minor, commonsense alterations in the mannerin which a course is presented. A student who asks theinstructor to change the color of chalk used becausehe is colorblind may be so accommodated withoutregistering with the DRS Office. However, the facultymember must report making such accommodations toDRS.Documentation GuidelinesStudents requesting accommodations must providedocumentation of their disability. Documentationconsists of an evaluation prepared by a trained andqualified professional that identifies:• current level of functioningcurrent documentationall standardized testing must use adultnormed instrumentsage of the documentation may vary forsome disabilities, provided the presenceof a substantial limitation(s) is adequatelyestablished• how the disability impacts the student’s learning• contain information supportive of the student’srequest for specific academic support, auxiliaryaids, and accommodationsSpecific Eligibility Requirements1. Physical DisabilitiesA. Required DocumentationSubmit a written, current diagnostic reportof any physical disabilities that are basedon appropriate diagnostic evaluationsadministered by trained and qualified (i.e.,certified and/or licensed) professionals(e.g., medical doctors, ophthalmologists,neuropsychologists, audiologists). Disabilitydiagnosis categories include, but not limitedto:i. Orthopedic Disabilityii. Blind or Visual Impairmentiii. Deaf or Hard-of-Hearingiv. Traumatic Brain Injuryv. Other Health-Related/Systemic DisabilitiesB. Diagnostic ReportThe written diagnostic report must include:i. A clear disability diagnosis, history, and thedate of diagnosis.ii. A description of any medical and/orbehavioral symptoms associated with thedisability.iii. Medications, dosage, frequency, and anyadverse side effects attributable to use.iv. A clear statement specifying functionallimitations.v. A recommendation for accommodation(s).2. Specific Learning DisabilitiesA. Required DocumentationSubmit a written diagnostic report ofspecific learning disabilities that is basedon age appropriate, comprehensive, psychoeducational evaluations using adult normedinstruments.The assessment or evaluation which leadsto the diagnosis must be administered bya trained and qualified (i.e., certified and/or licensed) professional (e.g., psychologist,school psychologist, neuropsychologist, oreducational diagnostician) who has had directexperience with adolescents and adults withlearning disabilities.An appropriate Psycho Educational Evaluationmust include comprehensive measures in eachof the following areas:i. Aptitude: evaluation must contain acomplete intellectual assessment, with allsub-tests and standard scores reported.ii.Examples Of Measures (including but notlimited to):1. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale(WAIS-R)2. Stanford Binet Intelligence Scale3. Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery4. Kaufman Adolescent And AdultIntelligence TestAcademic Achievement: evaluation mustcontain a comprehensive achievementbattery with all sub-tests and standardscores reported. The test battery shouldinclude current levels of functioning in therelevant area(s).Examples of Achievement (including butnot limited to):1. Wechsler Individual Achievement Tests(WIAT)2. Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery3. Stanford Test of Academic Skills (TASK)4. Scholastic Abilities Test for Adults(SATA)iii. Information Processing: evaluation shouldassess specific information processingareas such as short- and long-termmemory, sequential memory, auditory andvisual perception/processing, processingspeed, executive function, and motorability.Examples of Achievement (including butnot limited to):1. Wechsler Individual Achievement Tests(WIAT)2. Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery3. Stanford Test of Academic Skills (TASK)4. Scholastic Abilities Test for Adults(SATA)B. Diagnostic ReportThe diagnostic report must include thefollowing information:i. A diagnostic interview that addressesrelevant historical information, pastand current academic achievement,instructional foundation, past performance


Student Handbook 2013-201451ii.in areas of difficulty, age at initialdiagnosis, and history of accommodationsused in past educational settings and theireffectiveness.A list of all instruments used in the testbattery.iii. Discussion of test behavior and specifictest results.iv. A diagnostic summary or statement withthe following information:1. DSM-IV, including all five axes.2. A clear and direct statement that alearning disability does or does notexist, including a rule-out of alternativeexplanations for the learning problems.Terms such as “appears,” “suggests,”or “probable” used in the diagnosticsummary statement do not support aconclusive diagnosis.3. A clear statement specifying thesubstantial limitations to one or moremajor life activities.4. A psychometric summary of scores.5. A recommendation foraccommodations, including rationale.Diagnosis of specific learning disabilities thatdo not contain psycho-educational measuresmay not be sufficient for determiningeligibility for academic accommodations. Forexample, school plans such as individualizededucation plans (IEP) or 504 plans may notbe sufficient documentation. DRS reserves theright to request reassessment when questionsregarding previous assessment or previousservice provision arise.3. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder(ADHD) / Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD)A. Required DocumentationSubmit a current diagnosis of attention deficithyperactivity disorder (ADHD)/attentiondeficit disorder (ADD) that is based onappropriate diagnostic evaluations.B. Diagnostic ReportAcceptable documentation must include:i. DSM-IV diagnosis, including all five axesii.A summary or statement which includesthe following information:iii. A clear summary or statement specifyingevidence of behavior that significantlyimpairs functioning, including degree ofseverity.iv. A recommendation for accommodations,including rationale.4. Psychological/Psychiatric DisabilitiesA. Required Documentationi. Depression and/or bipolar disorderii. Generalized anxiety disordersiii. Post traumatic stress disorderiv. Psychotic disordersv. Autism spectrum disorder.B. Diagnostic ReportIf the diagnostic report is not current, a letterfrom a qualified professional that provides anupdate of the diagnosis may be requested.The diagnostic report must include thefollowing:i. DSM-IV diagnosis, including all five axesii.A diagnostic summary or statement thatincludes the following:1. A clear summary or statement that adisability does or does not exist.2. A clear summary or statementspecifying evidence of behavior thatsignificantly impairs functioningincluding degree of severity.3. A discussion of medications andtheir possible impact on academicfunctioning.5. Neurological DisordersA. Required DocumentationDisorders of the central and peripheralnervous system, including but not limited to:i. Acquired Brain Injury/Traumatic BrainInjuryii. Epilepsy/Seizure Disorderiii. StrokeB. Diagnostic ReportWritten statement of diagnosis:i. Current functional limitationsii. Information regarding current symptomsiii. Information regarding prescribedmedication(s) and possible side effect andimpact on student academic performanceiv. Restrictions on activities imposed by theconditionv. Where learning has been affected, arecent neuro-psychological evaluation isrequested6. Temporary Disabling ConditionsA. Required Documentationi. Temporary disabling conditions as a resultof surgery, accident, or serious illness mayrequire accommodations for a limited time.Acceptable documentation must include:ii. Written statement of diagnosisiii. List of current symptoms and degree ofseverityiv. Information regarding functionallimitations and impact within an academicenvironmentv. Medications and possible side effectsvi. Duration of symptoms and estimatedlength of time services will be neededEligibility of Students Taking ReducedCourse Loads (A.R. 2.8.2)Although any student may register for fewer than12 credit hours, a student with a disability mayrequest a reduced academic load as a reasonableand appropriate accommodation. A college DisabilityResource Services (DRS) professional may certify thata student who is afforded a reduced academic load as


52 Student Handbook 2013-2014an accommodation for a disability shall neverthelessbe deemed a full-time student. Such certification shallbe solely to enable the student to seek eligibility forhealth insurance benefits and to seek eligibility tocomply with mandates of the National Junior CollegeAthletic Association. The college DRS professionalwill certify that a student may be deemed a full-timestudent as provided under this regulation only on asemester-by-semester basis.The appropriate college offices will receivedocumentation of the DRS professional’s certificationfrom the professional or the student. An incomingstudent may apply for such certification uponacceptance to the college. Requests for certificationmust be made prior to the beginning of each semester.Every attempt will be made to accommodate theserequests.The following criteria also apply:1. Students taking a reduced course load mustregister for at least 6 credit hours (based onDRS approval) during the regular fall and springsemesters. It is recommended that studentsregister for at least 3 credit hours duringthe summer to offset the impact of academiceligibility.2. Students taking a reduced course load mustmaintain satisfactory academic progress standardsas defined by the College catalog.3. The reduced credit load may result in an adjustedfinancial aid package. There may be additionalramifications including, but not limited to, extratime to complete college, insurance coverage,Vocational Rehabilitation funding, etc.4. Eligibility for Federal Stafford Loans may bereduced according to the total number of credithours taken in the full academic year. A student,taking a reduced course load, must be at least halftime in a semester (6 credits) in order to receive aStafford Loan.5. The amount of Federal Financial Aid (Title IV)awarded is based on the actual number of cerdithours taken.6. Requirements for continuation of funding throughVocational Rehabilitation may differ. The studentmust contact his/her VR counselor to determinehow a reduced course load will impact theirfunding.7. The National Junior College Athletic Association(NJCAA) has published standards in regard tothe designation of Certified Disabled Student-Athlete in Article V Section J of the NJCAA bylaws.This procedure addresses the NJCAA criteria forreduced course loads.Application Process1. Applications for reduced course loads must besubmitted to the Disability & Services professionalwith supporting documentation. Requests must bemade prior to the beginning of each semester.2. Supporting documentation must include adiagnostic evaluation from an appropriateprofessional. The documentation must meet theguidelines set forth by the Maricopa CommunityCollege District’s Documentation Policy in order toevaluate the current impact of the disabilityin regards to the request. Students are requiredto complete an application form for this statusevery semester, but do not need to re-submit theirdocumentation. Continuation of this status isnot automatic. Each case will be re-evaluatedat the end of the semester to determine if thisaccommodation is still appropriate.3. Students requesting a reduced course load shouldconsult with their academic advisor regardingthe consequences of this status for makingprogress toward graduation requirements andeligibility for various academic distinctions anddesignations.4. Students registered in occupational and/oracademic programs that have specific blockformats will not be considered for reduced courseloads.5. Students who are approved for a reduced courseload will be required to sign the Reduced CourseLoad Approval Form (see Appendix S-10), whichincludes a statement acknowledging that he orshe has reviewed the consequences that go withreduced load status and accepts them.6. When a reduced course load status is granted bythe Disability Resources & Services professional, acopy of the Reduced Course Load Approval Formwill be sent to the appropriate individuals.Academic Misconduct (A.R. 2.3.11)1. DefinitionsA. Academic Misconduct - includes misconductassociated with the classroom, laboratoryor clinical learning process. Examples ofacademic misconduct include, but are notlimited to, cheating, plagiarism, excessiveabsences, use of abusive or profane language,and disruptive and/or threatening behavior.B. Cheating - includes, but is not limited to,(a) use of any unauthorized assistance intaking quizzes, tests, assessment tests orexaminations; (b) dependence upon the aidof sources beyond those authorized by thefaculty member in writing papers, preparingreports, solving problems, or carrying outother assignments; or (c) the acquisition,without permission, of tests or other academicmaterial belonging to a member of the collegefaculty or staff.C. Plagiarism - includes, but is not limited to, theuse of paraphrase or direct quotation of thepublished or unpublished work of anotherperson without full and clear acknowledgment.It also includes the unacknowledged use ofmaterials prepared by another person oragency engaged in the selling of term papersor other academic materials. Informationgathered from the internet and not properlyidentified is also considered plagiarism.


Student Handbook 2013-2014532. SanctionsAny student found by a faculty member to havecommitted academic misconduct maybe subjectto the following sanctions: (Note: sanctions A, B,C, and D may be imposed by a faculty member.The faculty member may recommend to thedepartment chairperson and the appropriatevice president of academic affairs or designeethat sanctions E, F, or G be imposed. Collegesuspension or expulsion will be imposed only bythe appropriate vice president of academic affairsor designee.A. Warning - A notice in writing to the studentthat the student has violated the academiccode.B. Grade Adjustment - Lowering of a score on atest or assignment.C. Discretionary Sanctions - Additional academicassignments determined by the facultymember.D. Course Failure - Failure of a student from acourse where academic misconduct occurs.E. Disciplinary Probation - Disciplinary probationis for a designated period of time and includesthe probability of more severe sanctions if thestudent commits additional acts of academicmisconduct.F. College Suspension - Separation of the studentfrom the college for a definite period of time,after which the student is eligible to return.Conditions for readmission may be specified.(A suspension from one Maricopa CommunityCollege will apply to all other colleges/centersin the District.)G. College Expulsion - Permanent separation ofthe student from the college. (Expulsion fromone Maricopa Community College will apply toall colleges/centers in the District.)3. Appeal of Sanctions for AcademicMisconductStudents can appeal sanctions imposedfor academic misconduct by following theinstructional grievance process. (A.R. 2.3.5;Appendix S-6)DISCIPLINARY STANDARDSDisciplinary Standards (A.R. 2.5.1)1. Disciplinary Probation and SuspensionAccording to the laws of the State of Arizona,jurisdiction and control over the MaricopaCommunity Colleges are vested in the DistrictGoverning Board. The Governing Board andits agents-the chancellor, administration andfaculty-are granted broad legal authority toregulate student life subject to basic standards ofreasonableness.In developing responsible student conduct, theMaricopa Community Colleges prefer mediation,guidance, admonition and example. However, whenthese means fail to resolve problems of studentconduct and responsibility, appropriate disciplinaryprocedures will be followed.Misconduct for which students are subject todisciplinary action falls into the general areas of:A. Cheating on an examination, assessment tests,laboratory work, written work (plagiarism),falsifying, forging or altering college recordsB. Actions or verbal statements which threatenthe personal safety of any faculty, staff,students, or others lawfully assembled onthe campus, or any conduct which is harmful,obstructive, disruptive to, or interferes with theeducational process or institutional functionsC. Violation of Arizona statutes, and/or collegeregulations and policiesD. Use of college computer resources such as theInternet in violation of Technology ResourceStandards (A.R. 4.4) which may result innotification of law enforcement authorities2. Disciplinary Removal from ClassA faculty member may remove a student fromclass meetings for disciplinary reasons. If aninstructor removes a student for more than oneclass period, the faculty member shall notify thedepartment/division chair and the appropriatevice president or designee in writing of theproblem, action taken by the faculty member,and the faculty member’s recommendation. If aresolution of the problem is not reached betweenthe faculty member and the student, the studentmay be removed permanently pursuant to dueprocess procedures.Student Conduct Code (A.R. 2.5.2)The purpose of this Code is to help ensure a healthy,comfortable and educationally productive environmentfor students, employees and visitors.Article I: DefinitionsThe following are definitions of terms or phrasescontained within this Code:1. “Accused student” means any student accused ofviolating this Student Conduct Code.2. “Appellate boards” means any person or personsauthorized by the college president to consider


54 Student Handbook 2013-2014an appeal from a Student Conduct Board’sdetermination that a student has violated thisStudent Conduct Code or from the sanctionsimposed by the Student Conduct Administrator.The college president may act as the appellateboard.3. “College” means a Maricopa Community Collegeor center.4. “College premises” means all land, buildings,facilities and other property in the possession ofor owned, used or controlled by the college orDistrict.5. “College official” means any person employedby the college or District, performing assignedadministrative or professional responsibilitiespursuant to this Student Conduct Code. Thecollege president shall designate the collegeor center official to be responsible for theadministration of the Student Conduct Code.6. “Complainant” means any person who submitsa charge alleging that a student violated thisStudent Conduct Code. When a student believesthat s/he has been a victim of another student’smisconduct, the student who believes s/he hasbeen a victim will have the same rights underthis Student Conduct Code as are provided tothe complainant, even if another member of thecollege community submitted the charge itself.7. “Day” means calendar day at a time when collegeis in session, and shall exclude weekends andholidays.8. “Disruptive behavior” means conduct thatmaterially and substantially interferes with orobstructs the teaching or learning process in thecontext of a classroom or educational setting.9. “District” means the Maricopa County CommunityCollege District.10. “Faculty member” means any person hired bythe college or District to conduct classroom orteaching activities or who is otherwise consideredby the college to be a member of faculty.11. “May” is used in the permissive sense.12. “Member of the college community” means anyperson who is a student, faculty member, collegeofficial or any other person employed by thecollege or center. A person’s status in a particularsituation shall be determined by the collegepresident.13. “Organization” means any number of persons whohave complied with the formal requirements forcollege recognition.14. “Policy” is defined as the written regulationsof the college and/or District as found in, butnot limited to, this Student Conduct Code andGoverning Board policy.15. “Shall” is used in the imperative sense.16. “Student” means any person taking courses at thecollege whether full-time or part-time. Personswho are not officially enrolled for a particular termbut who have a continuing relationship with thecollege are considered “students”.17. “Student Conduct Administrator” means a collegeofficial authorized on a case by case basis by thecollege official responsible for administration ofthe Student Conduct Code to impose sanctionsupon students found to have violated this StudentConduct Code. A Student Conduct Administratormay serve simultaneously as a Student ConductAdministrator and the sole member or one ofthe members of a Student Conduct Board. Thecollege official responsible for administration ofthe Student Conduct Code may authorize thesame Student Conduct Administrator to imposesanctions in all cases.18. “Student Conduct Board” means any personor persons authorized by the college presidentto determine whether a student has violatedthis Student Conduct Code and to recommendsanctions that may be imposed when a violationhas been committed.19. “Threatening behavior” means any written ororal statement, communication, conduct orgesture directed toward any member of thecollege community, which causes a reasonableapprehension of physical harm to self, others orproperty. It does not matter whether the personcommunicating the threat has the ability to carryit out, or whether the threat is made on a present,conditional or future basis.Article II: Judicial Authority1. The college official responsible for administrationof the Student Conduct Code shall determinethe composition of Student Conduct Board anddetermine which Student Conduct Administrator,Student Conduct Board, and appellate board shallbe authorized to hear each case.2. The college official responsible for administrationof the Student Conduct Code shall developprocedures for the administration of the judicialprogram and rules for the conduct of hearingsthat are consistent with provisions of this StudentConduct Code.3. Decisions made by a Student Conduct Board and/or Student Conduct Administrator shall be final,pending the normal appeal process.Article III: Prohibited Conduct1. Jurisdiction of the CollegeThe Student Conduct Code shall apply to conductthat occurs on college or District premises, orat college- or District-sponsored activities thatadversely affects the college community and/or the pursuit of its objectives. Each studentshall be responsible for his/her conduct from thetime of admission through the actual awardingof a degree, certificate, or similar indicator ofcompletion of a course of study, even thoughconduct may occur before classes begin or afterclasses end, as well as during the academic yearand during periods between terms of actualenrollment (and even if their conduct is notdiscovered until after a degree is awarded). TheStudent Conduct Code shall apply to a student’sconduct even if the student withdraws fromschool while a disciplinary matter is pending.


Student Handbook 2013-2014552. Temporary Removal of StudentDisruptive behavior includes conduct thatdistracts or intimidates others in a mannerthat interferes with instructional activities, failsto adhere to a faculty member’s appropriateclassroom rules or instructions, or interferes withthe normal operations of the college. Studentswho engage in disruptive behavior or threateningbehavior may be directed by the faculty memberto leave the classroom or by the college officialresponsible for administration of the StudentConduct Code to leave the college premises. Ifthe student refuses to leave after being requestedto do so, college safety may be summoned. Forinvoluntary removal from more than one classperiod, the faculty member should invoke theprocedures prescribed in the Student ConductCode.3. Conduct - Rules and RegulationsAny student found to have committed thefollowing misconduct is subject to the disciplinarysanctions outlined in Article IV:A. Acts of dishonesty, including but not limited tothe following:i. Furnishing false information to any collegeofficial or office.ii. Forgery, alteration or misuse of any collegedocument, record or instrument ofidentification.iii. Tampering with the election of any collegerecognized student organization.B. Obstruction of teaching, research,administration, disciplinary proceedings orother college activities, including its publicservice functions on campus, in clinicalsettings or other authorized non-collegeactivities, when the conduct occurs oncollege premises a faculty member mayremove a student from a class meeting fordisciplinary reasons. If a faculty memberremoves a student for more than one classperiod, the faculty member shall notify thecollege official responsible for administrationof the Student Conduct Code in writing of theproblem, action taken by the faculty member,and the faculty member’s recommendation.If a resolution of the problem is not reached,the student may be removed permanentlypursuant to appropriate due processprocedures.C. Physical abuse, verbal abuse, threats,intimidation, harassment, coercion, conductwhich threatens or endangers the healthor safety of any person, and/or disruptivebehavior as defined in Article II.2. above.D. Attempted or actual theft of and/or damageto property of the college or property of amember of the college community or otherpersonal or public property.E. Failure to comply with direction of collegeofficials or law enforcement officers in theperformance of their duties and/or failureto identify oneself to these persons whenrequested to do so.F. Unauthorized possession, duplication or use ofkeys to any college premises, or unauthorizedentry to or use of college premises.G. Violation of any college or District policy, ruleor regulation published in hard copy such asa college catalog, handbook, etc. or availableelectronically on the college’s or District’swebsite.H. Violation of federal, state or local law.I. Use, possession, manufacturing or distributionof illegal or other controlled substancesexcept as expressly permitted by law.J. Illegal use, possession, manufacturing ordistribution of alcoholic beverages or publicintoxication.K. Illegal or unauthorized possession of firearms,explosives, other weapons, or dangerouschemicals on college premises, or use ofany such item, even if legally possessed, in amanner that harms, threatens, or causes fearto others, or property damage.L. Participation in a demonstration, riot oractivity that disrupts the normal operations ofthe college and infringes on the rights of othermembers of the college community; leadingor inciting others to disrupt scheduled and/ornormal activities within any college building orarea.M. Obstruction of the free flow of pedestrianor vehicular traffic on college premises or atcollege-sponsored or supervised functions.N. Conduct that is disorderly, lewd or indecent;breach of the peace; or aiding, abetting orprocuring another person to breach thepeace on college premises or at functionssponsored by or participated in by the collegeor members of the academic community.Disorderly conduct includes but is not limitedto: any unauthorized use of electronic or otherdevices or to make an audio or video recordof any person while on college or Districtpremises without his/her prior knowledge,or without his/her effective consent or whensuch a recording is likely to cause injury ordistress. This includes, but is not limited to,secretly taking pictures of another person in agym, locker room, or restroom.O. Attempted or actual theft or other abuse oftechnology facilities or resources, includingbut not limited to:i. Unauthorized entry into a file, to use, reador change the contents or for any otherpurposeii. Unauthorized transfer of a fileiii. Unauthorized use of another individual’siv.identification and/or passwordUse of technology facilities or resources tointerfere with the work of another student,faculty member or college officialv. Use of technology facilities or resources tosend obscene or abusive messagesvi. Use of technology facilities or resourcesto interfere with normal operation of thecollege technology system or network


56 Student Handbook 2013-2014vii. Use of technology facilities or resources inviolation of copyright lawsviii. Any violation of the District’s technologyresource standardsix. Use of technology facilities or resources toillegally download filesP. Abuse of the Student Conduct system,including but not limited to:i. Falsification, distortion ormisrepresentation of information before aStudent Conduct Board.ii. Disruption or interference with the orderlyconduct of a Student Conduct Boardproceeding.iii. Invoking a Student Conduct Codeproceeding with malicious intent or underfalse pretensesiv.Attempting to discourage an individual’sproper participation in, or use of, theStudent Conduct systemv. Attempting to influence the impartialityof the member of a judicial body prior to,and/or during the course of, the StudentConduct Board proceedingvi. Harassment, either verbal or physical, and/or intimidation of a member of a StudentConduct Board prior to, during and/orafter a Student Conduct Board proceedingvii. Failure to comply with the sanctionsimposed under this Student ConductCodeviii. Influence or attempting to influenceanother person to commit an abuse of theStudent Conduct Code systemix. Failure to obey the notice from a StudentConduct Board or college official toappear for a meeting or hearing as part ofthe Student Conduct system.Q. Engaging in irresponsible social conduct.R. Attempt to bribe a college or Districtemployee.S. Stalking behavior, which occurs if a studentintentionally or knowingly maintains visual orphysical proximity toward another person ontwo or more occasions over a period of timeand such conduct would cause a reasonableperson to fear for his or her safety.4. Violation of Law and College DisciplineA. Disciplinary proceedings may be institutedagainst a student charged with conduct thatpotentially violates both the criminal lawand this Student Conduct Code (that is, ifboth possible violations result from the samefactual situation) without regard to pending ofcivil or criminal litigation. Proceedings underthis Student Conduct Code may be carriedout prior to, simultaneously with, or followingcivil or criminal proceedings off campus at thediscretion of the college official responsiblefor administration of the Student ConductCode. Determinations made or sanctionsimposed under this Student Conduct Codeshall not be subject to change becausecriminal charges arising out of the same factsgiving rise to violation of college rules weredismissed, reduced, or resolved in favor of oragainst the criminal law defendant.B. When a student is charged by federal, stateor local authorities with a violation of law, thecollege will not request or agree to specialconsideration for that individual because ofhis or her status as a student. If the allegedoffense is also being processed under thisStudent Conduct Code, however, the collegemay advise off campus authorities of theexistence of this Student Conduct Code andof how such matters will be handled internallywithin the college community. The college willcooperate fully with the law enforcement andother agencies in the enforcement of criminallaw on campus and in the conditions imposedby criminal courts for the rehabilitation ofstudent violators. Individual students andfaculty members, acting within their personalcapacities, remain free to interact withgovernmental representatives as they deemappropriate.Article IV: Student Conduct Code Procedures1. Charges and Student Conduct BoardHearingsA. Any member of the college community mayfile charges against a student for violations ofthis Student Conduct Code. A charge shallbe prepared in writing and directed to theStudent Conduct Administrator. Any chargeshould be submitted as soon as possible afterthe event takes place, preferably within thirty(30) days following the incident. Misconductcharges of a sexual nature, including sexualharassment and sexual assault, should besent to the vice president of student affairswho is the designated Title IX Coordinatorat each MCCCD college. Title IX protectsstudents from sexual misconduct and otherforms of discrimination in connection with allacademic, extracurricular, athletic, and otherprograms sponsored by the college at anycollege facility or other location. The Title IXCoordinator (or designee) will conduct aninvestigation that is prompt, thorough, andimpartial according to the MCCCD sexualharassment complaint process.B. The Student Conduct Administrator mayconduct a prompt, thorough, and impartialinvestigation to determine if the chargeshave merit and/or if they can be disposedof administratively by mutual consent ofthe parties involved on a basis acceptableto the Student Conduct Administrator. Suchdisposition shall be final and there shall beno subsequent proceedings. If the chargesare not admitted and/or cannot be disposedof by mutual consent, the Student ConductAdministrator will convene the studentconduct board. If the student admits violating


Student Handbook 2013-201457institutional rules, but sanctions are notagreed to, the hearing shall be limited todetermining the appropriate sanction(s).C. All charges shall be presented to the accusedstudent in written form. The Student ConductAdministrator will provide written notice ofthe time, date, and location of the studentconduct hearing. The notice will describe theevidence of alleged misconduct, the codeprovisions violated, and the possible sanctions.The student conduct hearing notice, plus acopy of this code, shall be provided to thestudent accused of misconduct no less thanfive (5) workdays before the hearing date. Thehearing will be held no more than fifteen (15)workdays after the student has been notifiedunless the Student Conduct Administratorextends the deadline for good cause in his orher sole discretion.D. Hearings shall be conducted by a StudentConduct Board according to the followingguidelines, except as provided by Article IV 1.Gbelow:i. Student Conduct Board hearings normallyshall be conducted in private.ii. The complainant, accused student andtheir advisors, if any, shall be allowedto attend the entire portion of theStudent Conduct Board hearing atwhich information is received (excludingdeliberations). Admission of any personto the hearing shall be at the discretionof the Student Conduct Board and/or itsStudent Conduct Administrator.iii. In Student Conduct Board hearings involvingmore than one accused student, theStudent Conduct Administrator, in his or herdiscretion, may permit the Student ConductBoard hearing concerning each student tobe conducted either separately or jointly.iv.The complainant and the accused shallhave the right to be assisted by anyadvisor they choose, at their own expense.A party who elects to be assisted by anadvisor must notify the student conductadministrator of the name and contactinformation of the advisor not less thantwo (2) days before the scheduledhearing. The advisor must be a memberof the college community and may not bean attorney. Both the complainant and theaccused are responsible for presentingtheir own information and, therefore,advisors are not permitted to speakor participate directly in any StudentConduct Board hearing before a StudentConduct Board.v. The complainant, the accused student,and the Student Conduct Board mayarrange for witnesses to present pertinentinformation to the Student Conduct Board.The Student Conduct Administrator willtry to arrange the attendance of possiblewitnesses who are members of the collegecommunity, if reasonably possible, andwho are identified by the complainant and/or accused student at least two days priorto the Student Conduct Board hearing.Witnesses will provide information toand answer questions from the StudentConduct Board. Questions may besuggested by the accused student and/or complainant to be answered by eachother or by other witnesses. This willbe conducted by the Student ConductBoard with such questions directed to thechairperson, rather than to the witnessdirectly. This method is used to preservethe educational tone of the hearingand to avoid creation of an adversarialenvironment. Questions of whetherpotential information will be receivedshall be resolved in the discretion of thechairperson of the Student Conduct Board.vi. The Student Conduct Administrator willpresent the information he or she received.vii. Pertinent records, exhibits, and writtenstatements may be accepted asinformation for consideration by a StudentConduct Board at the discretion of thechairperson.viii. All procedural questions are subject tothe final decision of the chairperson of theStudent Conduct Board.ix.After the portion of the Student ConductBoard hearing concludes in which allpertinent information has been received,the Student Conduct Board shalldetermine (by majority vote if the StudentConduct Board consists of more than oneperson) whether the accused studentviolated the section of this StudentConduct Code which the student ischarged with violating.x. The Student Conduct Board’sdetermination shall be made on the basisof whether it is more likely than not thatthe accused student violated this StudentConduct Code.E. There shall be a single verbatim record, suchas a tape recording, of all Student ConductBoard hearings before a Student ConductBoard (not including deliberations). Therecord shall be the property of the District.F. No student may be found to have violatedthis Student Conduct Code because thestudent failed to appear before a StudentConduct Board. In all cases, the evidence andsupport of the charges shall be presented andconsidered.G. The Student Conduct Board mayaccommodate concerns for the personalsafety, well-being, and/or fears ofconfrontation of the complainant, accusedstudent, and/or other witness during thehearing by providing separate facilities, byusing a visual screen, and/or by permitting


58 Student Handbook 2013-2014participation by telephone, videophone,closed circuit television, video conferencing,videotape, audio tape, written statement,or other means, where and as determinedin the sole judgment of the college officialresponsible for administration of the StudentConduct Code.2. SanctionsA. The following sanctions may be imposedupon any student found to have violated theStudent Conduct Code:i. Warning - a written notice to the studentthat the student is violating or has violatedinstitutional rules or regulations.ii. Probation - a written reprimand for violationof specified rules or regulations. Probation isfor a designated period of time and includesthe probability of more severe disciplinarysanctions if the student is found to violateany institutional rules or regulation(s) duringthe probationary period.iii. Loss of Privileges - denial of specifiediv.privileges for a designated period of time.Restitution - compensation for loss,damage or injury. This may take the formof appropriate service and/or monetary ormaterial replacement.v. Discretionary Sanctions - workassignments, essays, service to thecollege, or other related discretionaryassignments. (Such assignments musthave the prior approval of the StudentConduct Administrator.)vi. College Suspension - separation of thestudent from all the colleges in the Districtfor a definite period of time, after whichthe student is eligible to return. Conditionsfor readmission may be specified.vii. College Expulsion - permanent separationof the student from all the colleges in theDistrict.B. More than one of the sanctions listed abovemay be imposed for any single violation.C. Other than college expulsion, disciplinarysanction shall not be made part of thestudent’s academic record, but shall becomepart of the student’s disciplinary record. Upongraduation, the student’s disciplinary recordmay be expunged of disciplinary actionsupon the student’s application to the StudentConduct Administrator. Cases involving theimposition of sanctions other than suspensionor expulsion shall be expunged from thestudent’s confidential record five (5) yearsafter final disposition of the case.In situations involving both an accusedstudent(s) (or group or organization) and astudent(s) claiming to be the victim of anotherstudent’s conduct, the records of the processand of the sanctions imposed, if any, shallbe considered to be the education recordsof both the accused student(s) and thestudent(s) claiming to be the victim becausethe educational career and chances of successin the college community of each may beimpacted.D. The following sanctions may be imposed upongroups or organizations:i. Those sanctions listed above in Article IV2. A. 1 through 4.ii. Loss of selected rights and privileges for aiii.specified period of time.Deactivation - loss of all privileges,including college recognition for adesignated period of time.E. In each case in which a Student ConductBoard determines that a student and/or group or organization has violated theStudent Conduct Code, the sanction(s) shallbe determined and imposed by the StudentConduct Administrator. In cases in whichpersons other than, or in addition to, theStudent Conduct Administrator have beenauthorized to serve as the Student ConductBoard, the recommendation of the StudentConduct Board shall be considered by theStudent Conduct Administrator in determiningand imposing sanctions. The Student ConductAdministrator is not limited to sanctionsrecommended by members of the StudentConduct Board. Following the StudentConduct Board hearing, the Student ConductBoard and the Student Conduct Administratorshall advise the accused student, groupand/or organization (and a complainingstudent who believes s/he was the victim ofanother student’s conduct) in writing of itsdetermination and of the sanction(s) imposed,if any.3. Emergency SuspensionIf a student’s actions pose an immediate threat ordanger to any member of the college communityor the educational processes, a college officialresponsible for administering the Student ConductCode may immediately suspend or alter the rightsof a student pending a Student Conduct Boardhearing. Scheduling the hearing shall not precluderesolution of the matter through mediation or anyother dispute resolution process. The decisionwill be based on whether the continued presenceof the student on the college campus reasonablyposes a threat to the physical or emotionalcondition and well-being of any individual,including the student, or for reasons relating tothe safety and welfare of any college property,or any college function. When an emergencysuspension is imposed, the student conductadministrator will seek to resolve the complaintat the earliest possible date. This suspension isnot a sanction but an effort to protect peopleand property and prevent disruption of collegeoperations.In imposing an emergency suspension, thecollege official responsible for administrationof the Student Conduct Code may direct thatthe student immediately leave the college


Student Handbook 2013-201459premises and may further direct the studentnot to return until contacted by that official. Anaccused student shall be in violation of this policyregardless of whether the person who is theobject of the threat observes or receives it, aslong as a reasonable person would interpret thecommunication, conduct or gesture as a seriousexpression of intent to harm.4. Administrative HoldThe Student Conduct Administrator may placea temporary administrative hold preventing anaccused student’s registration, financial aid award,transcript release, or graduation if it is necessaryto secure the student’s cooperation in theinvestigation or compliance with a direction. Thishold is not a sanction but a necessary step toresolve the complaint promptly.5. Academic ConsequencesViolations of the student conduct code canhave academic consequences if the violationalso constitutes failure to meet standards ofperformance or professionalism set by theinstructor or the program, or if it constitutescheating, plagiarism, falsification of data,or other forms of academic dishonesty. Theinstructor may award a failing grade for theassignment or the course in such cases, and theprogram faculty may decide that the student isineligible to continue in the program. Academicconsequences are determined by the faculty andacademic administration, and are not dependenton the decisions of the student conduct board,the appeals board, or the student conductadministrator.6. Appeals Regarding Student Code ofConductA. A decision reached by the Student ConductBoard judicial body or a sanction imposedby the Student Conduct Administratormay be appealed by accused students orcomplainants to an Appellate Board withinfive (5) days of receipt of the decision.Such appeals shall be in writing and shallbe delivered to the Student ConductAdministrator.B. Except as required to explain on the basisof new information, an appeal shall belimited to the review of the verbatim recordof the Student Conduct Board hearing andsupporting documents for one or more of thefollowing purposes:i. To determine whether the StudentConduct Board hearing was conductedfairly in light of the charges andinformation presented, and in conformitywith prescribed procedures giving thecomplainant a reasonable opportunity toprepare and present information that theStudent Conduct Code was violated, andgiving the accused student a reasonableopportunity to prepare and to present aresponse to those allegations. Deviationsfrom designated procedures will not bea basis for sustaining an appeal unlesssignificant prejudice results.ii. To determine whether the decisionreached regarding the accused studentwas based on substantial information, thatis, whether there were facts in the casethat, if believed by the fact finder, weresufficient to establish that a violation ofthe Student Conduct Code occurred.iii. To determine whether the sanction(s)imposed was appropriate to the violationof the Student Conduct Code which thestudent was found to have committed.iv. To consider new information, sufficientto alter a decision or other relevant factsnot brought out in the original hearing,because such information and/or factswere not known to the person appealingat the time of the original StudentConduct Board hearing.C. If an appeal is upheld by the appellateboard, the matter shall be returned to theoriginal Student Conduct Board and StudentConduct Administrator for reopening of theStudent Conduct Board hearing to allowreconsideration of the original determinationand/or sanction(s). If an appeal is not upheld,the matter shall be considered final andbinding upon all concerned.Article V: Interpretation and RevisionAny question of interpretation regarding the StudentConduct Code shall be referred to the college officialresponsible for administration of the Student ConductCode for final determination.Student Records (A.R. 2.5.3)1. DefinitionsFor the purposes of this policy, the MaricopaCounty Community College District has used thefollowing definition of terms.A. “College” includes all colleges, educationalcenters, skill centers and District office.B. “Educational Records” are any record (inhandwriting, print, tapes, film, or other media)maintained by the college or an agent of thecollege which is directly related to a student,except:i. A personal record kept by a staff member,if it is kept in the personal possession ofthe individual who made the record, andinformation contained in the record hasnever been revealed or made availableto any other person except the maker’stemporary substituteii.An employment record of an individualwhose employment is not contingenton the fact that he or she is a student,provided the record is used only in relationto the individual’s employmentiii. Records maintained by the college'ssecurity unit, if the record is maintainedsolely for law enforcement purposes, is


60 Student Handbook 2013-2014revealed only to law enforcement agenciesof the same jurisdiction and the securityunit does not have access to educationrecords maintained by the communitycollege.iv. Alumni records which contain informationabout a student after he or she is nolonger an attendant of the communitycollege and the records do not relate tothe person as a student2. Records RequestOfficial verification of educational records isissued by the Admissions and Records Office/Office of Student Enrollment Services.3. FeesIf a copy(ies) of a portion or all of the records ina student’s file is requested, the custodian ofthe records may charge a fee for copies made.However, the willingness or ability to pay thefee will not effectively prevent students fromexercising their right to inspect and review (undersupervision of a college employee) their records. Afee will not be charged to search for or to retrieverecords. Standard fees for printing and duplicationservices will apply.4. Annual Notification (see FERPA below)Students will be notified of their further rightsannually by publication in the college catalog and/or the student handbook:Rights of Access to Educational RecordsThe Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act(FERPA) affords eligible students certain rightswith respect to their education records. (An"eligible student" under FERPA is a studentwho is 18 years of age or older or who attends apostsecondary institution). These rights include:A. The right to inspect and review the student’seducation records within 45 days after the daythe college receives a request for access.Students should submit to the collegeadmissions and records department writtenrequests that identify the record(s) theywish to inspect. The college official willmake arrangements for access and notifythe student of the time and place where therecords may be inspected. If the records arenot maintained by the college official to whomthe request was submitted, that official shalladvise the student of the correct official towhom the request should be addressed.B. The right to request the amendment of thestudent’s education records that the studentbelieves is inaccurate, or misleading.Students may ask the college to amend arecord that they believe is inaccurate ormisleading. They should write the collegeofficial responsible for the record, clearlyidentify the part of the record they wantchanged, and specify why it is inaccurate ormisleading.If the college decides not to amend the recordas requested by the student, the collegewill notify the student of the decision andadvise the student of his or her right to ahearing regarding the request for amendment.Additional information regarding the hearingprocedures will be provided to the studentwhen notified of the right to a hearing. TheFERPA Appeal Process is also outlined in theStudent Handbook and in Appendix S-17 of theMCCCD Administrative Regulations.C. The right to provide written consent todisclosures of personally identifiableinformation contained in the student'seducation records, except to the extent thatFERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.CONDITIONS OF DISCLOSURE WITHOUTCONSENTFERPA permits the disclosure of personallyidentifiable information (PII) from students’education records, without consent of thestudent, if the disclosure meets certainconditions found in §99.31 of the FERPAregulations. Except for disclosures toschool officials, disclosures related to somejudicial orders or lawfully issued subpoenas,disclosures of directory information, anddisclosures to the student, §99.32 of FERPARegulations requires the institution to recordthe disclosure. Eligible students have a right toinspect and review the record of disclosures.A postsecondary institution may disclose PIIfrom the education records without obtainingprior written consent of the student:1. To other school officials, includinginstructions, administrators, supervisors,governing board members, academicor support staff, law enforcement andhealth staff, within the MCCCD whomthe college or district has determined tohave legitimate educational interests. Aschool official has a legitimate educationalinterest if the official needs to review aneducation record in order to fulfill his orher professional responsibilities. Thisincludes contractors, attorneys, auditors,collection agents, consultants, volunteers,or other parties to whom the collegehas outsourced institutional services orfunctions, provided that the conditionslisted in §99.31(A)(1)(I)(B)(1) – (A)(1)(I)(B)(2) are met. (§99.31(A) (1))2. To officials of another school where thestudent seeks to or intends to enroll, orwhere the student is already enrolled if thedisclosure is for purposes related to thestudent’s enrollment or transfer, subjectto the requirements of §99.34. (§99.31(A)(2))3. To authorized representatives of the USComptroller General, the US AttorneyGeneral, and the US Secretary of


Student Handbook 2013-201461Education, or State and Local EducationalAuthorities, such as a state postsecondaryauthority that is responsible forsupervising the college’s state supportededucation programs. Disclosures underthis provision may be made, subject tothe requirements of §99.35, in connectionwith an audit or evaluation of federal-orstate-supported education programs, orfor the enforcement of or compliance withfederal legal requirements that relate tothose programs. These entities may makefurther disclosures of PII to outside entitiesthat are designated by them as theirauthorized representatives to conductany audit, evaluation, or enforcement,or compliance activity on their behalf(§§99.31(A) (3) AND 99.35)4. In connection with financial aid for whichthe student has applied or which thestudent has received, if the informationis necessary to determine eligibility forthe aid, determine the amount of the aid,determine the conditions of the aid, orenforce the terms and conditions of theaid. (§99.31(A) (4))5. To organizations conducting studiesfor, or on behalf of, the college, in orderto: (A) Develop, Validate, or AdministerPredictive Tests; (B) Administer studentaid programs; or (C) Improve instruction(§99.31(A) (6))6. To accrediting organizations to carry outtheir accrediting functions. (§99.31(A) (7))7. To parents of an eligible student if thestudent is a dependent for IRS taxpurposes. (§99.31(A) (8))8. To comply with a judicial order or lawfullyissued subpoena.(§99.31(A) (9))9. To appropriate officials in connection witha health or safety emergency, subject to§99.36. (§99.31(A) (10))10. Information the college has designatedas “Directory Information” under §99.37.(§99.31(A) (11))11. To a victim of an alleged perpetrator ofa crime of violence or a non-forcible sexoffense, subject to the requirements of§99.39. The disclosure may only includethe final results of the disciplinaryproceeding with respect to that allegedcrime or offense, regardless of the finding.(§99.31(A) (13))12. To the general public, the final resultsof a disciplinary proceeding, subject tothe requirements of §99.39, if the schooldetermines the student is an allegedperpetrator of a crime of violence or nonforciblesex offense and the student hascommitted a violation of the college’s rulesor polices with respect to the allegationmade against him or her.(§99.31(A) (14))13. To parents of a student regarding thestudent’s violation of any federal, state,or local law, or of any rule or policy of theschool, governing the use or possessionof alcohol or a controlled substance if theschool determines the student committeda disciplinary violation and the student isunder the age of 21. (§99.31(A) (15))Students who believe that MCCCD or anagent of the college has disclosed informationcontrary to the provisions outlined in thissection may submit a grievance via the noninstructionalcomplaint resolution process.The process is posted at:www.maricopa.edu/publicstewardship/governance/adminregs/appendices/S-8.phpD. The right to file a complaint with the USDepartment to Education concerning allegedfailures by the college to comply with therequirements of FERPA.The name and address of the Office thatadministers FERPA is:Family Policy Compliance OfficeUS Department of Education400 Maryland Avenue SWWashington, DC 20202-59205. Student DirectoryA Maricopa community college may releasedirectory information about any student who hasnot specifically requested the withholding of suchinformation. Students who do not want directoryinformation released may so indicate duringthe admissions process or notify the Office ofAdmissions and Records.At any Maricopa community college, directoryinformation is defined as a student's name,address, telephone number, major field of study,participation in officially recognized activities andsports, weight and height of members of athleticteams, degrees and awards received, dates ofattendance, part-time or full-time status, mostrecent previous educational agency or institutionattended by the student, college within theMaricopa Community Colleges where the studenthas been enrolled, photograph of student, andelectronic mail address.6. Disclosure to ParentsIn accordance with federal law, college officialsmay disclose educational records to parents of astudent who have established the student’s statusas a dependent according to the Internal RevenueCode of 1986, section 152, without the writtenconsent of the student.


62 Student Handbook 2013-2014FERPA APPEAL PROCESSIn instances where the college decides not to amendan education record as requested by the student,the college will notify the student of the decision andadvise him/her of the right to an appeal hearingaccording to the following process:• The student must have first presented the issuein writing to the college’s Admissions/EnrollmentOffice or designee identifying the records thathe/she wishes to have amended and providedany supporting documentation. Note: With theexception of clerical errors, requests that areexpressly related to grade disputes are not subjectto this process and must be vetted through theInstructional Grievance Process.• If the request to change the record was deemedunsubstantiated by the college designee and theinstitution was able to demonstrate that the recordwas accurate, the student will be informed of theright to a formal appeal hearing.• Students must request a formal hearing within 10business days from the date they are informed ofthe right to an appeal hearing.• The request for a formal hearing must be inwriting and delivered to the [Dean of Admissions/Enrollment Services, Vice President of StudentAffairs] or designee.• The college official who receives the formal hearingrequest will either review the case personally ordesignate a hearing committee if the issue involvesa matter not clearly established by current policyor administrative regulation.• A written decision will be delivered to all partiessummarizing the evidence and stating thereason(s) for the decision. If the decision is infavor of the student, the education record will beamended. If the decision is for the record to remainthe same, the student may placeStudent Employment (A.R. 2.5.4)1. District Student EmployeesA. IntroductionStudents may be employed by the college asstudent help. District regulations require thatstudents be hired in essential jobs and thatthey be properly trained and supervised.B. Philosophy and Workload for StudentEmployeesi. It shall be the philosophy of MaricopaCommunity College District that a studentmay work to augment college andliving expenses, however, the scholasticendeavor should be foremost. Sufficienttime should be allotted for classroomattendance, homework, out-of-class studyand participation in activities.ii. A workload of twenty (20) hours per weekshould be established as the maximumnumber of hours a student employee maywork on campus. All student employeesshall be enrolled in a minimum of three (3)semester credit hours. Any combinationof day and evening hours would meetiii.this requirement. Any student employeehaving special reasons to work over 20hours per week or having dropped belowthree (3) credit hours should requesthis/her immediate supervisor to obtainapproval from the College president orhis/her designee.During the summer sessions, studentsmay be eligible for employment if theywere enrolled for a minimum of three(3) semester credit hours at the endof the spring semester, or if they havebeen accepted for admission for the fallsemester. Exceptions to the three (3)semester credit hours may be made bythe president or his/her designee. Summershall be designated as the time from theofficial end of the spring semester to thebeginning of classes for the fall semester.C. Student Employee BenefitsAs student employees, there are noentitlements to employee benefits; i.e.,vacation, retirement, sick leave, health and life,or disability insurance. Students will, however,be covered under Worker’s CompensationInsurance.D. Student Employment RecordsStudent employee records will be maintainedat the Financial Aid office, the office of thefiscal agent or the Career/Placement Officeand will be reviewed periodically by the vicepresident of students affairs.E. Student CompensationThe hourly rate of pay for student employeesshall coincide with the policies of the DistrictSalary Schedule.F. Employee Contracts and Forms(See Appendix FM-3)Student Employee Grievance ProcedureG. Part-time student employees working for oneof the Maricopa Community Colleges maywish to file a grievance relating to certainworking conditions or violation of studentemployment regulation. Please refer to theNon-Instructional Complaint ResolutionProcess (A.R. 2.3.12)2. Student Security GuardsA. Introduction and PhilosophyStudents may be employed by the college asstudent help. If student guards do not comefrom the ranks of Administration of Justiceclasses, they must undergo appropriatetraining to qualify them as student guards.This training program is outlined in theregulation.B. Workload of Student Security Guardsi. Student security guards shall be enrolledfor a minimum of three (3) semester hours.ii.Student security guards shall belimited to 20 hours per week when theworkweek starts at 7:00 a.m. on Mondayand concludes at 11:00 p.m. on Friday.Additional hours may be worked if guards


Student Handbook 2013-201463are assigned special duty at games oractivities held on campus during theweekend, or if guards are assigned a shifton Saturday and Sunday, between 7:00a.m. and 11:00 p.m.C. Students not in Administration of JusticeProgrami. Use of student other than those inAdministration of Justice Program:1. Selection of the student must bepersonally approved by the vicepresident of students affairs and chiefof security.2. Selection of a student should notextend beyond one semester withoutthe approval of the vice president ofstudents affairs.3. Selected student must undergo aspecial training program directed bythe chief of security and approved bythe vice president of student affairs.ii.Recommended program for studentsother than those in Administration ofJustice programs: Students employedby campus security who are not majorsin the Administration of Justice programshould be given at least twenty (20) hoursof training with pay before being allowedto function independently as a campussecurity guard. This training shouldinclude, but not be limited to instructionin:1. Wearing of the uniform, generalappearance, and demeanor2. The use of the various security reportforms and how to properly completethem to provide requested information;General report writing methods3. Public relations methods used on thecampus4. Crime prevention methods used onthe campus; Patrol methods used inbuildings and grounds.5. Basic techniques for interviewingstudents, faculty and visitors relative tothe incidents6. Laws and regulations governing theactions of campus security personnelconcerning rendering of assistance tostudents, faculty and visitors on thecampus7. Basic first aidD. Student Security Guards Employee BenefitsAs student employees there are not entitlementsto employee benefits; i.e., vacation retirement,sick leave, health and life, or disability insurance.Students will, however, be covered underWorker’s Compensation Insurance.E. Student Employment RecordsThe student security guard’s employmentrecords will be maintained at the office of thechief of security and reviewed periodically bythe vice president of student affairs.Student Governance (A.R. 2.5.5)Student governing bodies derive their authorityfrom the Maricopa County Community CollegeDistrict Governing Board that exists in accordancewith Arizona Revised Statutes. The administrationof the District is vested in the Chancellor whodelegates responsibility for each college to thecollege president who serves in a management andpolicy implementation capacity having the ultimateresponsibility for all activities of the college. Thepresident shall designate the administrator(s) (i.e.,directors of student leadership) at each college whowill be charged with the responsibility for workingwith the college student governing body(ies) inthe development of college student activities andprograms.A representative form of student governance mayexist at each college/center as well as district wideto provide an effective means of communicationamong students, faculty, staff and administrationand to provide student input in college and Districtmatters. Eligibility requirements are to be met andspelled out in detail in each student governanceconstitution. These constitutions shall establish theminimum requirements for the elective/appointiveofficers. All student government constitutions shall besubmitted to the Governing Board General Counselto ensure compliance with federal and state laws,and the Maricopa Community Colleges GoverningBoard Administrative Regulations. Since Rio SaladoCommunity College is a countywide non-campuscollege, the president shall ensure that opportunitiesexist for student involvement.College student constitutions should be reviewedannually by student governance. The appropriatevice president or designee of each college shallbe responsible for submitting any changes tothe president of the college for transmittal to theGoverning Board General Counsel.1. Officers/MembersAll reference in this document to positions willdesignate whether the position is an officerposition or a member position.Each student governance constitution shall definewhich of its elected positions (maximum of 5)within its structure shall be designated as officers.The persons filling those positions shall bereferred to, in this document, as officers. Personsfilling all other positions, elected or appointed,shall be referred to as members (excluding nonvotingcommittee members).All positions filled by election shall be consideredas elected positions, even though the personfilling the position may have been appointed to fillan unexpired term of another individual.2. DesignationColleges with two (2) student governments shalldesignate the governments as “day” or “evening.”Colleges with one (1) government shall beconsidered day students, for the purposes of thisdocument.


64 Student Handbook 2013-20143. Eligibility for OfficeAll student governance constitutions shallprescribe that all persons elected or appointedas officers shall be enrolled in and maintain aminimum of six (6) credit hours for day studentgovernments, three (3) credit hours for eveningstudent governments. Officers shall have andmaintain a minimum cumulative grade pointaverage of 2.50 and be in good standing (not onprobation) according to the written district policy.Convicted felons shall be ineligible for office (ARS§ 13-904). The constitution may, however, setmore rigid requirements, if so desired by collegestudent governance.4. Tenure of PositionTenure in any student governance position shall bedetermined by the respective student governanceconstitutions. In no case shall any student beallowed to serve in any combination of officer/member positions beyond a total of ten (10)semesters. Tenure in any combination of officerpositions shall be limited to four (4) semesters.5. Removal from OfficeProvisions shall be made in all student governanceconstitutions for removal for cause of individualsfrom elected or appointed student governancepositions.6. Remuneration LimitationsA. Student body officers may receive financialsupport and/or a letter grade in a leadershipclass during their terms of office as authorizedin their respective student governanceconstitutions. Student body officers (maximum5) may receive up to twenty (20) hours perweek in financial support and/or up to six (6)credit hours in leadership classes per semester.Remuneration shall be for services renderedand not for merely holding the office.B. For qualifying students, Federal Work Study(FWS) funds may be used in accordance withFederal guidelines.C. The allowance for awarding honorariums orscholarships for executive student officers is amaximum of $200.00.D. Compensation may be received for bothhonorariums/scholarships and collegeemployment in the same semester.7. Amending Student ConstitutionsCollege student constitutions should be reviewedannually by student governance. The appropriatevice president or designee of each college shallbe responsible for submitting any constitutionalchanges to the President of the college fortransmittal to the Governing Board GeneralCounsel.8. Student Governance AdvisorsCollege organization advisors will be provided forin each student governance constitutions. Suchadvisors shall be full-time or part-time employeesof the Maricopa Community Colleges.Recommendations for appointment of an advisormay be submitted to the appropriate vicepresident or college president. Recommendationsfor dismissal of an advisor with just cause may besubmitted to the appropriate vice president orcollege president.9. Legal/Fiscal/Financial MattersAuthority and responsibility beyond the scopespecifically covered in student policies, orinterpretation of such matters within laws, boardpolicies, etc. shall rest with the offices of GeneralCounsel and Chancellor, respectively.10. Final AuthorityIn the event of a complete breakdown of thegovernance body, the college president will serveas the final authority.Student Clubs and OrganizationsIn addition to student governing bodies, student clubsand organizations may be formed that fall under theoperational direction of the Office of Student Life andLeadership and the administrative direction of the VicePresident of Student Affairs at each college. Studentclubs and organizations are generally interest-based innature (such as for a particular program, discipline, orcollege activity) and are considered to be an importantpart of the total college experience. Each collegeshall outline the requirements necessary to establishthe formation of an interest-based student club andorganization (i.e., mission/purpose, size, structure,advisors). Club advisors shall be employees of theMaricopa County Community College District.In most instances, student clubs and organizationsshall be open to all students who are enrolled incredit courses at a Maricopa Community College.Pursuant to ARS §15-1863, religious or political studentorganizations may determine that the organization’sinternal affairs, selecting the organization’s leadersand members, defining the organization’s doctrines,and resolving the organization’s disputes are part ofthe organization’s religious or political mission andthat only persons committed to that mission shouldconduct such activities. For religious and politicalorganizations, state statute recognizes the role thatviewpoint serves in the mission and purpose of theorganization’s operations. Thus, such groups mayelect to select members based upon organizationaldoctrine. The MCCCD may not deny recognition or anyprivilege or benefit to a religious or political studentorganization or group that exercises its rights pursuantto the statute.Whereas ARS §15-1863 allows religious and politicalorganizations to determine their internal affairs and theselection of their leaders and members, the MCCCDnon-discrimination policy is applicable to all otheraspects of these student clubs and organizations.


Student Handbook 2013-201465Appendix S-13: The Maricopa CommunityColleges Allied Health or Nursing ProgramIn collaboration and partnership with the healthcare community and its response to the dynamicchanges occurring in the health care arena and healthcare practice, the Maricopa Community Collegesintegrated the curriculum of all allied health andnursing programs. All allied health or nursing programpathways and educational offerings emphasize theachievement of relevant competencies and providevalue to the individual, the employer, and thecommunity. As a result, graduates of the various alliedhealth or nursing program pathways will meet thecommunity’s demand for a flexible, multi-skilled healthcare workforce that meets employer and consumerneeds. Refer to individual college catalogs for specifichealth care program pathways.For further information, healthcare.maricopa.edu is acomprehensive information source.Allied Health or Nursing Assumption of Risk/Release of LiabilityMost of the allied health or nursing program pathwaysinclude a program of study in a clinical trainingenvironment that may contain exposures to risksinherent in patient-oriented educational experiences(such as but not limited to bodily injury or communicableand infectious diseases). Students enrolling in clinicaleducational courses will be asked to sign a statementassuming all risks inherent in their coursework.Use of Confidential InformationStudents enrolled in allied health or nursing programpathways will have learning experiences in a healthcare setting where they will have access to confidentialinformation. Prior to beginning any clinical studies,the students will be asked to sign an agreement toadhere to the requirements of those clinical sitesand applicable law, including the Health InsurancePortability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA).Allied Health or Nursing Program CollegeAttendanceAs the allied health or nursing programs are integratedacross the Maricopa Community Colleges, college ofattendance requirements for the completion of thehealthcare program pathways can be met throughthe completion of coursework taken at all MaricopaCommunity Colleges and Skills Centers.MCCCD Required Background ChecksStudents enrolled in an MCCCD allied health ornursing program are required to complete and passclinical learning experiences, working with children,elderly persons, and other vulnerable populations.MCCCD’s major clinical agency partners nowmandate that any college students assigned to themfor clinical experiences submit to a comprehensivebackground clearance prior to entering suchlearning experiences. Because the clinical experienceportion of the programs is critical to completinga program of study, MCCCD has instituted twospecific background check requirements in orderfor a student to enroll in a program on or afterSeptember 1, 2011. First, the student must obtain, athis or her own cost, a Level I Fingerprint ClearanceCard from the Arizona Department of Public Safety.Precluding offenses for a Level I card can be foundin Arizona Revised Statute § 41-1758.07 (www.azleg.gov/FormatDocument.asp?inDoc=/ars/41/01758-07.htm&Title=41&DocType=ARS). Additionally,students must also obtain a “pass” status on aMCCCD supplemental background check fromMCCCD’s authorized background check contractor.The student must also pay for this background check.The supplemental check will be based on the moststringent standards of MCCCD’s clinical experiencepartners.The sole program for which the background checkrequirements are different is the Emergency MedicalTechnician program. For that program, studentsmust have obtained a Level 1 Fingerprint ClearanceCard from the Arizona Department of Public Safety.They are also required, at the time of their clinicalassignments, to submit to, pay for and pass anyadditional background check requirements of theclinical agencies to which their EMT program placesstudents.Certain licensing boards may require a separatebackground check or clearance card upon applicationfor licensure or certification.The MCCCD supplemental background check reviewmay include searches of the following databases andinformation but MCCCD reserves the right to changethe search criteria and the program background checkrequirements at any time without notice:1. National Federal Health Care and AbuseDatabases2. Social Security Number Verification3. Residency History4. Arizona Statewide Criminal offense Databases5. Nationwide Criminal offense Databases6. State of Arizona and National Sexual OffenderRegistries7. Homeland Security Watch ListsExamples of background information that will resultin a “fail” status on the supplemental backgroundcheck include:1. Social Security number does not belong to theapplicant2. Any inclusion on any registered sex offenderdatabase3. Any inclusion on any of the Federal exclusion listsor Homeland Security watch lists4. Any conviction of a felony regardless of how longago the conviction was5. Any arrest warrant issued by any state6. Any misdemeanor conviction for the followingregardless of how long ago the conviction was:A. Violent crimesB. Sex crime of any kind including non consensualsexual crimes and sexual assaultC. Murder, attempted murder


66 Student Handbook 2013-2014D. AbductionE. AssaultF. RobberyG. ArsonH. ExtortionI. BurglaryJ. PanderingK. Any crime against minors, children, vulnerableadults including abuse, neglect, exploitationL. Any abuse or neglectM. Any fraudN. Illegal drugsO. Aggravated DUI8. Any misdemeanor relating to a controlledsubstance conviction in last 7 years9. Any other misdemeanor conviction within last 3years with the exception-any misdemeanor trafficmisdemeanor [NOTE that a DUI is NOT considereda traffic misdemeanor.]The information that MCCCD uses for the “pass/fail”background check is subject to change at any timewithout notice.MCCCD recommends that students carry proof of thebackground clearance at all times during any clinicalagency learning experience.Students Accepted in a Program beforeSeptember 1, 2011Students who are accepted in a program beforeSeptember 1, 2011 will generally need to meet therequirements of each program that existed before thatdate. It is not MCCCD’s intent to apply the standardseffective on September 1, 2011 to students acceptedin a program before that date. However, note thatMCCCD always reserves the right to change therequirements for these programs, even after a studentis accepted. Students should be aware of this right.Duty to Report Changes; RemovalStudents have an obligation to immediately reportto the director of their program any change in theinformation that they supplied on forms submittedto initiate background checks relating to the alliedhealth or nursing program. That includes informationprovided to the Arizona Department of Public Safetyand MCCCD’s supplemental background check vendor,as well as that related to the background checkrequired by a clinical agency. Failure to do so willresult in removal from the program. Additionally, anychange in background check status that would affectthe student’s clearance under either MCCCD’s or aclinical agency’s standards will result in removal from aprogram.Additional Clinical Agency Background CheckSome clinical agencies require that students assignedto their sites submit to a criminal background checkcovering other offenses, as well as to a drug screening.Students are required to pay for the additionalagency clinical background check. A clinical agencythat requires this additional background check mayrefuse to place a student due to information theclinical agency obtains in its background check eventhough that student possess a valid Level I FingerprintClearance Card and has obtained a “pass” status onthe MCCCD supplemental background check.Some conditions that have resulted in students beingdenied placement at clinical agencies include pendingcriminal charges, outstanding warrants, unfinishedterms of a sentence (such as unpaid fines), pattern ofrepeated types of arrests/convictions, and failure todisclose all past arrests/convictions when asked to doso on any background check application.Inability to PlaceMCCCD has no obligation to make repeated attemptsto place a student when the reason for MCCCD’sinability to place the student is due to backgroundcheck issues. Since clinical agency assignments aremandatory requirements for completion of a program,a student’s inability to complete required clinicalexperience due to his or her background check issueswill result in removal from the program.Changes to Admission or Background CheckRequirementsMCCCD may change its program admissionrequirements or background check requirementswithout notice at any time.No Guarantee of Receipt of Licensure/CertificateMany of the nursing and allied health programsprepare graduates for application for State orNational certificates or licenses. In some professions,such licensure and certification is required prior toemployment or practice in the profession. Graduationfrom a nursing and allied health program does notguarantee the receipt of a license or certificate topractice in the field of study.Consensual Relationships (A.R. 4.18)1. GeneralThe existing Governing Board Policy on Hiring ofRelatives prohibits employees from being involvedin any employment or key decision that involvesa relative. This would include work performance,job assignments, or pay related matters. In thatsuch relationships can create a conflict with theinterests of the Maricopa Community Colleges,and the increased potential for nepotism andfavoritism, the same principles also apply inthe case of consensual amorous, romantic and/or sexual relationships that occur betweenemployees or between employees and students.In the work and academic environment, such arelationship that might be appropriate in othercircumstances is inappropriate if one of theindividuals in the relationship has a professionalresponsibility toward, or is in a position ofauthority with respect to, the other, such as inthe context of supervision, instruction, coaching,counseling or advisement. An element of power is


Student Handbook 2013-201467present in such a context and it is incumbent uponthose with authority not to abuse that power. Inaddition, consensual relationships may yield tothird parties the appearance that unfair bias orfavoritism towards the student or supervisee istaking place.A. Definitionsi. Consensual relationships are definedas romantic, amorous and/or sexualrelationships between consentingemployees or between employeesand adult (18 years or older) collegestudents currently enrolled at one of thecommunity colleges.ii.An employee is any individual whois employed by the Maricopa CountyCommunity College District (MCCCD). Anemployee includes an individual who issubject to an established employee jobgroup policy manual, whether regular,full-time board approved, at-will, parttime,and/or temporary. An employeealso includes a contract worker (specialservices employment, request forpersonnel services) working or servingas an agent or designee on behalf of theMCCCD.iii. A student is considered to be any personcurrently enrolled in a credit or non-creditclass at one of the colleges or centerswithin the Maricopa County CommunityCollege District.iv. A vendor is someone who sells or cansell products or services to the MaricopaCounty Community College District.v. A recent consensual relationship isconsidered to be one that has taken placewithin the past 24 months.B. Prohibited Conducti. An employee shall not maintain, engage inor be involved in a consensual relationshipwith another employee who is subjectto that individual’s supervision or with astudent that is currently enrolled in theindividual’s class, or a student whom theindividual otherwise instructs, coaches,counsels or advises, or with a vendorif the employee manages that contractor otherwise exerts influence over thecontract.ii.The Governing Board recognizes thatthe personal life of its employees is not aconcern of the institution, and therefore,this regulation does not seek to prohibitromantic relationships that exist betweenparties where the context of powerauthoritybetween employees or betweenemployees and students is not present;and provided that the relationship doesnot affect the employee’s effectiveness infulfilling his or her professional obligation.For these instances, appropriate measuresshould still be taken in order to avoidconflicts of interest from occurring. Forrelationships that may exist prior to thetime that either a student or employeeis placed in a situation of instructionor supervision that is considered to bea conflict of interest, the employee(s)involved shall disclose and take immediatemeasures to avoid the conflict orappearance of conflict.2. Procedures for DisclosureEmployees should first avoid allowing aninappropriate consensual, amorous or sexualrelationship to develop with a supervisee orstudent.A. Where the employee is already in or has had arecent consensual relationship with asupervisee, the following procedures shall befollowed:i. Immediate disclosure by the employee ofthe relationship to their supervisor andto the appropriate Vice President or ViceChancellor in order to ensure that anyconflicts of interest have been adequatelyaddressed.ii.The respective administrator responsiblefor the department or division shallplace the subordinate under alternatesupervision when a supervisor underhis/her direction has or has had arecent consensual relationship with theemployee.iii. The supervisor shall recuse himselfor herself from any discussions orinvolvement with decisions relatedto evaluations, promotion, hiring,determination of salary, or continuation ofcontract or employment.iv. The respective Vice President or ViceChancellor shall prepare and retain areport that specifies the appropriatealternate arrangements that have beenmade to eliminate the conflict of interest.The EEO/AA Office shall be provideda copy of the report along with theemployees involved in the relationship.B. Where the employee is already in or has had arecent consensual relationship with a studentprior to enrollment in his or her class, thefollowing procedures shall be followed:i. The faculty member shall counsel andadvise the student not to enroll in his orher course.ii.The Consensual Relationships Policy willbe made available to students via thestudent handbook and other appropriatecommunications vehicles.iii. If it is not possible for a student toenroll in another course, section, orcourse and section at another collegedue to a requirement for completionof a degree or certificate and no otheracademic option is available, disclosureof the relationship will be made to theappropriate Department Chair, Deanand Vice President of Academic Affairs


68 MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-14or Vice President for Student Affairs asappropriate for review. The Vice Presidentwill refer the matter to the Vice Chancellorfor Academic and Student Affairs forconsideration. The Chancellor or his/herdesignee may allow a student to enrollin the class only upon a showing by thestudent that the enrollment is necessaryto avoid an extreme hardship, and upona showing by the college President ordesignee that the academic integrity ofthe student’s enrollment in the class willnevertheless be maintained.3. Persons who are married, or were married, areincluded within the definition of persons thathave or who have had a consensual amorousrelationship. Disclosure in this instance may bemade via the Maricopa Disclosure process atwww.maricopa.edu/disclosure/.4. An employee who fails to follow the requirementsestablished in this policy and who does notwithdraw from participation in activities ordecisions that may reward or penalize a superviseeor student with whom the employee has or hashad a recent consensual amorous relationship,will be considered in violation of policy and willbe addressed in accordance with establishedprocesses in job group policy manuals.ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONSThe following are a portion of the AdministrativeRegulations used in managing the day-to-dayoperations of the Maricopa County CommunityCollege District (MCCCD) and are subject to change.Administrative Regulations are amended, adopted,or deleted as necessary and are subject to a formalapproval process. Administrative Regulations arereferenced by number, which corresponds with theregulations on the MCCCD web site:www.maricopa.edu/publicstewardship/governance/adminregs/adminregs_toc.phpSome regulations include reference to Arizona RevisedStatutes from the State of Arizona and are noted as“ARS” followed by a reference number.General Statement (A.R. 2.4.1)The Maricopa Community Colleges are dedicated toproviding a healthy, comfortable and educationallyproductive environment for students, employees andvisitors.Nondiscrimination (A.R. 2.4.2) (see A.R. 5.1.1Maricopa EEO Policy)It is the policy of the Maricopa District (consistingof Chandler-Gilbert Community College, the DistrictOffice, Estrella Mountain Community College, GateWayCommunity College, Glendale Community College,Maricopa Skill Center, Mesa Community College,Paradise Valley Community College, Phoenix College,Rio Salado Community College, Scottsdale CommunityCollege, and South Mountain Community College) to:Recruit, hire, and promote in all job groups, and toensure that all Human Resources (HR) employmentselection and decision practices do not discriminate,nor tolerate discrimination in employment oreducation, against any applicant, employee, orstudent on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexualorientation, gender identity, national origin, citizenshipstatus (including document abuse), age, disability,veteran status or genetic information.All HR employment selection and decision practicespertaining to advertising, benefits, compensation,discipline (including probation, suspension, and/orinvoluntary termination for cause or layoff), employeefacilities, performance evaluation, recruitment, social/recreational programs, and training will continue tobe administered without regard to race, color, religion,sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin,citizenship status (including document abuse), age,disability, veteran status or genetic information.Hold each level of management responsible forensuring that all employment policies, procedures,and activities are in full compliance with all applicablefederal, state, and local EEO statutes, rules, andregulations.


MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-201469Equal Opportunity Statement (A.R. 2.4.3)(see 5.1.3 EEO Policy Statement)It is the policy of Maricopa to promote equalemployment opportunities through a positivecontinuing program. This means that Maricopawill not discriminate, nor tolerate discrimination inemployment or education, against any applicant,employee, or student because of race, color, religion,sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, nationalorigin, citizenship status (including document abuse),age, disability, veteran status or genetic information.Additionally, it is the policy of Maricopa to providean environment for each Maricopa job applicant andemployee that is free from sexual harassment, as wellas harassment and intimidation on account of anindividual’s race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation,gender identity, national origin, citizenship status(including document abuse), age, disability, veteranstatus or genetic information.Affirmative Action Policy Statement forIndividuals with DisabilitiesIn conformance with the provisions of Section 503of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, andthe implementing regulations, 41 CFR 60-741.5(a), as amended, Maricopa County CommunityCollege District will not discriminate, nor toleratediscrimination in employment or education, againstany applicant, employee, or student because ofphysical or mental disability in regard to any positionfor which the known applicant or employee is qualified.Maricopa agrees to take affirmative action to employ,advance in employment, and otherwise treat knownqualified individuals with disabilities without regardto their physical or mental disability in all humanresources selection and decision practices, such asthe following: advertising, benefits, compensation,discipline (including probation, suspension, and/ortermination for cause or layoff), employee facilities,performance evaluation, recruitment, social/recreational programs, and training. Maricopa will alsocontinue to administer these practices without regardto race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, genderidentity, national origin, citizenship status (includingdocument abuse), age, disability, veteran status orgenetic information. Additionally, all applicants andemployees are protected from coercion, intimidation,interference, or discrimination for filing a complaint orassisting in an investigation under the Act.Affirmative Action Policy Statement forOther Eligible Veterans, Special DisabledVeterans, and Vietnam Era VeteransIn conformance with the Vietnam Era VeteransReadjustment Assistance Act of 1974, the VeteransEmployment Opportunities Act of 1998, and theimplementing regulations, 41 CFR 60-250 (k),Maricopa County Community College District will notdiscriminate, nor tolerate discrimination inemploymentor education, against any applicant, employee, orstudent because he or she is a special disabled veteranor Vietnam era veteran in regard to any position forwhich the known applicant or employee is qualified.Maricopa agrees to take affirmative action to employ,advance in employment, and otherwise treat knownqualified special disabled veterans and Vietnam eraveterans without discrimination based upon theirdisabled or veteran status in all human resourcesselection and decision practices, such as the following:advertising, benefits, compensation, discipline(including probation, suspension, and/or terminationfor cause or layoff), employee facilities, performanceevaluation, recruitment, social/recreational programs,and training. Maricopa will continue to administerthese practices without regard to race, color, religion,sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, nationalorigin, citizenship status (including document abuse),age, disability, veteran status or genetic information.Additionally, Maricopa agrees to post all suitable jobopenings at the local office of the State employmentservice where the job opening occurs. This includesfull-time, temporary greater than 3 days’ duration,and part-time employment. Finally, all applicants andemployees are protected from coercion, intimidation,interference, or discrimination for filing a complaint orassisting in an investigation under the Act.Notice of Americans with Disabilities Act(ADA)/ Section 504 of the RehabilitationAct/Title IX CoordinatorDr. Diana Muñiz, Vice President of Student Affairs108 N. 40th Street, Phoenix, AZ 85034(602) 286-8031muniz@gatewaycc.eduUnder the ADA and Section 504, Maricopa recognizesthe obligation to provide overall program accessibilitythroughout its locations for disabled individuals.The designated ADA/504/Title IX Coordinator ateach college/center will provide information as tothe existence and location of services, activities,and facilities that are accessible to and usable byindividuals with disabilities. Likewise, under Title IX,there is an obligation to provide services and programaccessibility in a gender-neutral manner.Students with disabilities may request cataloginformation in an alternative format from the collegeADA/504 Coordinator.DECLARACIÓNES DE ACCIÓN AFIRMATIVAMandato de No DescriminaciónEs el mandato de los Colegios Comunitarios delCondado de Maricopa (The Maricopa CommunityColleges) que consisten del Centro de Apoyo delDistrito, los colegios comunitarios de Chandler-Gilbert, Estrella Mountain, Gateway, Glendale, Mesa,Paradise Valley, Phoenix, Rio Salado, Scottsdale, SouthMountain y el Centro de Capacitación de Maricopa,proveer igualdad en las oportunidades de empleomediante un programa continuo y positivo. Estosignifica que Maricopa no descriminará o tolerarádescriminación en empleo o educación en contra deningún aplicante, empleado, o estudiante debido a suraza, color, religión, sexo, orientación sexual, identidadsexual, origen nacional, ciudadania (incluyendo


70 MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-14abuso de documentos), edad, incapacidad, estado deveterano/a o información genética. Asi mismo, es elmandato de los Colegios Comunitarios proveer paracada aplicante, empleado, y estudiante un ambientelibre de acoso sexual como también libre de acosoe intimidación referente a raza, color, religión, sexo,orientación sexual, identidad sexual, origen nacional,ciudadania (incluyendo abuso de documentos), edad,incapacidad, estado de veterano/a o informacióngenética.Este mandato de no descriminación cubre todoslos aspectos de contratación del empleado, ingreso,acceso a, y tratamiento de alumnos en los ColegiosComunitarios de Maricopa los cuáles incluyentambién programas de educación vocacional. Estemandato también prohibe descriminación en basede orientación sexual en la admisión y tratamientode estudiantes, en sus programas y actividades y enla contratación, tratamiento, promoción/ascensos,evaluación y despido de empleados.Declaración de Igualdad de OportunidadEs el mandato de los Colegios Comunitarios del Condadode Maricopa promover igualdad en las oportunidadesde empleo mediante un programa continuo y positivo.Esto significa que Maricopa no descriminará o tolerarádescriminación en contra de ningún aplicante o empleadodebido a su raza, color, religión, sexo, orientación sexual,identidad sexual, origen nacional, ciudadania (incluyendoabuso de documentos), edad, incapacidad, estado deveterano/a o información genética. Agregando, es elmandato de los Colegios Comunitarios promover paracada aplicante y empleado un ambiente libre de acososexual como también de acoso e intimidación referente ala raza, color, religión, sexo, orientación sexual, identidadsexual, origen nacional, ciudadania (incluyendo abuso dedocumentos), edad, incapacidad, estado de veterano/a oinformación genética.Declaración de Acción AfirmativaMandato y Declaración de Acción Afirmativapara Individuos con Incapacidades De acuerdoa las provisiones en la Sección 503 de la Ley deRehabilitación de 1973, como enmienda, y las leyesde implementación, 41 CFR 60-741.5 (a), declara queel Distrito de Colegios Comunitarios de Maricopa nodescriminarán o tolerarán descriminación en contraningún aplicante o empleado debido a su desabilidad/incapacitación física o mental referente a cualquierposición para la cuál el aplicante o empleado hacalificado. Maricopa promete tomar acción afirmativapara emplear, dar ascenso en empleo y tratar a dichosindividuos con incapacidades sin hacer incapie ensus incapacidades físicas o mentales en la selecciónde recursos humanos y prácticas decisivas como sonlas siguientes: anuncios, beneficios, compensación,disciplina (incluyendo período de prueba, suspensión,y/o terminación de empleo por causa de paro forzoso),facilidades para empleados, evaluación de trabajo,recrutamiento, programas sociales/recreacionales yentrenamiento. Maricopa continuará llevando a caboéstas prácticas de no descriminar por razones deraza, color, religión, sexo, orientación sexual, identidadsexual, origen nacional, ciudadania (incluyendoabuso de documentos), edad, incapacidad, estadode veterano/a o información genética. Asi mismo,todo los aplicantes y empleados estan protegidosen contra de coacción, intimidación, interferenciao descriminación por quejas o por ayudar en unainvestigación cubierta bajo éste Acto.Declaración de Mandato de Acción Afirmativapara Otros Veteranos Elegibles, Veteranos conIncapacitación Especial y Veteranos de la EraVietnamitaConforme a la ley de Reajuste y Asistencia para losVeteranos de la Era Vietnamita de 1974, acta deOportunidades de Empleo para Veteranos de 1998 yreglamentos de implementación, 41 CFR 60-250(k),el Distrito de Colegios Comunitarios del Condado deMaricopa no descriminará ni tolerará descriminaciónen empleo o educación en contra de ningún aplicante,empleado, o estudiante veterano o veterana de la EraVietnamita con desabilidad/incapacitación especialreferente a cualquier posición la cual dicho aplicante oempleado califique. Maricopa promete aplicar acciónafirmativa para emplear, ascender en empleo y tratar adichos veteranos incapacitados y de la Era Vietnamitaque califiquen sin descriminar base a su desabilidad/incapacitación o condición de veterano en todas lasáreas de recursos humanos y decisiones como sonlas siguientes: anuncios, beneficios, compensación,disciplina (incluyendo período de prueba, suspensión,y/o despido por causa o paro forzoso), facilidadespara empleados, evaluación de trabajo, recrutamiento,programas sociales/recreacionales y entrenamiento.Maricopa continuará llevando a cabo estasprácticas sin descriminar por razones de raza, color,religión, sexo, orientación sexual, identidad sexual,origen nacional, ciudadania (incluyendo abuso dedocumentos), edad, incapacidad, estado de veterano/ao información genética. Maricopa promete anunciartodas las oportunidades de empleo disponibles en laoficina local del servicio de empleo del Estado dondeel empleo esté disponible. Esto incluye empleo detiempo completo, temporal de más de tres días deduración y empleo de tiempo medio. Finalmente,todos los aplicantes y empleados están protegidosen contra de coacción, intimidación, interferenciao descriminación por quejas o por ayudar en unainvestigación cubierta sobre este Acto.Notificación del Acta de Americanos conImpedimentos (ADA)/Sección 504 del Acta deRehabilitación/Coordinador del Título IXDr. Diana Muñiz, Vice President of Student Affairs108 N. 40th Street, Phoenix, AZ 85034(602) 286-8031muniz@gatewaycc.eduDe acuerdo a ADA y a la sección 504, el distrito y suscolegios reconocen la obligación de proveer accesoa programas en todas sus localidades a personasincapacitadas. El coordinador designado de ADA/504/Título IX proveerá información tocante a la existenciay localidad de servicios, actividades y facilidades que


MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-201471son accesibles y de utilidad a personas incapacitadas.Solicitudes para acomodación deben ser dirigidas alcoordinador. Del mismo modo, bajo el Título IX, hayobligación de proveer acceso a servicios y programasde una manera imparcial segun el género.Estudiantes incapacitados pueden solicitarinformación de catálogo en una forma diferente pormedio del Coordinador designado por ADA/504 encada colegio.Governing Values (Board Policy A.R. 4.1)Our Vision: A Community of Colleges—Colleges forthe Community—working collectively and responsiblyto meet the life-long learning needs of our diversestudents and communities.Our Mission: The Maricopa Community Collegesprovide access to higher education for diversestudents and communities. We focus on learningthrough:• University Transfer Education• General Education• Developmental Education• Workforce Development• Student Development Services• Continuing Education• Community Education• Civic Responsibility• Global EngagementLearningWe value lifelong learning opportunities that respondto the needs of our communities and are accessible,affordable, and of the highest quality. We encouragedialogue and the freedom to have an open exchangeof ideas for the common good.ResponsibilityWe value responsibility and believe that we areeach accountable for our personal and professionalactions. We are responsible for making our learningexperiences significant and meaningful.StewardshipWe value stewardship and honor the trust placedin us by the community. We are accountable to ourcommunities for the efficient and effective use ofresources as we prepare our students for their role asproductive world citizens.Our Institutional Values: The Maricopa CommunityColleges are committed to:CommunityWe value all people—our students, our employees,their families, and the communities in which they liveand work. We value our global community of which weare an integral part.ExcellenceWe value excellence and encourage our internal andexternal communities to strive for their academic,professional and personal best.Honesty and IntegrityWe value academic and personal honesty and integrityand believe these elements are essential in our learningenvironment. We strive to treat each other withrespect, civility and fairness.InclusivenessWe value inclusiveness and respect for one another.We believe that team work is critical, that each teammember is important; and we depend on each other toaccomplish our mission.InnovationWe value and embrace an innovative and risk-takingapproach so that we remain at the forefront of globaleducational excellence.


72 MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-14ADMISSION, REGISTRATION ANDENROLLMENTGeneral Regulation (A.R. 2.1)1. General StatementCompliance with Policies, Rules and RegulationsEvery student is expected to know and complywith all current published policies, rules andregulations as stated in the college catalog, classschedule, and/or student handbook. Documentsare available on each college’s website.Policies, courses, programs, fees and requirementsmay be suspended, deleted, restricted,supplemented or changed through action of theGoverning Board of the Maricopa CommunityColleges.The Maricopa Community Colleges reserve theright to change, without notice, any materials,information, curriculum, requirements andregulations.Note: The regulations that comprise the student sectioncontain language that appears in various sources such asthe Catalog Common Pages and the Student Handbook.All areas became Administrative Regulations with the1996 adoption of the Governance Model. Changesare made annually either through the AdministrativeRegulations approval process, or by Board approvalfor those items that fall under its statutory duty, suchas Tuition and Fees. In an effort to prevent duplication,topics in this section may be incorporated by reference,as they are featured in other areas of the manual and arenoted accordingly.The Maricopa County Community College DistrictVision, Mission and Values that are featured in theCommon Pages are a part of approved GoverningBoard policy and are located in the policy sectionof the manual. As such, the following statementrelated to Outcomes Assessment that appears inthe Common Pages is presented here as a generalstatement.2. Outcomes AssessmentThe mission of the Maricopa Community Collegesis “to create and continuously improve affordable,accessible, and effective learning environmentsfor the lifelong educational needs of the diversecommunities we serve.” In order to evaluate howsuccessfully the Maricopa County CommunityCollege District accomplishes this mission,student outcomes will be assessed as part of thecontinuous improvement process.Students may be asked to participate in avariety of assessment activities at each college.Assessment results will be used to improveeducational programs, services and studentlearning.Admission Policy (A.R. 2.2.1)Persons meeting the admissions criteria may attendany Maricopa Community College of their choice.Falsification of any admission materials or officialcollege records may be cause for denial or cancellationof admission. Exceptions to the admissions policiesmay be requested through the Admissions andStandards Committee. Admission is determined inaccordance with state law (ARS §§15-1805.01 and15-1821) and regulations of the Maricopa CommunityColleges Governing Board.Admission Classifications1. Admission of Regular StudentsAdmission to the community college in Arizonamay be granted to any person who meets at leastone of the following criteria:A. Is a graduate of a high school, whichis accredited by a regional accreditingassociation as defined by the United StatesOffice of Education or approved by a StateDepartment of Education or other appropriatestate educational agency.B. Has a high school certificate of equivalency.C. Is at least 18 years of age and demonstratesevidence of potential success in thecommunity college.D. Is a transfer student in good standing fromanother college or university.2. Admission of Students Under 18 Years of AgeA. Admission to the community colleges inArizona shall be granted to any student whois under age 18 and who completes courseprerequisites and meets any one of thefollowing requirements:i. A composite score of 93 or more onthe Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test(PSAT).ii.A composite score of 930 or more on theScholastic Aptitude Test (SAT).iii. A composite score of twenty-two or moreon the American College Test (ACT).iv. A passing score on the relevant portionsof the Arizona Instrument to MeasureStandards test (AIMS).v. The completion of a college placementtest designated by the community collegedistrict that indicates the student is at theappropriate college level for the course.vi. Is a graduate of a private or public highschool or has a high school certificate ofequivalency.B. A community college may limit the numberof semester hours in which the student mayenroll to not more than six (6) credit hours.C. Home schooled students are exempt from thissub-section.D. A student shall not be denied admissionbecause of age, lack of a high school diplomaor high school certificate of equivalency, gradein school, lack of permission of school officialsor lack of concurrent enrollment in a public orprivate school, if the student has achieved atleast a specified score on a college entranceexamination.3. Specialized Vocational / Training ProgramStudents who enroll in vocational courses may


MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-201473be admitted on an individual basis with theapproval of college officials if the student meetsthe established requirements of the courses forwhich the student enrolls and the college officialsdetermine that the student’s admission is in thebest interest of the student.4. Western Undergraduate Exchange ProgramThe Western Undergraduate Exchange (WUE)program is a student exchange programcoordinated by the Western Interstate Commissionfor Higher Education (WICHE) and administeredby the Arizona Board of Regents. Through WUE,students who reside in western states (Alaska,Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho,Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota,Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, andWyoming) and the Commonwealth of the NorthernMarianas Islands (CNIMI) and who meet theeligibility requirements, pay 150 percent of theregular resident tuition plus fees. Students mustmark prominently on the Student InformationForm that they seek admission as WUE students.Students may not apply as out-of-state studentsand expect to receive the WUE tuition rate afteradmitted. Once admitted as WUE students,students may not petition for in-state residency.Further information may be obtained from theAdmissions and Records Office/Office of StudentEnrollment Services.5. Admission of F-1 Nonimmigrant StudentsProspective students should contact theAdmissions and Records Office/Office of StudentEnrollment Services or designated office for theinternational student application form(s). Whencompleted, the form(s) should be returned to theAdmissions and Records Office/Office of StudentEnrollment Services or the International Educationoffice with all requested supporting documents.After the file has been reviewed, a notice will besent to the applicant indicating either acceptanceor denial of admission.To be guaranteed consideration for admission, allapplication materials must be received by July 1for the fall semester and November 1 for the springsemester.Prospective students seeking admission basedon F-1 nonimmigrant status must provide proof ofsecondary school completion with documentationcomparable to a United States high schooldiploma or higher degree. It is recommendedthat F-1 nonimmigrant students have graduatedin the upper 50% of their secondary school (highschool or equivalent) in order to ensure successin academic classes at this college. Applicants foradmission to the college must have high schooland college (if applicable) transcripts sent directlyfrom the high school or college to the Admissionsand Records Office/Office of Student EnrollmentServices or designated office. In addition, it is theapplicant’s responsibility to have all transcriptstranslated into English and evaluated by a foreigncredential evaluation service if necessary.A. Admission to Academic ProgramsApplicants who wish to enroll in an academicprogram at the college must present evidenceof English language proficiency. If the Testof English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) isused to satisfy this requirement, the applicantmust attain a score of at least 500 (on thepaper-based TOEFL) or 61 (on the internetbasedTOEFL, known as the iBT). If theInternational Language Testing System (IELTS)is used to satisfy this requirement, an IELTSoverall Band Score of 5.5 or better is required,and a minimum IELTS individual Band Scoreof 5.0 on each module is recommended. Thedean or director of Admissions and RecordsOffice/Office of Student Enrollment Servicesof the college may accept other proof ofEnglish language proficiency for admissionpurposes, such as the ASSET, ACCUPLACER,COMPASS or CELSA tests.B. Admission to an Intensive English ProgramApplicants for admission to an IntensiveEnglish Program are advised to check withindividual colleges for their respectiveadmission requirements. Applicants mustprovide evidence of at least an intermediatecommand of English by way of one or more ofthe following criteria:i. At least six years of English languageinstruction as shown by the applicant’sschool transcript(s);ii.A minimum TOEFL score of 400 (onthe paper-based TOEFL) or 23 (on theinternet-based test);iii. An original letter of recommendation froma teacher, school principal or headmaster/headmistress, or the director of anEnglish language institute attesting to theapplicant’s proficiency at the intermediatelevel;iv. Other credentials, test scores, interviewresults, or evidence accepted by thecoordinator of an intensive Englishprogram or the college’s responsibledesignee. Students admitted to anIntensive English Program will not beallowed to enroll in courses outsidethose officially designated as part of theprogram unless and until they have metall of the prerequisites or other courserequirements.v. Foreign students under certain typesof visas may need special permission toenroll and should contact the appropriatecollege official.C. Financial SupportEvidence of financial support will be requiredprior to issuance of the I-20 form. The collegeshave no scholarship or financial aid provisionsfor foreign students; therefore, students must befully prepared to meet the necessary financialobligations for the full time they will be in theUnited States. The colleges estimate a student’saverage expenses for 10 months to be:


74 MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-14Tuition and Fees $7,810 (1)Living Expenses $10,140 (2)Books $1,100 (3)Health Insurance $1,360 (4)Total $20,410 (5)D. Dependent Financial GuaranteeEvidence of financial support for dependentsof F-1 and M-1 students (spouse and dependentchildren) is also required: $5,000 for the firstdependent and $2,500 for each additionaldependent.E. Health InsuranceAll F-1 and M-1 students who have an I-20issued by one of the Maricopa CommunityColleges are required to purchase theMaricopa Community Colleges’ internationalstudent health insurance plan. Healthinsurance coverage for dependents of F-1and M-1 students is highly recommended.The Maricopa Community Colleges contractswith an insurance provider annually to offer ahealth insurance plan for F-1 and M-1 students.For more information contact the collegeAdmissions and Records Office/Office ofStudent Enrollment Services or designatedinternational student office.Footnotes:(1) Based on 2012-2013 tuition and fee schedule.(2) Based on estimated living expenses for two (2) semesters(10 months).(3) Based on average new and used textbook prices andrental rates. Assumes books are sold at the end of thesemester.(4) Based on the 2012-2013 insurance premiums for themandatory Maricopa Community Colleges’ InternationalStudent Health Plan.(5) Applicants must provide evidence of this minimumamount of financial support before an I-20 is issued.Admission Information (A.R. 2.2.2)Students must file a Student Information Form withthe Admissions and Records Office/Office of StudentEnrollment Services at the college of attendance.There is no charge for this service.1. Student StatusA. Freshman - A student who has completedfewer than 30 credit hours 100-level coursesand above.B. Sophomore - A student who has completed 30credit hours or more in 100-level courses andabove.C. Unclassified - A student who has an associatedegree or higher.2. Student Identification NumberDisclosure of the social security number isvoluntary (ARS §15-1823). However, studentsmust use social security numbers for reportinginformation pertaining to potential educationaltax credits and for processing federal financial aidapplications and Veterans Administration benefits.3. Residency for Tuition Purposes (see alsoAppendix S-1)All students are classified for tuition purposesunder one of the following residency classifications:A. Maricopa County residentB. Out-of-County residentC. Out-of-State resident (including F-1 nonimmigrantstudents)Residency for tuition purposes is determinedin accordance with state law (ARS §§15-1801etseq.) and regulations of the Maricopa CommunityColleges Governing Board. All of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges are subject to the abovestatutes and regulations. Students who havequestions about their residency should contact theAdmissions and Records Office/Office of StudentEnrollment Services for clarification.A. Implementationi. Domicile status must be establishedbefore the student registers and pays fees.It is the student’s responsibility to registerunder the correct domicile status.ii.Enforcement of domicile requirementsshall be the responsibility of the Chancellorof the Maricopa Community Colleges. TheChancellor has charged the Director ofAdmissions and Records or other designeeat each college to make the initial domicileclassification. In determining a student’sclassification, the college may considerall evidence, written or oral, presentedby the student and any other informationreceived from any source which is relevantto determining classification. The collegemay request written sworn statements orsworn testimony of the student.iii. A request for review of the initialclassification may be made to a districtreview committee. The request must bein writing, signed by the student andaccompanied by a sworn statement of allfacts relevant to the matter. The requestmust be filed with the admissions officerof the college within ten days of receiptof notification of classification as a nonresident.Failure to properly file a requestfor review within the prescribed time limitconstitutes a waiver of review for thecurrent enrollment period. The decision ofthe review committee shall be final.B. Definitionsi. “Armed Forces of the United States”means the Army, the Navy, the Air Force,the Marine Corps, the Coast Guard, thecommissioned corps of the United StatesPublic Health Services, the NationalOceanographic and AtmosphericAdministration, the National Guard, or anymilitary reserve unit of any branch of theArmed Forces of the United States.ii.“Continuous attendance” meansenrollment at one of Maricopa CommunityColleges as a full-time or part-timestudent for a normal academic yearsince the beginning of the period forwhich continuous attendance is claimed.


MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-201475Students need not attend summersessions or other such intersession beyondthe normal academic year in order tomaintain continuous attendance.iii. “Maricopa County resident” means anindividual who has lived in MaricopaCounty for at least fifty (50) days beforethe first day of classes of the semester.In-state residency must be establishedprior to county residency for those movingfrom other states. Refer to Section C forguidelines.iv. “Domicile” means a person’s true, fixed,and permanent home and place ofhabitation. It is the place where he or sheintends to remain and to which he or sheexpects to return when he or she leaveswithout intending to establish a newdomicile elsewhere.v. “Emancipated person” means a personwho is neither under a legal duty ofservice to his parent nor entitled to thesupport of such parent under the laws ofthis state.vi. “Full-time student” means one whoregisters for at least twelve (12) credithours per semester.vii. “Part-time student” means one whoregisters for fewer than twelve (12) credithours per semester.viii. “Parent” means a person’s father, ormother, or if one parent has custody,that parent, or if there is no survivingparent or the whereabouts of theparents are unknown, then a guardianof an unemancipated person if there arenot circumstances indicating that suchguardianship was created primarily forthe purpose of conferring the status of anin-state student on such unemancipatedperson.C. Criteria for Determining Residencyi. In-State Student Status1. Except as otherwise provided in thisarticle, no person having a domicileelsewhere than in this state is eligiblefor classification as an in-state studentfor tuition purposes. Applicants forin-state tuition status and other publicbenefits must demonstrate lawfulpresence in the United States bypresenting one of the documents listedin this regulation, under the section"Demonstrating Lawful Presence."2. A person is not entitled to classificationas an in-state student until the personis domiciled in this state for one yearpreceding the official starting day ofthe semester, except that a personwhose domicile is in this state isentitled to classification as an in-statestudent if the person meets one of thefollowing requirements:a. The person’s parent’s domicileis in this state and the parent isallowed to claim the person as anexemption for state and federal taxpurposes.b. The person is an employee of anemployer which transferred theperson to this state for employmentpurposes or the person is thespouse of such an employee.c. The person is an employee of aschool District in this state andis under contract to teach on afull-time basis, or is employed asa full-time non-certified classroomaide, at a school within that schoolDistrict. For purposes of thisparagraph, the person is eligiblefor classification as an in-statestudent only for courses necessaryto complete the requirements forcertification by the state boardof education to teach in a schoolDistrict in this state. No memberof the person’s family is eligiblefor classification as an in-statestudent if the person is eligible forclassification as an in-state studentpursuant to this paragraph, unlessthe family member is otherwiseeligible for classification as anin-state student pursuant to thissection.d. The person’s spouse hasestablished domicile in thisstate for at least one year andhas demonstrated intent andfinancial independence and isentitled to claim the student as anexemption for state and federaltax purposes or the person’sspouse was temporarily out ofstate for educational purposes, butmaintained a domicile in this state.If the person is a non-citizen, theperson must be in an eligible visastatus pursuant to federal law toclassify as an in-state student fortuition purposes.3. The domicile of an unemancipatedperson is that of such person’s parent.4. An unemancipated person who remainsin this state when such person’s parent,who had been domiciled in this state,removes from this state is entitled toclassification as an in-state studentuntil attainment of the degree forwhich currently enrolled, as long assuch person maintains continuousattendance.5. A person who is a member of theArmed Forces of the United States andwho is stationed in this state pursuantto military orders or who is the spouse


76 MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-14or a dependent child of a person whois a member of the armed forces of theUnited States and who is stationed inthis state pursuant to military orders isentitled to classification as an in-statestudent. The student does not losein-state student classification whilein continuous attendance toward thedegree for which he or she is currentlyenrolled.6. A person who is a member of thearmed forces of the United Statesor the spouse or a dependent ofa member of the armed forcesof the United States is entitled toclassification as an in-state studentif the member of the armed forceshas claimed this state as the person’sstate of home record for at leasttwelve consecutive months before themember of the armed forces, spouse ordependent enrolls in a university underthe jurisdiction of the Arizona Board ofRegents or a community college underjurisdiction of a community collegedistrict governing board. For purposesof this subsection, the requirement thata person be domiciled in this state forone year before enrollment to qualifyfor in-state student classification doesnot apply.7. Beginning in the fall semester of2011, a person who is honorablydischarged from the armed forcesof the United States on either activeduty or reserve or national guardstatus, or who has retired from activeduty or reserve or guard status, shallbe granted immediate classificationas an in-state student on honorabledischarge from the armed forcesand, while in continuous attendancetoward the degree for which currentlyenrolled, does not lose in-state studentclassification if the person has met thefollowing requirements:a. Registered to vote in this state.b. Demonstrated objective evidenceof intent to be a resident of Arizonawhich, for the purposes of thissection, include at least one of thefollowing:1. An Arizona driver license2. Arizona motor vehicleregistration3. Employment history in Arizona4. Transfer of major bankingservices to Arizona5. Change of permanent addresson all pertinent records6. Other materials of whateverkind or source relevant todomicile or residency statusii.7. A person who is a member ofan Indian tribe recognized bythe United States Departmentof the Interior whosereservation land lies in thestate and extends into anotherstate and who is a resident ofthe reservation is entitled toclassification as an in-statestudent.Alien In-State Student Status1. An alien is entitled to classificationas an in-state refugee student if suchperson has been granted refugee statusin accordance with all applicable lawsof the United States and has met allother requirements for domicile.2. In accordance with the IllegalImmigration Reform and ImmigrantResponsibility Act of 1996 (P.L. 104-208; 110 Stat. 3009-546), a personwho was not a citizen or legal residentof the United States or who is notlawfully present in the United Statesis not entitled to classification as anin-state student pursuant to ARS§15-1802 or entitled to classificationas a county resident pursuant toARS §15-1802.01. A student will beassessed out-of-state tuition until suchtime that documentation of lawfulpresence is received in the Office ofAdmissions and Records/EnrollmentServices and (eligibility for) residencyis confirmed. Documentation must beprovided prior to the end of the term inwhich residency classification is beingrequested. Documentation receivedafter the end of term will be used forresidency determination in subsequentterms.3. In establishing domicile, the alienmust not hold a visa that prohibitsestablishing domicile in this state. Aftermeeting other domicile requirements,students holding valid, unexpired visasin the following categories may beclassified as in-state students:A= Foreign GovernmentOfficial or Adopted Child of aPermanent ResidentE= Treaty TradersG= Principal ResidentRepresentative of RecognizedForeign Member Governmentto International StaffK= Spouse or Child of Spouse ofa US Citizen, Fiancé or Child ofFiancé of US CitizenL= Intracompany Transferee orSpouse or ChildN6= NATO-6V= Spouses and DependentChildren of Lawful PermanentResidents


MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-2014774. Students who hold a current visaand have submitted an I-485 toCitizenship and Immigration Services(CIS), may establish residency if otherdomicile requirements have beenmet. Residency eligibility for I-485applicants may be considered oneyear after the date on the CIS Noticeof Action letter (I-797) confirmingapplication for permanent residentstatus. Students must providerequired residency documentation inaddition to the Notice of Action forresidency consideration. In establishingdomicile, the alien must be in a statusthat does not prohibit establishingdomicile in this state for at leastone year immediately preceding theofficial starting date of the semester.Exception: In the event that an alienstudent’s parent is allowed to claimthe student as an exemption for stateor federal tax purposes (3C.1.2.A)(e.g., the student is under 23 and notemancipated), the student’s residenceis deemed to be the same as theparent’s. If the parent holds a Visa thatis not listed in section 3 above, he orshe would not be eligible to establishresidency. In such circumstances,the student would likewise be barrednotwithstanding his or her own filing ofan I-485.iii. Proving lawful presence in the UnitedStatesAll applicants for instate tuition (andother public benefits) must first show atleast one of the following documents inaccordance with ARS 1-502 to demonstratethat they are lawfully present in the UnitedStates by presenting to the Registrar atleast one of the following documents:• An Arizona Driver’s license issuedafter 1996 or an Arizona non-operatingidentification license.• A birth certificate or delayed birthcertificate issued in any state, territory,or possession of the United States.• A United States certificate of birthabroad.• A United States Passport.• A Foreign Passport with a UnitedStates Visa.• An I-94 Form with a photograph.• A United States Citizenship andImmigration Services EmploymentAuthorization Document (WorkPermit) or Refugee Travel Document.• A United States Certificate ofNaturalization.• A United States Certification ofCitizenship.• A Tribal Certificate of Indian Blood.• A Tribal or Bureau of Indian AffairsAffidavit of Birth.Tribal Members*, the Elderly and “Personswith Disabilities or incapacity of the mindor body,” may submit certain types ofdocuments under Section 1903 of theFederal Social Security Act (42 UNITEDSTATES CODE 1396B, as amended bySection 6036 of the Federal DeficitReduction Act of 2005)***A document issued by a federallyrecognized Indian tribe evidencingmembership or enrollment in, or affiliationwith, such tribe.**If you think that this may apply, pleasecontact the Legal Services Department forassistance.iv. Presumptions Relating to Student StatusUnless there is evidence to the contrary,the registering authority of the communitycollege or university at which a student isregistering will presume that:1. No emancipated person hasestablished a domicile in this statewhile attending any educationalinstitution in this state as a full-timestudent, as such status is definedby the community college districtgoverning board or the Arizona Boardof Regents, in the absence of a cleardemonstration to the contrary.2. Once established, a domicile is not lostby mere absence unaccompanied byintention to establish a new domicile.3. A person who has been domiciled inthis state immediately before becominga member of the Armed Forces of theUnited States shall not lose in-statestatus by reason of such person’spresence in any other state or countrywhile a member of the Armed Forcesof the United States.v. Proof of ResidencyWhen a student’s residency is questioned,the following proof will be required.1. In-State Residencya. An affidavit signed by the studentmust be filed with the personresponsible for verifying residency.b. Any of the following may be usedin determining a student’s domicilein Arizona:1. Arizona income tax return2. Arizona Voter registration3. Arizona Motor Vehicleregistration4. Arizona Driver’s license5. Employment history in Arizona6. Place of graduation from highschool7. Source of financial support8. Dependency as indicated onfederal income tax return9. Ownership of real property10. Notarized statement of landlordand/or employer11. Transfer of major bankingservices to Arizona


78 MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-1412. Change of permanent address onall pertinent records13. Other relevant information2. County Residencya. An affidavit signed by the studentmust be filed with the personresponsible for verifying domicileto prove continuous residency in acounty for fifty (50) days, andb. Any of the following may be usedto determine a student’s countyresidency:1. Notarized statements of landlordand/or employer2. Source of financial support3. Place of graduation from highschool4. Ownership of real property5. Bank accounts6. Arizona income tax return7. Dependency as indicated on aFederal income tax return8. Other relevant informationD. Concurrent Enrollment in Arizona PublicInstitutions of Higher Education (ARS §15-1807) (Appendix S-3)Under Arizona Revised Statutes §15-1807, itis unlawful for any non-resident student toregister concurrently in two or more publicinstitutions of higher education in this stateincluding any university, college or communitycollege for a combined student credit hourenrollment of more than six (6) credit hourswithout payment of non-resident tuition at oneof such institutions. Any non-resident studentdesiring to enroll concurrently in two or morepublic institutions of higher education in thisstate including any university or communitycollege for a combined total of more than six(6) credit hours who is not subject to nonresidenttuition at any of such institutions shallpay the non-resident tuition at the institutionof his choice in an amount equivalent tonon-resident tuition at such institution for thecombined total of credit hours for which thenon-resident student is concurrently enrolled.Other Admission Information (A.R. 2.2.3)1. VeteransBy Arizona statute, any failing grades from anyArizona university or community college that werereceived prior to military service will not be usedto determine admission to the community collegefor the honorably discharged veterans with twoyears’ service in the Armed Forces of the UnitedStates. Students admitted or readmitted to thecommunity college under this statute are subjectto progression, retention, graduation and otheracademic regulations and standards. (Also seeWithdrawal - Appendix S-7)2. Ability to BenefitA. Federal guidelines require that students whoare applying for financial aid demonstrate theability to benefit. Under federal law, a studentwho enrolls after June 30, 2012, must be a highschool graduate, have a GED certificate, orhave completed a secondary school educationin a home school setting that is treated as ahome school or private school under statelaw, be admitted as a regular student, and bepursuing an eligible degree or certificate toqualify for federal financial assistance underTitle IV of the Higher Education Act.B. For student enrolled prior to July 1, 2012,an evaluation during the admission processresulted in the student being admitted to thecollege with the status of Regular, Regularwith Provisional Requirements or Special.i. “Regular” status, for the purpose of 2.2.3.2,is granted to an individual admitted tothe college who is a high school graduate,has a GED certificate, or has completeda secondary school education in a homeschool setting that is treated as a homeschool or private school under state law. Astudent without a high school diploma orGED certification and beyond the age ofcompulsory high school attendance maybe a regular status student if the studenthas been assessed to benefit from collegeinstruction by receiving qualifying scoreson approved assessment instruments. Allregular status students must be pursuing adegree/certificate in an eligible program.ii.“Regular with Provisional Requirements”status, for the purpose of 2.2.3.2, isgranted to a student admitted to thecollege who is not a high school graduate,does not have a GED certificate, is beyondthe age of compulsory high schoolattendance, or has completed a secondaryschool education in a home schoolsetting that is treated as a home schoolor private school under state law, but hasbeen assessed to benefit from collegeinstruction requiring developmental/remedial coursework and is pursuing adegree/certificate in an eligible program.iii. “Special” status, for the purpose of2.2.3.2, is granted to a student admittedto the college for concurrent enrollmentor pursuing one or more courses ofspecial interest and who meets all therequirements for admission.3. TranscriptsThe Maricopa Community Colleges reserve theright to require an official transcript for admissionto specific programs, for verification of courserequisites and for determination of academicstanding. The official transcript must be maileddirectly from the source institution to thecollege Admissions and Records Office/Office ofStudent Enrollment Services. It is the student’sresponsibility to ensure that official transcriptshave been received and are complete.Students entering as high school graduates maybe required to submit high school transcripts.


MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-201479Students entering as GED recipients may berequired to present a copy of the high schoolequivalency certificate or official report ofqualifying GED scores.4. Educational AssessmentAll students are encouraged to undergo aneducational assessment to determine courseplacement. Prospective students who do notpossess a high school diploma or GED equivalencecertificate are required to complete an educationalassessment to determine their ability to benefitfrom college instruction. See Student CoursePlacement Process (A.R. 2.2.7)Credit for Prior Learning (A.R. 2.2.4)The Maricopa Community Colleges recognize thatlearning takes place in a variety of situations andcircumstances. Many students have significant,demonstrable learning from experiences outside thetraditional academic environment. Therefore, priorlearning, not life experience, is the basis for the awardof college credit. Students may be awarded no morethan 30 credit hours, unless required by a specificprogram of study, within the Maricopa CommunityColleges using one or more of the followingassessment methods recommended by the Councilfor Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL) and theAmerican Council on Education (ACE):• Articulated Programs;• Credit by Evaluation; and• College-Level Equivalency Examinations.Credit awarded for prior learning does not countas hours in residence for graduation requirements.Exceptions may be granted at some MCCD collegesfor specially approved programs. No more than 20credit hours may be applied to AGEC. Credit receivedthrough Prior Learning Assessment is transferablewithin the Maricopa Community Colleges but isnot necessarily transferable to other colleges anduniversities. Therefore, students are strongly advisedto meet with a program advisor or contact thecollege or university they plan to attend. For furtherinformation on Prior Learning Assessment, contactthe Admissions and Records Office/Office of StudentEnrollment Services.1. Credit by EvaluationThe Maricopa Community Colleges offer credit byevaluation. The American Council on Education(ACE) evaluates military training and experiencesas well as non-collegiate sponsored trainingprograms and recommends credit awards basedon this evaluation. The number of credits listed inthe ACE guide are recommendations only.A college is not required to grant a student thenumber of credits recommended. The credits areincluded on a student’s transcript.A. Educational Experiences in the ArmedServicesThe Maricopa Community Colleges may awardcredit for military experiences based on theACE Guide to the Evaluation of EducationalExperiences in the Armed Services. A studentmay receive college credit if:i. Training parallels a discipline area offeredthrough the Maricopa CommunityColleges, andii. Credit meets a program requirement or isused as elective credit.Upon request, individuals who havesuccessfully completed Basic Training,four (4) credit hours in Physical Educationwill be awarded as indicated in the ACEGuide and the Community College of theAir Force Catalog. Official documentationof military training is required.B. College Credit Recommendation Service(CREDIT)ACE evaluates training programs offeredby business, industry, and government andpublishes its credit recommendations in TheNational Guide to College Credit for WorkforceTraining. If a student has received training thatappears in the guide, he or she may receivecollege credit if:i. training parallels a discipline area offeredthrough the Maricopa CommunityColleges,andii.credit meets a program requirement or isused as elective credit.C. Departmental Credit by EvaluationStudents may apply for Departmental CreditBy Evaluation in certain courses by obtainingthe appropriate form in the Admissions andRecords Office/Office of Student EnrollmentServices, and completing applicablepaperwork and other requirements of thecollege, including payment of required fee. Seefee schedule for appropriate fee. Fees are notrefundable if a student fails to obtain credit.Students may not request:i. The evaluation of a course a second time;ii.The evaluation of a course while currentlyenrolled in the course;iii. To establish credit in a previouslycompleted course; andiv. To establish credit for a lower level of acourse in which credit has been received.Exceptions may be granted at someMCCCD colleges for their unique programsof studyCertain departments have additionalrequirements that must be met before creditmay be granted through departmentalcredit by evaluation. When credit is grantedas outlined above, a notation of “credit byevaluation,” and the number of credits willappear on the student’s transcript. Thesecredits are not used in computing thegrade point average. Credit by evaluation istransferable within the Maricopa CommunityColleges, but is not necessarily transferable toother colleges and universities.


80 MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-142. College-Level Equivalency ExaminationsACE has published credit recommendations for a number of national standardized examinations such as theones listed below in the Guide to Educational Credit By Examination. The Maricopa Community Collegesuse these recommendations as guidelines to award credit for equivalent Maricopa Community Collegescoursework as well as elective credit. Scores must be sent directly to the Admissions and Records Office/Office of Student Enrollment Services from the specific testing company(s) before credit is awarded. Allequivalency is subject to future review and possible catalog change.A. Advanced Placement ExaminationsStudents who have taken an advanced placement course of the College Entrance Examination Board(CEEB) in their secondary school and who have taken an Advanced Placement Examination of the CEEBmay receive course credit with a score of 3, 4 or 5. Scores must be received directly from CEEB beforecredit is awarded.English Advanced Placement Recommendation:Exam Score Credit Hours/EquivalencyEnglish-Language and 5 or 4 6 credit hrs/ENG101, ENG100, AA, AC, ADCompositionEnglish-Literature andComposition5 or 4 6 credit hrs/ENG101, ENH110Math Advanced Placement Recommendation:Exam Score Credit Hours/EquivalencyMath-Calculus AB 5, 4, or 3 MAT221Math-Calculus BC 5 or 43MAT 221 and MAT 231MAT221Computer Science A 4 or 5 CSC100 or CSC110B. College Level Examination ProgramThe Maricopa Community Colleges may award credit to individuals who have received a score of 500 ormore for the 1986 version of the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) General Examinations (610on the 1978 version) and who meet or exceed the American Council on Education (ACE) recommendedscores for awarding credit on the CLEP subject examinations. The ACE credit-granting scorerecommendation will be 50 (on the 20-80 scale) for all CLEP computer-based exams beginning July 1,2001.• Credit received through CLEP is transferable within the Maricopa Community Colleges, but is notnecessarily transferable to other colleges and universities.• Rio Salado College and Paradise Valley Community College are national CLEP test sites. For moreinformation on registering for the CLEP examinations, contact Rio Salado College or Paradise ValleyCommunity College.College Composition:Exam Score Credit Hours/EquivalencyCollege Composition 50 With essay qualifies for ENG101 (3) and ENG297 (1)The Maricopa Community Colleges do not award credit for ENG 102 through CLEP examination.Foreign Languages:Credit earned through CLEP examination for French, German, and Spanish meets the languageproficiency requirements of the Maricopa Community Colleges. For CLEP examinations taken prior toJuly 1, 2001, the Maricopa Community Colleges will grant credit based on the scaled scores indicatedbelow:Course Spanish French German Credit101 50-54 50-54 39-45 4 (101)102 55-65 55-61 46-50 8 (101, 102)201 66-67 62-65 51-59 12 (101, 102, 201)202 68-80 66-80 60-80 16 (101, 102, 201, 202)At the discretion of the individual college, an oral exam at the 202 level may be administered.


MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-201481C. Defense Activity for Non-traditional Education Support Examination ProgramAt the discretion of the individual college, an oral exam at the 202 level may be administered.The Maricopa Community Colleges may award credit for the Defense Activity for Non-TraditionalEducation Support (DANTES) Examination Program to individuals who meet or exceed the ACErecommended scores for awarding credit on the DANTES subject examinations. The MaricopaCommunity Colleges do not award credit for ENG 102 through DANTES examination. Credit receivedthrough DANTES is transferable within the Maricopa Community Colleges, but is not necessarilytransferable to other colleges and universities.The Assessment Center at Rio Salado College is a national test site. For additional information onregistering for DANTES examinations, call (480) 517-8560.D. American College Testing Proficiency Examination ProgramThe Maricopa Community Colleges may award credit for the American College Testing ProficiencyExamination Program (ACT-PEP) based on the scores earned.E. Departmental Credit By ExaminationStudents may apply for Departmental Credit By Examination in certain courses by obtaining theappropriate form in the Admissions and Records Office/Office of Student Enrollment Services, payingthe required fee, and completing the examination and other requirements of the college. See feeschedule for appropriate fees.Students may not request:i. To challenge a course a second time;ii. To challenge a course while currently enrolled in the course;iii. To establish credit in a previously completed course; andiv. To establish credit for a lower level of a course in which credit has been received.• Exceptions may be granted at some MCCCD colleges for their unique programs of study.• Certain departments may have additional requirements that must be met before credit may begranted through departmental credit by examination.• Only grades of A, B, C, D or P earned as a result of this examination will be recorded on thestudent’s transcript. Fees are not refundable after the examination has been administered,regardless of results.• When credit is granted as outlined above, a notation of “credit by examination,” a grade andthe number of redits will appear on the student’s transcript. The grade is used in computingthe grade point average.COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP)NOTE: Changes to exams and scores are determined by the respective Statewide Articulation Task Force (ATF). The creditawarded and equivalent courses are established by MCCCD Instructional Councils (ICs).DISCLAIMER: Test scores are continually reviewed and may be updated at any time. Changes will be noted as they occur.Table Revised March 2013Examination MCCCDGeneral Score Sem. Hrs. EquivalencyCollege Composition50 (July 1, 2001 or later),600 (1986 version),500 (1978 version)4With essay qualifies forENG101(3) and ENG297(1)College Composition—Modular — 0 No CreditHumanitiesNatural SciencesSocial Sciences and History50 (July 1, 2001 or later),500 (prior to July 1, 2001)50 (July 1, 2001 or later),500 (prior to July 1, 2001)50 (July 1, 2001 or later),500 (prior to July 1, 2001)6 Elective Credit8 Elective Credit*3 Elective Credit


82 MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-14CLEP Examination - Subject Score Sem. Hrs. EquivalencyAmerican Government ACE Score 3 POS110American Literature ACE Score 6 ENH241, 242Analyzing & Interpreting Literature ACE Score 3 Elective CreditBiology ACE Score 8 BIO Elective Credit*Calculus (Previously Calculus with Elem Functions) ACE Score 4 MAT221Chemistry ACE Score 4 CHM Elective Credit*College Composition (Replaces English Compositionwith Essay)50 4CHM151(3) andCHM151LL(1)English Literature ACE Score 3 Elective CreditEnglish Literature ACE Score 3 Elective CreditFinancial Accounting 50 3 Elective CreditFrench Language, Level 1 (Previously FrenchLanguage)French Language, Level 2 (Previously FrenchLanguage)German Language, Level 1 (Previously GermanLanguage)German Language, Level 2 (Previously GermanLanguage)50-5455-6162-6566-8039-4546-5051-5960-80481216481216FRE101FRE101, 102FRE101, 102, 201FRE101, 102, 201. 202GER101GER101, 102Human Growth and Development 50 or higher 3 CFS205GER101, 102, 201GER101, 102, 201, 202Information Systems and Computer Applications ACE Score 3 CIS Elective CreditIntro to Educational Psychology ACE Score 3 EDU Elective CreditIntroductory Business Law 50 3 Elective CreditIntroductory Psychology ACE Score 3 PSY101Introductory Sociology 50 or higher 3 SOC101Macroeconomics, Principles of (ReplacesIntroductory Macroeconomics)ACE Score 3 ECN211Management, Principles of 50 0 No creditMarketing, Principles of 50 0 No creditMathematics, College ACE Score 3 MAT142Microeconomics, Principles of (ReplacesIntroductory Microeconomics)ACE Score 3 ECN212Precalculus 50 or higher 5 MAT187Spanish Language, Level 1 (Previously SpanishLanguage)Spanish Language, Level 2 (Previously SpanishLanguage)50-5455-6566-6768-80481216SPA101SPA101, 102Trigonometry ACE Score 3 MAT182U.S. History I – Early Colonization to 1877 ACE Score 3 HIS103U.S. History II – 1865 to the Present ACE Score 3 HIS104SPA101, 102, 201SPA101, 102, 201, 202Western Civilization I – Ancient Near East to 1648 ACE Score 6 HIS100, 101Western Civilization II – 1648 to the Present ACE Score 3 HIS102*The general studies requirement in natural sciences (SQ and SG) and Literacy and Critical Inquiry (L) are not satisfied by CLEP


MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-201483ADVANCED PLACEMENT CREDITNOTE: Changes to exams and scores are determined by the respective Statewide Articulation Task Force (ATF). The creditawarded and equivalent courses are established by MCCCD Instructional Councils (ICs).DISCLAIMER: Test Scores are continually reviewed and may be updated at any time. Changes will be noted as they occur.Table Revised March 2013Art – HistoryArt – Studio Art (2-D Design)(Previously Art – Studio – General)Examination Score MCCCD Sem. Hrs.5 or 4354ARH101, 102ARH101 or 102ART111, 112ART112Art - Studio Art (3-D Design) 5 or 4 ART115 3Art – Studio Art (Drawing)(Previously Art – Studio – Drawing)BiologyChemistryCalculus AB(Previously Mathematics – Calculus AB)Calculus BC(Previously Mathematics – Calculus BC)Comparative Government and Politics (previouslyPolitical Science–Comparative Government and Politics)545 or 4345ART111, 112ART112BIO181, 182BIO100 or EquivalentCHM151/151LLCHM151/151LL & CHM152/152LL5, 4, or 3 MAT221 45 or 43MAT221 and MAT231MAT2215 or 4 POS140 3Computer Science A 5 or 4 CSC100 or CSC110 3Economics – Macroeconomics 5 or 4 ECN211 3Economics – Microeconomics 5 or 4 ECN212 3English – Language & Composition 5 or 4 ENG100AA, AC, AD and ENG101 6English – Literature & Composition 5 or 4 ENG101 and ENH110 6Environmental Science 5 or 4 No Credit 3European History 5 or 4 HIS101, HIS102 6French – Language 5, 4, or 3 FRE101, 102, 201, 202 16French – Literature 5, 4, or 3 FRE101, 102, 201, 202 16German – Language 5, 4, or 3 GER101, 102, 201, 202 16German – Literature 5, 4, or 3 GER101, 102, 201, 202 16Japanese – Language and Culture(Previously Japanese – Language)Latin: Vergil(Previously Latin – Language)543543JPN101, 102, 201 and 202JPN101, 102 and 201JPN101 and 102LAT101, 102, 201, 202LAT101, 102, 201LAT101, 102Music Theory (Previously Music) 5 or 4 MTC105 3Physics B54PHY111, PHY112PHY111Physics C – Electricity & Magnetism 5, 4 or 3 PHY112 4Physics C – Mechanics 5, 4 or 3 PHY111 4Psychology 5 or 4 PSY101 3Spanish – Language 5, 4, or 3 SPA101, 102, 201, 202 16Spanish – Literature 5, 4, or 3 SPA101, 102, 201, 202 16Statistics 5, 4, or 3 MAT206 3U.S. Government and Politics (Previously PoliticalScience – American Government)5 or 4 POS110 3U.S. History (Previously History – American) 5 or 4 HIS103, HIS104 66363638448842015101612884


84 MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-14F. International Baccalaureate Diploma/CertificateStudents who present an International Baccalaureate Diploma/Certificate may qualify for college credit.MCCCD College grants credit for college-level courses only. Credit is awarded according to the“International Baccalaureate Diploma/Certificate Credit” table.INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE DIPLOMA/CERTIFICATE CREDITNOTE: Changes to exams and scores are determined by the respective Statewide Articulation Task Force (ATF). The creditawarded and equivalent courses are established by MCCCD Instructional Councils (ICs).DISCLAIMER: Test scores are continually reviewed and may be updated at any time. Changes will be noted as they occur.Table Revised March 2013BiologyExamination Score Sem. Hrs. MCCCD Equivalency7 or 65 or 484BIO181, 182BIO100 or equivalentBusiness and Management 5 or higher 3 Elective creditChemistry7, 6, or 5484CHM151/CHM151LL andCHM152/CHM152LLCHM151/CHM151LLEconomics 7, 6, or 5 6 ECN211, 212English A7, 6, or 54English B No Credit NoneForeign Language A or B7, 6, or 54Geography (Previously Human Geography) 5 or higher 3 GCU102History (Previously History – American)History (Previously History – EuropeanMathematics HLMathematics SLMathematical Studies SLFurther Mathematics SL(Previously Mathematics)Physics7, 6, or 547, 6, or 5463886363ENG101, ENG100AB, AC, ADENG100AB, AC, ADForeign Language 201, 202Foreign Language 101, 102HIS103, 104HIS103HIS101, 102HIS1017, 6, 5, or 4 4 MAT2217, 6, or 5484PHY111, 112PHY111Psychology 5 or higher 3 PSY101Social and Cultural Anthropology 7, 6, 5 or 4 3 ASB102Visual Arts (Previously Art/Design)7, 6, or 5463ART111, 112ART112


MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-2014853. Health Care Integrated Educational System(HCIES) Credit for Prior LearningNational/Regional Credential RecognitionStudents who have recognized credentials relatedto healthcare may request an evaluation for coursecompetency equivalency on a case-by-case basisthrough the Integrated Competency AssessmentNetwork (ICAN). For more information contact theICAN office at (480) 731-8240 or by email atican@domail.maricopa.edu. Website: http://healthcare.maricopa.edu/healthcarecourses.php. When national or regional credentials aredetermined to be equivalent to the competenciesdemonstrated in corresponding courses, therecognition of external credentials will fulfillgraduation credit requirements for the identifiedcourses through Credit by Evaluation.Credit by Examination and Credit by SkillsDemonstration AssessmentHealth care students may apply for credit for priorlearning in certain courses. Specific informationand required forms can be found on http://healthcare.maricopa.edu/healthcarecourses.phpCredit by Examination in the HCIES is determinedthrough the use of HCIES Competency AssessmentTests (CATs) and/or Skills DemonstrationAssessment under the direction of the HCIESIntegrated Competency Assessment Network (ICAN). Students may apply for HCIES Health CarePathway/Program Advanced Placement in certaincourses by obtaining the appropriate form(s) in theAdmissions and Records Office/Office of StudentEnrollment Services, paying the required fee(s),and successfully completing the examination and/or skills demonstration and other requirements ofthe college. See fee schedule for appropriate fee.Fees are not refundable if a student fails to obtaincredit. Students may not request:A. To challenge a course a second time;B. To challenge a course while currently enrolledin the course;C. To establish credit in a previously completedcourse; orD. To establish credit for a lower level of a coursein which credit has been received.Certain health care pathways/programs haveadditional requirements which must be met beforecredit may be granted through HCIES credit byexamination and credit by skills demonstrationassessment.Grades of A, B, C, D, or P, earned as a result ofexamination or skills assessment will be recordedon the student’s transcript. Fees are not refundableafter the examination/skills demonstration hasbeen administered, regardless of results. A gradeof P/Z is not used in computing the grade pointaverage.When credit is granted as outlined above, anotation of “Credit by Examination,” “Credity byEvaluation,” or “Credit by Skills Demonstration”and the number of credits will appear on thestudent’s transcript. If a grade is assigned, it will beused in computing the grade point average.4. Transferring to the Maricopa CommunityCollegesA student enrolling at one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges after having attended otherpost-secondary institutions can have courseworkevaluated for transfer credit. To be eligible forevaluation, coursework must appear on officialtranscripts from the source institutions. The officialtranscripts must be mailed directly from thesource institutions to the Admissions and Records/Enrollment Services Offices of the receivinginstitutions. The Admissions and Records/Enrollment Services Offices at the receivinginstitutions will complete course-by-courseevaluations for all submitted transcripts uponstudent request.The Maricopa Community Colleges may transfer incoursework if:• The coursework was completed atcolleges and universities accredited bythe following regional accreditingagencies: New England Association ofSchools and Colleges, Middle StatesAssociation of Colleges and Schools,North Central Association of Colleges andSchools, Northwest Association of Schoolsand Colleges, Southern Association ofColleges and Schools, and/or WesternAssociation of Schools and Colleges. TheMaricopa Community Colleges will not awardcredit for courses completed at institutions notregionally accredited.• The coursework was earned with a grade of Cor better.• The coursework was taken at another Arizonacommunity college to fulfill general educationrequirements for the Arizona GeneralEducation Curriculum (AGEC).Conditions of Transfer Credit:• Acceptance and applicability of courses fromanother Maricopa Community College thatfulfill requirements other than generaleducation is determined by individualMaricopa Community Colleges.• The award of transfer credit shall not expressor imply that all transfer credit will be fullyapplicable toward all Maricopa associate’sdegree and certificate requirements.• Developmental coursework (below 100-level)is accepted for the purpose of fulfilling courseprerequisites. The credit does not applytoward a degree or certificate.• Courses with different credit systems (quarterhours, units) are converted to semester hours


86 MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-14of credit. The semester conversion of quartercredits is at a rate of .67 semester credit hoursfor each quarter hour.• The age of credit may be considered inapplying credit toward degrees and certificateprograms.• College-level courses completed outside theUnited States and recorded on officialtranscripts will be evaluated for transfercredit, provided that the institution wherethe courses were taken is accredited by theministry of education in that country. It is thestudent’s responsibility to submit all foreignand international transcripts to one of theinternational credential evaluation to betranslated into English, evaluated on a courseby-course-basis,and sent directly tothe receiving colleges. Contact your collegeadmissions and records/enrollment servicesoffice to obtain a list of approved agencies.• For military credit, credit by examination,credit by evaluation, and CLEP/AP/IB see thesection for Credit For Prior Learning.A. Transfer Credit from MCCCD and EstablishedArticulation AgreementsThe Maricopa Community Colleges havedeveloped formal agreements to facilitate thetransfer of credit to four year colleges anduniversities. This is accomplished throughthe development of course and programarticulation agreements. The MaricopaCommunity Colleges articulate with private,public, and international baccalaureate degreegranting institutions that have achieved fullaccreditation or candidacy status with aregional accreditation commission. Maricopatransfer agreements are on behalf of theDistrict as a whole and not with individualcolleges within the district. Courses taken atany of the Maricopa Community Colleges areequally transferable by institutions wishing toarticulate. Students planning to transfer to auniversity may be required to submit officialtranscripts from all institutions attended.B. Articulation and Transfer Agreementsi. Maricopa Skill Center and theSouthwest Skill Center: The MaricopaCommunity Colleges have articulationagreements with the Maricopa SkillCenter and the Southwest Skill Center inlimited areas of study. Students who haveparticipated in these agreements maybe granted credit for prior learning. Nofees will be assessed for credits awardedfor prior learning. Articulated course/program credit is transferable within theMaricopa Community Colleges, but maynot necessarily be transferable to otheruniversities and colleges. Students shouldcontact the admissions and records office/office of student enrollment servicesfor specific information related to theseagreements.ii. Arizona Public Community Colleges andUniversities: Maricopa is a participantin the Arizona statewide transfersystem. The aztransfer.com website isthe official source of information forthe statewide articulation agreementsbetween the Arizona public communitycolleges and universities (Arizona StateUniversity, Northern Arizona University,and University of Arizona). Included onaztransfer.com is the course equivalencyguide (CEG), which shows how institutionshave agreed to transfer courseworkfrom Arizona public community collegesand tribal institutions to Arizona StateUniversity, Northern Arizona University,and the University of Arizona. Thetransferability of a course does notindicate directly how the course willapply to meet requirements for specificbachelor’s degrees. www.aztransfer.com/cgi-bin/WebObjects/Admin_CEGiii. Domestic (U.S) and InternationalInstitutions: The Maricopa CommunityColleges have transfer agreementswith U.S. universities and colleges thatare regionally accredited as well asinternational institutions that have beenapproved by the Ministry of Education.These partnerships are formalized throughdistrict-wide articulation agreements andare designed to help students maximizetheir transfer credit toward a bachelor’sdegree. To access a list of institutionswith which Maricopa has establishedarticulation agreements, visit:www.maricopa.edu/academic/ccta/artic/partner_list.phpC. Limitations on the Transfer of CreditGenerally, the following types of coursesare not intended for transfer. Contact theAdmissions and Records office at your collegefor specific information.i. Remedial/developmental courses orcourses numbered below 100ii. Arizona government university coursesiii. Cooperative educationiv. Experimental coursesv. Post baccalaureate coursesvi. Contractual training for business, industry,and governmentvii. Some forms of credit for prior learningviii. Non-credit coursesD. Time Limit for Transfer CourseworkStudents should be aware other colleges anduniversities may have age of credit limits oncertain coursework to be used in transfer.Students should refer to the policy of theirintended transfer institution regarding timelimits for transfer coursework.


MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-201487E. Shared Unique Numbering (SUN) SystemCourse InformationSenate Bill 1186, which passed into law in2010, mandated the creation of a sharednumbering system for public college anduniversity courses in Arizona to identifycourses that transfer from community collegesto universities toward a baccalaureate degree.The shared unique number (SUN) system is acollege course numbering system designedto help students locate and enroll in coursesthat have direct equivalents for transferamong Arizona’s public community collegesand three state universities. However, even if acourse at the Maricopa Community Colleges isnot designated as a SUN course, it could stilltransfer to other Arizona public institutionswith a direct equivalent as per the courseequivalency guide on aztransfer.com. The SUNsystem does not address the applicability ofcourses. Students are encouraged to workwith an academic advisor on course selections.To access a list of SUN courses, visit www.azsunsystem.com.5. Servicemen’s Opportunity CollegeThe Maricopa Community Colleges recognizethe unique educational problems confrontingmany active duty military personnel in attainingtheir educational goals. The colleges have,therefore, established themselves as Servicemen’sOpportunity Colleges. This means that the collegesrecognize the peculiar needs of military personnelin that they provide courses on the various militarybases located in Maricopa County and provideopportunities to complete courses through nontraditionalmeans when education is interruptedby military obligations. Maricopa CommunityColleges maintain liberal entrance requirements,offer maximum credit for educational experiencesobtained in the Military Services, and followresidency statutes applicable to the special needsof servicemen. Maricopa Community Collegesfollow the recommendations established bythe American Council on Education. If, for anyreason, Maricopa Community Colleges’ statusas a Servicemen’s Opportunity College Districtis discontinued, it will nonetheless maintain itscommitment to students previously enrolled.In addition, the option to enter into a “contractfor a degree” allows the community college,as the college of record, to grant a degreeupon completion of twelve (12) credit hours atthe college and the satisfaction of graduationrequirements.Academic Advising and New StudentOrientation (A.R. 2.2.6)1. Academic AdvisingStudents who will be attending college for the firsttime, and intend to earn an Associate’s degree orto transfer on to a college/university to completea Bachelor’s degree, will be required to meet withan academic advisor prior to the start of their firstsemester at a MCCCD college.i. Recent high school students who receivedMCCCD credits through Dual/ConcurrentEnrollment, ACE, Hoop of Learning, orany MCCCD Early Outreach Program areconsidered first time to college.2. New Student OrientationStudents who will be attending college for the firsttime, and intend to earn an Associate’s degree orto transfer to a college/university to complete aBachelor’s degree, will be required to attend NewStudent Orientation prior to the start of their firstsemester at a MCCCD College.i. Recent High School students who receivedMCCCD credits through Dual/ConcurrentEnrollment, ACE, Hoop of Learning, orany MCCCD Early Outreach Program areconsidered first time to college.Student Assessment and CoursePlacement (A.R. 2.2.7)1. Testing for Course PlacementA. Students will be required to complete a courseplacement test under any one of the followingconditions:i. The student is taking his or her firstcollege credit English, reading or mathcourse, or any college course for whichEnglish, reading or math is a prerequisite.ii.The student is pursuing a degree ortransfer pathway and does not havecurrent valid district approved courseplacement scores on file or does not haveprevious college credit in English, readingand math.iii. The student for whom English is not theprimary language and is taking his orher first English as a Second Languageclass is required to take a test of Englishproficiency.B. Course placement scores will be valid for twoyears.C. Reading Placement Scores that indicate“Exempt from CRE101” Do Not Expire.D. Students will be permitted one re-test inEnglish, reading, or math level with at least a24-hour waiting period. ONE additional re-testis permitted no sooner than three monthsfrom the oldest valid score date at any courseplacement testing site.E. The vice president of student affairs ordesignee may approve re-testing for studentswith special needs or circumstances. The retestdate will then serve as the date of record.


88 MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-14F. Students will be exempt from a courseplacement test if at least one of the followingconditions apply:i. The student has earned an associate orhigher degree from a regionally accreditedcollege.ii.The student has earned college creditsfrom a regionally accredited college inEnglish, reading, and math with a grade ofC or higher.iii. The student has currently valid districtapproved course placement scores on file.G. The student who is exempt from a courseplacement test must fulfill the minimumgraduation requirements.2. Course PlacementA. Students who enroll in English, Reading, orMath will be advised and placed into coursesbased on valid district approved scores.B. Students who test into course(s) that arebelow college-level (i.e., below 100-level)will be advised and placed into the course(s)within the first two semesters enrolled.C. A department/division chair or designee maygrant a course placement waiver under specialcircumstances. The signed waiver will be notedon the student's electronic record.3. Implementation of PolicyTo ensure consistency of the course placementprocess within the Maricopa Community Colleges:A. All colleges shall accept the sameapproved course placement instruments.B. All colleges shall adhere to the sameapproved cut-off scores.C. Course placement scores will be valid for twoyears.D. Reading Placement Scores that indicate“Exempt from CRE101” Do Not Expire.4. EvaluationThe Maricopa Community Colleges will providean ongoing evaluation of the course placementprocess. An annual report shall be submittedto the Governing Board to indicate the policy’seffectiveness noting the number of studentsassessed, their placement scores and their successin courses. Every three years a thorough review ofthe policy and procedures shall be implemented,including recommendations from the English,Reading and Math Instructional Councils regardingcut-off scores, course placement assessment toolsand procedures.Registration (A.R. 2.2.8)Students must register according to the datesindicated, and in the manner described in the collegeclass schedule. To be eligible for registration, studentsmust have completed the appropriate steps listedunder the Admissions section. The college may allowearly or priority registration. Tuition and fees must bepaid or payment arrangements made by the due dateto secure class enrollment. Students may not attend aclass for which they are not registered.The colleges reserve the right to enroll students incourses. The final decision for admission to any classfor students admitted under section 2 of A.R. 2.2.1 willbe determined by the designated college administratorin consultation with the department chairperson and/or faculty.Class Registration Deadlines:1. For classes with published start dates and meetingtimes, registration in the class must be completedbefore the first official class meeting date andtime. Students may not register for a class onceit has started. Self-Service registration for a classthrough my.maricopa.edu will end at 11:59 PM onthe day before the class starts. Registration for aclass on the date it starts must be done in personor on the phone, and must be completed beforethe class start time.2. For classes without published meeting times(for example, online classes, special projects),registration in the class must be completed by 11:59PM on the day before the class starts.3. ExceptionsA. Exceptions to class registration deadlinesrequire permission of appropriate instructor(s)and approval of the appropriate department/division chair or designee.B. Exceptions are limited toi. Courses requiring permission of instructorii. Courses requiring auditions or try-outsiii. Courses for Special Populations or Cohortsiv. Enrollment in an alternative section of acourse taught by the same instructorv. Enrollment in an alternative section of acourse taught by a different instructorvi. Course level changesvii. Students dropped for non-payment duringthe 100% refund period may be reinstatedif they attended since the first classmeeting.viii. Students dropped due to Human orsystem errors may be reinstated if theyattended the first class meeting.ix. Other exceptions may be granted afterfaculty consultation with the student.


MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-201489Tuition and Fees Policy (A.R. 2.2.9)Tuition and fees are public monies within thejurisdiction and responsibility of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges Governing Board under the lawsand regulations of the State of Arizona and must beadministered by the Governing Board. The GoverningBoard reserves the right to change tuition and feecharges when necessary without notice. All studentsare classified for tuition purposes under one of thefollowing residency classifications:1. Maricopa County resident2. Out-of-County resident3. Out-of-State resident(including F-1 non-immigrant students)Residency for tuition purposes is determined inaccordance with state law (ARS §§15-1801 et seq.)and regulations of the Maricopa Community CollegesGoverning Board. All of the Maricopa CommunityColleges are subject to the above statutes andregulations. Students who have questions about theirresidency should contact the Admissions and RecordsOffice/Office of Student Enrollment Services forclarification.Students attending more than one MaricopaCommunity College will be assessed fees for theirenrollment at each of the Maricopa Communitycolleges/centers. (Students who are considered to beout-of-state residents for tuition and fees purposesshould refer to the Concurrent Enrollment in ArizonaPublic Institutions of Higher Education policy underthe Residency section of this publication.)1. Time of PaymentAll tuition, fees, assessments and deposits must bepaid at the time of registration or by the specifieddeadline date and in accordance with the feeschedule approved by the Maricopa CommunityColleges Governing Board.2. Tuition and Fees Schedule (effective July 1, 2013for fall, spring and summer sessions).Current information can be found at www.maricopa.edu/publicstewardship/governance/adminregs/appendices/S-4.php.A. Determine Student Residency StatusRefer to admissions information (A.R.2.2.2) of the college catalog for residencyinformation and to review the requirements forclassification as a Maricopa county resident.Contact the Admissions and Records Office/Office of Student Enrollment Services if youhave questions about residency requirements.B. Use the Chart to Locate Tuition ChargesDetermine the correct column based on yourresidency status and then select the numberof credit hours. The general tuition chart isprovided for reference only.C. Add Any Additional Fees1. A one-time, per semester $15 registrationfee is due by the official start of the term(semester) or by the specified due date orat time of registration.2. There may also be additional course fees forclasses, please refer to the college schedulefor course fees.3. If you choose to audit a class, add anadditional fee of $25 per credit hour.4. Additional course fees may apply forspecific courses. Check with the college’sAdmissions and Records Office/Office ofStudent Enrollment Services for a currentlisting of course fees.D. Pay Your FeesPayment of fees may be made by cash, check,money order, VISA, MasterCard, Discover orAmerican Express. Payment PlanE. If you choose to audit a class, add anadditional fee of $25 per credit hour.F. Additional course fees may apply for specificcourses. Check with the college’s Admissionsand Records Office/Office of StudentEnrollment Services for a current listing ofcourse fees.G. Pay Your FeesPayment of fees may be made by cash, check,money order, VISA, MasterCard, Discover orAmerican Express. Payment Plan options arealso available.NOTE: If you do not pay your tuition and fees atthe time of registration or by the specified due date,you may be dropped from your classes and may beresponsible for the tuition and fees based on therefund schedule which outlines the refund deadlinesfor each course.Skill Center Tuition RatesRegular$5.00 per contact hourNursing Assistant $6.00 per contact hourPractical Nursing $6.00 per contact hourCredit by Examination & Credit by Evaluation(excludes Allied Health courses)Regular Rate $74.00 per credit hourContract Rate $37.00 per credit hourTUITION AND FEE SCHEDULEThe following is a tuition and fees schedule for 2013-2014 and is provided for reference. These tuition andfees are subject to change. Consult the college’sAdmissions and Records Office/Office of StudentEnrollment Services for course fees in effect during thesemester/term in which you intend to register.


90 MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-142013-2014MaricopaCountyResident(In County)APPENDIX S-4: TUITION & FEE SCHEDULEIN-STATEIn CountyResidentAuditRateOut ofCountyResidentNon-ResidentLiving inArizonaNon-ResidentStudyAbroadProgramNon-ResidentDistanceLearningOUT-OF-STATEWesternUndergraduateExchange(WUE)Credit Hours A B C* D** E F***/+ G1 81.00 106.00 334.00 322.00 201.00 215.00 119.002 162.00 212.00 668.00 644.00 402.00 430.00 238.003 243.00 318.00 1,002.00 966.00 603.00 645.00 357.004 324.00 424.00 1,336.00 1,288.00 804.00 860.00 476.005 405.00 530.00 1,670.00 1,610.00 1,005.00 1,075.00 595.006 486.00 636.00 2,004.00 1,932.00 1,206.00 1,290.00 714.007 567.00 742.00 2,338.00 2,254.00 1,407.00 1,505.00 833.008 648.00 848.00 2,672.00 2,576.00 1,608.00 1,720.00 952.009 729.00 954.00 3,006.00 2,898.00 1,809.00 1,935.00 1,071.0010 810.00 1,060.00 3,340.00 3,220.00 2,010.00 2,150.00 1,190.0011 891.00 1,166.00 3,674.00 3,542.00 2,211.00 2,365.00 1,309.0012 972.00 1,272.00 4,008.00 3,864.00 2,412.00 2,580.00 1,428.0013 1,053.00 1,378.00 4,342.00 4,186.00 2,613.00 2,795.00 1,547.0014 1,134.00 1,484.00 4,676.00 4,508.00 2,814.00 3,010.00 1,666.0015 1,215.00 1,590.00 5,010.00 4,830.00 3,015.00 3,225.00 1,785.0016 1,296.00 1,696.00 5,344.00 5,152.00 3,216.00 3,440.00 1,904.0017 1,377.00 1,802.00 5,678.00 5,474.00 3,417.00 3,655.00 2,023.0018 1,458.00 1,908.00 6,012.00 5,796.00 3,618.00 3,870.00 2,142.00* Students from any other county in Arizona are considered Maricopa County Residents (in county) due to a reciprocal arrangementwith that county. Reciprocal agreements allow for in-county tuition rates for residents of all Arizona counties*except* Apache and Greenlee counties without an Out-of-County Residence Affidavit.** According to ARS §15-1802F, “A person who is a member of an Indian tribe recognized by the US Department of the Interiorwhose reservation lies in this state and extends into another state and who is a resident of the reservation is entitled to classificationas an in-state student.” Therefore, unclassified and out-of-state surcharges do not apply to such students.*** According to ARS §15-1470, community college districts may offer credit and noncredit courses and services outside of thisstate. A district is not entitled to state aid payments for students who are provided courses and services outside of this state.+ This rate applies to out-of-state students who are taking distance learning courses or students who are taking classroom-basedcredit courses through a contract agreement between MCCCD and the company they work for. This rate does not apply to StudyAbroad Programs as there is a separately calculated rate for those students.SPECIAL FEESFee2013-2014 FeesRegistration Processing Fee$15.00 (per student/semester/college)Commencement Participation Fee $25.00(includes cap, gown, honor cords, diploma cover, andparticipation in commencement ceremony)Transcript Fee $5.00Check Returned from Bank $15.00Library Fines - Lost Materials$5.00 + Item List PriceIdentification Card Replacement Fee$5.00 (actual cost for Magstripe/Smart Cards)See www.maricopa.edu/publicstewardship/governance/adminregs/appendices/S-4.php for full list of special fees.


MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-2014913. Outstanding DebtsAny debt or returned check may revoke a student’scurrent enrollment and the student’s right toregister in subsequent semesters at all MaricopaCommunity Colleges. Delinquent debts mayrequire penalties, late charges, collection costs,and/or legal fees to be paid before good standingis restored to the student.The following procedure will be used forthe collection of returned checks and otheroutstanding debts:A. The designated college official or fiscal officeris responsible for:i. Verifying the student’s district wide debt,ii.Attempting to notify the student of thedebt andiii. Attempting to collect the debt.B. Maricopa Community College services maybe withheld pending payment of debt (atdesignated college office) with cash, certifiedcheck or money order or online with debitor credit card or in person with credit card.Student may be withdrawn from classes.C. If other collection attempts fail, the MaricopaCommunity Colleges District Office will eithercollect or use other means available, including:i. Collection agency, requiring payment ofcollection fees by the student;ii.The Tax Refund Setoff Programs as statedin ARS §42-1122;iii. Litigation, requiring payment of courtcosts and legal fees by the student.D. Debt Holds may be lifted only in limitedinstances by the appropriate College orDistrict business services designee for theextension of services provided that at leastone of the following conditions are met:i. MCCCD staff verify that full payment hasbeen made to another College;ii.The College can deduct payment from afinancial aid award made to the student(referring to student authorizationguidelines for regulations on applyingfederal financial aid to debt balances);iii. A third party not related to the student,such as an employer or state agency,makes a verified payment directly to theCollege;iv. It is determined and verified with theappropriate MCCCD office that the holdresulted from a system error and theerror is due to an activity that requirescorrection by the appropriate College orDistrict personnel.Admission criteria to attend a college within theMaricopa Community College District (MCCCD)is determined in accordance with state law (ARS§§15-1805.01 AND 15-1821) and regulations of theMaricopa Community Colleges Governing Boardand the Chancellor. As such, participants enrolledin courses as part of third party agreements are alsosubject to the same admissions criteria. This includesthe participants resolving any current enrollmentor administrative holds that are unrelated to thethird party in an existing student account, but thatotherwise impact his/her eligibility to enroll in coursesor participate in programs delivered by MCCCD facultyor staff.4. Discounted Fees and WaiversA. Citizens 62 years of age and older shall beissued ID cards that allow them the privilegeof attending events at no cost and that allowthem to use the library facilities.B. Employees, Dependents and Mandated GroupsThe Maricopa Community College Districtwaives tuition and student activity fees forcredit-hour courses for employees and theirdependents, and for legislatively mandatedgroups. Special fees and fees for Non-credit/Special lnterest Community Services coursesare not waived.C. Tuition and Registration Fee Waiver forMembers of the Pima-Maricopa IndianCommunityTuition and fee waivers shall be fundedthrough Auxiliary Fund Monies for collegecredit courses for the enrolled members of thePima-Maricopa community who live on thePima-Maricopa Reservation.All other guidelines and proceduresestablished for the purpose of administeringwaivers, affidavits and exemptions are outlinedin the Maricopa County Community CollegeDistrict tuition waiver manual.Refund Policy (A.R. 2.2.10)1. Refund Policy for Credit ClassesStudents who officially withdraw from creditclasses (in fall, spring, or summer) within thewithdrawal deadlines listed below will receivea 100% refund for tuition, class and registrationprocessing fees. Deadlines that fall on a weekendor a college holiday will advance to the nextcollege workday except for classes fewer than10 calendar days in length or as specified bythe college. Calendar days include weekdaysand weekends. Refer to individual colleges forwithdrawal and refund processes. Never attendingis not an allowable refund exemption or an excuseof the debt incurred through registration.


92 MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-14Length of ClassOfficial WithdrawalDeadlines for100% Refund1-9 calendar days Prior to the class startdate10-19 calendar days 1 calendar day*20-29 calendar days 2 calendar days*30-39 calendar days 3 calendar days*40-49 calendar days 4 calendar days*50-59 calendar days 5 calendar days*60-69 calendar days 6 calendar days*70+ calendar days 7 calendar days**Including the class start dateCourse fees and registration processing fees will be refundedonly if the student qualifies for a 100% refund. Debts owed toany MCCCD college must be satisfied before any refunds arepaid to the student. Refunds for students receiving federalfinancial assistance are subject to federal guidelines. Requestsfor exceptions to the refund policy must be filed within oneyear from the semester in which the course was taken.2. Refund Policy for Non-Credit ClassesUnless otherwise specified, students must dropnon-credit classes prior to the course start date tobe eligible for a 100% refund.3. Canceled ClassesWhen a class is canceled by the college, a 100%refund will be made.4. Refund ExceptionsStudents withdrawing from a college or fromcourses for one of the following reasons mustsubmit a written request for a refund exceptionto the Admissions and Records Office/Office ofStudent Enrollment Services or designated collegeofficial:A. A student with a serious illness, verifiable bya doctor’s written statement that the illnessprevents the student from attending all classesfor the semester. The doctor’s statement mustbe on file with the college before a refund canbe given.B. Serious illness or death of an immediatefamily member that prevents the studentfrom attending all classes for the semester.Immediate family members include spouse/partner, father, mother, grandfather,grandmother, child, foster child, grandchild,stepchild, sibling, stepsibling, stepfather,stepmother, or spouse’s/partner’s father,mother, grandfather, grandmother, or in-laws inany one incident. Appropriate documentationmust be provided before a refund can begiven.C. Death of a student. Appropriatedocumentation must be provided before arefund can be given.D. A student in the Armed Forces or the ArizonaNational Guard who is called to active dutyand assigned to a duty station, verifiable by acopy of the orders, will be allowed to withdrawand receive a 100% refund of tuition, providedcourses have not been completed.Requests for a total withdrawal from a college orcourses for one of the above reasons may resultin a partial prorated refund of tuition, providedcourses have not been completed. All decisionsmade by the college are final.Limitation: Never attending is not an allowablerefund exception or an excuse of the debt incurredthrough registrationStudent Financial Assistance (A.R. 2.2.11)The Maricopa Community Colleges provide studentsfinancial assistance to enable access to higher education.Student financial assistance shall be awarded onthe basis of demonstrated financial need except wherefunds are specified for recognition of special talentsand achievements. Additional procedural informationon financial assistance is available in Appendix S-5.Appendix S-5: Student Financial AssistanceThe Maricopa Community Colleges provide studentsfinancial assistance to enable access to highereducation. Student financial assistance shall beawarded on the basis of demonstrated financial needexcept where funds are specified for recognition ofspecial talents and achievements. Only those with alawful presence in the United States may qualify forfederal financial aid or Maricopa County CommunityCollege District (MCCCD) scholarships. Under Arizonalaw, any information the student provides abouthis or her legal status when applying for financialaid or publicly funded scholarships may be subjectto mandatory reporting to federal immigrationauthorities. This does not apply to applications for theprivate scholarship funds held in and distributed bythe Maricopa Community Colleges Foundation.The office of financial aid may request to havethe validity of a student’s high school completionevaluated if either the college or the United StatesDepartment of Education has reason to believethat the high school diploma is not valid or was notobtained from an entity that provides secondaryschool education. An evaluation may be conducted onthe basis of any of the following:• Alerts, bulletins, or similar communicationsprovided by any state, federal, or othergovernmental agency, another institution, aprofessional or similar organization, or any otherresource that might provide information helpful tothe evaluation;• A transcript or other record received from anotherinstitution the student may have attended;• The contents of the student’s Free Application forFederal Student Aid, student information form, orany other information the student provides to thecollege;


MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-201493• The independent professional judgment by anyofficial of the office of student financial aid.How to Apply for Federal Financial AidNew students must complete the Free Applicationfor Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) or FAFSA on theWeb at http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/. Each academicyear, continuing students must reapply by completinga FAFSA, Renewal FAFSA, or FAFSA on the Web.Scholarships require separate applications. Specificinformation regarding financial assistance, includingapplication deadlines or priority dates, may beobtained from the college Office of Student FinancialAid.Types of AidGrants, loans, student employment, and scholarshipfunds may be available from federal, state, and/orprivate sources.The Maricopa Community Colleges Foundation offersa variety of scholarship opportunities. Scholarshipopportunities are available year round. However,most scholarships are posted mid-January and mostdeadlines are the last week of March. Options areavailable at www.maricopa.edu/foundation/apply/index.php or by calling (480) 731-8400.Distribution of AidCriteria by which aid is distributed among eligiblefinancial aid applicants are available on request at thecollege Office of Student Financial Aid.Rights and ResponsibilitiesStudents should read all information provided in theprocess of applying for federal financial aid in orderto gain a greater knowledge of all the rights as well asresponsibilities involved in receiving that assistance.Satisfactory Academic ProgressSpecific requirements for academic progress forfinancial aid recipients are applied differently thanscholastic standards. In addition to scholasticstandards which are explained elsewhere in thiscatalog, financial aid recipients are also subject tothe following Standards of Satisfactory AcademicProgress. Specific information is available at thecollege Office of Student Financial Aid.Refunds and RepaymentsIn accordance with federal regulations (CFR 668.22),a student may be required to repay federal financialaid funds if they completely withdraw, are withdrawn,or fail to earn a passing grade from all classes duringa semester. Further information is available at thecollege Office of Student Financial Aid. This couldaffect a student’s ability to receive Financial Aid in thefuture at any school. For a student receiving FinancialAid, also see Appendix S-7 for Withdrawal procedures.Verification of Information1. A Free Application for Federal Student Aid(FAFSA) or a change to that FAFSA may beselected for verification. If a student’s FAFSAis selected for verification, the student will benotified via the Student Center in My.maricopa.edu. In most cases, the student will be required tosubmit documentation as part of the verificationprocess. The earlier the Financial Aid Officereceives the required documentation, the earlierthe student’s eligibility for financial aid can bedetermined. The verification process must becompleted no later than 120 days after the lastdate of enrollment or August 31, whichever comesfirst. In addition, the Financial Aid Office mustreceive a final and valid electronic Sar by thestudent’s last day of enrollment or June 30 of theaward year, whichever comes first. The verificationprocess must be completed before the FinancialAid Office can award any federal aid.2. If an award has already been made and a FAFSA isselected for verification, the student must providerequired documentation within thirty days afterit has been requested of the student or on June30, whichever comes first. If documentation is notreceived within this deadline, the student’s awardmay be adjusted or canceled.3. The required forms and documents a studentsubmits for verification will be compared to theinformation reported on the student’s FAFSA. Ifthe information provided does not match whatis shown on the FAFSA, the Financial Aid Officewill submit changes to the US Department ofEducation FAFSA processor. After all changes aremade to the FAFSA data, the student’s eligibilityfor financial aid will be reviewed. If there are anychanges to the student’s financial aid eligibility asa result of verification, the student will be notifiedby means of the Student Center in My.maricopa.edu. If, following verification, the institutiondiscovers evidence of student aid fraud (includingidentity theft), waste or abuse of US Departmentof Education funds, such evidence may bereferred to the Office of Inspector General of theUS Department of Education.Award Amount and Level of EnrollmentAward amount is determined, in part, on the level ofenrollment. A reduction in course load after financialaid has been awarded may result in an adjustedfinancial aid award. Federal student aid recipients areadvised to register at the same time for all classes theyintend to take during a semester to maximize award.Some federal aid may not be awarded for classesadded at a later date. Contact the college Office ofStudent Financial Aid for more information.Repeated Coursework and Financial AidEnrollment StatusFederal regulations regarding repeated courseworkmay impact your financial aid eligibility and awards.Federal regulations specify that students may receivefederal financial aid funding for one repetition of apreviously passed course. A passed course is defined


94 MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-14as one in which a grade of A, B, C, D, or P is received.If you enroll in a course in which you have previouslyreceived passing grades twice, the course will not becounted towards your enrollment level for financialaid purposes. You may repeat a failed course until it ispassed. Your enrollment for financial aid purposes willbe calculated accordingly.Maricopa Community Colleges Standards ofSatisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) forFinancial Aid EligibilityFederal regulations (CFR 668.32(f) and 668.34)require a student to move toward the completionof a degree or certificate within an eligible programwhen receiving financial aid. Specific requirementsfor academic progress for financial aid recipients areapplied differently than Scholastic Standards. Federalregulations state that Academic Progress Standardsmust include a review of all periods of enrollment,regardless of whether or not aid was received.Students will be evaluated using the standardsdescribed below. Failure to meet any of theseminimum standards will result in loss of title IV, HEAprogram (federal financial aid) eligibility.Evaluation PeriodStandards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)will be evaluated at the end of each semester; fall,spring and summer. Programs less than one yearin length will be evaluated at the midpoint of theprogram. Non-standard sessions will be evaluated atthe completion of the session.Standards of Satisfactory Academic ProgressStandards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)are evaluated on each of the three measurementsoutlined below. Failure to meet any of these standardswill result in suspension of eligibility for financial aid.Note: Grades of F,I,N,W,X,Y,Z, and courses not yetgraded are considered attempted but not meetingprogress standards for the purposes of financial aid.• Grade Point Measurement: Students must meetthe following credit hour/cumulative grade pointaverage (CGPA).Total Credits Attempted* Min CGPA< 15.75 1.6016-30.75 1.7531-45.75 1.9046 + 2.00• Pace of Progression Measurement: Studentsmust successfully complete 2/3 (66.67%) of allattempted course work.• Maximum Time Frame Measurement: Studentswho have attempted more than 150% of thepublished credits required for their program ofstudy are considered not meeting SAP.Coursework Treatment in SAP CalculationCourse work taken during the semester also includedin the evaluation:• Courses funded through a consortium agreement• All attempted remedial credits• Repeated course workCoursework included in the Pace of Progressionevaluation:• All of those included in the semester evaluation• All evaluated transfer creditsCourse work included in the Maximum Time Frameevaluation:• All of those included in the Pace of Progressionevaluation• Any Associates degree or higher earned will beconsidered to have exhausted maximum timeframeeligibility• All coursework forgiven through the academicrenewal processCourse work not included in SAP evaluation:• Audited courses• Non-credit courses• Credit by examination• Credit for prior learning option (as outlined in thecollege general catalog)NotificationStudents that have applied for federal assistance,but who do not meet the standards, will be notified.This notification will direct students to informationregarding the appeal process.Ineligibility Determination AppealAny student who has lost financial aid eligibility due toextenuating circumstances may appeal. Appeal must:• Be in writing and submitted to the Financial AidOffice where the student is applying for aid.• Include the extenuating circumstances that causedthe student not to meet SAP standards.• Include appropriate supporting documentation.• Include how that condition or situation has beenresolved thus allowing the student the ability tomeet SAP standards.Students will be notified of the results of their appealand any restrictions or conditions pertaining to theirappeal. The outcome of an appeal may include aprobationary term or denial.Failure to successfully complete all conditions duringthe probationary period (as defined in the academicplan) will result in loss of future financial aid eligibility.Regaining EligibilityA student who has lost financial aid eligibility mayonly regain eligibility by meeting the minimum SAPstandards. Course work taken at other colleges will notbe considered for reinstatement purposes.


MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-201495Terminology and Information Pertaining to thisPolicy• Summer Sessions – Enrollment in any or allSummer Sessions within the same calendar yearwill be considered one term.• Non-Standard Session – Sessions that do notfollow the traditional start and end dates for thesemester.• Attempted Credit – Any credit for which a gradeof A, B, C, D, F, I, IP, N, P, W, X, Y, or Z is receivedand courses not yet graded.• CGPA [Cumulative Grade Point Average] –The MCCCD grading policy is published in theadministrative regulations at 2.3.3. The CGPA doesnot include credits accepted in transfer.• Appeal – “A process by which a student who isnot meeting the institution’s satisfactory academicprogress standards petitions the institution forreconsideration of the student’s eligibility fortitle IV, HEA program assistance.”• Extenuating Circumstance – Examples are:personal injury or illness, serious illness or deathwithin the immediate family, or other circumstancebeyond the reasonable control of the student.• Supporting Documentation – Examples couldinclude: an obituary notice, divorce decree, anaccident report, or a letter from a physician,attorney, social services agency, etc.• Financial Aid Probation –“A status assignedby an institution to a student who fails to makesatisfactory academic progress and who hasappealed and has had eligibility for aid reinstated.”A student in this status “may not receive title IV,HEA program funds for the subsequent paymentperiod unless the student makes satisfactoryacademic progress or the institution determinesthat the student met the requirements specified bythe institution in the academic plan for thestudent.”• Academic Plan – A plan developed throughthe SAP Appeal Process which will lead a studentto qualify for further title IV, HEA program funds.• Financial Aid Suspension – The status assignedupon failing to meet the minimum SAP standardsor the terms of a probationary status. Studentsin this status are not eligible to receive title IV, HEAassistance.For more information, contact the college FinancialAid Office.If you are receiving federal financial aid it is importantto read the information below prior to making adecision to withdraw.Treatment of Title IV Aid When a StudentWithdrawsThe law specifies how your school must determine theamount of Title IV program assistance that you earnif you withdraw from school. The Title IV programsthat are covered by this law are: Federal Pell Grants,National SMART grants, TEACH Grants, StaffordLoans, PLUS Loans, Federal Supplemental EducationalOpportunity Grants (FSEOGs), and Federal PerkinsLoans.When you withdraw during your payment period orperiod of enrollment (you may contact the FinancialAid office to define these for you and tell you whichone applies) the amount of Title IV program assistancethat you have earned up to that point is determinedby a specific formula. If you received (or your schoolor parent received on your behalf) less assistancethan the amount that you earned, you may be able toreceive those additional funds. If you received moreassistance than you earned, the excess funds must bereturned by the school and/or you.The amount of assistance that you have earned isdetermined on a pro-rata basis. For example, if youcompleted 30% of your payment period or periodof enrollment, you earn 30% of the assistance youwere originally scheduled to receive. Once you havecompleted more than 60% of the payment period orperiod of enrollment, you earn all the assistance thatyou were scheduled to receive for that period.If you did not receive all of the funds that you earned,you may be due a post-withdrawal disbursement.If your post-withdrawal disbursement includes loanfunds, your school must get your permission beforeit can disburse them. You may choose to declinesome or all of the loan funds so that you don’t incuradditional debt. Your school may automatically useall or a portion of your post-withdrawal disbursementof grant funds for tuition, fees, and room and boardcharges (as contracted with the school). The schoolneeds your permission to use the post-withdrawalgrant disbursement for all other school charges. If youdo not give your permission, you will be offered thefunds. However, it may be in your best interest to allowthe school to keep the funds to reduce your debt atthe school.There are some Title IV funds that you were scheduledto receive that cannot be disbursed to you once youwithdraw because of other eligibility requirements.For example, if you are a first-time, first-yearundergraduate student and you have not completedthe first 30 days of your program before you withdraw,you will not receive any FFEL or Direct loan funds thatyou would have received had you remained enrolledpast the 30th day.If you receive (or your school or parent receives onyour behalf) excess Title IV program funds that mustbe returned, your school must return a portion of theexcess equal to the lesser of:1. your institutional charges multiplied by theunearned percentage of your funds, OR2. the entire amount of excess funds. The school mustreturn this amount even if it didn’t keep thisamount of your Title IV program funds.


96 MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-14If your school is not required to return all of the excessfunds, you must return the remaining amount. Any loanfunds that you must return, you (or your parent for aPLUS Loan) repay in accordance with the terms of thepromissory note. That is, you make scheduled paymentsto the holder of the loan over a period of time. Anyamount of unearned grant funds that you must returnis called an overpayment. The maximum amount of agrant overpayment that you must repay is half of thegrant funds you received or were scheduled to receive.You must make arrangements with your school or theDepartment of Education to return the unearned grantfunds.The requirements for Title IV program funds when youwithdraw are separate from any refund policy that yourschool may have. Therefore, you may still owe funds tothe school to cover unpaid institutional charges. Yourschool may also charge you for any Title IV programfunds that the school was required to return. You canview the tuition refund policy and requirements andprocedures for withdrawing from school at www.maricopa.edu/publicstewardship/governance/adminregs/students/2_2.phpVaccinations [as required by 20 USC§1092(a)(1)(V)] (A.R. 2.2.12)The Maricopa County Community CollegesDistrict does not require that students receivevaccinations prior to enrollment. Certain professionalor occupational programs do require particularvaccinations for participation in those programs. Moreinformation about these programs can be found oncollege websites.Veterans Services (A.R. 2.9)The Maricopa Community Colleges’ veterans’services offices act as liaisons with the Departmentof Veterans Affairs. Each program must be approvedby the Department of Veterans Affairs. Studentsmay be eligible to receive educational benefits ifthey are registered in courses that apply to thestudent’s approved programs. Application forms,counseling, advisement and tutoring are available forstudents who are eligible for veteran’s educationalbenefits. Students applying for veteran’s educationalbenefits should allow eight to ten weeks beforereceiving benefits. The amount of benefits awarded isdetermined by the Department of Veterans Affairs, andis based on the number of credit hours or clock hoursfor which a student is enrolled and the length of theenrollment period for each course.• Chapter 1606 - Montgomery GI Bill, SelectedReserve• Chapter 1607 - REAP Reserve EducationalAssistance ProgramIt is the student’s responsibility to notify the office thatserves veterans at their campus regarding any changein enrollment, address, program of study, enrollmentat another institution, or any other change that mayimpact their veteran’s educational benefits.Those students receiving benefits must follow the VAacademic progress policy to continue to receive benefits.Academic Progress Policy for StudentsReceiving Veteran’s Educational BenefitsCredit Hours for WhichGrade Points are Computedat Resident MaricopaCommunity College (A, B,C, D, F, and Y)Minimum Grade PointAverage Required12-15 1.6016-30 1.7531-45 1.9046 + 2.00Department of Veterans Affairs regulations requirethat all persons using any type of veteran educationalassistance program be making satisfactory academicprogress toward achievement of their educationalobjective (program of study). A student who does notmeet the minimum standards (see above) will be placedon probation for a maximum of two (2) consecutivesemesters. At this point, if satisfactory academic progresshas not been demonstrated, veteran educational benefitswill be terminated. Benefits may be resumed when thestudent raises the cumulative grade point average tothe required minimum standards or demonstrates theability to meet these standards through the approval of awritten appeal. For appeal procedures, contact the officethat serves veterans at your campus.For additional details and information regarding veteran’seducational benefits, contact the office that servesveterans at your campus.Veteran’s benefits available:• Chapter 30 - Montgomery GI Bill• Chapter 31 - Vocational Rehabilitation (separatelyserved through the local VA office)• Chapter 32 - VEAP Program• Chapter 33 - Post 9/11 GI Bill & Transfer ofEligibility to Dependents (TOE)• Chapter 35 - Survivors and dependents ofdeceased/100% disabled veterans


MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-201497SCHOLASTIC STANDARDSAcademic Load (A.R. 2.3.1)A credit hour is defined as an amount of workrepresented in course competencies and verified byevidence of student achievement that reasonablyapproximates not less than one hour of classroomor direct faculty instruction and a minimum of twohours of out-of-class student work each week forapproximately fifteen weeks for one semester hourof credit, or the equivalent amount of work over adifferent amount of time, or at least an equivalentamount of work for other academic activities,including laboratory work, internships, practica, studiowork, and other academic work leading to the awardof credit hours. In accordance with common practicein higher education, instruction representing a credithour is typically delivered in a 50 minute class period.Students carrying at least twelve (12) credit hourswill be considered full-time students for the fall andspring semesters. Three-quarter-time is 9 - 11.9 credithours. Half-time is 6 - 8.9 credit hours. Fewer thansix (6) credit hours is considered less than half-time.Academic load for summer and special terms maybe defined differently. Contact the Admissions andRecords Office/Office of Student Enrollment Servicesfor clarification. As provided in the Reduced CourseLoad administrative regulation, a student may bedeemed a full-time student carrying fewer than twelvecredit hours pursuant to an accommodation of adisability.Courses may vary in length, and begin and endthroughout the year. A credit hour indicates the valueof an academic credit. Standards for the awarding ofcredit hours may be time based or competency based.To obtain credit, a student must be properly registeredand must pay fees for the course. The fall and springsemesters are typically sixteen (16) weeks in length.Summer sessions are typically five or eight weeks inlength.Students desiring to take more than eighteen (18)credit hours must obtain approval from the designatedcollege official. Ordinarily, only students with a gradepoint average of 3.0 or higher for the precedingsemester or first semester students who were in theupper quarter of their high school graduating classare permitted to carry more than eighteen (18) credithours.Students participating in extra-curricular or cocurricularactivities or receiving financial assistancemay be required to maintain a specified minimumacademic load.Students who are working, have considerable extracurricularor co-curricular activities, or have beenreinstated from academic suspension/probationshould plan their academic load accordingly.Schedule ChangesStudents may change their schedule by following thedesignated procedures at their college of enrollment.It is the student’s responsibility to notify the collegeif he/she will no longer be attending the class (seeAppendix S-7 for Withdrawal Procedures).Attendance (A.R. 2.3.2)• Only persons who are registered for a class at anyof the Maricopa Community Colleges may attendthat class. Attendance requirements are determinedby the course instructor. Students who do not meetthe attendance requirement as determined by thecourse instructor may be withdrawn.• Students who fail to attend the first scheduledclass meeting, or to contact the instructorregarding absence before the first scheduled classmeeting may, at the option of the instructor, bewithdrawn.• At the beginning of each course, each facultymember will provide students with writtenattendance requirements. It is the student’sresponsibility to consult with the instructorregarding official or unofficial absences. Absencesbegin to accumulate with the first scheduled classmeeting.• Students bear the responsibility of notifying theAdmissions and Records Office/Office of StudentEnrollment Services when they discontinue studiesin a course or at the college. Please refer toAppendix S-7 for Withdrawal Procedures.1. Official AbsencesA. Official absences are those that occur whenstudents are involved in an official activityof the college, i.e., field trips, tournaments,athletic events, and present an official absenceexcuse form. Absences for such events shallnot count against the number of absencesallowed by an instructor or department.Students who must miss a class for an officialreason must obtain an official absenceverification card from the appropriate vicepresident or designee and present it to theappropriate instructor(s) before the absence.Prior arrangements must be made witheach instructor for make-up work. If priorarrangements have been made, the studentwill not be penalized.B. Other official absences include jury duty andsubpoenas. Appropriate documentation willbe required. Prior arrangements must be madewith each instructor for makeup work. If priorarrangements have been made, the studentwill not be penalized.C. In the event of military commitments.Absences for periods of up to one weekwill not be counted against the numberof absences allowed by an instructor ordepartment. The student is required to provideappropriate documentation of the specificorders, length of assignment and location.Prior notification must be initiated with eachinstructor to discuss make-up work. If the


98 MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-14length of the absence will be longer thanone week, the instructor and the studentwill determine whether there is sufficientopportunity for the student to make up thework. If it is determined that the length ofabsence for the military commitment providesan undue hardship on the student’s abilityto make up the assignments, he or she willbe provided an opportunity to request anincomplete grade or drop the class or, in thecase of open-entry classes, the opportunity torequest an extension.D. In the event of the death of an immediatefamily member, absences for periods of upto one week will not be counted against thenumber of absences allowed by an instructoror department. Students should contactinstructor(s) as soon as possible to arrange formake-up work. Appropriate documentationwill be required (for example, a copy of theobituary or funeral program). In specializedprograms that require clinical rotations, thisregulation may not apply.2. Religious HolidaysStudents shall have the right to observe majorreligious holidays without penalty or reprisal byany administrator, faculty member or employeeof the Maricopa Community Colleges. Absencesfor such holidays shall not count against thenumber of absences allowed by an instructor ordepartment. At least one week before the holiday,students shall submit to their instructor(s) awritten statement that includes both the date ofthe holiday and the reason why class attendanceis impossible. Prior arrangements must be madewith each instructor for make-up work. If priorarrangements have been made, the student willnot be penalized.Grading (A.R. 2.3.3)1. PolicyIt is the policy of the Maricopa Community Collegesthat a grade will be assigned at the conclusionof the course. Official grades are available ondesignated college web sites.Grade KeyAExcellentB Above AverageCDFIAveragePassingFailureIncomplete4 grade points percredit hour3 grade points percredit hour2 grade points percredit hour1 grade point percredit hour0 grade points percredit hourNot computed ingrade point averageIPNCourse inProgressAuditP* CreditWYZWithdrawn,passingWithdrawn,failingNo CreditNot computed ingrade point averageNot computed ingrade point averageNot computed ingrade point averageNot computed ingrade point average0 grade points percredit hourNot computed ingrade point average*A “P” is judged to be equivalent to a grade ofC or higher2. Incomplete GradeA. Students who are doing acceptable work mayrequest an incomplete grade “I” if they areunable to complete the course requirementsby the end of the term because of illness orother extenuating circumstances. If the requestis approved by the instructor, he or she shalldefine, in a written/electronic contract, howthe course will be completed.B. Students must complete the requirementswithin the time period agreed to--maximumtime allowed is seven (7) months from the lastdate of class in which the grade of incompletewas assigned. Students who do not completethe requirements within seven (7) monthswill have their grade recorded in accordancewith the written contract. Students shouldNOT reregister for the course to complete thecontract.3. Repeating a Course/Improving a GradeTo improve a previously earned grade, studentsmay repeat the course up to three times after theinitial attempt to improve a grade. (A “W” or “Y”is not considered an attempt.) Students planningto repeat a course should seek advisement prior toenrolling. The lower grade(s) for repeated courseswill automatically be excluded from the gradepoint calculation. All enrollments in a course willappear on the transcript. Check individual coursesand programs for exceptions.4. Credit/No Credit Courses (P/Z)A. Some courses may be taken under a credit/no credit grading system. These coursescarry grades of P (credit, equivalent to agrade of C or higher) or Z (no credit) andare not computed in the student’s gradepoint average. Credits earned with a gradeof P may be counted toward graduation withthe exception of AGEC (Arizona GeneralEducation Curriculum).B. The prescribed time limits are for full-semesterclasses. Time limits for classes which meetfewer than sixteen (16) weeks are adjustedaccordingly. See “Important Deadlines forStudents”.


MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-201499C. In courses with credit/no credit (P/Z) grading,the student may request standard grading(A, B, C, D, F), within fourteen (14) daysincluding the date of the first class meeting.The instructor must immediately notify theAdmissions and Records Office/Office ofStudent Enrollment Services.D. In courses with standard grading (A, B, C, D,F), the instructor determines if the credit/no credit option is available. If the optionis available, the student must obtain thepermission of the instructor. The instructormust notify the Admissions and RecordsOffice/Office of Student Enrollment Serviceswithin fourteen (14) days including the day ofthe first class meeting.E. It is the student’s responsibility to verify thetransferability of credit/no credit courses.Some universities place a limitation on thenumber of credit/no credit courses that can betransferred.Advisory note: Some institutions outside theMaricopa Community Colleges may translatethe Z grade as failing.5. Audit CoursesA. Auditors are those who enroll in a course forthe sole purpose of obtaining information;they receive no credit, grades, homework,or tests. If an auditor wishes to earn credit,he or she must change from audit status tocredit status within the first week. If a studentwishes to audit a course for which he or she isenrolled for credit, the change must be madewithin the first five (5) weeks of a semester.Auditors are subject to the same attendancepolicies as other students and must meet thesame prerequisite requirements or obtainapproval of the instructor. See the fee schedulefor charges. Financial aid is not available foraudited courses.B. The prescribed time limits are for full-semesterclasses. Time limits for classes which meetfewer than sixteen (16) weeks are adjustedaccordingly and appear in the “ImportantDeadlines for Students.”6. Important Deadlines for Students (see page 16)COLLEGE ENVIRONMENTSexual Harassment Policy for Employeesand Students (A.R. 2.4.4) (see also 5.1.8)The policy of the Maricopa County CommunityCollege District (MCCCD) is to provide an educational,employment, and business environment free of sexualviolence, unwelcome sexual advances, requestsfor sexual favors, and other verbal and/or physicalconduct or communications constituting sexualharassment as defined and otherwise prohibited bystate and federal law.Each college has designated its vice president forstudent affairs as Title IX Coordinator, and studentcomplaints of sexual harassment must be reportedto him or her. Sexual violence against employees isprohibited by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.Employee complaints of sexual harassment must bereported to the District Office of Equity, Opportunity,and Engagement.Sexual harassment is unwelcome, verbal, or physicalconduct of a sexual nature that is sufficientlysevere, persistent, or pervasive that it alters workingconditions and creates a hostile environment foremployees, or that it unreasonably interferes with,limits, or deprives a student of the ability to participatein or benefit from any MCCCD educational programor activity. The unwelcome behavior may be basedon power differentials, the creation of a hostileenvironment, or retaliation for sexual harassmentcomplaints. Sexual harassment by and between,employees; students; employees and students;and campus visitors and students or employees, isprohibited by this policy.Due process is afforded any employee, student, orvisitor accused of sexual harassment. On receipt ofa complaint, an immediate preliminary investigationwill be conducted to determine if there is reasonablecause to believe the nondiscrimination policy hasbeen violated. If so, then a prompt, thorough, impartialinvestigation will be conducted by the authorizedadministrator. If the final decision is that sexualharassment occurred, the college will take immediateaction to eliminate the hostile environment, preventits recurrence, and address its effects. Remediesfor the complainant will also be sought. Violationsof this policy may result in disciplinary action up toandincluding termination for employees; sanctionsup to and including suspension or expulsion forstudents; and appropriate sanctions against campusvisitors. This policy applies to prohibited conduct thatoccurs both on and off campus and covers students,employees, and visitors.This policy is subject to constitutionally protectedspeech rights and principles of academic freedom.Questions about this policy may be directed to theMCCCD EEO/Affirmative Action Office.


100 MCCCD Administrative Regulations 2013-14Examples of Policy Violations (A.R. 5.1.9)It shall be a violation of MCCCD’s Sexual HarassmentPolicy for any employee, student or campus visitor to:1. Make unwelcome sexual advances to anotheremployee, student or campus visitor;2. Make unwelcome requests for sexual favors,whether or not accompanied by promisesor threats with regard to the employment oracademic relationship;3. Engage in verbal or physical conduct of asexual nature with another employee, studentor campus visitor, that may threaten orinsinuate, either explicitly or implicitly, that theindividual’s submission to, or rejection of, thesexual advances will in any way:A. Influence any personnel decisionregarding that person’s employment,evaluation, wages, advancement, assignedduties, shifts or any other condition ofemployment or career development; orB. Influence his or her grades, participationin or access to academic programs,class standing or other educationalopportunities;4. Engage in verbal or physical conduct of asexual nature that:A. Has the purpose or effect of substantiallyinterfering with an employee’s ability to dohis or her job; or with a student’s ability tolearn or participate in a class; orB. Creates an intimidating, hostile or offensivework or academic environment;5. Commit any act of sexual assault or publicsexual indecency against any employee orstudent whether on MCCCD property orin connection with any MCCCD-sponsoredactivity;6. Continue to express sexual interest in anotheremployee, student or campus visitor afterbeing informed or on notice that the interestis unwelcome (reciprocal attraction is notconsidered sexual harassment);7. Engage in other sexually harassing conductin the workplace or academic environment,whether physical or verbal, including, but notlimited to, commentary about an individual’sbody (or body parts), sexually degradingwords to describe an individual, sexuallyoffensive comments, sexually suggestivelanguage or jokes, innuendoes, and sexuallysuggestive objects, books, magazines,computer software, photographs, cartoons orpictures. Other sexual misconduct may includesexual exploitation, stalking, and gender-basedbullying.8. Treat a complainant or witness of sexualharassment in a manner that could dissuadea reasonable person from pursuingor participating in the complaint andinvestigation.Additional Policy Violations (A.R. 5.1.10)Supervisors, managers, administrators and facultywho disregard or fail to report allegations of sexualharassment (whether reported by the person who isthe subject of the sexual harassment or a witness) arein violation of this policy.Responsibility for Policy Enforcement (A.R.5.1.11)Employees and students must avoid offensive orinappropriate sexual and/or sexually harassingbehavior at work or in the academic environment.Employees and students are encouraged (but notrequired) to inform perceived offenders of thispolicy that the commentary/conduct is offensive andunwelcome.Complaints (A.R. 5.1.12)1. EmployeesEmployees who experience sexual harassment atwork (by a supervisor, co-employee, student orvisitor) are urged to report such conduct to thedirect attention of their supervisor, their collegepresident or to the Maricopa Community CollegesEqual Employment Opportunity/Affirmative ActionOffice. If the complaint involves the employee’ssupervisor or someone in the direct line ofsupervision, or if the employee for any reason isuncomfortable in dealing with his or her immediatesupervisor, the employee may go directly to theMaricopa Community Colleges EEO/AA Office.2. StudentsStudents who experience sexual harassmentor sexual assault in a school’s education programand activities (by a faculty member, administrator,campus visitor or other student) are urged toreport such conduct to the Title IX Coordinator,who is the vice president of student affairs at eachcollege. A student may also contact the MCCCDEEO/AA Office to obtain the name and phonenumber of the college official designated torespond to sexual harassment complaints.3. General - Applicable to Both Employees andStudentsA. Complaints will be investigated according toprocedures established by the MCCCD EEO/AA Office. Copies of these procedures maybe obtained in the college president’s office,Office of the Vice President of Student Affairsand the MCCCD EEO/AA Office.B. The college/center/MCCCD will investigateall complaints in a prompt, thorough, andimpartial manner.C. Where investigationconfirms the allegations, appropriateresponsive action will be taken by the college/center/MCCCD.


Graduation Requirements101Confidentiality (A.R. 5.1.13)Records will be maintained in a confidential manner tothe extent permitted by law and insofar as they do notinterfere with MCCCD’s legal obligation to investigateand resolve issues of sexual harassment.Violations of Law (A.R. 5.1.14)An employee or student may be accountable forsexual harassment under applicable local, state,and/or federal law, as well as under MCCCD policy.Disciplinary action by MCCCD may proceed whilecriminal proceedings are pending and will not besubject to challenge on the grounds that criminalcharges involving the same incident have beendismissed or reduced.False Statements Prohibited (A.R. 5.1.15)Any individual who knowingly provides falseinformation pursuant to filing a discrimination chargeor during the investigation of a discrimination charge,will be subject to appropriate disciplinary action, up toand including, employment termination or academicdismissal.Retaliation Prohibited (A.R. 5.1.16)Retaliation against an employee or student for filinga sexual harassment complaint, or participating inthe investigation of a complaint, is strictly prohibited.MCCCD will take appropriate disciplinary action, up toand including employment termination or academicdismissal if retaliation occurs.GRADUATION REQUIREMENTSGeneral Graduation Requirements(A.R. 2.3.9)Note: Also see Catalog Under Which a Student Graduates(A.R. 2.2.5)All students are required to complete the degree and/or certificate requirements as approved by the MCCCDGoverning Board. The college reserves the right tomake necessary course and program changes in orderto meet current educational standards. In addition,students must:1. Be credited in the Admissions and Records Office/Office of Student Enrollment with not fewer than:60 semester credit units in courses numbered100 or above for the Associate in Arts degree,Associate in Science degree, and Associate inGeneral Studies degree; 60 semester credit unitsfor the Associate in Applied Science degree; 62semester credits for the Associate in Businessdegrees. For specific certificate programs, becredited with not fewer than the minimumtotal of credit units required for the certificateprogram. Students not continuously enrolled, asoutlined in the Catalog Under Which a StudentGraduates policy, must satisfy current graduationrequirements.2. Have earned a minimum of 12 semester credit unitstoward the degree or certificate at the districtcollege granting the degree or certificate. The 12hours in the AAS degree curricula may be in theRequired Courses area and/or Restricted Electivescourses. Courses from the General Education Coreand Distribution area are excluded. In cases wherethe certificate requires fewer than 12 credit units, aminimum of six credit units must be completed atthe college awarding the certificate. The minimumof six credit hours in the certificate or degreecurricula may be in the Required Courses areaand/or the Restricted Electives. Courses from theGeneral Education Core and Distribution areasare excluded. Shared Programs are programsoffered at multiple colleges but not available at allcolleges. The requirements are identical at all thecolleges offering the program. A shared programrequires a minimum of six credit hours from thetotal program requirements to be completed witha grade of “C” or better at the college awardingthe certificate or degree. The exception is theNursing program. For those shared programswith less than six credit hours, the total hours forthe program must be completed at the collegeawarding the certificate.3. Have filed an application for the degree orcertificate with the Admissions and RecordsOffice/Office of Student Enrollment Serviceson the date determined by the college/center.Students must apply for graduation from thecollege where they have successfully completedBlock 4 of the Associate in Applied Science inNursing.


102 Graduation Requirements4. Have a minimum cumulative grade point averageof 2.000 at the college granting the degree.5. Have a minimum cumulative grade point averageof 2.000 in all courses used to fulfill degreerequirements. Some specific programs havehigher grade requirements. It is the student’sresponsibility to be aware of these programrequirements.6. Have removed, thirty (30) days after theanticipated graduation date, all deficiencies onthe record to use those courses toward programcompletion.7. Have removed any indebtedness to any MCCCDcollege /center.8. Have paid required degree or certificateapplication fee.See fee schedule for charges.See Graduation with Honors for information on honorsdesignation.Certificates/DegreesThe Maricopa Community Colleges offer Certificates ofCompletion as well as Associate Degrees, one of whichis conferred on each student who has completed aprogram of study. These certificates and degreesare as follows: (1) Certificate of Completion (CareerProgram Specified); (2) Academic Certificate; (3)General Education Certificate; (4) Associate in Arts;(5) Associate in Science; (6) Associate in Business; (7)Associate in General Studies; (8) Associate in AppliedScience (Career Program Specified).All candidates for a degree and/or certificate mustcomplete the General Graduation Requirements asapproved by the MCCCD Governing Board.All students are urged to meet with a faculty advisor,program advisor or counselor as soon as possible todetermine which program meets their needs and toplan their course of study.Licensure DisclaimerMaricopa Community Colleges courses and programsprepare students for entry into a variety of professions.Many of these professions require that a personhold an occupational license or certificate in orderto work in a particular field. Typically, a person mustmeet certain legal requirements before obtainingsuch a license or certificate. These requirements areestablished by county, state or federal agencies, andoften are based on a person’s character, or whetherthe person has been convicted of a criminal offense.It is possible for a student who has obtained adegree or certificate from a community college tobe denied the right to work in a particular professionafter completing the degree or certificate becauseof concerns over the student’s character or criminalbackground. Any student preparing to enter a field forwhich a professional license or certificate is requiredis strongly advised to consult with the appropriategovernment agency that issues such credentials. Thatagency can provide the student complete informationabout any requirements the law imposes for working ina particular occupation.MCCCD General Education StatementThe general education core of the program of studyfor an associate degree or a certificate helps studentsdevelop a greater understanding of themselves, oftheir relationship with others, and of the richly diverseworld in which they live. The general educationexperience provides students with opportunities toexplore broad areas of commonly held knowledgeand prepares them to contribute to society throughpersonal, social, and professional interactions withothers. General education fosters students’ personaldevelopment by opening them to new directions,perspectives, and processes.Through its general education requirements, theMaricopa County Community College District iscommitted to helping students develop qualitiesand skills that will serve them throughout their lives.General education opportunities encourage studentsto:1. Build self-awareness, self-respect, and selfconfidence2. Recognize and respect the beliefs, traditions,abilities, and customs of all people and all cultures3. Consider the local, global, and environmentalimpacts of personal, professional, and socialdecisions and actions4. Access, evaluate, analyze, synthesize, and useinformation wisely5. Communicate effectively personally, socially, andprofessionally6. Think critically, make informed decisions, solveproblems, and implement decisions7. Consider the ethical implications of their choices8. Value the learning process throughout their lives9. Integrate and connect ideas and events in ahistorical perspective, and see relationshipsamong the past, the present, and the future10. Develop a personal sense of aesthetics11. Use technological resources appropriately andproductively12. Work cooperatively and respectfully with others toserve their communitiesThe general education experience at MCCCD iscomposed of specific elements across the curriculumdesigned to provide the learner with essentialknowledge and skills:• Communication• Arts and Humanities• Numeracy• Scientific Inquiry in the Natural and Social Sciences• Information Literacy• Problem-Solving and Critical Thinking• Cultural DiversityGeneral Education Designations (example:(FYC), [SB], [HU], etc.)Effective fall 2000 the course evaluation and/orgeneral education designation as listed in the ArizonaCEG (Course Equivalency Guide) within the ArizonaCourse Applicability System (AZCAS) is valid forthe term in which the student is awarded credit onthe transcript. A course evaluation and/or general


Graduation Requirements103education designation may be subject to change.Given that curriculum is dynamic at both MCCCD andthe institutions to which MCCCD students transfer,students have the option to petition for generaleducation evaluations and/or general educationdesignations.The college reserves the right to make necessarycourse and program changes in order to meet currenteducational standards.Catalog Under Which a Student Graduates(A.R. 2.2.5)Students maintaining continuous enrollment at anypublic Arizona community college or university maygraduate according to the requirements of the catalogin effect at the time of initial enrollment or accordingto the requirements of any single catalog in effectduring subsequent terms of continuous enrollment.Students may maintain continuous enrollmentwhether attending a single public community collegeor university in Arizona or transferring among publicinstitutions in Arizona while pursuing their degrees.1. A semester in which a student earns course creditwill be counted toward continuous enrollment.Non-credit courses, audited courses, failedcourses, or courses from which the studentwithdraws do not count toward the determinationof continuous enrollment for catalog purposes.EXAMPLE AAdmitted & EarnedCourse Credit at aPublic CommunityCollege or UniversityContinued at a PublicCommunityCollege Transferred toa UniversityEXAMPLE BAdmitted & EarnedCourse Credit at aPublic CommunityCollege or UniversityEnrolled But Earned AllWs, Zs, or FsEnrolled in AuditCourses OnlyNonattendanceTransferred to aUniversityFall ‘05 (Active)Spring ‘06, Fall ‘06(Active)Spring ‘07 (2005or Any SubsequentCatalog)Fall ‘02 (Active)Spring ‘03 (Inactive)Fall ‘03 (Inactive)Spring ‘04 (Inactive)Fall ‘04 (2004 or AnySubsequent Catalog)2. Students who do not meet the minimumenrollment standard stipulated in No. 1 duringthree consecutive semesters (fall/spring) and theintervening summer term* at any public Arizonacommunity college or university are no longerconsidered continuously enrolled, and must meetrequirements of the public Arizona communitycollege or university catalog in effect at the timethey are readmitted or of any single catalog ineffect during subsequent terms of continuousenrollment after readmission.EXAMPLE AAdmitted & EarnedCourse Credit at aPublic CommunityCollege or UniversityNonattendanceReadmitted & EarnedCourse Credit at aPublic CommunityCollegeTransferred to aUniversityEXAMPLE BAdmitted & EarnedCourse Credit at aPublic CommunityCollege or UniversityNonattendanceReadmitted & EarnedCourse Credit at aPublic CommunityCollegeNonattendanceTransferred to aUniversityFall ‘02 (Active)Spring ‘03, Fall ‘03,Spring ‘04 (Inactive)Fall ‘04 (Active)Spring ‘05 (2004or Any SubsequentCatalog)Fall ‘02 (Active)Spring ‘03 (Inactive)Fall ‘03, Spring ‘04(Inactive)Summer ‘03 (Active)Fall ‘04 (2002 or AnySubsequent Catalog)*Students are not obligated to enroll and earncourse credit during summer terms, but summerenrollment may be used to maintain continuousenrollment status.


104 Graduation Requirements3. Students admitted or readmitted to a publicArizona community college or university duringa summer term must follow the requirements ofthe catalog in effect the following fall semester orof any single catalog in effect during subsequentterms of continuous enrollment.EXAMPLEAdmitted & EarnedCourse Credit at aPublic CommunityCollege or UniversityContinued at a PublicCommunity CollegeNonattendanceReadmitted & EarnedCourse Credit at aPublic CommunityCollegeTransferred to aUniversitySummer ‘04 (Active)Fall ‘04, Spring ’05(Active)Fall ‘05 (Inactive)Spring ‘06 (Active)Summer ‘06 (2004or Any SubsequentCatalog)4. Students transferring among Arizona public highereducation institutions must meet the admissionrequirements, residency requirements, and allcurricular and academic requirements of thedegree-granting institution.The college reserves the right to make necessarycourse and program changes in order to meetcurrent educational standards.Transcripts for Transfer (A.R. 2.3.10)The transcript is issued upon written request only.Those students who want to transfer to otherinstitutions of higher education, including otherMaricopa Community Colleges, must request theirtranscript be sent from the Admissions and RecordsOffice/Office of Student Enrollment Services. However,transcripts may be shared within the MaricopaCommunity College District without the writtenrequest of the student in compliance with FERPA.Official transcripts will not be issued to studentshaving outstanding debts to any of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges. The release of transcripts isgoverned by the guidance of the Family EducationRights and Privacy Act of 1974 (see Records Policy inthe Student Rights and Responsibilities section of thismanual). There is no charge for unofficial transcripts,or for official transcripts sent between MaricopaCommunity Colleges. See the Tuition and FeeSchedule for charges for other official transcripts.


DEGREES STUDENT HANDBOOK& CERTIFICATESSTUDENT HANDBOOK


106 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014ARIZONA GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM (AGEC) – A, B, SThe Maricopa County Community College DistrictArizona General Education Curriculum (MCCCDAGEC) is a 35-38 semester-credit general educationcertificate that fulfills lower-division general educationrequirements for students planning to transfer toany Arizona public community college or university.Generally, the MCCCD AGEC transfers as a blockwithout loss of credit.In most cases, all courses used to satisfy the MCCCDAGEC will apply to graduation requirements of theuniversity major for which the AGEC was designed.For students planning to pursue an associate degreeor transfer to an Arizona public community college oruniversity, the AGEC A is a component of the MCCCDAssociate in Arts, the AGEC B is a component of theMCCCD Associate in Business, and the AGEC S is acomponent of the MCCCD Associate in Science.Purpose of the AGECsThere are three types of MCCCD AGECs. They arethe AGEC A, the AGEC B, and the AGEC S. Designedto articulate with different academic majors, theirrequirements vary accordingly. Additional informationon academic majors at the Arizona public universitiescan be accessed via the following website: www.aztransfer.com1. The AGEC A is designed to satisfyrequirements in many liberal arts majors aswell as other majors that articulate with theAssociate in Arts (e.g., social sciences, finearts, humanities). AGEC A requires a minimumof college mathematics or college algebra tosatisfy the Mathematics [MA] requirement.AGEC A Mathematics requirement is lessstringent than the AGEC B and AGEC S.AGEC A and AGEC B Natural Sciencesrequirements are less stringent than AGEC S.Academic Policies that Govern the AGEC A, B, S:• Requires 35-38 semester credits in coursesnumbered 100 and above to be completed with agrade of “C” or better. Credit units transferredfrom outside of the district need to be at agrade of “C” or better. A grade of “C” equals 2.0on a 4.0 grading scale or equivalent; A minimumof 60 semester credits in courses numbered 100and above to be completed with a grade of “C” orbetter; On an exception basis, P-grades maybe allowed in the AGEC for credit transferred ifdocumentation collected by the communitycollege indicates that the P-grade issued was theonly option for the student and the P-grade is a“C” or better. The P-grade exception does notapply to credits awarded by AGEC granting/receiving institutions;• Credit received through prior learning assessmentor credit by evaluation is transferable within theMaricopa Community Colleges but is notnecessarily transferable to other colleges anduniversities. No more than 20 semester credithours may be applied toward AGEC;• Uses the following policies to help studentscomplete the required Core and Awareness Areaswithout exceeding the 35-38 semester credits1. Courses can satisfy a Core area and one ortwo Awareness areas simultaneously.2. A course cannot be used to satisfy more thanone Core area requirement in the AGEC A and B.3. A course can be used to satisfy the L and SBor L and HU requirements simultaneously inthe Core area for the AGEC S.• Follows the general education policy below:2. The AGEC B is designed to satisfyrequirements in business majors that articulatewith the Associate in Business. AGEC Brequires a minimum of brief calculus to satisfythe Mathematics [MA] requirement.3. The AGEC S is designed to satisfyrequirements in majors with more prescriptivemathematics and mathematics-based sciencerequirements. AGEC S articulates with theAssociate in Science. AGEC S requires aminimum of the first course in a calculussequence to satisfy the Mathematics [MA]requirement, and a minimum of eight creditsof either university chemistry, universityphysics or general biology to satisfy theNatural Sciences [SQ/SG] requirement. Inaddition, students must select six to eightadditional credits of math and/or scienceappropriate to the major.General Education Designations (example:(FYC), [SB], [HU], etc.)Effective fall 2000 the course evaluation and/or thegeneral education designation as listed in the ArizonaCEG (Course Equivalency Guide) within the ArizonaCourse Applicability System (AZCAS) is valid forthe term in which the student is awarded credit onthe transcript. A course evaluation and/or generaleducation designation may be subject to change.Given that curriculum is dynamic at both MCCCD andthe institutions to which MCCCD students transfer,students have the option to petition for courseevaluations and/or general education designations.• Require courses that transfer as equivalentcourses, departmental elective credit (XXXXDEC),or general elective credit (Elective) at all Arizonapublic universities according to the Arizona CEG(Course Equivalency Guide). The course evaluationand/or general education designation as listed inAZCAS is valid for the term in which the student isawarded credit on the transcript;+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014107• Require that a minimum of 12 semester creditsof course work be taken at any of the MCCCDcolleges;• Include both courses and their modular equivalents,either the course or the modular equivalents willsatisfy the AGEC;• Accept one of the courses that is cross-referencedwith other courses;• Provide for exemption from Arizona universityadmission requirements for: Students who completethe AGEC A, AGEC B, or AGEC S with a minimum2.5 on a 4.0=A scale, or students who completean associate or higher degree from a regionallyaccredited post-secondary institution with a minimum2.0 on a 4.0=A scale for Arizona residents and aminimum 2.5 on a 4.0=A scale for non-residents.AGEC RequirementsThe 35-38 semester credits required for each of thethree AGECs follow. View specific course informationvia the following website: www.maricopa.edu/academic/ccta/ by clicking on the statewide AGECicon. The AGEC A, B, S, and AGEC Matrix identify thecourses in alpha-order by prefix as well as the CoreAreas and Awareness Areas where the course willapply.The list identifies the courses in alpha-order by prefixas well as the different Core Areas and AwarenessAreas where the course will apply.CreditsA. Core Areas: ...................................................................351. First-Year Composition (FYC) .............................62. Literacy and Critical Inquiry [L] .....................0-3AGEC A & AGEC B: Select a course thatsatisfies the [L] requirement (3)AGEC S: Recommend selecting a course thatsatisfies (L and SB) or (L and HU),or (L and COM), or (L and CRE101 requirementssimultaneously.3. Mathematical Studies [MA/CS] ......................4-6The Mathematics [MA] requirement differs forAGEC A, AGEC B, and AGEC S.To complete the Mathematical Studiesrequirement for AGEC A and AGEC B, selectone course to satisfy Mathematics [MA], and asecond course fromComputer/Statistics/Quantitative Applications[CS].AGEC S does not require the [CS] area.AGEC A requiresa. Mathematics [MA] (3 credits) AND(Requires a course in college mathematics(MAT142) or college algebra (MAT 150, MAT151, MAT152) or pre calculus (MAT 187) orany other mathematics course designatedwith the MA general education value andfor which college algebra is a pre-requisite.)b. Computer/Statistics/QuantitativeApplications [CS] (3 credits)AGEC B requiresa. Mathematics [MA] (3 credits) AND(Requires a course in brief calculus(MAT212) or a higher level mathematicscourse(MAT220 or MAT221 or any course forwhich these courses are prerequisites).b. Computer/Statistics/QuantitativeApplications [CS] (3 credits)CIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystemsAGEC S requiresa. Mathematics [MA] (4 credits) ANDRequires a calculus course (MAT220 orMAT221) ORany mathematics course for which MAT220or MAT221 are prerequisites.4. Humanities and Fine Arts [HU] ...........................6AGEC A and AGEC B: Students areencouraged to choose courses from more thanone discipline for a total of six semestercredits.AGEC S: Recommend selecting a course thatsatisfies (L and HU) requirementssimultaneously.5. Social and Behavioral Sciences [SB] .................6AGEC A and AGEC B: Students are encouragedto choose courses from more than onediscipline for a total of six semester credits.AGEC S: Recommend selecting a course thatsatisfies (L and SB) requirementssimultaneously.6. Natural Sciences [SQ/SG] ....................................8To complete the Natural Sciences requirement:AGEC A and AGEC B require four (4) semestercredits of [SQ] and four (4) semester creditsof [SG] for a total of eight (8) semestercredits, OR eight (8) semester credits of [SQ].Students cannot take eight (8) semestercredits of [SG] to meet the Natural Sciencesrequirement.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


108 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014The Natural Sciences requirement differs forAGEC S. AGEC S requires eight (8) semestercredits of either university chemistry or eight(8) semester credits of university physics oreight (8) semester credits of general biologyappropriate to the major.The lecture course(s) selected for NaturalSciences must include or be accompaniedby the corresponding laboratory course. Thelecture and corresponding laboratory course(s)may carry separate credit. Students shouldconsult with an advisor for appropriate courseselection. Students should also access the AZCourse Equivalency Guide (CEG) within theAZ Course Applicability System (AZCAS) forinformation on equivalencies.7. Subject Options (Subject based on major)(AGEC S) .............................................................. 6-8Students completing AGEC S, through carefulselection of courses that meet theother major or pre-requisite requirements forScience degrees, will meet this requirement.Using a transfer guide, select Mathematicscourses above Calculus, and/or Sciencecourses from: Astronomy, Biology, Botany,Chemistry, Environmental Science, Geology,Physical Geography, Physics, Zoology.B. Awareness Areas:Students must satisfy two Awareness areas:Cultural Diversity in United States [C] andeither Global Awareness [G] or HistoricalAwareness [H]. However, it is not necessary forstudents to exceed thirty-five to thirty-eightsemester credits to complete any of the threeMCCCD AGECs because courses can satisfy aCore area and one or two Awareness areassimultaneously. Therefore, no additional semestercredits are required to satisfy the two Awarenessareas.Cultural Diversity in the United States [C]ANDGlobal Awareness [G]ORHistorical Awareness [H]AGEC Area Requirements Descriptions/DefinitionsCORE AREASFirst-Year Composition (FYC)Courses must be completed with a grade of “C” orbetter in the First-Year Composition Core area. Coursesmust emphasize skills necessary for college-levellearning and writing skills.Literacy and Critical Inquiry [L]Courses must be completed with a grade of “C” orbetter in the Literacy and Critical Inquiry Core area.In the [L] course, typically at the sophomore level,students gather, interpret, and evaluate evidence andexpress their findings in writing or speech. This courseincludes a series of graded written or spoken formalassignments.For AGEC S, students will select a course that satisfiesboth Literacy and Social & Behavioral Sciences orLiteracy and Humanities and Fine Arts requirementssimultaneously.Literacy is defined broadly as communicativecompetence in written and oral discourse; criticalinquiry is defined as the gathering, interpreting, andevaluating of evidence. Building on the proficiencyattained in traditional First-Year Composition courses,the Literacy and Critical Inquiry requirement helpsstudents sustain and extend their ability to reasoncritically and communicate clearly through language.Mathematical StudiesCourses must be completed with a grade of “C” orbetter in the Mathematical Studies Core Area. Onecourse must be selected from Mathematics [MA].In AGEC A and AGEC B, a second course must beselected from Computer/Statistics/QuantitativeApplications [CS].The Mathematical Studies requirement is intended toensure that students have skill in basic mathematics,can use mathematical analysis in their chosen fields,and can understand how computers makemathematical analysis more powerful and efficient.First, the acquisition of essential skill in basicmathematics requires the student to complete a coursein college algebra or to demonstrate a higher level ofskill by completing a course for which college algebrais a prerequisite.Second, the real-world application of mathematicalreasoning requires the student to take a course instatistics or the use of quantitative analysis to solveproblems of substance.Third, the use of the computer to assist in seriousanalytical work is required. Computers are widely usedto study the implications of social decisions or tomodel physical systems.• Mathematics [MA] AGEC AThe AGEC A Mathematics Core area requires acourse in college mathematics, college algebra,pre-calculus, or any other mathematics course forwhich college algebra is a prerequisite.• Mathematics [MA] AGEC BThe AGEC B Mathematics Core area requires acourse in Brief Calculus or a higher levelmathematics course.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014109• Mathematics [MA] AGEC SThe AGEC S Mathematics Core area requires thefirst course in the calculus sequence or anymathematics course for which that course is aprerequisite.Computer/Statistics/Quantitative Applications[CS]AGEC A, B [CS] requires: courses that emphasizethe use of statistics or other mathematical methodsin the interpretation of data and in describing andunderstanding quantitative relationships, courses thatinvolve the use of computer programming languagesor software in the development of skills in analyticalthinking.AGEC B specifies CIS105 as the course that meets the[CS] requirement.Humanities and Fine Arts [HU]Courses must be completed with a grade of “C” orbetter in the Humanities and Fine Arts Core area.Students are encouraged to choose coursework frommore than one discipline. The Humanities and Fine ArtsCore area enables students to broaden and deepentheir consideration of basic human values and theirinterpretation of the experiences of human beings.The humanities are concerned with questions of humanexistence and the universality of human life, questionsof meaning and the nature of thinking and knowing,and questions of moral, aesthetic, and other humanvalues. The humanities investigate these questions inboth the present and the past and make use ofphilosophy, foreign languages, linguistics andcommunications studies, religious studies, literature,and fine arts.The fine arts constitute the artist’s creative deliberationabout reality, meaning, knowledge, and values.Social and Behavioral Sciences [SB]Courses must be completed with a grade of “C” orbetter in the Social and Behavioral Sciences Core area.Students are encouraged to choose course work frommore than one discipline.The Social and Behavioral Sciences Core area providesscientific methods of inquiry and empirical knowledgeabout human behavior, both within society and withinindividuals. The forms of study may be cultural,economic, geographic, historical, linguistic, political,psychological, or social. The courses in this areaaddress the challenge of understanding the diversenatures of individuals and cultural groups who livetogether in a world of diminishing economic, linguistic,military, political, and social distance.Natural Sciences [SQ/SG]Courses must be completed with a grade of “C” orbetter in the Natural Sciences Core area.Courses in the Natural Sciences Core area help thestudent to develop an appreciation of the scopeand limitations of scientific capability to contributeto the quality of society. This Core area emphasizesknowledge of methods of scientific inquiry andmastery of basic scientific principles and concepts,in particular those that relate to matter and energy inliving and non-living systems. Firsthand exposure toscientific phenomena in the laboratory is importantin developing and understanding the concepts,principles, and vocabulary of science. At least one ofthe two laboratory courses required in the NaturalSciences Core area must include an introduction to thefundamental behavior of matter and energy in physicalor biological systems.• Natural Sciences [SQ] A & BThe AGEC A and B Natural Sciences Core arearequires one laboratory course in naturalsciences that includes a substantialintroduction to the fundamental behavior ofmatter and energy in physical or biologicalsystems.• Natural Sciences [SG] A & BThe AGEC A and B Natural Sciences Core arearequires a second laboratory course in the naturalsciences, for example, from anthropology,astronomy, biology, chemistry, experimentalpsychology, geology, microbiology, physicalanthropology, physical geography, physics, plantbiology• Natural Sciences SThe AGEC S Natural Sciences Core area requireseight semester credits of either university chemistryor eight semester credits of university physicsor eight semester credits of general biologyappropriate to the major.SQ = Natural Science-QuantitativeSG = Natural Science-GeneralSubject Options (for AGEC S)Courses in the Subject Options area help the student tobe prepared for specific majors in science.Students completing AGEC S, through careful selectionof courses that meet the other major or prerequisiterequirements for Science degree, will meet thisrequirement. Using a transfer guide, courses would beselected from Mathematics courses above Calculus,and/or Science courses from: Astronomy, Biology,Botany, Chemistry, Environmental Science, Geology,Physical Geography, Physics, Zoology.Awareness AreasStudents must satisfy two Awareness areas: CulturalDiversity in U.S. and either Global Awareness orHistorical Awareness. Courses can satisfy a Core areaand one or two Awareness areas simultaneously.Therefore, no additional semester credits are requiredto satisfy the two Awareness areas.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


110 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014Cultural Diversity in the United States [C]The contemporary “culture” of the United Statesinvolves the complex interplay of many differentcultures that exist side by side in various statesof harmony and conflict. U.S. history involvesthe experiences not only of different groups ofEuropean immigrants and their descendants,but also of diverse groups of American Indians,Hispanic Americans, African Americans and AsianAmericans—all of whom played significant rolesin the development of contemporary culture andtogether shape the future of the United States.At the same time, the recognition that gender,class, and religious differences cut across alldistinctions of race and ethnicity offers an evenricher variety of perspectives from which to viewone. Awareness of cultural diversity and its multiplesources can illuminate the collective past, present,and future and can help to foster greater mutualunderstanding and respect.The objective of the Cultural Diversity arearequirement is to promote awareness of andappreciation for cultural diversity within thecontemporary United States. This is accomplishedthrough the study of the cultural, social, or scientificcontributions of women and minority groups,examination of their experiences in the UnitedStates, or exploration of successful or unsuccessfulinteractions between and among cultural groups.Global Awareness [G]Human organizations and relationships haveevolved from being family and village centeredto the modern global interdependence thatis apparent in many disciplines—for example,contemporary art, business, engineering, music,and the natural and social sciences. Many seriouslocal and national problems are world issues thatrequire solutions which exhibit mutuality andreciprocity. These problems occur in a wide varietyof activities, such as food supply, ecology, healthcare delivery, language planning, informationexchange, economic and social developments, law,technology transfer, and even philosophy and thearts. The Global Awareness Area recognizes theneed for an understanding of the values, elements,and social processes of cultures other than theculture of the United States. The Global AwarenessArea includes courses that recognize the nature ofother contemporary cultures and the relationshipof the American cultural system to generic humangoals and welfare.3. Studies of international relationships,particularly those in which cultural changeis facilitated by such factors as social andeconomic development, education, andthe transfer of technology; and4. Studies of cultural interrelationships ofglobal scope such as the globalinterdependence produced by problemsof world ecology.Historical Awareness [H]The Historical Awareness Area option in therequirements aims to develop a knowledge of thepast that can be useful in shaping the present andfuture. Because historical forces and traditionshave created modern life and lie just beneathits surface, historical awareness is an aid in theanalysis of present-day problems. Also, becausethe historical past is a source of social and nationalidentity, historical study can produce interculturalunderstanding by tracing cultural differencesto their origins. Even the remote past may haveinstructive analogies for the present.The Historical Awareness Area consists of coursesthat are historical in method and content. In thisarea, the term “history” designates a sequence ofpast events or a narrative whose intent or effect isto represent such a sequence.The requirement presumes that these are humanevents and that history includes all that has beenfelt, thought, imagined, said, and done by humanbeings. History is present in the languages, art,music, literature, philosophy, religion, and thenatural sciences, as well as in the social sciencetraditionally called history.Courses that satisfy the global awareness optionin the requirements are of one or more of thefollowing types:1. Area studies that are concerned with anexamination of culture-specific elements ofa region of the world;2. The study of a non-English language;+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014111ASSOCIATE IN GENERAL STUDIES (AGS) DEGREEThe Maricopa County Community College DistrictAssociate in General Studies (AGS) degree isrecommended for students whose educational goalsrequire flexibility. The AGS allows students to chooseany elective courses numbered 100 or above tocomplete the degree. Therefore, this degree may beless appropriate for students who intend to transfer toa baccalaureate-granting institution.Students who demonstrate skills comparable to thosein Critical Reading and/or Mathematics and/orComputer Usage may substitute acceptable electivecourses to satisfy the total credits required for thedegree.Academic Policies That Govern the Associate inGeneral Studies Degree:• requires a minimum of 60 semester credits incourses numbered 100 and above.• AGS degree requirements follow with the use of adiagonal character (/) between course numbersto signify options. An asterisk (*) following thecourse number defines requirements with aneffective begin term of spring;Degree RequirementsGENERAL EDUCATION CORE(16 credits - grade of “C” or better)First-Year Composition (6 credits)ENG English [101/107] & [102/108]Oral Communication (3 credits)COM Communication 100/100AA & 100AB &100AC/110/110AA &110AB & 110AC/225/230Critical Reading (3 credits)CRE Critical Reading 101/Equivalent asindicated by assessmentMathematics (3 credits)MAT Mathematics102/120/121/122/122AA/122AB/122AC/126/140/141/142/150/151/151AA/151AB/151AC/151AD/152/156/172/182/187/206/212/213/220/221/230/231/240/241/261/262/276/277equivalent courseSatisfactory completion of a higher levelMathematics course.• requires grades as listed for specific areas suchas the General Education Core where a minimumgrade of “C” is required. Courses applied to otherareas may be completed with a minimum grade of“D”;• uses the following policies for course(s) satisfyingmultiple program areas;1. A course can simultaneously satisfy oneCore area and one Distribution area. Coursesthat meet this criterion are bold print andunderscored in the Core areas and Distributionareas.2. A course cannot satisfy more than one Corearea, even if it is approved for more than oneCore area.3. A course cannot satisfy more than oneDistribution area, even if it is approved for morethan one Distribution area.• follows the graduation policies within the generalcatalog;• includes both courses and their modular equivalents;either the course or the modular equivalents willsatisfy the Associate in General Studies;• accepts one of the courses that is cross-referencedwith other courses;Computer Usage (1 credit)Computer-related course or demonstration ofcomparable computer skills. Additional coursesmay be approved by individual colleges. Studentsshould contact their advisor for college-specificcourses satisfying the requirement.ACC Accounting 115ADAAdvertising Arts 169/170/170AA/170AB/173/173AA/173AB/173AC/175/175AA/175AB/177/177AA/177AB/any 180 modules/183/83AA/183AB/183AC/283/283AA/283AB/283AC/289/289AA/289AB/289ACAJS Administration of Justice Studies 205AMS Automated Manufacturing System 150ARC Architecture 243/244/245ARTArt 100/169/170/170AA/170AB/173/173AA/173AB/173AC/175/175AA/175AB/177/177AA/177AB/179/179AA/179AB/any 180 module/183/183AA/183AB/183AC/283/283AA/283AB/283AC/289/289AA/289AB/289ACBIO Biology 283BPCBusiness-Personal Computers Any BPCCourse(s)CFS Child/Family Studies 180CIS Computer Information Systems Any CISCourse(s) (except 162,162AC, 169, 183AA, 217AM, 259, 262)CSCComputer Science Any CSC Course(s)(except 200, 200AA,200AB, 210, 210AA, 210AB)CTR Court Reporting 101/102DFTDrafting Technology any 105 module/251/any 254 module/256AA+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


112 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014ECH Early Childhood Education 238EEE Electrical Engineering 120ELE Electronic 131/181/241/243/245/281ELT Electronic Technology 131/241/243ENG English 100AEFON Food & Nutrition 100GBS General Business 221GPH Physical Geography 220HRM Hotel Restaurant Management 126JAS Justice & Government Agencies Admin 225JRN Journalism 133LAS Paralegal Studies 229MAT Mathematics 206MET Manufacturing Technology 264MTC Music Theory/Composition 180/191NET Networking Technology 181OASOffice Automation Systems 111AA/111AB/113/119/130DKPSY Psychology 230SBS Small Business 211SWU Social Work 225TVL Travel Agent Technology 203VPT Video Production Technology 106GENERAL EDUCATION DISTRIBUTION AREAS(28-29 credits)Humanities and Fine Arts (9 credits)Students are encouraged to choose courses from morethan one discipline.AHU Arabic Humanities 245AIS American Indian Studies 213AJS Administration of Justice Studies 123ARH Art Humanities Any ARH Course(s)ASB Anthropology 211/214/220/222/223/253CCS Chicana and Chicano Studies 101CNS Construction 101COM Communication 241DAH Dance Humanities 100/201/250EDU Education 291/292/294ENG English 200/213/218ENHEnglish Humanities Any ENH Course(s)(except 250)FRE French 265HCR Health Care Related 210HIS History 101/102/103/108/111/113/114/212/243/253/254/275HUM Humanities Any HUM course(s) (except 120,203, 207, 225)INT Interior Design 115/120/225LAT Latin 201/202MHL Music: History/Literature 140/143/145/146/153/155/241/242/295PHIRELPhilosophy Any PHI Course(s)Religious Studies Any REL Course(s)(except 271)SLC Studies in Language & Culture 201SPA Spanish 241/242/265/266SPH Spanish Humanities 245SSHSustainability/Social Sciences andHumanities 111STO Storytelling 292/294THE Theater 111/205/206/210/220THP Theater/Performance/Production 241WST Women’s Studies 209/284/285/290Social and Behavioral Sciences (9 credits)Students are encouraged to choose courses from morethan one discipline.AFR African American Studies 202AIS American Indian Studies 101/140/141/160AJS Administration of Justice Studies 101/119/200/225/258/259/270ASB Anthropology 100/102/202/211/222/223/226/230/235/252ASM Anthropology 104/275CFS Child/Family Studies 112/157/159/176/205/235/259COM Communication 100/100AA&100AB&100AC/110/110AA&110AB&110AC/163/230/250/263ECH Early Childhood Education 176ECN Economics Any ECN Course(s)EDU Education 221/222EED Early Education 200/205/222EMT Emergency Medical Technology 258ENG English 213FOR Forensic Science 275FSC Fire Science Technology 258FUS Future Studies 101GCU Cultural Geography 102/121/122/141/221/227HES Health Science 100HIS History any HIS Course(s) (except 111, 170,203, 251, 252)IBS International Business 109MCO Mass Communications 120PAD Public Administration 200POS Political Science Any POS course(s)PSY Psychology 101/123/132/156/157/215/218/225/235/ 240/241/243/250/260/266/277/280/292REC Recreation 120SBU Society and Business 200SLC Studies in Language & Culture 201SOC Sociology Any SOC course(s) (except 143, 157,215, 245, 253, 265, 270)SSHSustainability/Social Sciences andHumanities 111SWU Social Work 102/171/258/292WED Wellness Education 110WST Women’s Studies 100/161YAQ Yaqui Indian History and Culture 100+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014113Natural Sciences (7-8 credits)Two lecture courses and one correspondinglaboratory course are to be selected. The lecture andcorresponding laboratory course(s) may carry separatecredit. For appropriate course selection studentsshould consult with an advisor.AGS Agricultural Science 164ASB Anthropology 231ASM Anthropology 104/265AST Astronomy 101/102/111/112/113/114BIO Biology 100/101/102/105/107/108/109/111/145/149AF/149AH/149AK/149AL/149AM/149AN/156/160/181/182/201/202/205/241/245CHM Chemistry 107&107LL/130&130LL/130AA/150/150AA/151/151AA/151LL/152AA/152&152LL/154&154LL/230&230LLENV Environmental Sciences 101FON Food and Nutrition 241&241LLFOR Forensic Science 105/106GLGGPHGeology Any GLG course(s)Physical Geography 111/112&113/211/212&214/213&215PHS Physical Science 110/120PHY Physics 101/101AA/111AA/ 111/112/ 115/116/121/131PSY Psychology 275/290AB/290ACLiteracy and Critical Inquiry (3 credits)AIS American Indian Studies 213BIO Biology 294COM Communication 222/225/241CRE Critical Reading 101CUL Culinary Arts 223ENG English 111/200/215/216/217/218ENH English Humanities 254/255GBS General Business 233GPH Physical Geography 211, 267HUM Humanities 225/250/251IFS Information Studies 101JRN Journalism 201/234MCO Mass Communications 220PHI Philosophy 103/106/218POS Political Science 115PSY Psychology 290AB/290ACREL Religious Studies 203/205/207/210THE Theater 220THP Theater Performance/Production 241Elective Courses (15-16 credits)May select courses from prefixes already chosen forGeneral Education Distribution requirements in order todevelop depth in one or more subject areas.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


114 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS(AAS GE)The Maricopa County Community College DistrictAssociate in Applied Science (AAS) degree isrecommended for students who wish to gain a depthof technical expertise by completing an occupationalprogram presented in the college catalog. Studentsshould consult this catalog to determine specificprogram requirements.Academic Policies that Govern the AAS degree:• requires 60 or more credits numbered 100 or aboveand includes credits or the equivalent in theGeneral Education Core areas and credits in theDistribution areas. AAS degree requirements followwith the use of a diagonal character (/) betweencourse numbers to signify options. An asterisk (*)following the course number defines requirementswith an effective begin term of spring;• requires grades as listed for specific areas such asthe General Education Core where a minimum gradeof “C” is required. See specific AAS occupationaldegree for specific program grade requirements;• follows the graduation policies within the generalcatalog;• includes both courses and their modular equivalents,either the course or the modular equivalents willsatisfy the Associate in Applied Sciencerequirements.• requires at least 12 semester credit hours earned atthe college awarding the AAS degree. The 12 hoursin the AAS degree curricula may be in the RequiredCourses area and/or Restricted Electives courses.Courses from the General Education Core andDistribution area are excluded.Shared Programs are programs offered at multiplecolleges but not available at all colleges. Therequirements are identical at all the colleges offeringthe program.A shared program requires a minimum of six credithours from the total program requirements to becompleted with a grade of “C” or better at thecollege awarding the certificate or degree. Theexception is the Nursing program. For those sharedprograms with less than six credit hours, the totalhours for the program must be completed at thecollege awarding the certificate. The minimum ofsix credit hours in the certificate or degree curriculamay be in the Required Courses area and/or theRestricted Electives. Courses from the GeneralEducation Core and Distribution areas are excluded;Students must apply for graduation from the collegewhere they have successfully completed Block 4 ofthe Associate in Applied Science in Nursing.• requires completion of General Education coursesas indicated in the General Education Requirementsfor the Associate in Applied Science degree fromthe Maricopa County Community College District, orcompletion of a curriculum as stated in the catalog;• accepts one of the courses that is cross-referencedwith other courses;GENERAL EDUCATION CORE(15 credits - grade of “C” or better)Demonstrate college-level skills in the followingareas:First-Year Composition (6 credits)ENG English [101/107] & [102/108/111]Oral Communication (3 credits)COM Communication 100/100AA & 100AB& 100AC/110/110AA & 110AB & 110AC/225/230Critical Reading (3 credits)CRE Critical Reading 101/111/Equivalent asindicated by assessmentMathematics (3 credits)MAT Mathematics102/103AA&103AB/120/121/122/122AA/122AB/1AC/126/140/141/142/150/151/151AA/151AB/151AC/151AD/152/156/172/182/187/206/212/213/220/221/230/231/240/241/261/262/276/277equivalent course/Satisfactory completion ofa higher level mathematics courseGENERAL EDUCATION DISTRIBUTION AREAS(9-10 credits)Humanities and Fine Arts (2-3 credits)Students are encouraged to choose courses frommore than one discipline.AHU Arabic Humanities 245AIS American Indian Studies 213AJS Administration of Justice Studies 123ARH Art Humanities Any ARH Course(s)ASB Anthropology 211/214/220/222/223/253CCS Chicana and Chicano Studies 101CNS Construction 101COM Communication 241DAH Dance Humanities 100/201/250EDU Education 291/292/294ENG English 200/213/218ENHEnglish Humanities Any ENH Course(s)(except 250)FRE French 265HCR Health Care Related 210HIS History 101/102/103/108/111/113/114/212/243/253/254/275HUMHumanities Any HUM course(s)(except 120, 203, 207, 225)+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014115INT Interior Design 115/120/225LAT Latin 201/202MHL Music: History/Literature 140/143/145/146/153/155/241/242/295PHIRELPhilosophy Any PHI Course(s)Religious Studies Any REL Course(s)(except 271)SLC Studies in Language & Culture 201SPA Spanish 241/242/265/266SPH Spanish Humanities 245SSHSustainability/Social Sciences andHumanities 111STO Storytelling 292/294THE Theater 111/205/206/210/220THP Theater Performance/Production 241WST Women’s Studies 209/284/285/290Social and Behavioral Sciences (3 credits)Students are encouraged to choose courses from morethan one discipline.AFR African American Studies 202AIS American Indian Studies 101/140/141/160AJS Administration of Justice Studies 101/200/225/258/259/270ASB Anthropology 100/102/202/211//222/223/226/230/235/252ASM Anthropology 104/275CFS Child/Family Studies 112/157/159/176/205/235/259COM Communications 100/100AA&100AB&100AC/110/110AA&110AB & 110AC/ 163/230/250/263ECH Early Childhood Education 176ECN Economics Any ECN course(s)EDU Education 221/222EED Early Education 200/205/222EMT Emergency Medical Technology 258ENG English 213FOR Forensic Science 275FSC Fire Science 258FUS Future Studies 101GCU Cultural Geography 102/121/122/141/221/227HES Health Science 100HIS History Any HIS course(s) (except 111, 170203, 251, 252)IBS International Business 109MCO Mass Communications 120PAD Public Administration 200POS Political Science Any POS course(s)PSY Psychology 101/123/132/156/157/215/218/225/235/240/241/243/250/260/266/277/280/292REC Recreation 120SBU Society and Business 200SLC Studies in Language & Culture 201SOC Sociology Any SOC course(s)SSH(except 143, 157, 215, 245, 253, 265, 270)Sustainability/Social Sciences andHumanities 111SWU Social Work 102/171/258/292WED Wellness Education 110WST Women’s Studies 100/161YAQ Yaqui Indian History and Culture 100Natural Sciences (4 credits)The lecture course(s) selected for Natural Sciencesmust include or be accompanied by the correspondinglaboratory course. The lecture and correspondinglaboratory course(s) may carry separate credit.Students should consult with an advisor forappropriate course selection.AGS Agricultural Science 164ASB Anthropology (Soc/Behv. Science) 231ASM Anthropology (Science/Math) 104/265AST Astronomy 101/102/111/112/113/114BIO Biology 100/101/102/105/107/108/109/111/145/149AN/156/160/181/182/201/202/205/241/245CHM Chemistry 107&107LL/130&130LL/130AA/150AA/150&151LL/151AA/151&151LL/152AA/152&152LL/154&154LL/230&230LLENV Environmental Sciences 101FON Food and Nutrition 241&241LLFOR Forensic Science 105/106GLGGPHGeology Any GLG course(s)Physical Geography 111/112&113/211/212&214/213&215PHS Physical Science 110/120PHY Physics 101/101AA/111/111AA/112/115/116/121/131PSY Psychology 275/290AB/290AC+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


116 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014The Maricopa County Community College DistrictAssociate in Science degree requires 60-64 semestercredits for the program of study. The degree includesthe following components:I. General Education:Arizona General Education Curriculum forScience (AGEC-S)MCCCD Additional RequirementsII.General ElectivesPurpose of the DegreeThe Associate in Science degree is designed forstudents planning to transfer to four-year collegesand universities. In general, the components of thedegree meet requirements for majors with morestringent mathematics and mathematics-based sciencerequirements. Generally, the degree will transfer asa block without loss of credit to Arizona’s publicuniversities and other institutions with district-widearticulation agreements.In most cases, courses used to satisfy the MCCCDAssociate in Science will apply to university graduationrequirements of the university major for which theAssociate in Science is designed. Information regardingthe articulation of the Associate in Science with majorsat the Arizona public universities can be accessed viathe following website: www.aztransfer.comAcademic Policies that Govern the Associate inScience Degree• Completion of the Associate in Science and theAGEC-S provides for exemption from Arizonapublic university admission requirements forArizona residents who have a minimum Grade PointAverage of 2.0 on a 4.0=A scale and a minimum 2.5on a 4.0=A scale for non-residents.• The graduation policies within the general catalogmust be satisfied for completion of the Associate inScience degree.• A minimum of 60 semester credits in coursesnumbered 100 and above to be completed with agrade of “C” or better. Credit units transferred fromoutside of the district need to be at a grade of “C”or better. A grade of “C” equals 2.0 on a 4.0grading scale or equivalent. On an exceptionbasis, P-grades may be allowed in the AGEC forcredit transferred if documentation collected by thecommunity college indicates that the P-gradeissued was the only option for the student andthe P-grade is a “C” or better. The P-gradeexception does not apply to credits awarded byAGEC granting/receiving institutionsASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE (AS)• Credit received through prior learning assessmentor credit by evaluation is transferable within theMaricopa Community Colleges but is notnecessarily transferable to other colleges anduniversities. No more than 20 semester credit hoursmay be applied toward AGEC.• The General Education Requirements for AGEC-Smay be completed in 36-38 semester credits withthe following stipulations- Courses can satisfy a Core area and one or twoAwareness areas simultaneously.- A course cannot be used to satisfy more thanone Core area requirement in the AGEC A and B.- A course can be used to satisfy the L and SB orL and HU requirements simultaneously in theCore area for the AGEC S.• General Education Courses can satisfy multipleareas within the degree simultaneously (AGEC-SCore Area, AGEC Awareness Area, MCCCDAdditional Requirements, or lower-division coursesapplicable to the major).• Effective fall 2000, the course evaluation and/orgeneral education designation as listed in theArizona Course Equivalency Guide (CEG) within theArizona Course Applicability System (AZCAS),is valid for the term in which the student is awardedcredit on the transcript. A course evaluation and/or general education designation may be subjectto change. Students do have the option to petitionfor general education evaluations and/or generaleducation designations upon transfer.• Courses completed at one of theMaricopaCommunity Colleges to meet AGEC-Srequirements must be listed in the CourseEquivalency Guide within the Arizona CourseApplicability System as an equivalent course,departmental elective credit (XXXXDEC), orgeneral elective credit (Elective) at all Arizonapublic universities. The course’s evaluation and/or general education designation is valid for theterm in which the student is awarded credit on thetranscript. View specific course information via thefollowing website: www.maricopa.edu/academic/ccta/ by clicking on the statewide AGEC icon.• Courses completed at one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges to meet the General Electivesrequirement All courses used to satisfy electivesmust be transferable to the university or universitiesto which the student plans to transfer, as electivecredit or better. For appropriate course selection,students should consult with an advisor.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014117• Courses transferred from another regionallyaccredited institution to one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges will be evaluated by thecollege for inclusion in the AGEC-S or Associate inScience Degree.• Courses and their modular equivalents will satisfyAGEC-S and Associate in Science requirements.• If a course is cross-referenced with one or moreother courses, then only one of the crossreferencedcourses will be accepted to meetrequirements.• Courses completed at one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges to satisfy Common Coursesmust be transferable as elective or better to theuniversities that have the shared majors listed on aCommon Course Matrix. A shared major is auniversity degree program that has similaracademic preparation to one or more degreeprograms at other Arizona public universities aslisted on the Common Course Matrices. Forappropriate course selection, students shouldconsult with an advisor.Degree RequirementsThe 60-64 semester credits required for the Associatein Science follow. View specific course information viathe following website: www.maricopa.edu/academic/ccta/ by clicking on the statewide AGEC icon. TheAGEC A, B, S, and AGEC Matrix identify the coursesin alpha-order by prefix as well as the Core Areas andAwareness Areas where the course will apply.I. MCCCD General EducationThe MCCCD General Education includes two areas:MCCCD AGEC-S and MCCCD AdditionalRequirements.MCCCD AGEC-S1. Core Areas: ..................................................... 36-38a. First-Year Composition (FYC) ......................6b. Literacy and Critical Inquiry [L] ..............0-3Recommend selecting a course thatsatisfies L (Literacy and Critical Inquiry)and SB (Social and Behavioral Sciences) ORL (Literacy and Critical Inquiry) and HU(Humanities and Fine Arts) or L (Literacyand Critical Inquiry) and COM or L(Literacy and Critical Inquiry) and CRE101requirements simultaneously.c. Mathematical Studies [MA] ..........................4To complete the Mathematical Studiesrequirement, select one course to satisfyMathematics [MA] S.1) Mathematics [MA] S (4 credits)Select a calculus course MAT220 orMAT221, ORAny mathematics course for whichMAT220 or MAT221 is a prerequisite.d. Humanities and Fine Arts [HU] ....................6Students are encouraged to choose coursework from more than one disciplinefor a total of six semester credits.Select a course that satisfies both L and HUrequirements simultaneously.e. Social and Behavioral Sciences [SB] ..........6Students are encouraged to choose coursework from more than one disciplinefor a total of six semester credits.Select a course that satisfies both L and SBrequirements simultaneously.f. Natural Sciences ..............................................8To complete the Natural Sciencesrequirement:Select eight (8) semester credits of eithergeneral chemistryCHM151 & CHM151LL and CHM152 & CHM152LLOREight (8) semester credits of universityphysics PHY115 & PHY116 or PHY121 &PHY131OREight (8) semester credits of generalbiology, BIO181 & BIO182 appropriate to themajor.g. Subject Options ........................................... 6-8(subject based on major)Students completing AGEC S, throughcareful selection of courses that meet theother major or pre-requisite requirementsfor Science degree, will meet thisrequirement. Using a transfer guide, selectcourses from Mathematics courses aboveCalculus, and/or Science courses from:Astronomy, Biology, Botany, Chemistry,Environmental Science, Geology,Physical Geography, Physics, Zoology.2. Awareness Areas:Students must satisfy two Awareness Areas:Cultural Diversity in the United States [C] andeither Global Awareness [G] or HistoricalAwareness [H]. However, it is not necessaryfor students to exceed thirty-six to thirty-eightsemester credits to complete the AwarenessAreas because courses can satisfy a CoreArea and one or two Awareness Areassimultaneously. Therefore no additionalsemester credits are required to satisfy the twoAwareness Areas.Cultural Diversity in the United States [C]ANDGlobal Awareness [G]ORHistorical Awareness [H]+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


118 Degrees and Certificates 2013-20143. MCCCD Additional Requirements ..................0-6Students must satisfy Oral Communicationand Critical Reading areas. However, it is notnecessary for students to exceed the thirtysixto thirty-eight semester credits requiredin order to complete the MCCCD AdditionalRequirements.a. Oral CommunicationA total of three (3) semester credits arerequired for Oral Communication. However,if students select a communication coursethat satisfies both the Oral Communicationarea and an area within the Core, then theOral Communication requirement has beensatisfied and additional electives may betaken.Select from the following options:COM100 [SB] (3 credits) ORCOM100AA & COM100AB & COM100AC[SB] (3 credits) ORCOM110 [SB] (3 credits) ORCOM110AA & COM110AB & COM110AC [SB](3 credits) ORCOM225 [L] (3 credits) ORCOM230 [SB] (3 credits)Students must select MCCCD courses that aretransferable to the university or universities towhich the student plans to transfer, as electivecredit or better according to the Arizona CEGwithin the AZCAS. For appropriate courseselection, students should consult with an advisor.For some majors, students must demonstrate 4thsemester proficiency at the 202 course level tosatisfy the Non-English Language Requirements.Students should consult the Arizona TransferPathway Guides and/or the University TransferGuides to determine this requirement for the majorat the university to which they intend to transfer.If required, it is recommended that studentschoose Maricopa courses as electives to meet thisrequirement as part of the Associate in Sciencedegree.Students who are undecided on a major oruniversity should consult an advisor. Not all majorshave common courses, so it is recommendedthat students consult with an advisor for a listof common courses or assistance with selectingappropriate electives.Associate in Science Total Credits:...............60-64b. Critical ReadingA total of three (3) semester credits arerequired for the Critical Reading area. Ifstudents demonstrate proficiency throughassessment, then the Critical Readingrequirement has been satisfied andadditional electives may be taken.CRE101 [L] OR equivalent as indicated byassessmentII. General ElectivesSelect courses to complete a minimum of 60semester credits but no more than a total of 64semester credits.For students who have decided on a major thatarticulates with the AS, but who are undecided onthe university to which they will transfer, coursessatisfying the General Electives area should beselected from the list of Common Courses, ArizonaTransfer Pathway Guides, and/or UniversityTransfer Guides in order for the courses to apply inthe major upon transfer.The list of Common Courses for each major isincluded in the Arizona Transfer Pathway Guides.University Transfer Guides are also available forthe Arizona public universities. These guides, bothstatewide and institutional, are accessible on thefollowing web site: www.aztransfer.com+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014119ASSOCIATE IN ARTS, ELEMENTARY EDUCATION DEGREE (AAEE)The MCCCD Associate in Arts in Elementary Education(AAEE) requires the student to complete a total of60-63 semester credits in the program of study. Thedegree has two major components:I. MCCCD General EducationArizona General Education Curriculum for Arts(AGEC-A)Additional MCCCD Requirements• The General Education Requirements for AGEC-Amay be completed in 35 semester credits with thefollowing stipulations:- Courses can satisfy a Core Area and one or twoAwareness Areas simultaneously- A course cannot be used to satisfy more thanone Core AreaII.Elementary Education RequirementsEducation FoundationsRestricted Electives- Courses can satisfy an Elementary EducationRequirement and one or more AwarenessAreas simultaneously.Purpose of the DegreeThe AAEE is designed for the student who plans totransfer to an Elementary Education, Early Childhood,Multicultural/Multilingual, or Special Education programat an Arizona public higher education institution and/orwho plans to become a classroom instructional aide.Generally, the degree transfers as a block withoutloss of credit to Arizona’s public universities. In mostcases, courses applied to the MCCCD Associate inArts in Elementary Education also apply to graduationrequirements of the university major for which theAAEE was designed.Academic Policies that Govern the Associate inArts Elementary Education Degree:• Completion of the Associate in Arts and theAGEC-A provides for exemption from Arizonapublic university admission requirements forArizona residents who have a minimum GradePoint Average of 2.0 on a 4.0=A scale and aminimum 2.5 on a 4.0=A scale for non-residents.• The graduation policies within the general catalogmust be satisfied for completion of the Associatein Arts degree.• A minimum of 60 semester credits in coursesnumbered 100 and above to be completed with agrade of “C” or better. Credit units transferredfrom outside of the district need to be at a gradeof “C” or better. A grade of “C” equals 2.0 on a 4.0grading scale or equivalent. A grade of “C” equals2.0 on a 4.0 grading scale or equivalent. On anexception basis, P-grades may be allowed in theAGEC for credit transferred if documentationcollected by the community college indicatesthat the P-grade issued was the only option forthe student and the P-grade is a “C” or better. TheP-grade exception does not apply to creditsawarded by AGEC granting/receiving institutions.• Credit received through prior learning assessmentor credit by evaluation is transferable within theMaricopa Community Colleges but is notnecessarily transferable to other colleges anduniversities. No more than 20 semester credithours may be applied toward AGEC.- A course cannot satisfy both the ElementaryEducation Requirement and a Core AreaRequirement simultaneously.• Effective Fall 2000, the course evaluation and/orgeneral education designation as listed in theArizona Course Equivalency Guide (CEG) withinthe Arizona Course Applicability System (AZCAS),is valid for the term in which the student isawarded credit on the transcript. A courseevaluation and/or general education designationmay be subject to change. Students do havethe option to petition for general educationevaluations and/or general education designationsupon transfer.• Courses completed at one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges to meet AGEC-Arequirements must be listed in the CourseEquivalency Guide within the Arizona CourseApplicability System as an equivalent course,departmental elective credit (XXXXDEC), orgeneral elective credit (Elective) at all Arizonapublic universities. The course’s evaluation and/or general education designation is valid for theterm in which the student is awarded credit on thetranscript. View specific course information via thefollowing website: www.maricopa.edu/academic/ccta/ by clicking on the statewide AGEC icon.• Courses completed at one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges to meet the General Electivesrequirement. must be transferable to the universityor universities to which the student plans totransfer, as elective credit or better. For appropriatecourse selection, students should consult with anadvisor.• Courses transferred from another regionallyaccredited institution to one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges will be evaluated by thecollege for inclusion in the AGEC A or the Associatein Arts Elementary Education degree.• Courses and their modular equivalents will satisfyAGEC-A and Associate in Arts in ElementaryEducation requirements.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


120 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014• If a course is cross-referenced with one or moreother courses, then only one of the crossreferencedcourses will be accepted to meetrequirements.• Courses completed at one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges to satisfy Common Coursesmust be transferable as elective or better to theuniversities that have the shared majors listed on aCommon Course Matrix. A shared major is auniversity degree program that has similaracademic preparation to one or more degreeprograms at other Arizona public universities aslisted on the Common Course Matrices. Forappropriate course selection, students shouldconsult with an advisor.Degree RequirementsI. MCCCD General Education RequirementsMCCCD AGEC-A1. Core Areas .......................................................35-38a. First-Year Composition (FYC) 6ENG101/102 ORENG107/108b. Mathematics Studies [MA] andComputer/Statistics QuantitativeApplications [CS] ...........................................61) MAT142 [MA] College Mathematics,or higher (NOTE: MAT156, 157, 182 and206 are excluded)AND2) CIS105 [CS] Survey of ComputerInformation Systems, ORBPC110 [CS] Computer Usage andApplicationsc. Literacy and Critical Inquiry [L] ................. 3Select the following:COM225 Public Speakingd. Humanities and Fine Arts [HU] ...................61) Select (3) semester creditsfrom the following courses:ARH100 Introduction to ArtARH101 Prehistoric through Gothic ArtARH102 Renaissance throughContemporary ArtTHE111 Introduction to TheatreDAH100 Introduction to DanceDAH201 World Dance StudiesMHL140 Survey of Music HistoryMHL143 Music in World CulturesAND2) Select (3) semester creditsfrom the following courses:EDU/ENH291 Children’s LiteratureENH110 Introduction to LiteratureENH241 American LiteratureBefore 1860ENH242 American LiteratureAfter 1860HUM250 or HUM251 Ideas andValues in the Humanitiese. Social and Behavioral Sciences [SB] .........61) Select 3 semester credits fromthe following courses:HIS103 United States History to 1865POS110 American NationalGovernmentGCU/POS227 United States andArizona Social StudiesAND2) Select 3 semester credits from thefollowing courses:CFS205 Human DevelopmentECH/CFS176 Child DevelopmentHIS104 United States History 1865 toPresentPSY101 Introduction to PsychologyGCU121 World Geography I:Eastern HemisphereGCU122 World Geography II:Western HemisphereECN211 Macroeconomic PrinciplesECN212 Microeconomic Principlesf. Natural Sciences—Science- Quantitative[SQ] and Science General [SG] ..................8To complete the Natural Sciences requirement,select a total of 8 semestercredits from the following categories. Atleast 4 credits must be SQ courses. Youcan select 4 semester credits of SG and4 semester credits of SQ for a total of 8semester credits. Natural Sciences coursesmust include or be accompanied by thecorresponding laboratory course. Whenthe lecture and corresponding laboratoryare awarded separate credit, both will becounted as equivalent to one course inthat discipline.1) Life Sciences-Select 4 semestercredits of SQ or SG from BIOAND2) Physical Sciences or Earth/SpaceSciences- Select 4 semester creditsof SQ or SG credits from thefollowing prefixes:AGS CHM PHSASM GPH PHYAST GLGNote: Students are advised to check withthe university they plan to attend asrequirements for lab sciences may vary.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014121g. Awareness Areas ............................................0The MCCCD AAEE requires courseworkin two Awareness Areas:Cultural Diversity in the U.S. [C]ANDHistorical Awareness [H]ORGlobal Awareness [G]Courses can satisfy a Core AreaRequirement and one or more AwarenessAreas, or can satisfy an ElementaryEducation Requirement and one ormore Awareness Areas simultaneously.Therefore, no additional semester creditsare required to satisfy the two AwarenessAreas.2. MCCCD Additional Requirements ..................0-3a. Oral CommunicationSatisfied by COM225 taken for Literacyand Critical Inquiry Requirementb. Critical ReadingCRE101 or exemption by testingII. Elementary Education Requirements ..........25A total of 25 semester credits are required tosatisfy the Elementary Education Requirements.A. Education Foundations ........................................18Complete the following courses to satisfy theEducation Foundations requirements:EDU220 Introduction to Serving EnglishLanguage LearnersEDU221 Introduction to EducationEDU222 Introduction to the ExceptionalLearnerEDU230 Cultural Diversity in EducationMAT156 Mathematics for ElementaryTeachers IMAT157 Mathematics for ElementaryTeachers IIB. Restricted Electives .............................................. 7A total of 7 semester credits are required tosatisfy the Restricted Electives. Courses musttransfer to all public Arizona universities asElective Credit, Departmental Elective, orEquivalent to a university course as indicatedin the Arizona Course Equivalency Guide in effectwhen the course is taken.Courses identified as Non-transferable in theArizona Course Equivalency Guide cannot beused to satisfy this requirement.Content Area ElectivesSelect 7 credits from the following:Any ARH, ART, CIS, ECN, BPC, ENG, ENH,GCU, GPH, HIS, MHL, MTC, POS,THE, THP prefixed course(s)Any EDU prefixed course(s) (except EDU250)Any MAT (courses numbered higherthan 142 except MAT156 and MAT157)Any Foreign Language course(s)Any Natural Science course(s)CFS/ECH176 Child DevelopmentCFS205 Human DevelopmentEED215 Early Learning: Heath, Safety,Nutrition and FitnessFON100 Introductory NutritionAAA/CPD115 Creating College SuccessAssociate in Arts - Elementary Education (AAEE)Total Credits: ............................................................ 60-63NOTE: The following courses meet the state teachercertification requirement for United States and ArizonaConstitutions: United States—HIS 103, POS 110, POS 220, andPOS 222 Arizona—POS 220 and POS 221+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


122 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014The Maricopa County Community College DistrictAssociate in Arts degree requires 60-64 semestercredits for the program of study. The degree includesthe following components:I. General Education:Arizona General Education Curriculum for Arts(AGEC-A) MCCCD Additional RequirementsII.General ElectivesPurpose of the DegreeThe Associate in Arts degree is designed for studentsplanning to transfer to four-year colleges anduniversities. In general, the components of the degreemeet requirements for majors in the Liberal Arts orprograms of study other than business or science.Generally, the degree will transfer as a block withoutloss of credit to Arizona’s public universities and otherinstitutions with district-wide articulation agreements.In most cases, courses used to satisfy the MCCCDAssociate in Arts will apply to university graduationrequirements of the university major for which theAssociate in Arts is designed. Information regardingthe articulation of the Associate in Arts with majors atthe Arizona public universities can be accessed via thefollowing website: www.aztransfer.comAcademic Policies that Govern the Associate inArts Degree• Completion of the Associate in Arts and theAGEC-A provides for exemption from Arizonapublic university admission requirements forArizona residents who have a minimum GradePoint Average of 2.0 on a 4.0=A scale and aminimum 2.5 on a 4.0=A scale for non-residents.• The graduation policies within the general catalogmust be satisfied for completion of the Associatein Arts degree.• A minimum of 60 semester credits in coursesnumbered 100 and above to be completed witha grade of “C” or better. Credit units transferredfrom outside of the district need to be at a gradeof “C” or better. A grade of “C” equals 2.0 on a4.0 grading scale or equivalent. On an exceptionbasis, P-grades may be allowed in the AGEC forcredit transferred if documentation collected bythe community college indicates that the P-gradeissued was the only option for the student and theP-grade is a “C” or better. The P-grade exceptiondoes not apply to credits awarded by AGECgranting/receiving institutions.• Credit received through prior learning assessment orcredit by evaluation is transferable within the MaricopaCommunity Colleges but is not necessarily transferableto other colleges and universities. No more than 20semester credit hours may be applied toward AGEC.ASSOCIATE IN ARTS (AA) DEGREE• The General Education Requirements for AGEC-Amay be completed in 35 semester credits with thefollowing stipulations- Courses can satisfy a Core Area and one or twoAwareness Areas simultaneously- A course cannot be used to satisfy more thanone Core Area• General Education Courses can satisfy multipleareas within the degree simultaneously (AGEC-ACore Area, AGEC Awareness Area, MCCCDAdditional Requirements, or lower-division coursesapplicable to the major).• Effective Fall 2000, the course evaluation and/or general education designation as listed in theArizona Course Equivalency Guide (CEG) within theArizona Course Applicability System (AZCAS), isvalid for the term in which the student is awardedcredit on the transcript. A course evaluation and/or general education designation may be subjectto change. Students do have the option to petitionfor general education evaluations and/or generaleducation designations upon transfer.• Courses completed at one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges to meet AGEC-A requirementsmust be listed in the Course Equivalency Guidewithin the Arizona Course Applicability System asan equivalent course, departmental elective credit(XXXXDEC), or general elective credit (Elective)at all Arizona public universities. The course’sevaluation and/or general education designation isvalid for the term in which the student is awardedcredit on the transcript. View specific courseinformation via the following website:www.maricopa.edu/academic/ccta/ by clicking onthe statewide AGEC icon.• Courses completed at one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges to meet the General Electivesrequirement must be transferable to the universityor universities to which the student plans totransfer, as elective credit or better. For appropriatecourse selection, students should consult with anadvisor.• Courses transferred from another regionallyaccredited institution to one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges will be evaluated by thecollege for inclusion in the AGEC-A or Associate inArts Degree.• Courses and their modular equivalents will satisfyAGEC-A and Associate in Arts requirements.• If a course is cross-referenced with one or moreother courses, then only one of the cross-referencedcourses will be accepted to meet requirements.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014123• Courses completed at one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges to satisfy Common Coursesmust be transferable as elective or better to theuniversities that have the shared majors listedon a Common Course Matrix. A shared majoris a university degree program that has similaracademic preparation to one or more degreeprograms at other Arizona public universitiesas listed on the Common Course Matrices. Forappropriate course selection, students shouldconsult with an advisor.Degree RequirementsThe 60-64 semester credits required for the Associatein Arts follow. View specific course information viathe following website: www.maricopa.edu/academic/ccta/ by clicking on the statewide AGEC icon. TheAGEC A, B, S, and AGEC Matrix identify the coursesin alpha-order by prefix as well as the Core Areas andAwareness Areas where the course will apply.I. MCCCD General EducationThe MCCCD General Education includes two areas:MCCCD AGEC-A and MCCCD Additional Requirements.MCCCD AGEC-A1. Core Areas: ............................................................35a. First-Year Composition (FYC) .....................6b. Literacy and Critical Inquiry [L] ................. 3c. Mathematical Studies [MA/CS] ..................6To complete the Mathematical Studiesrequirement, select one course to satisfyMathematics [MA] A and a second coursefrom Computer/Statistics/QuantitativeApplications [CS].1) Mathematics [MA] A (3 credits)Note: requires a course in collegemathematics (MAT142) or college algebra(MAT 150, MAT 151, MAT152) or pre calculus(MAT 187) or any other mathematics coursedesignated with the MA general educationvalue and for which college algebra is a prerequisite.AND2) Computer/Statistics/QuantitativeApplications [CS] (3 credits)d. Humanities and Fine Arts [HU] ...................6Students are encouraged to choosecourse work from more than one disciplinefor a total of six semester credits.e. Social and Behavioral Sciences [SB] .........6Students are encouraged to choose coursework from more than one disciplinefor a total of six semester credits.f. Natural Sciences [SQ/SG] .............................8To complete the Natural Sciencesrequirement: Select four (4) semestercredits of [SQ] and four (4) semestercredits of [SG] for a total of eight (8)semester credits, OR eight (8) semestercredits of [SQ]. Students can not takeeight (8) semester credits of [SG] to meetthe Natural Sciences requirement.The lecture course(s) selected for NaturalSciences must include or be accompaniedby the corresponding laboratory course.The lecture and corresponding laboratorycourse(s) may carry separate credit.Students should consult with anadvisor for appropriate course selection.Students should also access the AZ CourseEquivalency Guide (CEG) within theAZ Course Applicability System (AZCAS)for information on equivalencies.2. Awareness Areas:Students must satisfy two AwarenessAreas: Cultural Diversity in the United States[C] and either Global Awareness [G] orHistorical Awareness [H]. However, it is notnecessary for students to exceed thirty-fivesemester credits to complete the AwarenessAreas because courses can satisfy a CoreArea and one or two Awareness Areassimultaneously. Therefore no additionalsemester credits are required to satisfy thetwo Awareness Areas.Cultural Diversity in the United States [C]ANDGlobal Awareness [G]ORHistorical Awareness [H]3. MCCCD Additional Requirements ..................0-6Students must satisfy Oral Communicationand Critical Reading areas. However, it is notnecessary for students to exceed the thirtyfivesemester credits required in order tocomplete the MCCCD AdditionalRequirements because courses can satisfy aCore Area and MCCCD AdditionalRequirements simultaneously. Therefore noadditional semester credits are required tosatisfy Oral Communication and CriticalReading.a. Oral CommunicationA total of three (3) semester credits isrequired for Oral Communication. However,if students select a communication coursethat satisfies both the Oral Communicationarea and an area within the Core, then theOral Communication requirement has beensatisfied and additional electives may betaken.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


124 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014Select from the following options:COM100 [SB] (3 credits) ORCOM100AA & COM100AB & COM100AC[SB] (3 credits) ORCOM110 [SB] (3 credits) ORCOM110AA & COM110AB & COM110AC [SB](3 credits) ORCOM225 [L] (3 credits) ORCOM230 [SB] (3 credits)A total of three (3) semester credits isrequired for the Critical Reading area.However, if students complete CRE 101and apply it to AGEC-A CoreRequirements or if the studentsdemonstrate proficiency throughassessment, then the Critical Readingrequirement has been satisfied andadditional electives may be taken.CRE101 [L] ORequivalent as indicated by assessmentII. General ElectivesSelect courses to complete a minimum of 60semester credits but no more than a total of 64semester credits.For students who have decided on a major thatarticulates with the AA, but who are undecided onthe university to which they will transfer, coursessatisfying the General Electives area should beselected from the list of Common Courses, ArizonaTransfer Pathway Guides, and/or UniversityTransfer Guides in order for the courses to apply inthe major upon transfer.The list of Common Courses for each major isincluded in the Arizona Transfer Pathway Guides.University Transfer Guides are also available forthe Arizona public universities. These guides, bothstatewide and institutional, are accessible on thefollowing web site: www.aztransfer.com/Students must select MCCCD courses that aretransferable to the university or universities towhich the student plans to transfer, as electivecredit or better according to the Arizona CEGwithin the AZCAS. For appropriate courseselection, students should consult with an advisor.For some majors, students must demonstrate 4thsemester proficiency at the 202 course level tosatisfy the Non-English Language Requirements.Students should consult the Arizona TransferPathway Guides and/or the University TransferGuides to determine this requirement for themajor at the university to which they intendto transfer. If required, it is recommended thatstudents choose Maricopa courses as electives tomeet this requirement as part of the Associate inArts degree.Students who are undecided on a major oruniversity should consult an advisor. Not all majorshave common courses, so it is recommended thatstudents consult with an advisor for a list ofcommon courses or assistance with selectingappropriate electives.Associate in Arts Total Credits: .....................60-64+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014125ASSOCIATE IN ARTS, FINE ARTS (AAFA) – ARTThe Maricopa County Community College DistrictAssociate in Arts, Fine Arts - Art degree requires aminimum of 63 semester credits for the program ofstudy. The degree includes the following components:I. General Education:Arizona General Education Curriculum for Arts(AGEC-A)MCCCD Additional RequirementsII.Fine Arts Requirements – ArtPurpose of the DegreeThe Associate in Arts, Fine Arts - Art degree isdesigned for students planning to transfer to four-yearcolleges and universities. In general, the componentsof the degree meet requirements for majors in the FineArts. The degree is designed to prepare students tomeet selective admission criteria for programs suchas the Bachelor of Fine Arts, which may require aportfolio or performance requirement.The semester credits used to satisfy the MCCCDAssociate in Arts, Fine Arts - Art degree may apply touniversity graduation requirements of the universitymajor for which the degree is designed. Informationregarding the articulation of the degree with majors atthe Arizona public universities can be accessed via thefollowing website: www.aztransfer.comAcademic Policies that Govern the Associate inArts, Fine Arts – Art Degree• Completion of the Associate in Arts, Fine Arts - Artdegree and the AGEC-A provides for exemptionfrom Arizona public university admissionrequirements for Arizona residents who have aminimum Grade Point Average of 2.0 on a 4.0=Ascale and a minimum 2.5 on a 4.0=A scale for nonresidents.• The graduation policies within the general catalogmust be satisfied for completion of the Associatein Arts, Fine Arts - Art degree.• A minimum of 63 semester credits in coursesnumbered 100 and above to be completed witha grade of “C” or better. Credit units transferredfrom outside of the district need to be at a gradeof “C” or better. A grade of “C” equals 2.0 on a4.0 grading scale or equivalent. On an exceptionbasis, P-grades may be allowed in the AGEC forcredit transferred if documentation collected bythe community college indicates that the P-gradeissued was the only option for the student and theP-grade is a “C” or better. The P-grade exceptiondoes not apply to credits awarded by AGECgranting/receiving institutions.• Credit received through prior learning assessmentor credit by evaluation is transferable withinthe Maricopa Community Colleges but is notnecessarily transferable to other colleges anduniversities. No more than 20 semester credithours may be applied toward AGEC.• The General Education Requirements for AGEC-Amay be completed in 35 semester credits with thefollowing stipulations- Courses can satisfy a Core Area and one or twoAwareness Areas simultaneously- A course cannot be used to satisfy more thanone Core Area• General Education Courses can satisfy multipleareas within the degree simultaneously (AGEC-ACore Area, AGEC Awareness Area, MCCCDAdditional Requirements, or lower-division coursesapplicable to the major).• Effective Fall 2000, the course evaluation and/or general education designation as listed inthe Arizona Course Equivalency Guide (CEG)within the Arizona Course Applicability System(AZCAS), is valid for the term in which the studentis awarded credit on the transcript. A courseevaluation and/or general education designationmay be subject to change. Students do havethe option to petition for general educationevaluations and/or general education designationsupon transfer.• Courses completed at one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges to meet AGEC-Arequirements must be listed in the CourseEquivalency Guide within the Arizona CourseApplicability System as an equivalent course,departmental elective credit (XXXXDEC), orgeneral elective credit (Elective) at all Arizonapublic universities. The course’s evaluation and/or general education designation is valid for theterm in which the student is awarded credit on thetranscript. View specific course information via thefollowing website: www.maricopa.edu/academic/ccta/ by clicking on the statewide AGEC icon.• Courses completed at one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges to meet the GeneralElectives requirement must be transferable tothe university or universities to which the studentplans to transfer, as elective credit or better. Forappropriate course selection, students shouldconsult with an advisor.• Courses transferred from another regionallyaccredited institution to one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges will be evaluated by thecollege for inclusion in the AGEC-A or Associate inArts, Fine - Arts Degree.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


126 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014• Courses and their modular equivalents will satisfyAGEC-A and Associate in Arts, Fine Arts – Artrequirements.• If a course is cross-referenced with one ormore other courses, then only one of the crossreferencedcourses will be accepted to meetrequirements.• Courses completed at one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges to satisfy Common Coursesmust be transferable as elective or better to theuniversities that have the shared majors listedon a Common Course Matrix. A shared majoris a university degree program that has similaracademic preparation to one or more degreeprograms at other Arizona public universitiesas listed on the Common Course Matrices. Forappropriate course selection, students shouldconsult with an advisor.Degree RequirementsThe 63 semester credits required for the Associatein Arts, Fine Arts - Art degree follow. View specificcourse information via the following website: www.maricopa.edu/academic/ccta/ by clicking on thestatewide AGEC icon. The AGEC A, B, S, and AGECMatrix identify the courses in alpha-order by prefix aswell as the Core Areas and Awareness Areas where thecourse will apply.I. MCCCD General EducationThe MCCCD General Education includes two areas:MCCCD AGEC-A and MCCCD AdditionalRequirements.MCCCD AGEC-A1. Core Areas: ...........................................................35a. First-Year Composition [FYC]: .................. 6b. Literacy and Critical Inquiry [L]: ................ 3c. Mathematical Studies [MA/CS]: .................6To complete the Mathematical Studiesrequirement, select one course to satisfyMathematics [MA] A and a second coursefrom Computer/Statistics/QuantitativeApplications [CS].1) Mathematics [MA] A (3 credits)Select a course in college mathematicsor college algebra or pre-calculus orany other mathematics course forwhich college algebra is a prerequisite.AND2) Computer/Statistics/QuantitativeApplications [CS] (3 credits)d. Humanities and Fine Arts [HU]: .................6Students are encouraged to choose coursework from more than one discipline for atotal of six semester credits.Select the following:ARH101 Prehistoric Through Gothic Art 3e. Social and Behavioral Sciences [SB]: ........6Students are encouraged to choose coursework from more than one discipline for atotal of six semester credits.f. Natural Sciences [SQ/SG]: ...........................8To complete the Natural Sciencesrequirement: Select four (4) semestercredits of [SQ] and four (4) semestercredits of [SG] for a total of eight (8)semester credits, OR eight (8) semestercredits of [SQ]. Students cannot take eight(8) semester credits of [SG] to meet theNatural Sciences requirement.The lecture course(s) selected for NaturalSciences must include or be accompaniedby the corresponding laboratory course.The lecture and corresponding laboratorycourse(s) may carry separate credit.Students should consult with an advisorfor appropriate course selection. Studentsshould also access the AZ CourseEquivalency Guide (CEG) within the AZCourse Applicability System (AZCAS)for information on equivalencies.2. Awareness Areas: ..................................................0Students must satisfy two Awareness Areas:Cultural Diversity in the United States [C]and either Global Awareness [G] or HistoricalAwareness [H]. However, it is not necessaryfor students to exceed thirty-five semestercredits to complete the Awareness Areasbecause courses can satisfy a Core Area andone or two Awareness Areas simultaneously.Therefore no additional semester creditsare required to satisfy the two AwarenessAreas.Cultural Diversity in the United States [C]ANDGlobal Awareness [G]ORHistorical Awareness [H]+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-20141273. MCCCD Additional Requirements: ................. 0-6Students must satisfy Oral Communicationand Critical Reading areas. However, it is notnecessary for students to exceed the thirty-fivesemester credits required in order to completethe MCCCD Additional Requirements becausecourses can satisfy a Core Area and MCCCDAdditional Requirements simultaneously.Therefore no additional semester credits arerequired to satisfy Oral Communication andCriticalReading.a. Oral Communication: ................................... 3A total of three (3) semester credits isrequired for Oral Communication. However,if students select a communication coursethat satisfies both the Oral Communicationarea and an area within the Core, thenthe Oral Communication requirement hasbeen satisfied and additionalelectives may be taken.Select from the following options:COM100 [SB] (3 credits) ORCOM100AA & COM100AB & COM100AC[SB] (3 credits) ORCOM110 [SB] (3 credits) ORCOM110AA & COM110AB & COM110AC [SB](3 credits) ORCOM225 [L] (3 credits) ORCOM230 [SB] (3 credits)II. Fine Arts Requirements – Art .........................28A minimum of 28 credits are required to satisfy theFine Arts Requirements – Art.Foundations: ................................................................16Select the following:ADA/ART112 Two-Dimensional Design 3ADA/ART115 Three-Dimensional Design 3ARH102Renaissance ThroughContemporary Art 3ART111 Drawing I 3ART113 Color 3ART255AB The Portfolio 1Restricted Electives: .................................................. 12Select from the following options to complete aminimum of twelve semester credits:ART116 Life Drawing I 3ART122 Drawing and Composition II 3ART131 Photography I 3ART151 Sculpture I 3ART161 Ceramics I 3ART165 Watercolor Painting I 3ART167 Painting I 3Associate in Arts, Fine Arts – ArtTotal Credits: .............................................................63b. Critical Reading: Credits: ............................ 3A total of three (3) semester credits isrequired for the Critical Reading area.However, if students complete CRE 101 andapply it to AGEC-A Core Requirements orif the students demonstrate proficiencythrough assessment, then the CriticalReading requirement has been satisfied.Select from the following options tocomplete 3 credits:CRE101 (3 credits) OR equivalent asindicated by assessment+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


128 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014ASSOCIATE IN ARTS, FINE ARTS (AAFA) – DANCEThe Maricopa County Community College DistrictAssociate in Arts, Fine Arts - Dance degree requiresa minimum of 64 semester credits for the program ofstudy. The degree includes the following components:I. General Education:Arizona General Education Curriculum for Arts(AGEC-A)MCCCD Additional RequirementsII.Fine Arts Requirements – DancePurpose of the DegreeThe Associate in Arts, Fine Arts - Dance degree isdesigned for students planning to transfer to four-yearcolleges and universities. In general, the componentsof the degree meet requirements for majors in the FineArts. The degree is designed to prepare students tomeet selective admission criteria for programs such asthe Bachelor of Fine Arts, which may require a portfolioor performance requirement.• Credit received through prior learning assessmentor credit by evaluation is transferable withinthe Maricopa Community Colleges but is notnecessarily transferable to other colleges anduniversities. No more than 20 semester credithours may be applied toward AGEC.• The General Education Requirements for AGEC-Amay be completed in 35 semester credits with thefollowing stipulations- Courses can satisfy a Core Area and one or twoAwareness Areas simultaneously- A course cannot be used to satisfy more thanone Core Area• General Education Courses can satisfy multipleareas within the degree simultaneously (AGEC-ACore Area, AGEC Awareness Area, MCCCDAdditional Requirements, or lower-division coursesapplicable to the major).The semester credits used to satisfy the MCCCD Associatein Arts, Fine Arts - Dance degree may apply touniversity graduation requirements of the universitymajor for which the degree is designed. Informationregarding the articulation of the degree with majors atthe Arizona public universities can be accessed via thefollowing website: www.aztransfer.comAcademic Policies that Govern the Associate inArts, Fine Arts - Dance Degree• Completion of the Associate in Arts, Fine Arts-Dance degree and the AGEC-A provides forexemption from Arizona public universityadmission requirements for Arizona residents whohave a minimum Grade Point Average of 2.0 on a4.0=A scale and a minimum 2.5 on a 4.0=A scalefor non-residents.• The graduation policies within the general catalogmust be satisfied for completion of the Associatein Arts, Fine Arts - Dance degree.• A minimum of 64 semester credits in coursesnumbered 100 and above to be completed witha grade of “C” or better. Credit units transferredfrom outside of the district need to be at a gradeof “C” or better. A grade of “C” equals 2.0 on a4.0 grading scale or equivalent. On an exceptionbasis, P-grades may be allowed in the AGEC forcredit transferred if documentation collected bythe community college indicates that the P-gradeissued was the only option for the student and theP-grade is a “C” or better. The P-grade exceptiondoes not apply to credits awarded by AGECgranting/receiving institutions;• Effective Fall 2000, the course evaluation and/or general education designation as listed inthe Arizona Course Equivalency Guide (CEG)within the Arizona Course Applicability System(AZCAS), is valid for the term in which the studentis awarded credit on the transcript. A courseevaluation and/or general education designationmay be subject to change. Students do havethe option to petition for general educationevaluations and/or general education designationsupon transfer.• Courses completed at one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges to meet AGEC-Arequirements must be listed in the CourseEquivalency Guide within the Arizona CourseApplicability System as an equivalent course,departmental elective credit (XXXXDEC), orgeneral elective credit (Elective) at all Arizonapublic universities. The course’s evaluation and/or general education designation is valid for theterm in which the student is awarded credit on thetranscript. View specific course information via thefollowing website: www.maricopa.edu/academic/ccta/ by clicking on the statewide AGEC icon.• Courses completed at one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges to meet the GeneralElectives requirement must be transferable tothe university or universities to which the studentplans to transfer, as elective credit or better. Forappropriate course selection, students shouldconsult with an advisor.• Courses transferred from another regionallyaccredited institution to one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges will be evaluated by thecollege for inclusion in the AGEC-A or Associate inArts, Fine Arts-Dance Degree.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014129• Courses and their modular equivalents will satisfyAGEC-A and Associate in Arts, Fine Arts - Dancerequirements.• If a course is cross-referenced with one ormore other courses, then only one of the crossreferencedcourses will be accepted to meetrequirements.• Courses completed at one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges to satisfy Common Coursesmust be transferable as elective or better to theuniversities that have the shared majors listedon a Common Course Matrix. A shared majoris a university degree program that has similaracademic preparation to one or more degreeprograms at other Arizona public universitiesas listed on the Common Course Matrices. Forappropriate course selection, students shouldconsult with an advisorDegree RequirementsThe 64 semester credits required for the Associate inArts, Fine Arts - Dance degree follow. View specificcourse information via the following website: www.maricopa.edu/academic/ccta/ by clicking on thestatewide AGEC icon. The AGEC A, B, S, and AGECMatrix identify the courses in alpha-order by prefix aswell as the Core Areas and Awareness Areas where thecourse will apply.I. MCCCD General EducationThe MCCCD General Education includes two areas:MCCCD AGEC-A and MCCCD AdditionalRequirements.MCCCD AGEC-A1. Core Areas: ...........................................................35a. First-Year Composition (FYC): ...................6b. Literacy and Critical Inquiry [L]: ............... 3c. Mathematical Studies [MA/CS]: ................6To complete the Mathematical Studiesrequirement, select one course to satisfyMathematics [MA] A and a second coursefrom Computer/Statistics/QuantitativeApplications [CS].1) Mathematics [MA] A (3 credits)Select a course in college mathematicsor college algebra or pre-calculus orany other mathematics course forwhich college algebra is a prerequisite.AND2) Computer/Statistics/QuantitativeApplications [CS] (3 credits)d. Humanities and Fine Arts [HU]: ..................6Students are encouraged to choosecourse work from more than one disciplinefor a total of six semester credits.Select from the following options tocomplete three credits:DAH100 Introduction to Dance 3DAH201 World Dance Studies 3e. Social and Behavioral Sciences [SB]: ........6Students are encouraged to choosecourse work from more than one disciplinefor a total of six semester credits.f. Natural Sciences [SQ/SG]: ..........................8To complete the Natural Sciences requirement:Select four (4) semester credits of[SQ] and four (4) semester credits of [SG]for a total of eight (8) semester credits,OR eight (8) semester credits of [SQ].Students cannot take eight (8) semestercredits of [SG] to meet the Natural Sciencesrequirement.The lecture course(s) selected for NaturalSciences must include or be accompaniedby the corresponding laboratory course.The lecture and corresponding laboratorycourse(s) may carry separate credit.Students should consult with an advisorfor appropriate course selection. Studentsshould also access the AZ Course EquivalencyGuide (CEG) within the AZ CourseApplicability System (AZCAS) for informationon equivalencies.Select from the following options tocomplete four credits:BIO160 Introduction to HumanAnatomy and Physiology 4BIO201 Human Anatomy andPhysiology I 42. Awareness Areas: ..................................................0Students must satisfy two Awareness Areas:Cultural Diversity in the United States [C]and either Global Awareness [G] or HistoricalAwareness [H].However, it is not necessary for students to exceedthirty-five semester credits to completethe Awareness Areas because courses cansatisfy a Core Area and one or two AwarenessAreas simultaneously. Therefore no additionalsemester credits are required to satisfy thetwo Awareness Areas.Cultural Diversity in the United States [C]ANDGlobal Awareness [G]ORHistorical Awareness [H]+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


130 Degrees and Certificates 2013-20143. MCCCD Additional Requirements: ......................... 0-6Students must satisfy Oral Communication andCritical Reading areas. However, it is not necessaryfor students to exceed the thirty-five semestercredits required in order to complete the MCCCDAdditional Requirements because courses cansatisfy a Core Area and MCCCD AdditionalRequirements simultaneously. Therefore noadditional semester credits are required to satisfyOral Communication and Critical Reading.a. Oral Communication:..................................... 3A total of three (3) semester credits isrequired for Oral Communication.However, if students select a communicationcourse that satisfies both the OralCommunication area and an area withinthe Core, then the Oral Communicationrequirement has been satisfied and additionalelectives may be taken.Select from the following options:COM100 [SB] (3 credits) ORCOM100AA & COM100AB & COM100AC[SB] (3 credits) ORCOM110 [SB] (3 credits) ORCOM110AA & COM110AB & COM110AC [SB](3 credits) ORCOM225 [L] (3 credits) ORCOM230 [SB] (3 credits)b. Critical Reading: ............................................ 3A total of three (3) semester credits isrequired for the Critical Reading area.However, if students complete CRE 101 andapply it to AGEC-A Core Requirements orif the students demonstrate proficiencythrough assessment, then the CriticalReading requirement has been satisfiedand additional electives may be taken.Select from the following options tocomplete three credits:CRE101 [L] (3 credits) ORequivalent as indicated by assessmentII. Fine Arts Requirements – Dance: ..................29A minimum of 29 credits are required to satisfy theFine Arts Requirements – Dance.Part I: ...........................................................................11Select the following:DAN150 Dance Performance I 1DAN210 Dance Production I 3DAN221 Rhythmic Theory for Dance I 2DAN264 Choreography I 3DAN280 Dance Practicum 2Part II: ........................................................................... 9Select from the following options to complete aminimum of nine semester credits. Students mustattain Level III competency in ballet and moderndance courses:DAN120++ World Dance (any module) 1DAN129 Musical Theatre Dance I 1DAN130 Musical Theatre Dance II 1DAN131 Ballet I 1DAN132 Modern Dance I 1DAN133 Modern Jazz Dance I 1DAN134 Ballet II 1DAN135 Modern Dance II 1DAN136 Modern Jazz Dance II 1DAN229 Musical Theatre Dance III 1DAN230 Musical Theatre Dance IV 1DAN231 Ballet III 1DAN231AA Ballet III: Intensive 2DAN232 Modern Dance III 1DAN233 Modern Jazz Dance III 1DAN234 Ballet IV 1DAN234AA Ballet IV: Intensive 2DAN232AA Modern Dance III: Intensive 2DAN235 Modern Dance IV 1DAN235AA Modern Dance IV: Intensive 2DAN233AA Modern Jazz Dance III: Intensive 2DAN236 Modern Jazz Dance IV 1DAN236AA Modern Jazz Dance IV: Intensive 2DAN237 Ballet Pointe I 1DAN290++ Dance Conservatory I(any module) 1-3DAN291++ Dance Conservatory II(any module) 1-3DAN292++ Dance Conservatory III(any module) 1-3Part III: Restricted Electives: Credits: .................... 3Only three of the remaining credits may beselected from the following DAN prefixed courses:DAN115++ Contemporary Dance (any module) 1DAN120++ World Dance (any module) 1DAN125++ Social Dance (any module) 1DAN129 Musical Theatre Dance I 1DAN130 Musical Theatre Dance II 1DAN131 Ballet I 1DAN132 Modern Dance I 1DAN133 Modern Jazz Dance I 1DAN134 Ballet II 1DAN135 Modern Dance II 1DAN136 Modern Jazz Dance II 1DAN140 Tap Dance I 1DAN145 Tap Dance II 1DAN146 Tap Dance Ensemble 1DAN150 Dance Performance I 1DAN155 Dance Performance II 1DAN164 Improvisation 1DAN229 Musical Theatre Dance III 1DAN230 Musical Theatre Dance IV 1DAN231 Ballet III 1DAN231AA Ballet III: Intensive 2DAN232 Modern Dance III 1DAN232AA Modern Dance III: Intensive 2DAN233 Modern Jazz Dance III 1+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014131DAN234 Ballet IV 1DAN234AA Ballet IV: Intensive 2DAN235 Modern Dance IV 1DAN233AA Modern Jazz Dance III: Intensive 2DAN236 Modern Jazz Dance IV 1DAN236AA Modern Jazz Dance IV: Intensive 2DAN237 Ballet Pointe I 1DAN240 Tap Dance III 1DAN245 Tap Dance IV 1DAN250 Dance Performance III 1DAN255 Dance Performance IV 1DAN290++ Dance Conservatory I(any module) 1-3DAN291++Dance Conservatory II(any module) 1-3DAN292++ Dance Conservatory III(any module) 1-3DAN298++ Special Projects (any module) 1-3Part IV: Restricted Electives: Dance TheoryE lectives: Credits: ....................................................... 6DAH100 Introduction to Dance 3DAH110 Dance in Film 3DAH190 Discovering Dance Careers 1DAH210 History of Ballet and Modern Dance 3DAN138 Dance Seminar I 1DAH201 World Dance Studies 3DAN211 Dance Production II 3DAN222 Rhythmic Theory for Dance II 2DAN238 Dance Seminar II 1DAN241 Dance Notation I 3DAH250 Dance in Popular Culture 3DAN265 Choreography II 3DAN272 Dance Technology 2DAN296++ Cooperative Education(any module) 1-4DAN293 Teaching Dance in ElementaryEducation 3DAN294 Teaching Dance in SecondaryEducation 3DAN295 Teaching and Management ofStudio Dance 3DAN298*++ Special Projects (any module) 1-3* Selection of DAN298 courses to satisfy degreerequirements should be done in consultation with aprogram advisor or faculty member as Special Projectscourses do not currently transfer to any of the threeArizona state public universities.Associate in Arts, Fine Arts – DanceTotal Credits: .............................................................64+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


132 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014ASSOCIATE IN ARTS, FINE ARTS (AAFA) – THEATREThe Maricopa County Community College DistrictAssociate in Arts, Fine Arts - Theatre degree requires aminimum of 60-64 semester credits for the program ofstudy. The degree includes the following components:I. General Education:Arizona General Education Curriculum for Arts(AGEC-A)MCCCD Additional RequirementsII.Fine Arts Requirements – TheatrePurpose of the DegreeThe Associate in Arts, Fine Arts - Theatre degree isdesigned for students planning to transfer to four-yearcolleges and universities. In general, the componentsof the degree meet requirements for majors in the FineArts the degree is designed to prepare students tomeet selective admission criteria for programs suchas the Bachelor of Fine Arts, which may require aportfolio or performance requirement.The semester credits used to satisfy the MCCCDAssociate in Arts, Fine Arts - Theatre may apply touniversity graduation requirements of the universitymajor for which the degree is designed. Informationregarding the articulation of the degree with majors atthe Arizona public universities can be accessed via thefollowing website: www.aztransfer.com.Academic Policies that Govern the Associate inArts, Fine Arts - Theatre Degree• Completion of the Associate in Arts, Fine Arts -Theatre and the AGEC-A provides for exemptionfrom Arizona public university admissionrequirements for Arizona residents who have aminimum Grade Point Average of 2.0 on a 4.0=Ascale and a minimum 2.5 on a 4.0=A scale for nonresidents.• The graduation policies within the general catalogmust be satisfied for completion of the Associatein Arts, Fine Arts - Theatre degree.• A minimum of 60 semester credits in coursesnumbered 100 and above to be completed witha grade of “C” or better. Credit units transferredfrom outside of the district need to be at a gradeof “C” or better. A grade of “C” equals 2.0 on a4.0 grading scale or equivalent. On an exceptionbasis, P-grades may be allowed in the AGEC forcredit transferred if documentation collected bythe community college indicates that the P-gradeissued was the only option for the student and theP-grade is a “C” or better. The P-grade exceptiondoes not apply to credits awarded by AGECgranting/receiving institutions.• Credit received through prior learning assessmentor credit by evaluation is transferable withinthe Maricopa Community Colleges but is notnecessarily transferable to other colleges anduniversities. No more than 20 semester credithours may be applied toward AGEC.• The General Education Requirements for AGEC-Amay be completed in 35 semester credits with thefollowing stipulations- Courses can satisfy a Core Area and one or twoAwareness Areas simultaneously- A course cannot be used to satisfy more thanone Core Area• General Education Courses can satisfy multipleareas within the degree simultaneously (AGEC-ACore Area, AGEC Awareness Area, MCCCDAdditional Requirements, or lower-division coursesapplicable to the major) Academic Policiescontinued:• Effective Fall 2000, the course evaluation and/or general education designation as listed inthe Arizona Course Equivalency Guide (CEG)within the Arizona Course Applicability System(AZCAS), is valid for the term in which the studentis awarded credit on the transcript. A courseevaluation and/or general education designationmay be subject to change. Students do have theoption to petition for general educationevaluations and/or general education designationsupon transfer.• Courses completed at one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges to meet AGEC-Arequirements must be listed in the CourseEquivalency Guide within the Arizona CourseApplicability System as an equivalent course,departmental elective credit (XXXXDEC), orgeneral elective credit (Elective) at all Arizonapublic universities. The course’s evaluation and/or general education designation is valid for theterm in which the student is awarded credit on thetranscript. View specific course information via thefollowing website: www.maricopa.edu/academic/ccta/ by clicking on the statewide AGEC icon.• Courses completed at one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges to meet the GeneralElectives requirement must be transferable tothe university or universities to which the studentplans to transfer, as elective credit or better. Forappropriate course selection, students shouldconsult with an advisor.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014133• Courses transferred from another regionallyaccredited institution to one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges will be evaluated by thecollege for inclusion in the AGEC-A or Associate inArts, Fine Arts - Theatre Degree.• Courses and their modular equivalents will satisfyAGEC-A and Associate in Arts, Fine Arts - Theatrerequirements.• If a course is cross-referenced with one ormore other courses, then only one of the crossreferencedcourses will be accepted to meetrequirements.• Courses completed at one of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges to satisfy Common Coursesmust be transferable as elective or better to theuniversities that have the shared majors listedon a Common Course Matrix. A shared majoris a university degree program that has similaracademic preparation to one or more degreeprograms at other Arizona public universitiesas listed on the Common Course Matrices. Forappropriate course selection, students shouldconsult with an advisor.Degree RequirementsThe 60-64 semester credits required for the Associatein Arts, Fine Arts -Theatre follow. View specific courseinformation via the following website: www.maricopa.edu/academic/ccta/ by clicking on the statewideAGEC icon. The AGEC A, B, S, and AGEC Matrixidentify the courses in alpha-order by prefix as well asthe Core Areas and Awareness Areas where the coursewill apply.I. MCCCD General EducationThe MCCCD General Education includes two areas:MCCCD AGEC-A and MCCCD AdditionalRequirements.MCCCD AGEC-A1. Core Areas: ...........................................................35a. First-Year Composition (FYC): Credits: .....6b. Literacy and Critical Inquiry [L]:Select the following:THE220 Modern Drama 3c. Mathematical Studies [MA/CS]: .................6To complete the Mathematical Studiesrequirement, select one course to satisfyMathematics [MA] A and a second coursefrom Computer/Statistics/QuantitativeApplications [CS].1) Mathematics [MA] A (3 credits)Select a course in collegemathematics or college algebra orpre-calculus or any other mathematicscourse for which college algebra is aprerequisite.AND2) Computer/Statistics/QuantitativeApplications [CS] (3 credits)d. Humanities and Fine Arts [HU]: .................6Students are encouraged to choose coursework from more than one discipline for atotal of six semester credits.Select the following:HUM/THE205 Introduction to Cinema 3e. Social and Behavioral Sciences [SB]: ........6Students are encouraged to choose coursework from more than one discipline for atotal of six semester credits.f. Natural Sciences [SQ/SG]: ...........................8To complete the Natural Sciencesrequirement: Select four (4) semestercredits of [SQ] and four (4) semestercredits of [SG] for a total of eight (8)semester credits, OR eight (8) semestercredits of [SQ]. Students cannot take eight(8) semester credits of [SG] to meet theNatural Sciences requirement.The lecture course(s) selected for NaturalSciences must include or be accompaniedby the corresponding laboratory course.The lecture and corresponding laboratorycourse(s) may carry separate credit.Students should consult with an advisorfor appropriate course selection. Studentsshould also access the AZ CourseEquivalency Guide (CEG) within the AZCourse Applicability System (AZCAS) forinformation on equivalencies.2. Awareness Areas: ..................................................0Students must satisfy two Awareness Areas:Cultural Diversity in the United States [C]and either Global Awareness [G] or HistoricalAwareness [H]. However, it is not necessary forstudents to exceed thirty-five semester creditsto complete the Awareness Areas becausecourses can satisfy a Core Area and oneor two Awareness Areas simultaneously.Therefore no additional semester credits arerequired to satisfy the two Awareness Areas.Cultural Diversity in the United States [C]ANDGlobal Awareness [G]ORHistorical Awareness [H]+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


134 Degrees and Certificates 2013-20143. MCCCD Additional Requirements: ......................... 0-6Students must satisfy Oral Communication andCritical Reading areas. However, it is not necessaryfor students to exceed the thirty-five semestercredits required in order to complete the MCCCDAdditional Requirements because courses cansatisfy a Core Area and MCCCD AdditionalRequirements simultaneously. Therefore noadditional semester credits are required to satisfyOral Communication and Critical Reading.a. Oral Communication: ................................... 3A total of three (3) semester credits is requiredfor Oral Communication. However, ifstudents select a communication course thatsatisfies both the Oral Communication areaand an area within the Core, then the OralCommunication requirement has been satisfiedand additional electives may be taken.Select from the following options:COM100 [SB] (3 credits) ORCOM100AA & COM100AB & COM100AC[SB] (3 credits) ORCOM110 [SB] (3 credits) ORCOM110AA & COM110AB & COM110AC [SB](3 credits) ORCOM225 [L] (3 credits) ORCOM230 [SB] (3 credits)b. Critical Reading: ............................................ 3A total of three (3) semester credits isrequired for the Critical Reading area.However, if students complete CRE 101 andapply it to AGEC-A Core Requirements orif the students demonstrate proficiencythrough assessment, then the CriticalReading requirement has been satisfied.Select from the following options tocomplete 3 credits:CRE101 [L] (3 credits) ORequivalent as indicated by assessmentRestricted Electives: ................................................9-12Students may take a variety of courses, or theymay choose to emphasize a particular aspect oftheatre, such as acting, technical theatre, cinema,theatre education, directing, movement, musicaltheatre, etc. Students should consult with theircampus theatre advisor for the restricted electivesrecommended to attain each area of emphasis.Select from the following options to complete aminimum of 9 semester credits:HUM/THE206 Introduction to Television Arts 3HUM/THE210 Contemporary Cinema 3THE118 Playwriting 3THP120AA Audition Techniques: PreparedTHP120ABMonologue 1Audition Techniques: ColdReadings 1THP130 Stage Combat 3THP131 Stage Movement 3THP151 Theatre for Youth 3THP210 Acting: TV/Film 3THP211 Creative Drama 3THP212 Acting II 3THP214 Directing Techniques 3THP216 Beginning Stage Lighting 3THP219 Introduction to Puppetry 3THP220 Advanced Acting: Televisionand Film 3THP226 Theatrical Design: Costuming 3COM/THP241 Oral Interpretation of Literature 3THP262 Entertainment Industry DesignDrafting 3THP267 Painting Techniques for Film,TV and Theatre 3THP268 Opportunities in Production 3MUP/THP270 Musical Theatre Workshop 2COM/THP271 Voice and Diction 3THP281 Production and Acting I 3THP298AA-AC Special Projects 1-3Associate in Arts, Fine Arts - TheatreTotal Credits: ......................................................60-64II. Fine Arts Requirements – Theatre:...........25-29A minimum of 25 credits are required to satisfy theFine Arts Requirements – Theatre.Foundations: ...........................................................16-17Select the following:THE111 Introduction to Theatre 3THP112 Acting I 3THP115 Theatre Makeup 3THP201AA Theatre Production I 1ORTHP201AB Theatre Production II 2THP213 Introduction to Technical Theatre 3THP213 Introduction to Design Scenography 3+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014135ASSOCIATE IN BUSINESS (ABUS) DEGREE,GENERAL REQUIREMENTS (GR)The Maricopa County Community College DistrictAssociate in Business General Requirements(ABus GR) degree requires a total of 62-63 semestercredits for the program of study. The degree has threemajor components:I. MCCCD General Education, which includesArizona General Education Curriculum forBusiness (AGEC-B),II. Common Lower Division ProgramRequirements,III. General Electives.Purpose of the DegreeThe ABus GR degree is designed for students whoplan to transfer to Arizona’s public universities intomajors that articulate with the Associate in BusinessGeneral Requirements pathway and for studentswho plan to complete lower division course worktoward a baccalaureate program at other degreegranting institutions. All business majors exceptComputer Information Systems should follow theABus GR pathway. Computer Information Systemsmajors should follow the Associate in Business SpecialRequirements pathway.Generally, the degree transfers as a block without lossof credit to Arizona’s public universities and otherinstitutions with district-wide articulation agreements.In most cases, courses used to satisfy the MCCCDAssociate in Business General Requirements will applyto university graduation requirements of the universitymajor for which the ABus GR was designed.Academic Policies that Govern the Associate inBusiness General Requirements Degree:• Requires 62-63 semester credits in coursesnumbered 100 and above to be completed witha grade of “C” or better. Credit units transferredfrom outside of the district need to be at a gradeof “C” or better. A grade of “C” equals 2.0 on a4.0 grading scale or equivalent. On an exceptionbasis, P-grades may be allowed in the AGEC forcredit transferred if documentation collected bythe community college indicates that the P-gradeissued was the only option for the student and theP-grade is a “C” or better. The P-grade exceptiondoes not apply to credits awarded by AGECgranting/receiving institutions;• Credit received through prior learning assessmentor credit by evaluation is transferable withinthe Maricopa Community Colleges but is notnecessarily transferable to other colleges anduniversities. No more than 20 semester credithours may be applied toward AGEC.• Uses the following policies to help studentscomplete the required Core and Awareness Areasin AGEC B without exceeding the 35 semestercredits• Courses can satisfy a Core Area and one or twoAwareness Areas simultaneously.• A course cannot be used to satisfy more than oneCore Area requirement.• Uses the following policies to help studentscomplete the program requirements at a minimumof 62 semester credits but not more than 63semester credits:• Courses can satisfy multiple areas within thedegree simultaneously (AGEC B Core Area, AGECB Awareness Area, and/or Common Lower DivisionProgram Requirements)• Follows the general education policy below:General Education Designations (example: (FYC),[SB], [HU], etc.)Effective Fall 2000 the course evaluation and/or general education designation as listed inthe Arizona CEG (Course Equivalency Guide)within the Arizona Course Applicability System(AZCAS) is valid for the term in which the studentis awarded credit on the transcript. A courseevaluation and/or general education designationmay be subject to change. Given that curriculumis dynamic at both MCCCD and the institutionsto which MCCCD students transfer, studentshave the option to petition for general educationevaluations and/or general education designations.• Requires courses that transfer as an equivalentcourse, departmental elective credit(XXXXDEC), or general elective credit (Elective)at all Arizona public universities according to theArizona Course Equivalency Guide (CEG) withinthe Arizona Course Applicability System (AZCAS).The course evaluation and/or general educationdesignation as listed in AZCAS is valid for theterm in which the student is awarded credit on thetranscript• Follows the graduation policies within the generalcatalog• Includes both courses and their modularequivalents, either the course or the modularequivalents will satisfy the Associate in BusinessGeneral Requirements• Accepts one of the courses that is cross-referencedwith other courses• Provides for exemption from Arizona universityadmission requirements for students who completethe ABus GR degree from a regionally accreditedpost-secondary institution with a minimum 2.0 ona 4.0=A scale for Arizona residents and a minimum2.5 on a 4.0=A scale for non-residents.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


136 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014Degree RequirementsThe 62-63 semester credits required for the Associatein Business General Requirements follow. View specificcourse information via the following website: www.maricopa.edu/academic/ccta/.Click on the AGEC icon. Select Maricopa CommunityCollege District or any of the Maricopa CommunityColleges. Click on the appropriate AGEC A, B, S, orAGEC Matrix.The lists identify the courses in alpha-order by prefixas well as the different Core Areas and AwarenessAreas where the course will apply.I. MCCCD General EducationMCCCD AGEC B1. Core Areas: ............................................................35a. First-Year Composition (FYC) .....................6b. Literacy and Critical Inquiry [L] ................. 3c. Mathematical Studies [MA/CS] ..................6To complete the Mathematical Studiesrequirement select one course to satisfyMathematics [MA] B and a second coursefrom Computer/Statistics/QuantitativeApplications [CS].1) Mathematics [MA] B (3 credits)MAT212, Brief Calculus, or a higherlevel mathematics courseAND2) Computers/Statistics/QuantitativeApplications) [CS] (3 credits).CIS105 [CS]Survey of Computer Information Systemsd. Humanities and Fine Arts [HU] ...................6Students are encouraged to choose coursework from more than one disciplinefor a total of six semester credits.e. Social and Behavioral Sciences [SB] .........6Students are encouraged to choose coursework from more than one disciplinefor a total of six semester credits.f. Natural Sciences [SQ/SG] ............................8To complete the Natural Sciencesrequirement:Select four (4) semester credits of [SQ]and four (4) semester credits of [SG] fora total of (8) semester credits, OR eight(8) semester credits of [SQ]. Studentscannot take eight (8) semester creditsof [SG] to meet the Natural Sciencesrequirement.The lecture course(s) selected for NaturalSciences must include or be accompaniedby the corresponding laboratory course.The lecture and corresponding laboratorycourse(s) may carry separate credit.Students should consult with an advisorfor appropriate course selection. Studentsshould also access the AZ CourseEquivalency Guide (CEG) within the AZCourse Applicability System (AZCAS) forinformation on equivalencies.2. Awareness AreasStudents must satisfy two Awareness Areas:Cultural Diversity in the United States [C]and either Global Awareness [G] or HistoricalAwareness [H]. However, it is not necessary forstudents to exceed thirty-five semester creditsto complete the Awareness Areas becausecourses can satisfy a Core Area and one or twoAwareness Areas simultaneously. Thereforeno additional semester credits are required tosatisfy the two Awareness Areas.Cultural Diversity in the United States [C]ANDGlobal Awareness [G]ORHistorical Awareness [H]II. Common Lower Division ProgramRequirements: ................................................... 27A total of 27-28 credits are required to satisfy theCommon Lower Division Program Requirements.However, if students select courses thatsimultaneously satisfy multiple areas of thedegree, then the number of semester creditsrequired for Common Lower Division ProgramRequirements is reduced. Additional semestercredits may be required in General Electives tocomplete the minimum 62-63 total programsemester credits.Complete the following: Accounting:ACC111** Accounting Principles I ANDACC230 Uses of Accounting Information I ANDACC240 Uses of Accounting Information II ORACC211** Financial Accounting ANDACC212 Managerial Accounting 6**MCCCD ACC111 and ACC112 together areequivalent to ACC211.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014137ECN211 [SB] Macroeconomic Principles 3ECN212 [SB] Microeconomic Principles 3GBS205 Legal, Ethical, Regulatory Issuesin Business 3GBS221 [CS] Business Statistics 3Quantitative Methods: ....................................................3GBS220 Quantitative Methods in BusinessORMAT217* Mathematical Analysis for BusinessORMAT218* Mathematical Analysis for Business*Students planning to attend ASU W.P. Carey will berequired to take MAT217 or MAT218Business Electives: ............................................................6Select from the following options:CIS114DE Excel SpreadsheetCIS133DA Internet/Web Development Level ICIS162AD C#: Level IGBS151 Introduction to BusinessGBS215 Business, Law and SocietyGBS233 [L] Business CommunicationGBS220** Quantitative Methods in BusinessGBS110 OR Human Relations in Business andIndustryMGT251 Human Relations in BusinessIBS101 Introduction to InternationalBusinessMGT253 Owning and Operating aSmall BusinessREA179 Real Estate Principles IREA180 Real Estate Principles IIMKT271 Principles of MarketingPAD100 21st Century Public Policy andServiceSBU200 Society and BusinessIII. General ElectivesSelect courses to complete a minimum of 62semester credits but no more than a total of 63semester credits. General Electives semestercredits may be necessary if courses selected forthe degree satisfy multiple areas. For appropriatecourse selection, students should consult anadvisor.All courses used to satisfy electives must betransferable to the university or universities towhich the student plans to transfer, as electivecredit or better For appropriate course selection,students should consult with an advisor.Associate in Business (ABUS) Degree, GeneralRequirements (GR) Total Credits: .................... 62-63**If course used to satisfy Common Lower DivisionProgram Requirements, it can not be used to satisfyBusiness Electives.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


138 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014ASSOCIATE IN BUSINESS (ABUS) DEGREE, SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS (SR)The Maricopa County Community College DistrictAssociate in Business, Special Requirements (ABusSR) degree requires a total of 62-63 semester creditsfor the program of study. The degree has three majorcomponents:I. MCCCD General Education which includes theArizona General Education Curriculum forBusiness (AGEC B),II.Common Lower Division ProgramRequirements,III. General Electives.Purpose of the DegreeThe ABus SR degree is designed for ComputerInformation Systems majors who plan to transfer toArizona’s public universities and for students whoplan to complete lower division course work towarda baccalaureate program at other degree grantinginstitutions. The Associate in Business GeneralRequirements (ABus GR) is designed for all otherbusiness majors. Additional information on academicmajors at the Arizona public universities can beaccessed via the following web site: www.aztransfer.com/.Generally, the degree transfers as a block without lossof credit to Arizona’s public universities and otherinstitutions with district-wide articulation agreements.In most cases, courses used to satisfy the MCCCDAssociate in Business Special Requirements may applyto university graduation requirements of the universitymajor for which the ABus SR was designed.Academic Policies that Govern the Associate inBusiness Special Requirements Degree:• Requires 62-63 semester credits in coursesnumbered 100 and above to be completed witha grade of “C” or better. Credit units transferredfrom outside of the district need to be at a gradeof “C” or better. A grade of “C” equals 2.0 on a4.0 grading scale or equivalent. On an exceptionbasis, P-grades may be allowed in the AGEC forcredit transferred if documentation collected bythe community college indicates that the P-gradeissued was the only option for the student and theP-grade is a “C” or better. The P-grade exceptiondoes not apply to credits awarded by AGECgranting/receiving institutions;• Credit received through prior learning assessmentor credit by evaluation is transferable within theMaricopa Community Colleges but is notnecessarily transferable to other colleges anduniversities. No more than 20 semester credithours may be applied toward AGEC.• Uses the following policies to help studentscomplete the required Core and AwarenessAreas in AGEC B without exceeding the 35semester credits• Courses can satisfy a Core Area and one or twoAwareness Areas simultaneously.• A course cannot be used to satisfy more than oneCore Area requirement.• Uses the following policy to help studentscomplete the program requirements at a minimumof 62 semester credits but not more than 63semester credits:Courses can satisfy multiple areas within thedegree simultaneously (AGEC B Core Area, AGECB Awareness Area, and/or Common Lower DivisionProgram Requirements)• Follows the general education policy below:General Education Designations (example: (FYC),[SB], [HU], etc.)Effective Fall 2000 the course evaluation and/or general education designation, as listed inthe Arizona CEG (Course Equivalency Guide)within the Arizona Course Applicability System(AZCAS) is valid for the term in which the studentis awarded credit on the transcript. A courseevaluation and/or general education designationmay be subject to change. Given that curriculumis dynamic at both MCCCD and the institutions towhich MCCCD students transfer, students have theoption to petition for course evaluations and/orgeneral education designations• Requires courses that transfer as an equivalentcourse, departmental elective credit (XXXXDEC),or general elective credit (Elective) at all Arizonapublic universities according to the Arizona CourseEquivalency Guide (CEG). The course evaluationand/or general education designation as listed inAZCAS is valid for the term in which the student isawarded credit on the transcript• Follows the graduation policies within the generalcatalog• Includes both courses and their modularequivalents, either the course or the modularequivalents will satisfy the Associate in BusinessSpecial Requirements• Accepts one of the courses that is cross-referencedwith other courses+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014139• Provides for exemption from Arizona universityadmission requirements for students who completethe ABus SR degree from a regionally accreditedpost-secondary institution with a minimum 2.0 ona 4.0=A scale for Arizona residents and a minimum2.5 on a 4.0=A scale for non-residentsDegree RequirementsThe 62-63 semester credits required for the Associatein Business Special Requirements follow. View specificcourse information via the following website: www.maricopa.edu/academic/ccta/.Click on the AGEC icon. Select Maricopa CommunityCollege District or any of the Maricopa CommunityColleges. Click on the appropriate AGEC A, B, S, orAGEC Matrix.The lists identify the courses in alpha-order by prefixas well as the different Core Areas and AwarenessAreas where the course will apply.I. MCCCD General EducationMCCCD AGEC B1. C ore Areas: ...........................................................35a. First-Year Composition (FYC) ..............6b. Literacy and Critical Inquiry [L] .......... 3c. Mathematical Studies [MA/CS] ...........6To complete the Mathematical Studiesrequirement select one course tosatisfy the Mathematics [MA] B and asecond course from Computer/Statistics/Quantitative Applications[CS]1) Mathematics [MA] B (3 credits)MAT212, Brief Calculus, or a higherlevel mathematics courseAND2) Computer/Statistics/QuantitativeApplications [CS]CIS105 [CS] Survey of ComputerInformation Systemsd. Humanities and Fine Arts [HU] ...........6Students are encouraged to choosecourse work from more than onediscipline for a total of six semestercredits.f. Natural Sciences [SQ/SG] ....................8To complete the Natural Sciencesrequirement:Select four (4) semester credits of[SQ] and four (4) semester credits of[SG] for a total of eight (8)semester credits, OReight (8) semester credits of [SQ].Students cannot take eight (8)semester credits of [SG] to meet theNatural Sciences requirement.The lecture course(s) selected forNatural Sciences must include or beaccompanied by the correspondinglaboratory course. The lecture andcorresponding laboratory course(s)may carry separate credit. Studentsshould consult with an advisorfor appropriate course selection.Students should also access the AZCourse Equivalency Guide (CEG)within the AZ Course ApplicabilitySystem (AZCAS) for information onequivalencies.2. Awareness Areas:Students must satisfy two AwarenessAreas: Cultural Diversity in the UnitedStates [C] and either Global Awareness [G]or Historical Awareness [H].However, it is not necessary for studentsto exceed thirty-five semester credits tocomplete the Awareness Areas becausecourses can satisfy a Core Area and oneor two Awareness Areas simultaneously.Therefore no additional semester creditsare required to satisfy the two AwarenessAreas.Cultural Diversity in the United States [C]ANDGlobal Awareness [G]ORHistorical Awareness [H]II. Common Lower Division ProgramRequirements: .................................................... 27A total of 27-28 credits are required for theCommon Lower Division Program Requirements.Common courses meeting general education areasare noted with the general education designationsencased in brackets.e. Social and Behavioral Sciences [SB] .6Students are encouraged to choosecourse work from more than onediscipline for a total of six semestercreditsComplete the following:Accounting:ACC111** Accounting Principles I ANDACC230 Uses of Accounting Information I ANDACC240 Uses of Accounting Information II ORACC211** Financial Accounting ANDACC212 Managerial Accounting 6**MCCCD ACC111 and ACC112 together are equivalent toACC211.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


140 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014Programming I: 3CIS162AD C#: Level IProgramming II: 3CIS250 Management of Information SystemsGBS205 Legal, Ethical, and Regulatory Issuesin Business 3GBS221 [CS] Business Statistics 3ECN211 [SB] Macroeconomic Principles 3ECN212 [SB] Microeconomic Principles 3Quantitative Methods : 3GBS220 Quantitative Methods in BusinessORMAT217* Mathematical Analysis for BusinessORMAT218* Mathematical Analysis for BusinessIII. General Electives .............................................0-6Select courses to complete a minimum of 62semester credits but no more than a total of 63semester credits for the program. General Electivessemester credits may be necessary if coursesselected for the degree satisfy multiple areas. Forappropriate course selection, students shouldconsult an advisor.All courses used to satisfy electives must betransferable to the university or universities towhich the student plans to transfer, as electivecredit or better. For appropriate course selection,students should consult with an advisor.Associate in Business Degree (ABUS), SpecialRequirements (SR) Total Credits: ................. 62-63*Students planning to attend ASU W.P. Carey will berequired to take MAT217 or MAT218The Maricopa Community College District AcademicCertificate (area of emphasis) is a defined andcoherent program of study that is recommended forstudents who wish to gain additional expertise in anacademic area. While this program of study can resultin proficiency in specified skills and competencies,as well as mastery of knowledge, it is not designedto prepare someone for employment in a specificoccupation. The content for an Academic Certificate(area of emphasis) may be derived from a varietyof disciplines or it can be discipline specific. TheAcademic Certificate does not require a generalstudies component even though requirements ofthe certificate may include courses that currentlymeet specific general studies designations such asHumanities and Fine Arts, Social and BehavioralSciences, etc.Academic Policies that Govern the AcademicCertificate (area of emphasis):• Generally ranges from 12-39 credit hours incourses numbered 100 or above, although there isno minimum number of credit hours required foran Academic Certificate;ACADEMIC CERTIFICATE (AC)• Requires a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better forcompletion;• Follows the graduation policies within the generalcatalog;• Accepts one of the courses that is crossreferencedwith other courses;• Includes both courses and their modularequivalents, either the course or the modularequivalents will satisfy the Academic Certificaterequirements;• Does not presume block transfer value —consequently, in most cases the AcademicCertificate should not be a subset of an existingtransfer degree;• May have admission criteria established by thecollege if and when appropriate;• Is for the most part college specific.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Transferable Courses 141TRANSFERABLE COURSESANTHROPOLOGYDivision: Liberal Arts; Chair: Kerry VrabelAnthropology is a multi-disciplinary humanisticscience. The field includes a broad range of courseswith topics including the theories of human origin,ethnic and minority relations, cultures and civilizationsout of the past, tribal perspectives on the modernworld, and much more. Students find anthropologycourses to be enriching. Knowledge in the field ofanthropology helps to sensitize students to a multiculturalview of the world, and to understand theuniversal commonality of humanity. Anthropologycourses may satisfy the Social and Behavioral Science,General Science, Humanities, Cultural and HistoricalAwareness parts the General Education requirementsfor Associate degrees and are generally transferrable.BIOLOGYDivision: Math & Sciences; Chair: Dr. James CrimandoBiology courses study living organisms and lifeprocesses; laboratories provide students theopportunity to participate directly in the scientificmethod of inquiry through a wide variety of handsonlaboratory experiences. A strong foundation inbiological science is essential to persons who arepursuing career goals in Nursing and Health Sciencesprograms as well as those pursuing a variety of degreeprograms for various life-science majors. Biologycourses may satisfy the Natural Science part of theGeneral Education requirements for the Associatedegrees and are generally transferrable.CHEMISTRYDivision: Math & Sciences; Chair: Dr. James CrimandoChemistry courses study atomic and molecularstructure, and the properties and reactions of matter;laboratory courses offer students the opportunity toparticipate directly in the scientific method of inquiry.Chemistry is very important to such fields as Nursing,Health Sciences and other technologies. Chemistrycourses may satisfy the Natural Science part of theGeneral Education requirements for the Associatedegrees and are generally transferrable.COMMUNICATIONDivision: Liberal Arts; Chair: Kerry VrabelCommunication skills in speech are important tostudents for a variety of personal and career-relatedgoals; persons who speak well more often achievetheir desired purpose through their abilities inorganizing and presenting ideas in a clear, convincingmanner. Speech communication courses are generallytransferable and may satisfy part of the GeneralEducation requirements for the Associate degrees andare generally transferrable.ENGLISHDivision: Liberal Arts; Chair: Kerry VrabelEnglish courses are important because communicationskills are essential to all areas of human endeavor;society depends on accuracy in the uses of languageand sensitivity to the impact of words on humanrelations. In English courses students learn howto organize their ideas into effective patterns ofcommunication. Placement testing is required forall students taking English courses. English courses(ENG081, ENG091, ENG101, and ENG102) requirean appropriate placement test score or successfulcompletion of the prior level; for example, ENG 101requires an appropriate placement test score or thesuccessful completion of ENG091. English coursesare an essential part of the General Educationrequirements for the Associate degrees. Coursesnumbered 100 and above are generally transferable.HISTORYDivision: Liberal Arts; Chair: Kerry VrabelHistory, the record of human accomplishments andfailures, is concerned with understanding the past andhow it has affected the present; therefore, throughthe study of history, students may be better able tointerpret the present and anticipate the future. Theemphasis at GateWay is not to simply memorizenames and dates, but to have a complete picture ofthe past. History courses generally transfer to fouryearinstitutions. Arizona History (HIS105), required forArizona K-12 teaching certification, can be taken at thecommunity college level. History courses may satisfythe Social and Behavioral Sciences part of the GeneralEducation requirements of the Associate degrees andare generally transferrable.HUMANITIESDivision: Liberal Arts; Chair: Kerry VrabelHumanities courses are a valuable introductionto the complexity and richness of human culturalachievements and are therefore a means by whichstudents may more fully understand themselves andother people and come to enjoy the beauty of lifemore completely. Humanities and English Humanitiessatisfy the Humanities part of the General Educationrequirement of the Associate degrees and aregenerally transferrable.MATHEMATICSDivision: Math & Sciences; Chair: Dr. James CrimandoMathematics is a key skill necessary to manyoccupational and academic areas, involving not onlycomputational abilities but also logic and the abilityto read and interpret mathematical data accurately.Mathematics courses comprise an important part ofa pre-technical block of courses offered for studentswho wish to strengthen academic skills whilebeginning their occupational coursework. Mathematicsis an essential part of the General Educationrequirements of the Associate degrees, and mostcourses numbered 100 and above transfer to othercollege or university programs.


142 Transferable CoursesPHYSICSDivision: Math & Sciences; Chair: Dr. James CrimandoPhysics courses study energy and matter and theinteractions between them; laboratory courses offerstudents the opportunity to participate directly inthe scientific method of inquiry. The knowledge ofphysics is important in health, technical and othersciences. When enrolling, students should be certainto enroll for both the lecture and laboratory sections,where required, and plan their schedules accordingly.Knowledge of algebra is strongly recommended asa preparation for entering physics classes. Physicscourses are generally transferable, some as electivecredit courses. Physics courses may satisfy the NaturalScience part of the General Education requirements ofthe Associate degrees and are generally transferrable.SOCIAL WORKDivision: Liberal Arts; Chair: Kerry VrabelSocial Work courses provide insight into manyimportant social justice and inequality issues, as wellas preparing students to working in a highly diverseworld. Courses are designed to transfer into manydisciplines at four-year state universities, includingthe schools of Social Work. Students do not need todeclare an intent to pursue Social Work to take thesecourses. Social Work courses may satisfy transferrequirements in Social and Behavioral Sciences,Cultural Awareness, and Historical Awareness. SocialWork courses meet General Education requirementsfor Associate degrees and are generally transferrable.SOCIOLOGYDivision: Liberal Arts; Chair: Kerry VrabelSociology courses help provide insight for studentsinto how society functions, with a focus on theinterrelationships of social groups. Sociology coursesmay satisfy the Social and Behavioral Sciences partof the General Education requirements for Associatedegrees and are generally transferable.SPANISHDivision: Liberal Arts; Chair: Kerry VrabelSpanish courses are valuable to students who workand live in the Southwest or expect to travel abroad;in addition, study of a foreign language is one of thebest ways for a person to gain understanding of thegrammatical structure of English and to broaden hisor her perspective concerning the different waysby which human beings perceive and communicatereality. Foreign language is required for admission andfor some degrees at the university level and coursesare generally transferable.WOMEN’S STUDIESDivision: Liberal Arts; Chair: Kerry VrabelWomen’s Studies courses focus on women’sexperiences and perspectives, exploring topics suchas history, culture, class, race, ethnicity, sexualityand gender in order to help bring about equality,understanding, and peace. These courses are culturallyresponsive to the diversity of one half of the world’speople, their work, and their impact on multiculturalsocieties. Women’s studies courses may satisfy partof the General Education requirements for Associatedegrees and are generally transferrable.


MARICOPA SKILL CENTERMaricopa Skill Center 143Maricopa Skill Center (MSC), a division of GateWay Community College, provides hands-on, industry-drivencertificate training programs at 1245 East Buckeye Road in Phoenix. Maricopa Skill Center offers a varietyof short-term programs in Business & Technology, Cosmetology, Health Care and Trades. MSC partners withbusiness leaders and employers to develop curriculum relevant to the evolving needs of the industry. Manyprograms have both local and national certifications that prepare students for today’s workforce.AUTO BODYAuto Body Basic Metal Repair & RefinishingCertificate ProgramAuto Body Basic Metal Repair Certificate ProgramAuto Body Basic Refinishing Certificate ProgramCOMPUTER REPAIR & NETWORKINGComputer Support Specialist Certificate ProgramCONSTRUCTION TRADESElectrician Worker Certificate ProgramGreen Builder: Solar Photovoltaic InstallerCertificate ProgramPlumbing Worker Certificate ProgramRough Carpentry Framer Certificate ProgramCOSMETOLOGYAesthetician Certificate ProgramCosmetologist Certificate ProgramCUSTOMER SERVICECustomer Service Representative CertificateProgramCustomer Service Representative for RetailCertificate ProgramCustomer Service Representative for Travel &Tourism Certificate ProgramHEALTH CARE OCCUPATIONSAssisted Living Caregiver TrainingOphthalmic Assistant Certificate ProgramMACHINE TRADESCNC Machinist Certificate ProgramManual Machinist Certificate ProgramMEAT CUTTERApprentice Meat Cutter Certificate ProgramMeat Department Helper Certificate ProgramWELDINGArc Welder Certificate ProgramCombination Welder - 2 Process CertificateProgramCombination Welder - 3 Process CertificateProgramCombination Welder - 3 Process with Intro to PipeWelding Certificate ProgramCombination Welder - 4 Process CertificateProgramFlux Core Welder Certificate ProgramMIG Welder Certificate ProgramTIG Welder/TIG Fingertip Welder CertificateProgram602-238-4300www.maricopaskillcenter.com


144 Average Length of Completion for Programs*Average length of completion isbased on having completed programprerequisites and successful completionof at least 12 credit hours a semester.degrees certificates degrees certificatesavg. 5 semesters/2 years to complete*(unless noted)(avg. # ofsemestersto complete*)avg. 5 semesters/2 years to complete*(unless noted)(avg. # ofsemestersto complete*)Accounting • (6) • (3)Administration of Justice Studies** • (6)Administrative Technology•Air Conditioning and ElectricalAccessories •(1)Air Conditioning/Refrigeration/Facilities •(6) •(5)Automotive Drive Trains •(1)Automotive Suspension, Steeringand Brakes •(1)Automotive Technology •(6) •(5)Biomedical Research Technology •(6)Business Technology Specialist •(2)Clinical Research Associate •(2)Clinical Research Coordinating •(2)Computed Tomography•(1)Computer Information Systems •(6) •(2)Court Reporting - Judicial •(8) •(6)Court Reporting - Scoping/Transcription •(3)Diagnostic Medical Sonography •(7) •(6)Electrical Technology •(6) •(4)Electroneurodiagnostic (END)Technology•Engine Performance and Diagnosis •(2)Fast Track Practical Nursing •(2)General Business •(6) •(2)Health Services Management • •(1)Health Unit Coordinating/PatientCare Associate •(2)Healthcare Compliance •(2)Homeland Security** •(2)Hospital Central Service Technology •(3)Industrial Design Technology •(6)Industrial Design Technology:Design Specialist - Solidworks •(3)Linux Professional •(1)Magnetic Resonance Imaging •(1)Management of Clinical and BioscienceInformatics •(8)Management of Clinical and BioscienceInformatics : Business and ProjectManagement •(5)Management of Clinical and BioscienceInformatics : Clinical InformaticsTechnology •(2)Management of Clinical and BioscienceInformatics : Public Health •(4)Management of Clinical InformationTechnology•Management of Clinical InformationTechnology: Clinical TechnologyConsulting •(2)Management of Clinical InformationTechnology: Health InformationTechnology Implementation Support •(2)Management of Clinical InformationTechnology: Health InformationTechnology Technical Support •(2)Management of Clinical InformationTechnology: Health InformationTechnology Training •(2)Management of Clinical InformationTechnology: ImplementationManagement •(2)Management of Clinical InformationTechnology: Practice Workflow andInformation Management Redesign •(2)Medical Radiography •(6)Medical Transcription •(6) •(3)Microsoft Certified Information TechnologyProfessional (MCITP) Administrator •(3)Microsoft Networking Technology •(6)Microsoft Technical Specialist •(2)Networking Administration: Cisco •(2)Networking Administration: MicrosoftWindows Server • •(2)Networking Technology: Cisco •(6) •(2)Nuclear Medicine Technology •(7)Nurse Assisting •(1)Nursing•Nursing Refresher •(1)Occupational Safety andHealth Technology •(6) •(3)Office Technology •(2)Organizational Leadership •(2)Organizational Management•Physical Therapist Assisting •(6)Polysomnographic Technology • •(4)Practical Nursing •(2)Production Technology •(6)Production Technology: CNCTechnology •(2)Production Technology: QualityAssurance •(2)Radiation Therapy •(5)Residential and Light CommercialAir Conditioning •(2)Respiratory Care •(6)Retail Management •(6) •(3)Small Business Entrepreuneurship** •(1)Surgical Technology • •(3)Surgical Technology for theOperating Room Nurse •(2)Wastewater Treatment •(3)Water Resource Technologies •(7)Water Resource Technologies:Hydrologic Studies •(3)Water Treatment •(3)**Open to Corporate Training and Development clients only


Average Length of Completion for Programs 145*Average length of completion isbased on having completed programprerequisites and successful completionof at least 12 credit hours a semester.degreesavg. 5 semesters/2 years to complete*(unless noted)certificates(avg. # ofsemestersto complete*)degreesavg. 5 semesters/2 years to complete*(unless noted)certificates(avg. # ofsemestersto complete*)APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAMSBricklaying-Tilesetting • •(3)Carpentry •(6) •(3)Concrete Form Builder •(3)Construction Management •(3)Electricity •(6) •(4)General Construction Worker •(1)Heat and Frost Insulation •(6) •(4)Heavy Equipment Operations • •(3)Ironworking •(7) •(5)Mechanical Trades: HVAC •(6) •(3)Mechanical Trades: Pipefitting •(4)Mechanical Trades: Plumbing •(6) •(4)Mechanical Trades: Sheet Metal •(6) •(3)Millwrighting •(6) •(3)Painting and Drywalling • •(2)Pipe Trades: Pipefitter-Refrigeration •(9) •(7)Plastering and Cement Masonry •(3)Plumbing •(8) •(6)Power Plant Technology•Pre-Apprenticeship •(1)Sheet Metal •(9) •(7)Steamfitting •(8) •(6)UNIVERSITY TRANSFER OPTIONSArizona General EducationCurriculum (AGEC) •(3)Associate in Applied Science (AAS) •Associate in Arts (AA)•Associate in Business (ABUS)•Associate in General Studies (AGS) •Associate in Science (AS)•Community colleges offer courses, programs andassociate degrees that are guaranteed to transfer toany one of Arizona’s three state universities. Alwayscheck with an advisor as some courses and programsmay transfer to other colleges and universitiesnationwide.


146 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014OCCUPATIONAL DEGREE/CERTIFICATE PROGRAMSACCOUNTINGCertificate of CompletionAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Business and Information TechnologiesChair: S. Annette TorreyCertificate of Completion in Accounting(23-26 Credits; Code 5665)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in Accountingis for students seeking to gain skills and knowledgein the field of accounting. Possible entry-level jobsfor this program include accounting clerk, accountspayable/receivable clerk, claims clerk, credit clerk, fullchargebookkeeper, accounting intern, or comparablepositions. An Associate in Applied Science (AAS) isalso available.Required Course Credits ............................................ 23-26ACC111 Accounting Principles I (3) ANDACC230+ Uses of Accounting Information I (3) ANDACC240+ Uses of Accounting Information II (3) ORACC111 Accounting Principles I (3) ANDACC112+ Accounting Principles II (3) ANDACC212+ Managerial Accounting (3) ORACC211 Financial Accounting (3) ANDACC212+ Managerial Accounting (3) ...................... 6-9ACC105 Payroll, Sales and Property Taxes ...............3ACC115+ Computerized Accounting ............................2CIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems.................................................................3CIS114DE Excel Spreadsheet ............................................3GBS151 Introduction to Business ................................3GBS205 Legal, Ethical and Regulatory Issues inBusiness ................................................................3Associate in Applied Science Degree inAccounting (60-65 Credits; Code 3149)The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) in Accountingis one of several options for students seeking togain skills and knowledge in the field of accounting.Possible entry-level jobs for this program includeaccounting clerk, accounts payable/receivable clerk,claims clerk, credit clerk, full-charge bookkeeper,accounting intern, or comparable positions.Program Prerequisites .........................................................3CRE101+ College Critical Reading (3) OREquivalent as indicated by assessment. .....3Required Course Credits ............................................ 29-32Students must earn a grade of “C” or better in eachcourse in the Required Courses area.ACC111 Accounting Principles I (3) ANDACC230+ Uses of Accounting Information I (3) ANDACC240+ Uses of Accounting Information II (3) ORACC230+ Uses of Accounting Information I (3) ANDACC240+ Uses of Accounting Information II (3) ANDACC250 Introductory Accounting Lab (1) ORACC111 Accounting Principles I (3) ANDACC112+ Accounting Principles II (3) ANDACC212+ Managerial Accounting (3) ORACC211 Financial Accounting (3) ANDACC212+ Managerial Accounting (3) ...................... 6-9ACC105 Payroll, Sales and Property Taxes ...............3ACC115+ Computerized Accounting ............................2ACC121 Income Tax Preparation (3) ORACC221+ Tax Accounting (3)...........................................3CIS114DE Excel Spreadsheet ............................................3CIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems.................................................................3GBS151 Introduction to Business ................................3GBS205 Legal, Ethical and RegulatoryIssues in Business ..............................................3GBS233+ Business Communication ...............................3Restricted Electives..............................................................9ACC+++++ Any ACC Accounting course(s) exceptcourses used to satisfy RequiredCourses area. ..................................................... 9CIS117DM Microsoft Access: Database Management ..3GBS131 Business Calculations ......................................3GBS207 Business Law (General Corporate) ............3GBS220+ Quantitative Methods in Business ..............3General Education Requirements ............................ 22-24ECN211 Macroeconomic Principles (3) ORECN212 Microeconomic Principles (3) ORSBU200 Society and Business (3) ...............................3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ANDENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG108+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3)........... 6MAT120+MAT121+MAT122+Intermediate Algebra (5) ORIntermediate Algebra (4) ORIntermediate Algebra (3) ORSatisfactory completion of a higherlevel mathematics course ......................... 3-5Any general education course in the OralCommunication area ................................................................3Any general education course in the Humanities andFine Arts area ..............................................................................3Any general education course in the NaturalSciences area.............................................................................. 4+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014147ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICESTUDIESCertificate of CompletionAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Department: Corporate Training and DevelopmentCoordinator: Nance HarrisPrograms 5322 and 3012 are only available for clientsof Corporate Training and Development.Certificate of Completion in HomelandSecurity (18 Credits; Code 5322)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in HomelandSecurity program is designed to provide studentswith the knowledge and skills needed to conduct ahomeland security evaluation and to assess, investigateand respond to terrorism incidents. It also providescriminal justice practitioners with an opportunity foracademic growth and the development of specializedskills in homeland security.Required Course Credits ................................................... 18AJS109 Substantive Criminal Law (3) ORAJS142 Transportation and Border Security (3) ..3AJS/DPR/FSC139 Emergency Response to Terrorism ...........3AJS195 International and Domestic Terrorism ......3AJS230 The Police Function ORAJS143 Intelligence Analysis and SecurityManagement (3) ...............................................3AJS260 Procedural Criminal Law ................................3AJS275 Criminal Investigation I ...................................3Associate in Applied Science Degree inAdministration of Justice Studies(62 Credits; Code 3012)The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) inAdministration of Justice Studies program is designedto prepare students for careers within the criminaljustice system including law enforcement, the courts,probation, parole, corrections, and social servicesagencies that support the criminal justice system. Theprogram is interdisciplinary in nature and providesstudents with a broad knowledge of the criminal justicesystem, its organizational components and processes,and its legal and public policy contexts. Students mayselect one of four Certificate of Completion (CCL)programs to complete the AAS degree: Crime andIntelligence Analysis, Forensic Science, HomelandSecurity, or Justice Studies.Required Course Credits ...................................................33The required courses below comprise a group ofProgram Common Core courses that are requiredfor the AAS degree in addition to completion of oneof four certificate programs. Some certificates maycontain additional course requirements. Student willneed to consult with a program advisor on availabilityof Certification of Completion programs.AJS119 Computer Applications in JusticeStudies .....................................................................3AJS200 Current Issues in Criminal Justice .................3AJS225 Criminology ......................................................3AJS/EMT/FSC/SWU258 Victimology and Crisis Management ...........3AJS270 Community Relations .........................................3Certificate of Completion in Crime and IntelligenceAnalysis (5056) (16) ORCertificate of Completion in Forensic Science (5326)(18) ORCertificate of Completion in Homeland Security (5322)(18) ORCertificate of Completion in Justice Studies (5327)(18) ............................................................................................ 16-18Restricted Electives..........................................................4-7Students must select credits in the Restricted Electivesarea to earn a total of 62 credits required for the AASin Administration of Justice Studies degree. Selectedcourses will not apply in both the Required Coursesarea and the Restricted Electives area.AJS+++ Any Administration of Justice Studiescourses .............................................................. 4-7General Education Requirements ............................ 22-25AJS101 Introduction to Criminal Justice ....................3AJS123 Ethics and the Administration of Justice ...3CRE101+College Critical Reading (3) OREquivalent as indicated by assessment .. 0-3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ANDENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ANDENG108+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ............. 6Any approved general education course in theOral Communication area ......................................................3Any approved general education course in theMathematics area ......................................................................3Any approved general education course in theNatural Sciences area .............................................................. 4ADMINISTRATIVE TECHNOLOGYAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Business and Information TechnologiesChair: S. Annette TorreyAssociate in Applied Science Degree inAdministrative Technology(60 Credits; Code 3237)The Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degreein Administrative Technology is designed to give astudent a well-rounded preparation for a career in anoffice environment in the public or private sector. Thedegree includes a wide range of business and computerskills and applications as well as general education.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


148 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014Program Prerequisites ..........................................................1OAS101AA Computer Typing I: Keyboard Mastery (1)OROAS103AA+ Computer Typing: Skill Building I (1) ..........1MAT102+MAT122+Mathematical Concepts/Applications(3) ORIntermediate Algebra (3) OREquivalent by Assessment ............................3Required Course Credits ...................................................33ACC111 Accounting Principles I ..................................3ACC115+ Computerized Accounting ............................2BPC110 Computer Usage and Applications (3) ORCIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems (3) ORCIS183AH Microsoft Office (3) ORBPC/OAS130DK+ Beginning Word (1) ANDBPC/CIS118ABCIS117AMPowerPoint: Level I (1) ANDDatabase Management: MicrosoftAccess Level I (1) ..............................................3BPC/CIS114DE Excel Spreadsheet ............................................3BPC/OAS131DK+ Intermediate Word ............................................1ECN211 Macroeconomic Principles (3) ORECN212 Microeconomic Principles (3)......................3GBS110 Human Relations in Business andIndustry .................................................................3GBS233+ Business Communication ..............................3MGT101 Techniques of Supervision ............................3OAS101AB+ Computer Typing I: Letters, Tables, andReports ..................................................................1OAS101AC+ Computer Typing I: Production andManuscripts .........................................................1OAS108 Business English ...............................................3OAS118 10-Key by Touch .................................................1TQM101 Quality Customer Service .............................3Restricted Electives..............................................................5Students should select five (5) credits from thefollowing prefixes:ACC+++++ Any ACC course(s)CIS+++++ Any CIS course(s)ECN+++++ Any ECN course(s)EPS+++++ Any EPS course(s)GBS+++++ Any GBS course(s)HSM+++++ Any HSM course(s)IBS+++++ Any IBS course(s)MGT+++++ Any MGT course(s)MKT+++++ Any MKT course(s)SBU+++++ Any SBU course(s)SBS+++++ Any SBS course(s)TQM+++++ Any TQM course(s)General Education Requirements ...................................22COM100 Introduction to Human Communication(3) ORCOM110 Interpersonal Communication (3)..............3CRE101+Critical and Evaluative Reading I (3) OREquivalent by Assessment ............................3ENG101+ First-Year Composition ...................................3ENG102+ First-Year Composition ...................................3Any general education course in the Humanities andFine Arts area ..............................................................................3Any general education course in the Natural Sciencearea ................................................................................................ 4AIR CONDITIONING/REFRIGERATION/FACILITIESCertificates of CompletionAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Industrial TechnologyChair: John KellyCertificate of Completion in AirConditioning/Refrigeration/Facilities(46-49 Credits; Code 5380)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in AirConditioning/Refrigeration/Facilities program isdesigned to provide training in the areas of heating,ventilation, refrigeration and air conditioning(HVAC&R) systems, electricity, electronic controls andinstrumentation, hydronics, electro-mechanical devices,and general repair. Students will have an opportunityto learn skills necessary to assess and solve problemsquickly in emergency situations, based upon anunderstanding of regulatory guidelines.Required Course Credits ............................................46-49BPC110 Computer Usage and Applications ...........3FAC/HVA101+FAC/HVA101LL+Refrigeration Applications andComponents I.....................................................2Refrigeration Applications andComponents I Lab .............................................1ELC/FAC/HVA105+ Electricity for Industry ....................................3ELC/FAC/HVA105LL+ Electricity for Industry Lab ............................1ELC/FAC/HVA115+ Motors, Controls and Wiring Diagrams ....3ELC/FAC/HVA115LL+Motors, Controls and WiringDiagrams Lab ......................................................1FAC/HVA186+ Electro-Mechanical Devices .........................3FAC/HVA210+ Facilities Air Conditioning Systems ...........3FAC/HVA210LL+ Facilities Air Conditioning Systems Lab ...1FAC220+ Controls and Instrumentation ......................3FAC220LL+ Controls and Instrumentation Lab ..............1FAC235+ Commercial Air and Water Test/Balance .. 3+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014149FAC235LL+ Commercial Air and Water Test/Balance Lab .........................................................1HVA103+ Refrigeration Applications/Components II ...................................................2HVA103LL+ Refrigeration Applications/Components II Lab ...........................................1HVA112+ Heating and Air Conditioning ......................3HVA112LL+ Heating and Air Conditioning Lab ..............1HVA143 Load Calculation and Duct Design ............3FAC/HVA231 Codes ....................................................................3MAT103AA+ Math for Industrial Applications I ...............2MAT103AB+ Math for Industrial Applications II ..............2OSH105AAOSH106AAConstruction Safety (3) ORIndustrial Safety (3) ORProof of OSHA 30 hour card .................. 0-3Certificate of Completion in Residential andLight Commercial Air Conditioning(20-23 Credits; Code 5542)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in Residentialand Light Commercial Air Conditioning program isdesigned to provide training in the areas of heating,ventilation, refrigeration and air conditioning(HVAC&R) systems, electricity, electronic controls andgeneral repair. Students will have the opportunity tolearn skills necessary to assess and solve problemsquickly in emergency situations.Required Course Credits ............................................ 20-23BPC110 Computer Usage and Applications ...........3FAC/HVA101+FAC/HVA101LL+HVA103+Refrigeration Applications andComponents I.....................................................2Refrigeration Applications andComponents I Lab .............................................1Refrigeration Applications andComponents II ...................................................2HVA103LL+ Refrigeration Applications andComponents II Lab ...........................................1ELC/FAC/HVA105+ Electricity for Industry ....................................3ELC/FAC/HVA105LL+ Electricity for Industry Lab ............................1HVA112+ Heating and Air Conditioning ......................3HVA112LL+ Heating and Air Conditioning Lab ..............1HVA143 Load Calculation and Duct Design ............3OSH105AAOSH106AAConstruction Safety (3) ORIndustrial Safety (3) ORProof of OSHA 30 hour card .................. 0-3Associate in Applied Science Degree in AirConditioning/Refrigeration/Facilities(65-71 Credits; Code 3587)The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) in AirConditioning/Refrigeration/Facilities program isdesigned to provide training in the areas of heating,ventilation, refrigeration and air conditioning(HVAC&R) systems, electricity, electronic controls andinstrumentation, hydronics, electro-mechanical devices,and general repair. Students will have an opportunityto learn skills necessary to assess and solve problemsquickly in emergency situations, based upon anunderstanding of regulatory guidelines. The programprovides students an opportunity to develop writtenand verbal communication skills through generaleducation courses.Required Course Credits ............................................46-49BPC110 Computer Usage and Applications ...........3FAC/HVA101+FAC/HVA101LL+Refrigeration Applications andComponents I.....................................................2Refrigeration Applications andComponents I Lab .............................................1ELC/FAC/HVA105+ Electricity for Industry ....................................3ELC/FAC/HVA105LL+ Electricity for Industry Lab ............................1ELC/FAC/HVA115+ Motors, Controls and Wiring Diagrams ....3ELC/FAC/HVA115LL+Motors, Controls and WiringDiagrams Lab ......................................................1FAC/HVA186+ Electro-Mechanical Devices .........................3FAC/HVA210+ Facilities Air Conditioning Systems ...........3FAC/HVA210LL+ Facilities Air Conditioning Systems Lab ...1FAC220+ Controls and Instrumentation ......................3FAC220LL+ Controls and Instrumentation Lab ..............1FAC/HVA231 Codes ....................................................................3FAC235+FAC235LL+HVA103+HVA103LL+Commercial Air and Water Test andBalance .................................................................3Commercial Air and Water Test andBalance Lab .........................................................1Refrigeration Applications andComponents II ...................................................2Refrigeration Applications andComponents II Lab ...........................................1HVA112+ Heating and Air Conditioning ......................3HVA112LL+ Heating and Air Conditioning Lab ..............1HVA143 Load Calculation and Duct Design ............3MAT103AA+ Mathematics for Industrial Applications I ...2MAT103AB+ Mathematics for Industrial Applications II ..2OSH105AAOSH106AAConstruction Safety (3) ORIndustrial Safety (3) ORProof of OSHA 30 hour card .................. 0-3+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


150 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014General Education Requirements ............................. 19-22CHM130+ Fundamental Chemistry (3) ANDCHM130LL+ Fundamental Chemistry Lab (1) ORPHY101+ Introduction to Physics (4) ORPHY111+ General Physics I (4) ...................................... 4COM100 Introduction to Human Communication ..3CRE101+CRE111+College Critical Reading (3) ORCritical Reading for Business andIndustry (3) OREquivalent as indicated by assessment ..0-3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ANDENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG108+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ORENG111+ Technical and Professional Writing (3) ... 6Any approved general education course from theHumanities and Fine Arts area .............................................3Any approved general education course from theSocial and Behavioral Sciences area ..................................3AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGYCertificates of CompletionAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Industrial TechnologyChair: John KellyCertificate of Completion in AirConditioning and Electrical Accessories(12 Credits; Code 5435)Students can obtain a Certificate of Completion bysuccessfully completing the following courses withgrade of “C” or better. This course grouping shouldprepare the students to enter the automotive airconditioning/electrical service areas of the industry.Required Course Credits ................................................... 12AUT103AA Automotive Electrical Systems .................. 6AUT107AA Automotive Air Conditioning .......................3AUT203 Electrical Accessories .....................................3Certificate of Completion in AutomotiveDrive Trains (12 Credits; Code 5463)Students can obtain a Certificate of Completion bysuccessfully completing the following courses with agrade of “C” or better. This course grouping shouldprepare the students to enter the transmission servicearea of automotive service.Required Course Credits ................................................... 12AUT106AC Engine Overhaul and Reconditioning:Heads and Valves .............................................3AUT110AA Automotive Transmissions and PowerTrains .....................................................................3AUT123 Automatic Transmissions ............................. 6Certificate of Completion in AutomotiveSuspension, Steering and Brakes(12 Credits; Code 5439)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in AutomotiveSuspension, Steering and Brakes program is designedto prepare students to enter the suspension, alignment,and brakes service areas of automotive service.Modern laboratory facilities, fully equipped with thelatest equipment, provide students with excellentopportunities for pre-employment experience.Students can obtain a Certificate of Completion bysuccessfully completing the following courses with agrade of “C” or better.Required Course Credits ................................................... 12AUT108AB Front-End Suspension, Steering andAlignment ........................................................... 4AUT109AC Automotive Brake Systems ......................... 4AUT130 Automotive Quick Service ........................... 4Certificate of Completion in AutomotiveTechnology (51 Credits; Code 5480)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in AutomotiveTechnology program is designed to preparestudents for employment as automotive technicians(mechanics). Instruction is given in both the theoreticaland practical aspects of automotive operation,maintenance and service. Instruction includes directedsystems (both conventional and electronic), brakes,air conditioning, automotive electricity, tune-up andemission control, suspension, and steering systems.Modern laboratory facilities, fully equipped with thelatest equipment, provide students with excellentopportunities for pre-employment experience.Required Course Credits .................................................. 45AUT103AA Automotive Electrical Systems .................. 6AUT104AA+ Automotive Fuel Systems .............................3AUT105AA+ Engine Performance and Diagnosis ..........3AUT106AC+ Engine Overhaul and Reconditioning:Heads and Valves .............................................3AUT107AD Automotive Air Conditioning ...................... 4AUT108AB Front-End Suspension, Steering andAlignment ........................................................... 4AUT109AC Automotive Brake Systems ......................... 4AUT110AC Automotive Power Trains ............................. 4AUT123AA Automatic Transmissions ............................. 4AUT130 Automotive Quick Service ........................... 4AUT240+ Hybrid Vehicle Overview ...............................2AUT215AA+Automotive and Electrical/ElectronicSystems II ........................................................... 4Restricted Electives..............................................................6Students should select six credits from the followingcourses:AUT101 Internal Combustion Engines Theory .......3AUT210+ Automotive Emission Systems ....................3AUT233+ Computerized Engine Control Systems ...3AUT270AC+ Automotive Technology Internship ...........3AUT296++/+ Any Cooperative Education course ...... 1-4AUT298AC Special Projects .................................................3+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014151Certificate of Completion in EnginePerformance and Diagnosis(15 Credits; Code 5479)Students can obtain a Certificate of Completion bysuccessfully completing the following courses with agrade of “C” or better. This course grouping shouldprepare the student to enter the automotive engineservice area.Required Course Credits ................................................... 15AUT103AA Automotive Electrical Systems .................. 6AUT104AA Automotive Fuel Systems .............................3AUT105AA Engine Performance and Diagnosis ..........3AUT210+AUT233+Automotive Emission Systems (3) ORComputerized Engine ControlSystems (3).........................................................3Associate in Applied Science Degree inAutomotive Technology(68-71 Credits; Code 3480)The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) in AutomotiveTechnology program is designed to preparestudents for employment as automotive technicians(mechanics). Instruction is given in both the theoreticaland practical aspects of automotive operation,maintenance and service. Instruction includes directedsystems (both conventional and electronic), brakes,air conditioning, automotive electricity, tune-up andemission control, suspension, and steering systems.Modern laboratory facilities, fully equipped with thelatest equipment, provide students with excellentopportunities for pre-employment experience.Required Course Credits .................................................. 45AUT103AA Automotive Electrical Systems .................. 6AUT104AA+ Automotive Fuel Systems .............................3AUT105AA+ Engine Performance and Diagnosis ..........3AUT106AC+ Engine Overhaul and Reconditioning:Heads and Valves .............................................3AUT107AD Automotive Air Conditioning ...................... 4AUT108ABFront-End Suspension, Steering andAlignment ........................................................... 4AUT109AC Automotive Brake Systems ......................... 4AUT110AC Automotive Power Trains ............................. 4AUT123AA Automatic Transmissions ............................. 4AUT130 Automotive Quick Service ........................... 4AUT240+ Hybrid Vehicle Overview ...............................2AUT215AA+ Automotive and Electrical/ElectronicSystems II ........................................................... 4Restricted Electives..............................................................6Students should select six credits from the followingcourses:AUT101 Internal Combustion Engines Theory ......... 3AUT210+ Automotive Emission Systems ...................... 3AUT233+ Computerized Engine Control Systems ..... 3AUT270AC+ Automotive Technology Internship ............. 3AUT296++/+ Cooperative Education (any suffixedcourse) .................................................................1-4AUT298AC+ Special Projects ................................................... 3General Education Requirements ............................. 17-20CRE101+ Critical and Evaluative Reading I (3) ORCRE111+ Critical Reading for Business andIndustry (3) OREquivalent by Assessment ....................... 0-3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ANDENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG108+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ORENG111+ Technical and Professional Writing (3) ... 6MAT102+ Mathematical Concepts/Applications (3)OREquivalent or higher level mathematicscourse ...................................................................3Any approved general education course in the OralCommunication area ................................................................3Any general education course in the Humanities andFine Arts area ..............................................................................2Any general education course in the Social andBehavioral Sciences area ........................................................3HONDA - TOYOTA AUTOMOTIVETECHNICIANCooperative training programs are available withmajor import manufacturers and dealerships to trainservice technicians for the sophisticated computerizedtechnology found in automobiles today. GateWayCommunity College offers a two-year Associate inApplied Science degree program that includes four,16-week semesters on campus plus 24-28 weeks ofpaid work experience at a local dealership in Arizonaor neighboring states. Current model vehicles, servicemanuals, test equipment and repair procedures areavailable to students. Enrollment requires pre-testingfor basic skills and personal interviews.HONDA PACTProfessional Automotive Career TrainingTOYOTA T-TENToyota Technical Education NetworkBIOMEDICAL RESEARCHTECHNOLOGYAssociate of Applied ScienceTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Math and SciencesChair: Dr. James CrimandoAssociate of Applied Science in BiomedicalResearch Technology(61-65 Credits; Code 3113)The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) in BiomedicalResearch Technology program includes significant+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


152 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014course work in both biology and chemistry.Additionally, it includes an emphasis in bio-safety,business and regulatory issues and a structuredinternship component that has been developedin partnership with Southeast Valley biomedicalcompanies along with local educational institutions.The program is designed to provide students with aworking knowledge of the field by focusing on boththeory and application in lab settings, as well asconsideration of current topics in biomedical research.Program Prerequisites .................................................... 9-11ENG091+ Fundamental of Writing (3) ORAppropriate English placement testscore ......................................................................3MAT090+ Developmental Algebra (5) ORMAT091+ Introductory Algebra (4) ORMAT092+ Introductory Algebra (3) ORMAT093+ Introductory Algebra/Math AnxietyReduction (5) ORSatisfactory score on Districtplacement exam ................................................. 3-5RDG091+ College Preparatory Reading (3) ORAppropriate Reading placement testscore ORPermission of instructor .................................3Required Course Credits ............................................43-44BIO181+ General Biology (Majors) I ........................... 4BIO205+ Microbiology (4) ORBIO220+ Biology of Microorganisms (4) ................. 4BIO211AA Biotechnology Seminar: BiomedicalApplications.........................................................1BIO211AB+ Biotechnology Seminar: LaboratoryProtocol .................................................................1BIO211AE Biotechnology Seminar: Business andRegulatory Issues ..............................................1BIO212AB+ Biotechnology II (5) ORBIO212BA+ Cell Biotechnology (5) ...................................5BIO213 BioSafety ..............................................................1BIO215+ Biotechnology Internship ..............................3BIO247+ Applied Biosciences: Biotechnology (4)ORBIO212AA+ Biotechnology I (5) ORBIO245 Cellular and Molecular Biology (4)...... 4-5CHM151+ General Chemistry I (3) ANDCHM151LL+ General Chemistry I Laboratory (1) ANDCHM130 Fundamental Chemistry (3) ANDCHM130LL+ Fundamental Chemistry Laboratory (1)ORCHM152+ General Chemistry II (3) ANDCHM152LL+ General Chemistry II Laboratory (1)..........8CHM230+ Fundamental Organic Chemistry ...............3CHM230LL+ Fundamental Organic ChemistryLaboratory ...........................................................1CHM260+ Fundamental Biochemistry ..........................3CHM260LL+ Fundamental Biochemistry Laboratory ....1CSC180 Computing for Scientists, Engineers andMedical/Health Specialists (3) ORCSC283+ Bioinformatics and ScientificComputing (3)...................................................3General Education ........................................................ 18-21COM100 Introduction to HumanCommunication (3) ORCOM225+ Public Speaking (3) ORCOM230+ Small Group Communication (3)................3CRE101+College Critical Reading (3) OREquivalent as indicated assessment .... 0-3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ANDENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ANDENG108+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) .......... 6MAT122+ Intermediate Algebra (3) OREquivalent ORSatisfactory completion of a higherlevel mathematics course ..............................3PHI/REL213 Medical and Bio-Ethics (3) ORHCR210+ Clinical Health Care Ethics (3).....................3Any approved General Education course in the Socialand Behavioral Sciences area ...............................................3BUSINESS TECHNOLOGYSPECIALISTCertificate of CompletionTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Business and Information TechnologiesChair: S. Annette TorreyCertificate of Completion in BusinessTechnology Specialist(22.5-23 Credits; Code 5762)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in BusinessTechnology Specialist emphasizes training on wordprocessing, spreadsheet, database, and presentationsoftware for business purposes. Completion of thiscertificate program which has as a prerequisitecompletion of the Office Technology Certificate wouldqualify an individual for secretarial, administrativeassistant, or executive assistant positions.Required Course Credits ........................................ 19.5-20Certificate of Completion in Office Technology (5261)... 18BPC/OAS131DK+ Intermediate Word ............................................1CIS100CIS133AAInternet: A Tool for Learning (0.5) ORInternet/Web DevelopmentLevel I-A (1)..................................................0.5-1Restricted Electives ............................................................3BPC/CIS+++++ Any BPC/CIS prefix courses.........................3+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014153CLINICAL RESEARCHCertificate of CompletionTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Health SciencesChair: Edward HoskinsCertificate of Completion in Clinical ResearchCoordinating (26 Credits; Code 5161)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in ClinicalResearch Coordinating program is achievable withina 12-24 month period. Required coursework coversresearch study management, project activities,subject coordination, and regulatory documentationand administration. The program focus is on theachievement of behavioral competencies andtechnical skills for Clinical Research Coordinators(CRC) including research site preparation; subjectscreening, enrollment, recruitment, and follow-upvisits; maintenance and dispensing of drug supplies;completion of case report forms and regulatorydocuments; and the adherence to Good ClinicalPractice guidelines.The Clinical Research Coordinating program istaught in accordance with standards of the Societyof Clinical Research Associates (SoCRA) and theAssociation of Clinical Research Professionals (ACRP)for their nationally and internationally recognizedCRC certification examinations. Course componentssuch as research ethics and Institutional Review Boardoperations, are based on the standards and guidelinesof the Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research(PRIMR).Admission CriteriaAcceptance into the program and permission ofProgram Director is required.Program Prerequisites .........................................................4Permission of the Program Director based onevaluation of occupational and educationalbackground ANDCRC120 Introduction to Clinical Research .............. 4Required Course Credits ..................................................22CRC200+ Legal and Regulatory ResearchCompliance ........................................................ 4CRC210+ Research Design and DataManagement ...................................................... 4CRC225+ Clinical Research Site Budget Process .....2CRC240+ Research Ethics .................................................3CRC250+ Clinical Research Site Management ......... 4CRC255+ Introduction to Medical Devices inClinical Evaluation ............................................2CRC270+ Institutional Review Board in ClinicalResearch ..............................................................3Certificate of Completion in ClinicalResearch Associate (13 Credits; Code 5639)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in ClinicalResearch Associate (CRA) program is an advancedcareer track certificate for Clinical ResearchCoordinators. It is designed to enhance the currentClinical Research Coordinator program (CRC) and totrain CRCs and other clinical research professionalswho are currently in the Industry to move into the CRArole. While the CRC typically works at research sites,hospitals, and research institutes, the CRA works withinthe Pharmaceutical, Biotechnology and Medical DeviceIndustries. This program offers courses focused onthe fundamental competencies of a Clinical ResearchAssociate, providing entry level courses that trainindividuals who wish to expand their coordinating orother medical background experience.Admission Criteria• Formal application and admission to program isrequired.• Certificate of Completion in Clinical ResearchCoordinating ORClinical research coordinator with a Bachelor ofArts/Science, or higher degree ORBachelor degree or higher degree in life orhealth sciences ORBachelor of Arts degree with experience inhealthcare or research experience.Program Prerequisites .........................................................3CRA290+ Introduction to the Clinical ResearchAssociate Role ...................................................3Required Course Credits ................................................... 13CRA291+ Monitoring .......................................................... 4CRA293+ Clinical Study Development ........................3CRA295+ Ethics/Regulations .........................................3CRA297+ Clinical Trial Material & DeviceAccountability ....................................................3COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHYCertificate of CompletionTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Health SciencesChair: Edward HoskinsCertificate of Completion in ComputedTomography (14 Credits; Code 5461)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in ComputedTomography program offers graduate RadiologicTechnologists, Radiation Therapists, and graduateNuclear Medicine Technologists the opportunity tocomplete both didactic coursework and clinical skillsexperience necessary to prepare to meet eligibility forthe professional certification in this field. The programfocuses on specific skills and knowledge necessary tobecome proficient in this field.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


154 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014Program Note: Students participating in any coursesinvolving clinical practice in a hospital or other healthcare facility must comply with all requirements of theMCCCD background check and immunization policies.Admission Criteria• Certified by American Registry of RadiologicTechnologists (ARRT) in Radiography or inRadiation Therapy, OR• Certified by ARRT or the Nuclear MedicineTechnology Certification Board (NMTCB) inNuclear Medicine, OR• Radiography or Nuclear Medicine student currentlyenrolled at GateWay, or registry eligible graduate.Program Prerequisites .....................................................4-5DMI/DMS/ICE220+ Sectional Anatomy ..........................................3DMI/ICE223+ Introduction to ComputedTomography (1) ORNUC150+ Fundamentals of ComputedTomography for Nuclear MedicineTechnologist (2).............................................1-2Required Course Credits ................................................... 14ICE248+ Computed Tomography (CT)Multi-Planar Sectional Anatomy .................2ICE263+ Computed Tomography Physics andInstrumentation .................................................3ICE254+ Advanced Imaging Practicum (1)...............2Two (2) semesters of ICE254 courseis requiredICE265+ Computed Tomography ProcedureProtocols ..............................................................3ICE273+ Computed Tomography Pathology ...........3ICE291+ Computed Tomography Registry andBoard Exam Preparation ................................1COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMSCertificate of CompletionAssociated in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Business and Information TechnologiesChair: S. Annette TorreyCertificate of Completion in ComputerInformation Systems (21 Credits; Code 5671)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in ComputerInformation Systems program is designed to meetthe needs of students who are planning to findemployment using current computer applications.It is intended for students who may later want topursue an Associate’s Degree in Computer InformationSystems, but who do not expect to go beyond thecommunity college program. The courses includeSurvey of Computer Information Systems and a varietyof operating systems, database management, andpopular programming languages. An Associate inApplied Science (AAS) is also available.Program Note: Consultation with an Academic Advisoris recommended for course selection.Required Course Credits ................................................... 12BPC/CIS133DA Internet/Web Development Level I ...........3CIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems ................................................................3CIS126DA UNIX Operations System (3) ORCIS126DL Linux Operating System (3) ORMST150 Microsoft Windows Professional (3) ORMST150VI Microsoft Windows Vista Administration(3) ORMST150XP Microsoft Windows XP Professional (3)....3CIS150+CIS150AB++ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed coursesProgramming Fundamentals (3) ORObject-Oriented ProgrammingFundamentals (3).............................................3Restricted Electives..............................................................9CIS+++++ Any CIS Computer Information course(s)except courses used to Satisfy RequiredCourses area ...................................................... 9Associated in Applied Science Degree inComputer Information Systems(61-64 Credits; Code 3152)The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degree inComputer Information Systems program is designed toprepare students who are planning to find employmentusing current computer applications. Courses includeSurvey of Computer Information Systems and a varietyof operating systems, database management, andpopular programming languages. A Certificate ofCompletion (CCL) is also available.Program Prerequisites .........................................................3CRE101+ College Critical Reading I (3) OREquivalent by Assessment ............................3Required Course Credits .............................................27-28ACC111 Accounting Principles I ..................................3BPC/CIS133DA Internet/Web Development Level I ...........3CIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems ................................................................3CIS126DA UNIX Operations System (3) ORCIS126DL Linux Operating System (3) ORMST150 Microsoft Windows Professional (3) ORMST150VI Microsoft Windows Vista Administration(3) ORMST150XP Microsoft Windows XP Professional (3)...3CIS150+ Programming Fundamentals (3) ORCIS150AB+ Object-Oriented ProgrammingFundamentals (3).............................................3CIS159+ Visual Basic Programming I (3) ORCIS162++/+ Any C Programming Level I course (3)ORCIS163AA+ Java Programming: Level I (3) ....................3CIS190+ Introduction to Local Area Networks(3) ORMST140 Microsoft Networking Essentials (3) ORCNT140AA Cisco Networking Fundamentals (4)... 3-4GBS151 Introduction to Business ................................3GBS233+ Business Communication ..............................3


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014155Restricted Electives............................................................ 12CIS+++++ Any CIS Computer Informationcourse(s) except courses used toSatisfy Required Courses area .................. 12General Education Requirements ........................... 22-24ECN211 Macroeconomic Principles (3) ORECN212 Microeconomic Principles (3) ORSBU200 Society and Business ......................................3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ANDENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG108+ First-Year Composition for ESL ................. 6MAT120+MAT121+MAT122+Intermediate Algebra (5) ORIntermediate Algebra (4) ORIntermediate Algebra (3) ORSatisfactory completion of a higherlevel mathematics course ......................... 3-5Any general education course in the OralCommunication area ................................................................3Any general education course in the Humanities andFine Arts area ..............................................................................3Any general education course in the Natural Sciencesarea ................................................................................................ 4COURT REPORTINGCertificates of CompletionAssociate in Applied Science DegreesTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Business and Information TechnologiesChair: S. Annette TorreyCOURT REPORTING - JUDICIALCertificate of Completion in CourtReporting - Judicial(70-72 Credits; Code 5194)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in Court Reporting:Judicial program prepares students for court reporting.Court reporters work for the government, courts, largebusiness corporations, freelance reporting agencies, andtelevision stations.GateWay Community College is one of the fewcommunity colleges across the nation to offer aNational Court Reporters Association certified courtreporting program which includes realtime machineshorthand, computerized machine shorthand theory,speed development, transcription, court practice andoverview in video application. Upon completion of theprogram, students will be qualified to enter the courtreporting profession subject to any and all individualstate requirements. In addition, students are assisted inpreparing for the National Court Reporters AssociationRegistered Professional Reporter (RPR) Examinationand the Arizona Written Knowledge Test. Studentswhose personal interests and needs can be met byconcentration on a core program of Court Reportingcourses and who do not wish an associate in appliedscience may receive a certificate after completion of thecourses listed.Admission Criteria• 45 wpm typing speed based on typing test atGateWay assessment center.• ENGLISH ASSESSMENT - Placement into ENG101/ENG107 First-Year Composition on districtplacement exam OR permission of Department orDivision.• Transcript(s) of high school graduation ORequivalent must be on file in the Admissions andRecords Office.Required Course Credits ........................................... 70-72BPC101AA Introduction to Computers I (1) ORdemonstrated proficiency in computerusage as determined by ProgramDirector ............................................................ 0-1BPC/OAS130DK+ Beginning Word .................................................1BPC/OAS131DK+ Intermediate Word ............................................1CTR101+ Court Reporting: Machine Shorthand I ....5CTR102+ Court Reporting: Machine Shorthand II ...5CTR197+ Court Reporting Lab ........................................1CTR201AA+ Court Reporting I: Literary ............................2CTR201AB+ Court Reporting I: Jury Charge ...................2CTR201AC+ Court Reporting I: Question/Answer ........3CTR202AA+ Court Reporting II: Literary...........................2CTR202AB+ Court Reporting II: Jury Charge .................2CTR202AC+ Court Reporting II: Question/Answer .......3CTR203AA+ Court Reporting III: Literary .........................2CTR203AB+ Court Reporting III: Jury Charge ................2CTR203AC+ Court Reporting III: Question/Answer ......3CTR204AA+ Court Reporting IV: Literary .........................2CTR204AB+ Court Reporting IV: Jury Charge ................2CTR204AC+ Court Reporting IV: Question/Answer .....3CTR205AA+ Court Reporting V: Literary ..........................2CTR205AB+ Court Reporting V: Jury Charge .................2CTR205AC+ Court Reporting V: Question/Answer ......3CTR206AA+ Court Reporting VI: Literary .........................2CTR206AB+ Court Reporting VI: Jury Charge ................2CTR206AC+ Court Reporting VI: Question/Answer .....3CTR209+ Judicial Procedures for Court Reporting ....3CTR211+ Judicial Internship .............................................1CTR215+ Computer-Aided Transcription ...................3HCC146 Common Medical Terminology forHealth Care Workers .......................................2LAS101 Introduction to Law .........................................3OAS103AA+ Computer Typing: Skill Building I (1) ORMay be waived if the student can passtwo 5-minute typing tests each at 60net wpm with a maximum of fiveerrors ................................................................. 0-1OAS108 Business English ...............................................3+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


156 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014Associate in Applied Science Degree inCourt Reporting-Judicial(91-96 Credits; Code 3194)The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) in CourtReporting: Judicial program prepares studentsfor court reporting. Court reporters work for thegovernment, courts, large business corporations,freelance reporting agencies, and television stations.GateWay Community College is one of the fewcommunity colleges across the nation to offer aNational Court Reporters Association certified courtreporting program which includes realtime machineshorthand, computerized machine shorthand theory,speed development, transcription, court practice andoverview in video application. Upon completion of theprogram, students will be qualified to enter the courtreporting profession subject to any and all individualstate requirements. In addition, students are assisted inpreparing for the National Court Reporters Association.Registered Professional Reporter (RPR) Examinationand the Arizona Written Knowledge Test.Admission Criteria• 45 wpm typing speed based on typing test atGateWay assessment center.• ENGLISH ASSESSMENT - Placement into ENG101/ENG107 First-Year Composition on districtplacement exam OR permission of Department orDivision.• Transcript(s) of high school graduation ORequivalent must be on file in the Admissions andRecords OfficeRequired Course Credits ........................................... 70-72BPC101AA Introduction to Computers I (1) ORDemonstrated proficiency in computerusage as determined by ProgramDirector ............................................................ 0-1BPC/OAS130DK+ Beginning Word .................................................1BPC/OAS131DK+ Intermediate Word ............................................1CTR101+ Court Reporting: Machine Shorthand I ....5CTR102+ Court Reporting: Machine Shorthand II ...5CTR197+ Court Reporting Lab ........................................1CTR201AA+ Court Reporting I: Literary ............................2CTR201AB+ Court Reporting I: Jury Charge ...................2CTR201AC+ Court Reporting I: Question/Answer ........3CTR202AA+ Court Reporting II: Literary...........................2CTR202AB+ Court Reporting II: Jury Charge .................2CTR202AC+ Court Reporting II: Question/Answer .......3CTR203AA+ Court Reporting III: Literary .........................2CTR203AB+ Court Reporting III: Jury Charge ................2CTR203AC+ Court Reporting III: Question/Answer ......3CTR204AA+ Court Reporting IV: Literary .........................2CTR204AB+ Court Reporting IV: Jury Charge ................2CTR204AC+ Court Reporting IV: Question/Answer .....3CTR205AA+ Court Reporting V: Literary ..........................2CTR205AB+ Court Reporting V: Jury Charge .................2CTR205AC+ Court Reporting V: Question/Answer ......3CTR206AA+ Court Reporting VI: Literary .........................2CTR206AB+ Court Reporting VI: Jury Charge ................2CTR206AC+ Court Reporting VI: Question/Answer .....3CTR209+ Judicial Procedures for Court Reporting ....3CTR211+ Judicial Internship .............................................1CTR215+ Computer-Aided Transcription ...................3HCC146+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed coursesCommon Medical Terminology forHealth Care Workers .......................................2LAS101 Introduction to Law ........................................3OAS103AA+ Computer Typing: Skill Building I (1) ORMay be waived if the student can passtwo 5-minute typing tests each at 60net wpm with a maximum of fiveerrors ................................................................. 0-1OAS108 Business English ...............................................3General Education Requirements ............................. 21-24BIO160 Introduction to Human Anatomy andPhysiology .......................................................... 4COM100 Introduction to Human Communication(3) ORCOM110 Interpersonal Communication (3)..............3CRE101+CRE111+Critical and Evaluative Reading I (3) ORCritical Reading for Business andIndustry (3) OREquivalent by Assessment ............................3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ANDENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG108+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ORENG111+ Technical and Professional Writing (3)..... 6MAT102+ Mathematical Concepts/Applications (3)OR Equivalent course or satisfactorycompletion of a higher levelmathematics course ........................................3PSY101 Introduction to Psychology ..........................3Any approved general education course in theHumanities and Fine Arts area .............................................2COURT REPORTING - SCOPING/TRANSCRIPTIONCertificate of Completion in Court Reporting –Scoping/Transcription(22-26 Credits; Code 5875)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in CourtReporting: Scoping/Transcription program preparesstudents for employment as a scopist for courtreporters and transcriptionists. This program willprovide students with the knowledge and skill ofreading machine shorthand notes and using computeraidedtranscript software to work in conjunction withcourt reporters in editing and preparing text andtranscripts. The curriculum provides instruction inrealtime machine shorthand theory, use of computeraidedtranscription software, and court procedures.The second emphasis in transcription will providestudents with the knowledge and skill of writingmachine shorthand and using computer-aidedtranscript software to produce transcripts from anaudio file.


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014157Both emphases will focus on English grammar, spelling,punctuation and proofreading, medical vocabulary,basic law and word processing skills are reinforcedwithin the program curriculum as well.Program Note: Students must pass two timed writingsof five minutes with a minimum speed of 45 wpm inorder to complete this certificate.Admission Criteria• 45 wpm typing speed based on typing test atGateWay assessment center.• English Assessment - Placement into ENG101/ENG107 First-Year Composition on districtplacement exam OR permission of Department orDivision.• Transcript(s) of high school graduation ORequivalent must be on file in the Admissions andRecords Office.Required Course Credits ........................................... 22-26BPC101AA+ Introduction to Computers I (1) ORProficiency in computer usage asdetermined by Program Director ........... 0-1LAS101 Introduction to Law .........................................3OAS108 Business English ...............................................3OAS181 Medical Office: Vocabulary ...........................3CTR101+ Court Reporting: Machine Shorthand I ....5CTR197+ Court Reporting Lab ........................................1CTR215+ Computer-Aided Transcription ...................3CTR271+ Scoping ................................................................2Student must select one of two (2) tracks or mayselect both tracks:Track I Scoping EmphasisBPC/OAS130DK+ Beginning Word .................................................1BPC/OAS131DK+ Intermediate Word ............................................1CTR209+ Judicial Procedures for Court Reporting ....3Track II Transcription EmphasisCTR272+ Transcription ......................................................2DIAGNOSTIC MEDICALSONOGRAPHYCertificate of CompletionAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Health SciencesChair: Edward HoskinsCertificate of Completion in DiagnosticMedical Sonography (61-62 Credits)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in DiagnosticMedical Sonography program is designed for studentswho wish to explore sonography as well as those whohave made a career decision to seek certificationfrom the American Registry of Diagnostic MedicalSonographers (A.R.D.M.S.). Diagnostic medicalsonographers are highly specialized members ofthe health care team who provide patient servicesusing ultrasound under the direction of a physician.Sonographers provide care essential to diagnosticultrasound imaging by operating equipment andperforming examinations for medical diagnosis.Sonographers have an in-depth knowledge of physics,disease processes, physiology, cross-sectional anatomy,positioning and sonographic techniques necessary tocreate ultrasound images. Knowledge of darkroomtechniques, equipment maintenance, record keepingand film processing are also part of the job.Careers in the field of diagnostic sonography can befound in hospitals, clinics, doctors’ offices, and mobileimaging centers. Research, applications, teaching andmarketing may be available to sonographers who wishto explore careers in business or industry.Educational Information: The Diagnostic MedicalSonography program is open to all students whosuccessfully complete the program prerequisites.Full-time day students must apply to the program andbe accepted prior to registering for course offerings.The full-time program is 24 months in length. Clinicalaffiliations include a cooperative effort with a numberof area hospitals, clinics and doctors’ offices. Clinicaltraining is required by the American Registry ofDiagnostic Medical Sonographers (A.R.D.M.S.) prior tositting for the Registry examination.Admission Criteria• Formal admission to the program.• ASSET Placement Testing.Program Prerequisites ................................................. 16-22Successful completion of the following college courseswith a minimum, cumulative GPA of 3.0:BIO160 Introduction to Human Anatomy andPhysiology .......................................................... 4COM+++++ Any approved general education OralCommunication course ..................................3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3HCC145 Medical Terminology for Health CareWorkers (3) ORHCC146 Common Medical Terminology forHealth Care Workers (2) ORGraduate of an allied health educationprogram that is patient carerelated (0) ...................................................... 0-3MAT120+ Intermediate Algebra (5) ORMAT121+ Intermediate Algebra (4) ORMAT122+ Intermediate Algebra (3) OREquivalent or higher levelmathematics course ................................... 3-5DMI105+ Fundamentals of Radiation Physics (3)ORPHY101+ Introduction to Physics (4) ORPHY111+ General Physics I (4) .................................. 3-4+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


158 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014Required Course Credits ............................................ 58-59DMI/DMS/ICE220+ Sectional Anatomy ..........................................3DMS110+ Introduction to Diagnostic Sonography ..3DMS120+ Ultrasound Imaging: AbdominalProcedures I ....................................................... 4DMS121+ Ultrasound Imaging: AbdominalProcedures II ......................................................3DMS130+ Ultrasound Imaging: OB/GYNProcedures ......................................................... 4DMS140+ Ultrasound Case Studies: Part I ..................2DMS145+ Clinical Pathology for DiagnosticDMS150+Imaging ................................................................3Sonographic Principles andInstrumentation .................................................3DMS155+ Clinical Practicum I ...........................................1DMS161+ Clinical Practicum II-AA ..................................1DMS162+ Clinical Practicum II-AB .................................2DMS163+ Clinical Practicum II-AC ..................................3DMS171+ Clinical Practicum III-AA ................................2DMS172+ Clinical Practicum III-AB ................................2DMS210+ Concepts of Vascular Imaging ....................3DMS240+ Ultrasound Case Studies: Part II .................2DMS261+ Clinical Practicum IV-AA ...............................2DMS262+ Clinical Practicum IV-AB ................................3DMS270+ Clinical Practicum V-AA ..................................1DMS271+ Clinical Practicum V-AB .................................2DMS272+ Clinical Practicum V-AC .................................2DMS281+DMS282+DMS283+DMS284+Ultrasound Registry Preparation Seminar:Physics and Instrumentation (1) ORsuccessful completion of the AmericanRegistry of Diagnostic Sonographers(ARDMS) Sonographic Principles andInstrumentation exam (SPI) ..................... 0-1Ultrasound Registry Preparation Seminar:Abdominal and Small Parts Imaging .........1Ultrasound Registry Preparation Seminar:Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Neonate .......1Ultrasound Registry Preparation:Vascular Imaging ...............................................1DMS285+ Intermediate Vascular Technology ............2DMS286+ Advanced Vascular Technology ..................2Restricted Electives..............................................................3Students should select three credits from the followingcourses in consultation with a Program Advisor.DMS225+ High Risk Obstetric/GynecologySonography .........................................................1DMS230+ Introduction to Echocardiography .............1DMS235+ Ultrasound Breast Imaging ............................1DMS245+ Neurosonography..............................................1DMS250+ Ultrasound Anatomy .......................................2Associate in Applied Science Degree inDiagnostic Medical Sonography(69-74 Credits; Code 3656)The Associate of Applied Sciences (AAS) in DiagnosticMedical Sonography program is designed for studentswho wish to explore the field of sonography, as wellas those who have made a career decision to seekcertification from the American Registry of DiagnosticMedical Sonographers (A.R.D.M.S.). Diagnostic medicalsonographers are highly specialized members ofthe health care team who provide patient servicesusing ultrasound under the direction of a physician.Sonographers provide care essential to diagnosticultrasound imaging by operating equipment andperforming examinations for medical diagnosis.Sonographers have an in-depth knowledge of physics,disease processes, physiology, cross-sectional anatomy,positioning and sonographic techniques necessary tocreate ultrasound images. Knowledge of darkroomtechniques, equipment maintenance, record keepingand film processing are also part of the job.Careers in the field of diagnostic sonography can befound in hospitals, clinics, doctors’ offices, and mobileimaging centers. Research, applications, teaching andmarketing may be available to sonographers who wishto explore careers in business or industry.Educational Information: The Diagnostic MedicalSonography program is open to all students whosuccessfully complete the program prerequisites.Full-time day students must apply to the program andbe accepted prior to registering for course offerings.The full-time program is 24 months in length. Clinicalaffiliations include a cooperative effort with a numberof area hospitals, clinics and doctors’ offices. Clinicaltraining is required by the American Registry ofDiagnostic Medical Sonographers (A.R.D.M.S.) prior tositting for the Registry examination.Admission Criteria• Formal admission to the program.• ASSET Placement Testing.Program Prerequisites ................................................. 16-22Successful completion of the following college courseswith a minimum, cumulative GPA of 3.0:BIO160 Introduction to Human Anatomy andPhysiology .......................................................... 4COM+++++ Any approved general education OralCommunication course ..................................3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3HCC145 Medical Terminology for Health CareWorkers (3) ORHCC146 Common Medical Terminology forHealth Care Workers (2) ORGraduate of an allied health educationprogram that is patient care related ... 0-3MAT120+ Intermediate Algebra (5) ORMAT121+ Intermediate Algebra (4) ORMAT122+ Intermediate Algebra (3) OREquivalent or higher level mathematicscourse .............................................................. 3-5DMI105+ Fundamentals of Radiation Physics (3)ORPHY101+ Introduction to Physics (4) ORPHY111+ General Physics I (4) .................................. 3-4+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014159Required Course Credits ............................................63-64DMI/DMS/ICE220+ Sectional Anatomy ..........................................3DMS110 Introduction to Diagnostic Sonography ...3DMS120+ Ultrasound Imaging: AbdominalProcedures ......................................................... 4DMS130+ Ultrasound Imaging: OB/GYNProcedures ......................................................... 4DMS140+ Ultrasound Case Studies: Part I ..................2DMS145+ Clinical Pathology for DiagnosticDMS150+Imaging ................................................................3Sonographic Principles andInstrumentation .................................................3DMS155+ Clinical Practicum I ...........................................1DMS161+ Clinical Practicum II-AA ..................................1DMS162+ Clinical Practicum II-AB .................................2DMS163+ Clinical Practicum II-AC ..................................3DMS171+ Clinical Practicum III-AA ................................2DMS172+ Clinical Practicum III-AB ................................2DMS210+ Concepts of Vascular Imaging ....................3DMS225+High Risk Obstetric/GynecologySonography .........................................................1DMS230+ Introduction to Echocardiography .............1DMS235+ Ultrasound Breast Imaging ............................1DMS240+ Ultrasound Case Studies: Part II .................2DMS241+ Ultrasound Case Studies: Part III ................2DMS245+ Neurosonography..............................................1DMS250+ Ultrasound Anatomy .......................................2DMS261+ Clinical Practicum IV-AA ...............................2DMS262+ Clinical Practicum IV-AB ................................3DMS270+ Clinical Practicum V-AA ..................................1DMS271+ Clinical Practicum V-AB .................................2DMS272+ Clinical Practicum V-AC .................................2DMS281+DMS282+DMS283+DMS284+Ultrasound Registry Preparation Seminar:Physics and Instrumentation (1) ORsuccessful completion of the AmericanRegistry of Diagnostic Sonographers(ARDMS) Sonographic Principles andInstrumentation exam (SPI) (0).............. 0-1Ultrasound Registry Preparation Seminar:Abdominal and Small Parts Imaging .........1Ultrasound Registry Preparation Seminar:Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Neonate .......1Ultrasound Registry Preparation:Vascular Imaging ...............................................1DMS285+ Intermediate Vascular Technology ............2DMS286+ Advanced Vascular Technology ..................2Restricted Electives..............................................................3Students should select three (3) credits from thefollowing courses in consultation with a Program Advisor.DMS220+High Risk Obstetric/GynecologySonography ..............................................................1DMS230+ Introduction to Echocardiography ..................1DMS235+ Ultrasound Breast Imaging ................................1DMS245+ Neurosonography ..................................................1DMS250+ Ultrasound Anatomy............................................2General Education Requirements ................................8-12CRE101+ College Critical Reading (3) ORCRE111+ Critical Reading for Business andIndustry (3) OREquivalent by assessment ........................ 0-3ENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG108+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3Any general education course in the Humanities andFine Arts area ..........................................................................2-3Any general education course in the Social andBehavioral Sciences area ........................................................3ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGYCertificate of CompletionAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Industrial TechnologyChair: John KellyCertificate of Completion in ElectricalTechnology (43 Credits; Code 5756)To assist industry in maintaining a safe and efficientfacility, the facility electrician must have specializedknowledge in electricity, refrigeration, solid stateelectronic controls and safety. Facility electricianswork closely with plant administration, regulatoryagencies, safety analysts and engineers to provideboth long and short term planning to meet regulatorycompliance, maintain a safe work environment anda cost controlled and efficient production schedule.The certificate and associate degree programs wererecommended and designed by a collaborativeeffort of the Electric League of Arizona and GateWayCommunity College. The Electric League, whoseindustry members include City of Phoenix, HoneywellFlight Systems, IPEC Planar and Salt River Project,endorse this program. Graduates of this program willfind employment with many of the companies that aremembers of the Electric League.Program Prerequisites• Completion of math ASSET test with a minimumscore of 43.• Permission of department.Required Course Credits .................................................. 43ELC119 Concepts of Electricity and Electronics ..3ELC120 Solid State Fundamentals .............................3ELC123 Residential Electrical Wiring and Codes ....3ELC124+ Industrial Electrical Wiring and Codes .....3ELC125+ Commercial Electrical Wiring and Codes ...3ELC144+Basic Automated Systems UsingProgrammable Controllers ............................2ELC162+ Electrical Codes and Inspection I ...............3ELC163+ Electrical Codes and Inspection II .............3ELC164 Grounding and Bonding ................................3ELC210 AC Machinery and DC Machinery ..............3ELC217 Motor Controls...................................................3ELC218+ Variable Frequency Drives ............................3ELE101+ Beginning Algebra for Technology ............3ELE105+ Algebra-Trigonometry for Technology ....5+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


160 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014Associate in Applied Science Degree inElectrical Technology (70 Credits; Code 3767)To assist industry in maintaining a safe and efficientfacility, the facility electrician must have specializedknowledge in electricity, refrigeration, solid stateelectronic controls and safety. Facility electricianswork closely with plant administration, regulatoryagencies, safety analysts and engineers to provideboth long and short term planning to meet regulatorycompliance, maintain a safe work environment anda cost controlled and efficient production schedule.The certificate and associate degree programs wererecommended and designed by a collaborativeeffort of the Electric League of Arizona and GateWayCommunity College. The Electric League, whoseindustry members include City of Phoenix, HoneywellFlight Systems, IPEC Planar and Salt River Project,endorse this program. Graduates of this program willfind employment with many of the companies that aremembers of the Electric League.Program Prerequisites• Completion of math ASSET test with a minimumscore of 43.• Permission of department.Required Course Credits .................................................. 45BPC/CIS121AB Microsoft Command Line Operations .......1ELC119 Concepts of Electricity and Electronics ..3ELC120 Solid State Fundamentals .............................3ELC123 Residential Electrical Wiring and Codes ...3ELC124+ Industrial Electrical Wiring and Codes .....3ELC125+ Commercial Electrical Wiring and Codes ...3ELC144+Basic Automated Systems UsingProgrammable Controllers ............................2ELC162+ Electrical Codes and Inspection I ...............3ELC163+ Electrical Codes and Inspection II .............3ELC164 Grounding and Bonding ................................3ELC210 AC Machinery and DC Machinery ..............3ELC217 Motor Controls...................................................3ELC218 + Variable Frequency Drives ............................3ELE101 + Beginning Algebra for Technology ............3ELE105+ Algebra-Trigonometry for Technology ....5ELC298AA Special Projects ..................................................1General Education Requirements ...................................25CHM130+ Fundamental Chemistry (3) ANDCHM130LL+ Fundamental Chemistry Laboratory (1).... 4COM230 Small Group Communication .......................3CRE111+Critical Reading for Business andIndustry (3) OREquivalent by Assessment ............................3ENG101+ First-Year Composition ...................................3ENG111+ Technical and Professional Writing ...........3HUM101MAT122+General Humanities..........................................3Intermediate Algebra (3) OREquivalent by Assessment ............................3ELECTRONEURODIAGNOSTIC (END)TECHNOLOGYAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Health SciencesChair: Edward HoskinsAssociate in Applied Science Degree inElectroneurodiagnostic (END) Technology(62-67.5 Credits; Code 3136)The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) inElectroneurodiagnostic (END) Technology programis designed to prepare students to use electricaltechniques to evaluate activity of the brain and spinalcord and to perform electroencephalograms (EEG’s),evoked potentials (EP’s), and nerve conduction velocitystudies (NCV’s) in hospitals and other healthcarefacilities. The program focuses on the general areaof biomedical electronics with specific instruction inthe theory and use of END instruments and factorsinfluencing testing outcomes and reporting.Successful completion of the AAS degree inElectroneurodiagnostic Technology programenables the student to take the American Board ofRegistered Electroneurodiagnostic Technologists(ABRET) examination to become a RegisteredElectroneurodiagnostic Technologist (R. EEG T.).Admission Criteria• Formal application and admission to the programis required.• Current American Heart Association CPR forHealth Care Provider card.• Immunizations as required.• High School Diploma or equivalent.• Documentation of successful completion ofprerequisites.• Drug test required prior to clinical experience.Background Check RequirementsAdmission to an Allied Health program requires thatstudents be in compliance with the Maricopa CountyCommunity College District Supplemental BackgroundCheck policy. Program applications will not beaccepted without a copy of an Arizona Department ofPublic Safety Level-one Fingerprint Clearance Card.Upon conditional program admission, the student mustcomply with all requirements of the current MCCCDbackground check policy.Program Prerequisites ...............................................16-21.5BIO160 Introduction to Human Anatomyand Physiology ................................................. 4CRE101+ College Critical Reading (3) ORCRE111+ Critical Reading for Business andIndustry (3) OREquivalent as indicated by assessment ..0-3SOC101 Introduction to Sociology .............................3+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014161EMT/HCC/RES109CPR for Health Care Provider (0.5) ORProof of Current Health Care ProviderCPR Certification (0) ............................. 0-0.5ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3HCC130 Fundamentals in Health Care Delivery (3)ORHCC130AA Health Care Today (0.5) ANDHCC130AB Workplace Behaviors in Health Care(0.5) ANDHCC130AC Personal Wellness and Safety (0.5) ANDHCC130AD Communication and Teamwork in HealthCare Organizations (0.5) ANDHCC130AE Legal Issues in Health Care (0.5) ANDHCC130AF Decision Making in the Health CareSetting (0.5) .......................................................3HCC146 Common Medical Terminology forHealth Care Workers .......................................2HCC164+ Pharmacology for Allied Health..............0.5HCC200+ Basic Client Care for Allied Health ........0.5MAT120+ Intermediate Algebra (5) ORMAT121+ Intermediate Algebra (4) ORMAT122+ Intermediate Algebra (3) OREquivalent course ORSatisfactory completion of a higherlevel mathematics course ......................... 3-5Required Course Credits .................................................. 34EEG130+ Introduction to EEG ........................................ 4EEG140+ Basic Electroneurodiagnostic Skills ..........2EEG200+ Clinical Rotation I .............................................3EEG201+ Intermediate EEG ............................................ 4EEG205+Applied Evoked Potentials and NerveConduction Studies .........................................2EEG206+ Advanced EEG ...................................................2EEG207+ Electroneurodiagnostic Record Review ..2EEG210+ Applied Neurophysiology .............................3EEG211+ Clinical Rotation II ............................................3EEG220+ Clinical Rotation III ...........................................3EEG282AA+ Volunteerism for ElectroneurodiagnosticTechnology: Service Learning Experience .....1HCE115+ Biomedical Electronic Technology I ..........2HCE116+ Biomedical Electronic Technology II .........3General Education Requirements ................................... 12COM100 Introduction to Human Communication(3) ORCOM110 Interpersonal Communication (3) ORCOM230 Small Group Communication (3)................3ENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG108+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ORENG111+ Technical and Professional Writing (3) ....3PSY101 Introduction to Psychology ..........................3Any approved general education course from theHumanities and Fine Arts area .............................................3GENERAL BUSINESSCertificate of CompletionAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Business and Information TechnologiesChair: S. Annette TorreyCertificate of Completion in GeneralBusiness (21 Credits; Code 5683)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in GeneralBusiness will provide business training for variousentry-level positions in business. The courses includean introduction to business concepts, accountingand computer principles, and legal issues related tobusiness. An Associate in Applied Science (AAS) is alsoavailable.Required Course Credits: .................................................. 12ACC111 Accounting Principles I ..................................3CIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems ................................................................3GBS151 Introduction to Business ................................3GBS205 Legal, Ethical and Regulatory Issues inBusiness ...............................................................3Restricted Electives: ...........................................................9ACC+++++ Any ACC Accounting prefixed coursesnot listed under Required Coursesarea. ................................................................... 1-9GBS+++++ Any GBS General Business prefixedcourses not listed under the RequiredCourses area. .................................................. 1-9IBS+++++ Any IBS International Business prefixedcourses ............................................................. 1-9MGT+++++ Any MGT Management prefixedcourses ............................................................. 1-9MKT+++++ Any MKT Marketing prefixed courses... 1-9REA+++++ Any REA Real Estate prefixed courses .... 1-9SBS+++++ Any SBS Small Business Managementprefixed courses............................................ 1-9CIS114DE Excel Spreadsheet ............................................3CIS117DM Microsoft Access: DatabaseManagement.......................................................3CIS133DA Internet/Web Development Level I ...........3Associate in Applied Science Degree inGeneral Business (61-63 Credits; Code 3148)The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) in GeneralBusiness program meets the needs of students whowish a broad overview of business and desire notto enroll in a specialized curriculum in business. Theprogram is designed to acquaint students with majorsubject areas of business, to improve the student’sbusiness vocabulary, and to provide students withan understanding of influencing factors in businessdecision making and activities. In addition, thisprogram could aid a student in recognizing a specificbusiness field to be pursued in future studies. Although+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


162 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014many courses will transfer to a four-year institution,some courses do not. This curriculum is not designedto meet the needs of students who wish to transferto a four-year institution. A Certificate of Completion(CCL) is also available.Program Prerequisites .........................................................3CRE101+ College Critical Reading I (3) OREquivalent by Assessment ............................3Required Course Credits ................................................... 21ACC111 Accounting Principles I ..................................3CIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems ................................................................3GBS110 Human Relations in Business andIndustry (3) ORMGT175 Business Organization andManagement (3) ORMGT251 Human Relations in Business (3)................3GBS151 Introduction to Business ................................3GBS205 Legal, Ethical and Regulatory Issues inBusiness ...............................................................3GBS233+ Business Communication ..............................3MKT271 Principles of Marketing ...................................3Restricted Electives............................................................ 18ACC+++++ Any ACC Accounting prefixed coursesnot listed under Required Coursesarea. .................................................................. 1-18CIS114DE Excel Spreadsheet ............................................3CIS117DM Microsoft Access:Database Management ..................................3CIS133DA Internet/Web Development Level I ...........3GBS+++++ Any GBS General Business course(s)except courses used to satisfy RequiredCourses area. ................................................. 1-18IBS+++++ Any IBS International Businesscourse(s) ......................................................... 1-18MGT+++++ Any MGT Management course(s)except courses used to satisfy RequiredCourses area. ................................................. 1-18MKT+++++ Any MKT Marketing course(s)except courses used to satisfy RequiredCourses area. ................................................. 1-18REA+++++ Any REA Real Estate course(s).............. 1-18SBS+++++ Any SBS Small Business Managementcourse(s) ......................................................... 1-18General Education Requirements ............................ 22-24ECN211 Macroeconomic Principles (3) ORECN212 Microeconomic Principles (3) ORSBU200 Society and Business .......................................3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ANDENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG111+ Technical and Professional Writing (3).... 6MAT120+ Intermediate Algebra (5) ORMAT121+ Intermediate Algebra (4) ORMAT122+ Intermediate Algebra (3) .......................... 3-5Any general education course in the Communicationsarea .................................................................................................3Any general education course in the Humanities andFine Arts area ..............................................................................3Any general education course in the Natural Sciencearea ................................................................................................ 4HEALTH SERVICES MANAGEMENTCertificate of CompletionAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Health SciencesChair: Edward HoskinsCertificate of Completion in Health ServicesManagement (12 Credits; Code 5336)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in HealthServices Management program prepares students tobecome candidates for leadership, supervisory andmanagement positions in health services settings. Thehealth services supervisor must develop skills to be aneffective leader and planner, capable of coaching anddeveloping motivated and committed employees andemployee teams.Program Prerequisites .....................................................0-6Students must select one of the following 4 options:Option ICurrently credentialed in a health care discipline, OROption IICompletion of an Associate in Applied Science degreeor higher degree in a health science discipline from aregionally accredited institution of higher educationrecognized by Maricopa County Community CollegeDistrict ANDOne year of employment in a health services setting,OROption IIITwo years experience in a related health care field/health services setting, OROption IV ........................................................................................ 6HCC130 Fundamentals in Health Care Delivery(3) ORHCC130AA Health Care Today (0.5) ANDHCC130AB Workplace Behaviors in Health Care(0.5) ANDHCC130AC Personal Wellness and Safety (0.5) ANDHCC130AD Communication and Teamwork inHealth Care Organizations (0.5) ANDHCC130AE Legal Issues in Health Care (0.5) ANDHCC130AF Decision Making in Health CareSetting (0.5) .......................................................3HCC145 Medical Terminology for Health CareWorkers ...............................................................3+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014163Required Course Credits .................................................. 12HSM122 Health Services Supervision .........................3HSM125 Current Issues in Health ServicesManagement.......................................................3HSM222 Health Services Management ......................3HSM226 Ethics and Legalities of Health ServicesManagement.......................................................3Associate in Applied Science Degree inHealth Services Management(60-61 Credits; Code 3336)The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) in HealthServices Management program prepares studentsto become successful supervisors and managers inall types of varied health care settings. Classroomexperiences focus on the development of skills to bean effective leader and planner, capable of directing,coaching and developing motivated employeesand employee teams. This is a program for currentsupervisors and managers who would like to enhancetheir skills as well as other employees currentlyworking in a health care discipline who would like totake on more responsibilities. It is also appropriate forindividuals planning to enter a health care field whowish to be candidates for promotional opportunities.Admission CriteriaStudents must meet one of the three requirementsbelow for admission to the program:1. Currently credentialed in a health care discipline.2. Completion of an Associate in Applied Sciencedegree or higher degree in a health sciencediscipline from a regionally accredited institutionof higher education recognized by MaricopaCounty Community College District.3. One year full time work experience and approval ofthe program director.Required Course Credits .................................................. 29ACC111 Accounting Principles I ..................................3BPC/CIS+++++Any BPC Business-Personal Computerscourse (2) ORAny CIS Computer Information Systemscourse (2)............................................................... 2CSM/TQM101 Quality Customer Service .............................3GBS233+ Business Communication ..............................3HCC146 Common Medical Terminology forHealth Care Workers .......................................2HSM122 Health Services Supervision .........................3HSM125 Current Issues in Health ServicesManagement.......................................................3HSM222 Health Services Management ......................3HSM226Ethics and Legalities of Health ServicesManagement.......................................................3HSM282AA+ Volunteerism for Health ServicesManagement: A Service LearningExperience (1) ORHSM298AA+ Special Projects (1) ...........................................1MGT276Personnel/Human ResourcesManagement.......................................................3Restricted Electives.......................................................... 7-9Students should consult with the department in theselection and approval of courses meeting RestrictedElectives area. In addition, students should choosefrom seven (7) to nine (9) credits in order to completea minimum of 60 credits for the AAS degree.General Education Requirements ............................ 22-25BIO160 Introduction to Human Anatomy andPhysiology (4) ORBIO201+ Human Anatomy and Physiology (4) ...... 4COM100 Introduction to Human Communication(3) ORCOM110 Interpersonal Communication .....................3CRE101+College Critical Reading (3) OREquivalent as indicated byassessment ..................................................... 0-3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ANDENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG108+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) .......... 6MAT102+Mathematical Concepts/Applications(3) OREquivalent course ORSatisfactory completion of a higherlevel mathematics course ..............................3Any approved general education course from theHumanities and Fine Arts area .............................................3Any approved general education course from theSocial and Behavioral Sciences area ..................................3HEALTH UNIT COORDINATING/PATIENT CARE ASSOCIATECertificate of CompletionTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Health SciencesChair: Edward HoskinsCertificate of Completion in Health UnitCoordinating/Patient Care Associate(18-18.5 Credits; Code 5307)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in Health UnitCoordinating/Patient Care Associate offers a twotract option which focuses on the work involved inthe nursing unit in health care facilities. The HealthUnit Coordinating track focuses on the coordinationof non-clinical activities related to patient care.Professional duties include processing doctors’orders, scheduling diagnostic tests and treatments forpatients, managing the patients’ paper and electroniccharts, managing unit supplies and equipment, andfacilitation of workflow in the health care setting.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


164 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014Communication duties include managing telephoneand patient intercom calls. The Patient Care Associatetrack adds the role of the nursing assistant for clientsacross the wellness/illness continuum within the nurseassisting scope of practice. Includes basic problemsolving processes specific to meeting the basic andholistic needs of clients, therapeutic communicationskills essential for the nursing assistant, interventionsto ensure the needs and safety of the client, specifictypes of diseases, conditions and alterations inbehavior of the client, and principles of nutritionand fluid balance. Focus is on special needs of theelder client in the acute and long-term care settings,and basic emergency care skills and procedures.Nurse Assisting course provides opportunity forthe development of clinical competency in theperformance of selected nurse assisting skills andprocedures through participation in the care of clients.Program Note: Completion of a Certified NursingAssistant (CNA) program recommended prior tostarting the Health Unit Coordinating program.Admission CriteriaSubmission of an Arizona DPS finger print clearancecard application upon enrollment. Must have valid DPSfingerprint clearance card in hand three weeks prior tothe start of the clinical class (HUC115) and card mustbe valid through completion of program.Background Check RequirementsAdmission to an Allied Health program requires thatstudents be in compliance with the Maricopa CountyCommunity College District Supplemental BackgroundCheck policy. Upon conditional program enrollment,the student must comply with all requirements of thecurrent MCCCD background check policy. Inability tocomply with background check requirements at thestart of classes may result in cancellation of enrollment.Required Course Credits ...........................................18-18.5Student must select one (1) of the following two (2)tracks:Track I Health Unit Coordinating Emphasis ..6-6.5HCC courses below may be taken concurrently withHUC required courses.EMT/HCCRES109HCC130HCC130AAHCC130ABHCC130ACHCC130ADHCC130AEHCC130AFCPR for Health Care Provider (0.5) ORProof of Current Health Care ProviderCPR Certification (0) ............................. 0-0.5Fundamentals in Health CareDelivery (3) ORHealth Care Today (0.5) ANDWorkplace Behaviors in HealthCare (0.5) ANDPersonal Wellness and Safety (0.5) ANDCommunication and Teamwork in HealthCare Organizations (0.5) ANDLegal Issues in Health Care (0.5) ANDDecision Making in the Health CareSetting (0.5) .......................................................3HCC145 or (HCC145AC and HCC146) must be takenwithin the last 5 academic years.HCC145 Medical Terminology for Health CareWorkers (3) ORHCC145AC+ Medical Terminology for Health CareWorkers III (1) ANDHCC146 Common Medical Terminology forHealth Care Workers (2)................................3Track II Patient Care Associate Emphasis.............. 6To enroll in NUR158, students must meet allrequirements and be accepted into the Certificateof Completion (CCL) Nurse Assisting (5963). It isrecommended students complete NUR158 prior toenrolling in the HUC courses.NUR158+ Nurse Assisting OREquivalent with credit by evaluation ....... 6Must be a certified nurse assistant inthe state of Arizona to apply fordepartmental credit by evaluation.Track I and Track II must complete the followingrequired HUC courses:HUC111+ Communication and Hospital UnitManagement in Health UnitCoordinating ......................................................2HUC113+ Health Unit Coordinator Lecture ............... 4HUC114+ Health Unit Coordinator Procedures .........2HUC115+ Health Unit Coordinator Clinical .................2HUC116+ Health Unit Coordinating ClinicalSeminar .................................................................1HUC120+ The Electronic Patient Chart for theHealth Unit Coordinator ..................................1HEALTHCARE COMPLIANCECertificate of CompletionTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Health SciencesChair: Edward HoskinsCertificate of Completion in HealthcareCompliance (15 Credits; Code 5773)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in HealthcareRegulatory Compliance program is designed to provideacademic preparation for health care professionalswishing to specialize in health care regulatorycompliance.Admission Criteria• One (1) year of experience working as a healthcareprofessional.• Satisfactory completion of college level English 101or equivalent as shown by transcript.• Application approved by the Program Director ordesignee.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014165Required Course Credits .................................................. 15HRC101 Overview of Healthcare Compliance .........1HSM226 Ethics and Legalities in Health ServicesManagement.......................................................3HRC228+ Health Care Industry Regulation ................3HRC230+ Health Care Corporate ComplianceProgram Design ................................................3HRC232+ Health Care Regulatory ComplianceProgram Design ................................................3HRC234+ Health Care Regulatory EnforcementCase Studies .......................................................2HOSPITAL CENTRAL SERVICETECHNOLOGYCertificate of CompletionTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Health SciencesChair: Edward HoskinsCertificate of Completion in HospitalCentral Service Technology(24-25.5 Credits; Code 5311)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in HospitalCentral Service Technology program focuses on thetypes and names of instrumentation and equipment,decontamination of instrumentation, processing ofinstruments and a firm foundation in the process ofsterilization of instrumentation. Students will havehands-on skill labs to learn techniques used forbuilding instrument trays, wrapping surgical suppliesand familiarizing themselves with care and handling ofinstrumentation. Clinical experience is arranged to givethe student working experience in all of the practicalareas of this department.Students graduate with a certificate of completionthat prepares them for employment in a hospital,clinic, veterinary hospital, out-patient hospital setting,endoscopy, or manufacturing companies of surgicalsupplies.This program will provide information for preparationof a post-graduate certification examination in the fieldof Hospital Central Service.Admission Criteria• High School diploma or GED• Current American Heart Association Health CareProvider CPR card required• Arizona DPS finger print clearance card validfrom enrollment into program through completionof program.Required Course Credits ........................................24-25.5The Program Director can waive RDG100AB if studenttakes District Placement Exam in reading and scoresinto CRE101 or if student has completed an associate’sdegree or a bachelor’s degree.BPC101AA Introduction to Computers I .........................1EMT/HCC/RES109 CPR for Health Care Provider (0.5) ORProof of Current American HeartAssociation Health Care ProviderCPR Certification (0) ............................. 0-0.5HCC130 Fundamentals in Health Care Delivery(3) ORHCC130AA Health Care Today (0.5) ANDHCC130AB Workplace Behaviors in Health Care(0.5) ANDHCC130AC Personal Wellness and Safety(0.5) ANDHCC130AD Communication and Teamwork inHealth Care Organizations (0.5) ANDHCC130AE Legal Issues in Health Care (0.5) ANDHCC130AF Decision Making in the Health CareSetting (0.5) .......................................................3HCC146 Common Medical Terminology forHealth Care Workers ......................................2HCS101AA+ Introduction to Hospital CentralService ..................................................................7HCS104AA Basic Surgical Instrumentation forHospital Central Service .................................1HCS104AB Specialty Surgical Instruments forHospital Central Service .................................1HCS110+ Packaging and Sterilization ......................... 4HCS130+ Hospital Central Service Practicum ...........5RDG100AB Studying and NotetakingTechniques (1) ORPermission of Program Director (0)....... 0-1INDUSTRIAL DESIGN TECHNOLOGYCertificate of CompletionAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Industrial TechnologyChair: John KellyCertificate of Completion in IndustrialDesign Technology: Design Specialist-SolidWorks (25 Credits; Code 5642)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in IndustrialDesign Technology: Design Specialist: SolidWorksprepares students for careers as technical assistants,engineering technicians or hands-on productdesigners. This expertise will allow employment ina variety of high tech product development andmanufacturing companies. The program includescourses designed to provide students with aworking knowledge in the field of product design,product development and rapid part manufacturing.Competency and technical expertise will be learnedon industry specific three-dimensional 3D SolidDesign software, 3D printers, and mechanical designsimulation software. The core specialty of the programis hands-on experience with solid design and 3Dprinting.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


166 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014Admission CriteriaMath assessment score on District placement examplacing students into MAT090 or higher, or permissionof department.Program Prerequisites .................................................... 0-4BPC/CIS121AE Windows Operating System:Level I (1) OREquivalent experience to bedetermined by program director ........... 0-1MET109 Machine Trades Print Reading (3) OROne year direct work experience withMechanical machine drawing ORSatisfactory placement ondepartmental placement exam .............. 0-3Required Course Credits ................................................... 19MET112 Inspection Techniques ....................................3MET113 Applied Geometric Dimensioning andTolerancing ..........................................................3MET231+ Manufacturing Processes andMaterials ...............................................................3MET286AE+ Solid Design I: Part Modeling:SolidWorks ..........................................................3MET288AE+ Solid Design II: Advanced PartModeling: SolidWorks .....................................3MET292AE+ Solid Design III: Detailing/GD&T/Assemblies/Kinematics: Solidworks .........3MET291AE+ Solid Design: Certified SolidWorksAssociate Test Preparation: CSWA .............1Restricted Electives............................................... 6 CreditsStudents should select six (6) credits from thefollowing courses:MET293AE+ Solid Design: Surface Modeling:SolidWorks ..........................................................3MET294AE+ Solid Design: Sheet Metal:SolidWorks ..........................................................3MET297AA+ Solid Design Internship: ThreeDimensional (3D) Printing .............................3MET297AB+ Solid Design Internship: 4 & 5 AxisCNC ........................................................................3MET297AC+ Solid Design Internship: ReverseEngineering .........................................................3MET297AD+ Solid Design Internship: WeldingFabrication ..........................................................3MET297AE+ Solid Design Internship: AdvancedSolid Design ........................................................3Associate in Applied Science Degree inIndustrial Design Technology(62-68 Credits; Code 3116)The Associate of Applied Science (AAS) in IndustrialDesign Technology prepares students for careersas technical assistants, engineering technicians orhands-on product manufacturers. This expertise willallow employment in a variety of high tech productdevelopment and manufacturing companies. Theprogram includes courses designed to providestudents with a working knowledge in the field ofproduct design, product development and rapid partproduction. Competency and technical expertise willbe learned on industry specific three-dimensional (3D)Solid Design software, Computer Aided Manufacturing(CAM) software, 3D printers and Multi-Axis ComputerNumerical Control (CNC) controlled machines. Thecore specialty of the program is hands-on experiencewith Computer Aided Design (CAD), CAM, CNC and 3Dprinting.Admission CriteriaMath assessment score on District placement examplacing students into MAT090 or higher, or permissionof department.Program Prerequisites .................................................... 0-4BPC/CIS121AE Windows Operating System:Level I (1) OREquivalent experience to bedetermined by program director ........... 0-1MET109 Machine Trades Print Reading (3) OROne year direct work experience withMechanical machine drawing ORSatisfactory placement ondepartmental placement exam .............. 0-3Required Course Credits ...................................................32MET112+ Inspection Techniques ....................................3MET113+ Applied Geometric Dimensioning andTolerancing ..........................................................3MET231+ Manufacturing Processes and Materials ..3GTC/MET206+ CNC Programming ...........................................3MET236AD+ CAD/CAM Programming for ComputerNumerical Control (CNC) Machines:MasterCam ..........................................................3MET246AD+ Advanced CAD/CAM CNCProgramming: MasterCam ............................3MET266AD+ Solids CAD/CAM Programming(Mastercam) .......................................................3MET276AD+ Mastercam Certified Programmer MillLevel I: Test Preparation: CPgM1 ..................1MET286AE+ Solid Design I: Part Modeling:SolidWorks ..........................................................3MET288AE+ Solid Design II: Advanced PartMET292AEModeling: SolidWorks .....................................3Solid Design III: Detailing/ GD&T/Assemblies/Kinematics: SolidWorks ........3MET291AE+ Solid Design: Certified SolidWorksAssociate Test Preparation: CSWA .............1+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014167Restricted Electives..............................................................9Students should select nine (9) credits from thefollowing courses:MET293AE+ Solid Design: Surface Modeling:SolidWorks ..........................................................3MET294AE+ Solid Design: Sheet Metal:SolidWorks ..........................................................3MET297AA+ Solid Design Internship: ThreeDimensional (3D) Printing .............................3MET297AB+ Solid Design Internship: 4 & 5 AxisCNC ........................................................................3MET297AC+ Solid Design Internship: ReverseEngineering .........................................................3MET297AD+ Solid Design Internship: WeldingFabrication ..........................................................3MET297AE+ Solid Design Internship: AdvancedSolid Design ........................................................3MET207+ CNC Mill: Operator Training I .......................3MET208+ CNC Lathe: Operator Training I ...................3MET220+ Fundamentals of CoordinateMeasuring Machines (CMM) .........................3General Education Requirements ............................. 21-27COM100+ Introduction to HumanCommunication .................................................3CRE101+College Critical Reading (3) OREquivalent as indicated byassessment ..................................................... 0-3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition (3) ANDENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG108+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) .......... 6MAT120+MAT121+MAT122+Intermediate Algebra (5) ORIntermediate Algebra (4) ORIntermediate Algebra (3) OREquivalent as indicated byassessment ..................................................... 3-5PHY101+ Introduction to Physics (4) ORCHM130+ Fundamental Chemistry (3) .................... 3-4Any general education course in the Humanities andFine Arts area ..............................................................................3Any general education course in the Social andBehavioral Sciences area ........................................................3MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGINGCertificate of CompletionTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Health SciencesChair: Edward HoskinsCertificate of Completion in MagneticResonance Imaging (12 Credits; Code 5626)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in MagneticResonance Imaging (MRI) program, offered by theMedical Radiography and Nuclear Medicine programs,prepares eligible students (eligible by their previousacademic and clinical preparation) to sit for thenational examination in Magnetic Resonance Imaging.Admission CriteriaGraduate registered medical radiographer, or agraduate registered nuclear medicine technologist, orother board eligible registered imagingprofessionals.Program Prerequisites .........................................................3DMI/DMS/ICE220+ Sectional Anatomy ........................................3Required Course Credits ................................................... 12Students entering into the program may take theprogram prerequisite concurrently with requiredcourses with permission of department.ICE229+ Magnetic Resonance Imagery forCross-Sectional Anatomy..............................2ICE233+ Fundamentals of Magnetic ResonanceImaging (MRI).....................................................1ICE264+ MRI Physics, Instrumentation andSafety ....................................................................3ICE269+ Magnetic Resonance ProcedureProtocols ..............................................................3ICE272+ Magnetic Resonance Pathologyand Contrast .......................................................3MANAGEMENT OF CLINICAL ANDBIOSCIENCE INFORMATICSCertificates of CompletionAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Business and Information TechnologiesChair: S. Annette TorreyManagement of Clinical and BioscienceInformatics: Business and ProjectManagement (43-52 Credits; Code 5755)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in Managementof Clinical and Bioscience Informatics: Business andProject Management program prepares studentsto enter the rapidly developing field of Clinical andBioscience Informatics. The focus of this degree is on+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


168 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014utilizing electronic health/medical data for improvedquality and efficiency of healthcare, while controllingcosts. The program will provide the backgroundneeded to prepare reports and to convert data tomeaningful information that can be used to improveefficiencies and control costs as well as reportsclinicians can use improve patient care. The programwill develop student skills in business management,organizational communication, statistical analysis ofdata, Health Insurance Portability and AccountabilityAct (HIPAA) regulations, customer service, computerinformation systems, and also encompasses a solidfoundation of biology, mathematics, and statisticalanalysis.Admission Criteria• Formal application and admission to the programis required.Health and Safety Requirements1. Students must submit a Health and SafetyDocumentation Checklist verifying completiono f all requirements and maintain current statusthroughout the program.2. Students must submit the Health Declaration Formsigned by a licensed health care provider.3. Students must provide a copy of their current andvalid Finger Print Clearance Card to be admitted tothe program.Required Course Credits ............................................ 43-52Certificate of Completion in Management of Clinicaland Bioscience Informatics: Clinical InformaticsTechnology (5752)............................................................. 24-32CIS124AA Project Management Software: Level I .....1CIS128 Databases in Practice Management ..........3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3GBS220+ Quantitative Methods in Business (3) ORMAT217+ Mathematical Analysis for Business (3)ORMAT218+ Mathematical Analysis for Business(4)...................................................................... 3-4GBS221+ Business Statistics ............................................3GBS233+ Business Communication ..............................3MGT228+ Management, Planning, and Leadershipfor Health Information Technology ...........3Management of Clinical and BioscienceInformatics: Clinical Informatics Technology(24-32 Credits; Code 5752)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in Managementof Clinical and Bioscience Informatics: ClinicalInformatics Technology program prepares students fora technologist-level job in this career field. Training inthis area provides students with basic knowledge/skillsin customer service, clinical and bioscience informatics,Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act(HIPAA) Privacy Rule, human relations, general biology,use of statistical analysis software, and computerspreadsheet skills. An Associate in Applied Science(AAS) degree is also available.Admission Criteria• Formal application and admission to the programis required.Program Prerequisites .....................................................0-8CRE101+ College Critical Reading (3) OREquivalent as indicated byassessment (0)............................................. 0-3MAT120+ Intermediate Algebra (5) ORMAT121+ Intermediate Algebra (4) ORMAT122+ Intermediate Algebra (3) ORhigher as indicated by assessment ORSatisfactory completion of a higherlevel mathematics course .........................0-5Required Course Credits .................................................. 24BIO181+ General Biology (Majors) I ........................... 4CIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems ................................................................3CIS114DE Excel Spreadsheet ............................................3GBS110 Human Relations in Business andIndustry (3) ORMGT251 Human Relations in Business (3)................3HSE106+ Introduction to HIPAA Privacy Rule ..........2MGT156 Introduction to the BusinessEnvironment and Management ofClinical and Bioscience Informatics ...........3MGT157 Introduction to Statistical Analysis ofClinical and Bioscience Data forManagers .............................................................3CSM/TQM101 Quality Customer Service .............................3Management of Clinical and BioscienceInformatics: Public Health(37-45 Credits; Code 5750)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in Managementof Clinical and Bioscience Informatics: PublicHealth program prepares students to assist MD/PhD researchers to collect, analyze and report datato protect and improve the health of the publicat the local, state, and national levels. Training inthis area provides students with basic knowledge/skills in Business Management, Public Health andEpidemiology, Statistical Analysis Software, CustomerService, Clinical and Bioscience Informatics, Biology,and Human Anatomy and Physiology. An Associate inApplied Science (AAS) degree is also available.Admission Criteria• Formal application and admission to the programis required.Health and Safety Requirements1. Students must submit a Health and SafetyDocumentation Checklist verifying completiono f all requirements and maintain current statusthroughout the program.2. Students must submit the Health Declaration Formsigned by a licensed health care provider.3. Students must provide a copy of their current andvalid Finger Print Clearance Card to be admitted tothe program.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014169Required Course Credits ............................................ 37-45Certificate of Completion in Management of Clinicaland Bioscience Informatics: Clinical InformaticsTechnology (5752)............................................................. 24-32BIO160 Introduction to Human Anatomy andPhysiology .......................................................... 4ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3GBS233+ Business Communication ..............................3MGT158 Introduction to Public Health andEpidemiology for Managers .........................3Associate in Applied Science DegreeManagement of Clinical and BioscienceInformatics (60-90 Credits; Code 3134)The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) in Managementof Clinical and Bioscience Informatics program preparesstudents to enter the rapidly developing field of Clinicaland Bioscience Informatics. The focus of this degreewith a business management emphasis is on utilizingelectronic health/medical data for improved qualityand efficiency of healthcare, while controlling costs.The program will provide the background needed todevelop management reports and to convert data tomeaningful information that can be used by cliniciansto improve patient care. The program will developstudent skills in business management, organizationalcommunication, statistical analysis of data, HealthInsurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)regulations, and customer service. In additional tothe business/management emphasis, the curriculumencompasses computer information systems andbioscience/clinical practice. A student completing theAAS program will also complete the AGEC-B GeneralEducation requirements to assist those students whowish to transfer to a four-year institution. The programincludes three tracks for specialization with threeCertificates of Completion (CCL) available.Program Note: Successful completion of all programrequirements also satisfies AGEC-B.Admission Criteria• Formal application and admission to the programis required.Health and Safety Requirements1. Students must submit a Health and SafetyDocumentation Checklist verifying completiono f all requirements and maintain current statusthroughout the program.2. Students must submit the Health Declaration Formsigned by a licensed health care provider.3. Students must provide a copy of their current andvalid Finger Print Clearance Card to be admitted tothe program.Program Prerequisites .....................................................0-8CRE101+ College Critical Reading (3) OREquivalent as indicated byassessment (0) ............................................ 0-3MAT120+ Intermediate Algebra (5) ORMAT121+ Intermediate Algebra (4) ORMAT122+ Intermediate Algebra (3) ORhigher as indicated by assessment ORsatisfactory completion of a higherlevel mathematics course .........................0-5Required Course Credits ............................................ 24-52Students must select one of three (3) tracks inconsultation with a Faculty Advisor:Track I Clinical Informatics Technology ...............24BIO181+ General Biology (Majors) I .......................... 4CIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems ................................................................3CIS114DE Excel Spreadsheet .......................................... 3GBS110 Human Relations in Business andIndustry (3) ORMGT251 Human Relations in Business (3)................3HSE106+ Introduction to HIPAA Privacy Rule ..........2MGT156 Introduction to the BusinessEnvironment and Management ofClinical and Bioscience Informatics ...........3MGT157 Introduction to Statistical Analysis ofClinical and Bioscience Data forManagers .............................................................3CSM/TQM101 Quality Customer Service .............................3Track II Public Health ............................................ 37-45Certificate of Completion in Management of Clinicaland Bioscience Informatics: Clinical InformaticsTechnology (5752) ............................................................ 24-32BIO160 Introduction to Human Anatomy andPhysiology .......................................................... 4ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3GBS233+ Business Communication ..............................3MGT158 Introduction to Public Health andEpidemiology for Managers .........................3Track III Business and Project Management ... 43-52Certificate of Completion in Management of Clinicaland Bioscience Informatics: Clinical InformaticsTechnology (5752) ...................................................... 24-32ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ..........3GBS233+ Business Communication ..............................3MGT228+ Management, Planning, and LeadershipCIS124AAfor Health Information Technology ...........3Project Management Software:Level I .....................................................................1CIS128 Databases in Practice Management ..........3GBS220+ Quantitative Methods in Business (3)ORMAT217+ Mathematical Analysis for Business (3)ORMAT218+ Mathematical Analysis forBusiness (4)................................................... 3-4GBS221+ Business Statistics ............................................3+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


170 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014Restricted Electives........................................................0-10These courses must be selected in consultation withProgram Faculty or a Program Advisor. Any coursesalready used to satisfy a Required Course within atrack may not be selected. No additional RestrictedElectives are required for Tracks II and III.Track I Clinical Informatics TechnologyStudents should select course credits from thefollowing list of courses to complete a minimum of 60credits for the AAS degree.BIO/CSC283+ Bioinformatics and ScientificComputing ..........................................................3CIS117AM Database Management: MicrosoftAccess-Level I .....................................................1CIS117BM+ Database Management: MicrosoftAccess-Level II ....................................................1CIS117CM+ Database Management: MicrosoftAccess-Level III ...................................................1CIS117DM Microsoft Access: DatabaseManagement.......................................................3CIS217AM+ Advanced Microsoft Access:Database Management ..................................3CIS228+ Advanced Databases for PracticeManagement.......................................................3GBS151 Introduction to Business ................................3GBS205 Legal, Ethical, and Regulatory Issuesin Business ...........................................................3GBS220+ Quantitative Methods in Business ..............3GBS233+ Business Communication ..............................3GBS270AA+ Business Internship ...........................................1GBS270AB+ Business Internship ..........................................2GBS270AC+ Business Internship ..........................................3HCC145 Medical Terminology for Health CareWorkers ................................................................3MGT156 Introduction to the BusinessEnvironment and Management ofClinical and Bioscience Informatics ...........3MGT157 Introduction to Statistical Analysis ofClinical and Bioscience Data forManagers .............................................................3MGT158 Introduction to Public Health andEpidemiology for Managers .........................3MGT228+ Management, Planning, and Leadershipfor Health Information Technology ...........3MGT253 Owning and Operating a Small Business ......3Track IITrack IIIPublic HealthRestricted Electives ........................................ 0Business and Project ManagementRestricted Electives ........................................ 0General Education Requirements ............................ 26-38Track I Clinical Informatics TechnologyENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3GBS233+ Business Communication ..............................3Track I and Track II and Track IIIBIO160 Introduction to Human Anatomy andPhysiology .......................................................... 4BIO241+ Human Genetics ............................................... 4COM263Elements of InterculturalCommunication (3) ANDECN211 Macroeconomic Principles (3) ORECN212 Microeconomic Principles (3) ORSBU200 Society and Business (3).............................. 6ENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG108+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3MAT150+MAT151+MAT152+MAT212+MAT213+College Algebra/Functions (5) ORCollege Algebra/Functions (4) ORCollege Algebra/Functions (3) OREquivalent as indicated by assessmentORSatisfactory completion of a higherlevel mathematics course .........................0-5Brief Calculus (3) ORBrief Calculus (4) ORSatisfactory completion of a higherlevel mathematics course ......................... 3-4Any approved general education course in theHumanities and Fine Arts area ............................................ 6Students are encouraged to choose course workfrom more than one discipline and awareness areaMANAGEMENT OF CLINICALINFORMATION TECHNOLOGYCertificates of CompletionAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Business and Information TechnologiesChair: S. Annette TorreyAdmission Criteria for all certificates and degree• Formal application and admission to the programis required.• Six months work experience in:1. Information technology OR2. Clinical environment OR3. Medical office settingHealth & Safety Requirements for all certificates anddegree1. Students must submit a Health and SafetyDocumentation Checklist verifying completionof all requirements and maintain current statusthroughout the program.2. Students must submit the Health Declaration Formsigned by a licensed health care provider.3. Students must provide a copy of their current andvalid Finger Print Clearance Card upon application.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014171Certificate of Completion in Management ofClinical Information Technology:Clinical Technology Consulting(17 Credits; Code 5705)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in Managementof Clinical Information Technology: Clinical TechnologyConsulting program trains workers to suggest solutionsfor health IT implementation problems in clinical andpublic health settings and address workflow and datacollection issues from a clinical perspective, includingquality measurement and improvement. An Associatein Applied Science (AAS) degree is also available.See Admission Critera and Health & SafetyRequirements under main headingProgram Prerequisites .....................................................6-9CIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems ................................................................3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3CRE101+ College Critical Reading (3) OREquivalent by assessment ........................ 0-3Required Course Credits ................................................... 17CIS128 Databases in Practice Management ..........3CIS225+ Business Systems Analysis and Design ...3CIS228+ Advanced Databases for PracticeManagement.......................................................3GBS110 Human Relations in Business andIndustry ................................................................3HSE106+ Introduction to HIPAA Privacy Rule ..........2MGT228+ Management, Planning, and Leadershipfor Health Information Technology ...........3Certificate of Completion in Management ofClinical Information Technology:Health Information TechnologyImplementation Support(20 Credits; Code 5720)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in Managementof Clinical Information Technology: Health InformationTechnology Implementation Support program trainsworkers to provide on-site user support for the periodof time before and during implementation of healthIT systems in clinical and public health settings. Theprevious background of workers in this role includesinformation technology or information management.An Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degree is alsoavailable.See Admission Critera and Health & SafetyRequirements under main headingProgram Prerequisites .....................................................6-9CIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems ................................................................3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3CRE101+ College Critical Reading (3) OREquivalent by assessment ........................ 0-3Required Course Credits .................................................. 20CIS128 Databases in Practice Management ..........3CIS225+ Business Systems Analysis and Design ...3CIS228+ Advanced Databases for PracticeManagement.......................................................3GBS110 Human Relations in Business andHCC145Industry ................................................................3Medical Terminology for Health CareWorkers ................................................................3HSE106+ Introduction to HIPAA Privacy Rule ..........2CSM/TQM101 Quality Customer Service .............................3Certificate of Completion in Management ofClinical Information Technology:Health Information Technology TechnicalSupport (17 Credits; Code 5723)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) Management ofClinical Information Technology: Health InformationTechnology Technical Support program trains workersto maintain systems in clinical and public healthsettings, including patching and upgrading of software.An Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degree is alsoavailable.See Admission Critera and Health & SafetyRequirements under main headingProgram Prerequisites .....................................................6-9CIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems ................................................................3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3CRE101+ College Critical Reading (3) OREquivalent by assessment ........................ 0-3Required Course Credits ................................................... 17CIS128 Databases in Practice Management ..........3CIS225+ Business Systems Analysis and Design ...3CIS228+ Advanced Databases for PracticeGBS110Management.......................................................3Human Relations in Business andIndustry ................................................................3HSE106+ Introduction to HIPAA Privacy Rule ..........2CSM/TQM101 Quality Customer Service .............................3Certificate of Completion in Management ofClinical Information Technology:Health Information Technology Training(20 Credits; Code 5738)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in Managementof Clinical Information Technology: Health InformationTechnology Training program trains workers to designand deliver training programs, using adult learningprinciples, to employees in clinical and public healthsettings. The previous background of workers in thisrole includes experience as a health professional(medical assistant, nursing, or physician). Experienceas a trainer in from the classroom is also desired. AnAssociate in Applied Science (AAS) degree is alsoavailable.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


172 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014See Admission Critera and Health & SafetyRequirements under main headingProgram Prerequisites .....................................................6-9CIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems ................................................................3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3CRE101+ College Critical Reading (3) OREquivalent by assessment ........................ 0-3Required Course Credits .................................................. 20CIS128 Databases in Practice Management ..........3CIS228+ Advanced Databases for PracticeManagement.......................................................3GBS110 Human Relations in Business andIndustry ................................................................3HSE106+ Introduction to HIPAA Privacy Rule ..........2MGT227+ Training and Instructional Design forHealth Information Technology ..................3MGT228+ Management, Planning, and Leadershipfor Health Information Technology ...........3CSM/TQM101 Quality Customer Service .............................3Certificate of Completion in Managementof Clinical Information Technology:Implementation Management(21 Credits; Code 5737)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in Managementof Clinical Information Technology: ImplementationManagement program trains workers to provide on-sitemanagement of mobile adoption support teams for theperiod of time before and during implementation ofhealth information technology systems in clinical andpublic health settings. Workers in this role will, prior totraining, have experience in health and/or informationtechnology environments as well as administrativeand managerial experience. An Associate in AppliedScience (AAS) degree is also available.See Admission Critera and Health & SafetyRequirements under main headingProgram Prerequisites .....................................................6-9CIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems ................................................................3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3CRE101+ College Critical Reading (3) OREquivalent by assessment ........................ 0-3Required Course Credits ................................................... 21CIS124AA Project Management Software: Level I .....1CIS128 Databases in Practice Management ..........3CIS225+ Business Systems Analysis and Design ...3CIS228+ Advanced Databases for PracticeManagement.......................................................3GBS110 Human Relations in Business andIndustry ................................................................3HSE106+ Introduction to HIPAA Privacy Rule ..........2MGT228+ Management, Planning, and Leadershipfor Health Information Technology ...........3CSM/TQM101 Quality Customer Service .............................3Certificate of Completion in Management ofClinical Information Technology:Practice Workflow and InformationManagement Redesign(20 Credits; Code 5724)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in Managementof Clinical Information Technology: Practice Workflowand Information Management Redesign program trainsworkers to assist in reorganizing the work of a medicalprofessional to provide meaningful use of the featuresof health information technology. An Associate inApplied Science (AAS) degree is also available.See Admission Critera and Health & SafetyRequirements under main headingProgram Prerequisites .....................................................6-9CIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems ................................................................3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3CRE101+ College Critical Reading (3) OREquivalent by assessment ........................ 0-3Required Course Credits .................................................. 20CIS128 Databases in Practice Management ..........3CIS225+ Business Systems Analysis and Design ...3CIS228+ Advanced Databases for PracticeManagement.......................................................3GBS110 Human Relations in Business andIndustry ................................................................3HSE106+ Introduction to HIPAA Privacy Rule ..........2MGT228+ Management, Planning, and Leadershipfor Health Information Technology ...........3CSM/TQM101 Quality Customer Service .............................3Associate in Applied Science Degree inManagement of Clinical Technology(60 Credits; Code 3128)The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degree inManagement of Clinical Information Technologyprogram meets the needs of students who wishto learn the process of analysis, design, andimplementation of business computer systems,with an emphasis on Electronic Health Recordsystems for small medical practices. The programdevelops customer service skills and techniquesfor communicating effectively with a wide range ofmedical and allied health personnel. The programis designed to acquaint students with the processof assisting a small medical office to convert to anElectronic Health Record (EHR) and then workingwith the practice to achieve optimal use. Thecourses include how to configure an EHR systemto achieve features required for meaningful usewith appropriate policies and procedures for datacontrol, security, privacy, and confidentiality of healthinformation maintained in electronic health informationmanagement systems. The program includes six tracksfor specialization, with six Certificates of Completion(CCL) available.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014173See Admission Critera and Health & SafetyRequirements under main headingProgram Prerequisites .....................................................6-9CIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems ................................................................3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3CRE101+ College Critical Reading (3) OREquivalent by assessment ........................ 0-3Required Course Credits .............................................. 17-21CIS128 Databases in Practice Management ..........3CIS228+ Advanced Databases for PracticeManagement.......................................................3GBS110 Human Relations in Business andIndustry ................................................................3HSE106+ Introduction to HIPAA Privacy Rule ..........2Students must select one of six (6) tracks inconsultation with a faculty advisor:Track I Management of Clinical InformationTechnology: Clinical TechnologyConsulting .......................................................... 6This track is designed for individuals who are currentlylicensed medical professionals.CIS225+ Business Systems Analysis and Design ...3MGT228+ Management, Planning, and Leadershipfor Health Information Technology ...........3Track II Management of Clinical InformationTechnology: Health InformationTechnology Implementation Support ...... 9CIS225+ Business Systems Analysis and Design ...3CSM/TQM101 Quality Customer Service .............................3HCC145 Medical Terminology for Health CareWorkers ................................................................3Track III Management of Clinical InformationTechnology: Health InformationTechnology Technical Support ................... 6CIS225+ Business Systems Analysis and Design ...3CSM/TQM101 Quality Customer Service .............................3Track IV Management of Clinical InformationTechnology: Practice Workflow andInformation Management Redesign ......... 9CIS225+ Business Systems Analysis and Design ...3CSM/TQM101 Quality Customer Service .............................3MGT228+ Management, Planning, and Leadershipfor Health Information Technology ...........3Track V Management of Clinical InformationTechnology: ImplementationManagement.....................................................10CIS124AA Project Management Software: Level I .....1CIS225+ Business Systems Analysis and Design ...3CSM/TQM101 Quality Customer Service .............................3MGT228+ Management, Planning, and Leadershipfor Health Information Technology ...........3Track VI Management of Clinical InformationTechnology: Health InformationTechnology Training ......................................... 9CSM/TQM101 Quality Customer Service .............................3MGT227+ Training and Instructional Design forHealth Information Technology ..................3MGT228+ Management, Planning, and Leadershipfor Health Information Technology ...........3Restricted Electives........................................................ 9-18These courses must be selected in consultation witha program faculty or program advisor, based uponstudents’ educational background and experience.Track IManagement of Clinical InformationTechnology: Clinical TechnologyConsulting ....................................................13-18Students should choose 13-18 credits from thefollowing list of courses to complete a minimum of 60credits for the AAS degree.BPC/CIS112AA Report Generator: Crystal Reports I ..........1CIS124AA Project Management Software: Level I .....1CIS276DB+ SQL Server Database ......................................3CCT175/CIS175EAIntroduction to Structured QueryLanguage ..............................................................1ITS100 Information Security Awareness .................1CSM/TQM101 Quality Customer Service .............................3BPC/CIS114DE Microsoft Excel ..................................................3BPC/CIS117DMMicrosoft Access: DatabaseManagement.......................................................3GBS151 Introduction to Business ................................3GBS205Legal, Ethical, and Regulatory Issues inBusiness ...............................................................3GBS233+ Business Communication ..............................3MGT101 Techniques of Supervision ............................3MGT270AA+ Management Internship ..................................1MGT270AB+ Management Internship .................................2MGT270AC+ Management Internship .................................3MGT276 Personnel/Human ResourcesManagement.......................................................3OAS108 Business English ...............................................3Track IIManagement of Clinical InformationTechnology: Health InformationTechnology Implementation Support ..10-15Students should choose 10-15 credits from thefollowing list of courses to complete a minimum of 60credits for the AAS degree.BPC/CIS112AA Report Generator: Crystal Reports I ..........1CIS124AA Project Management Software: Level I .....1CIS276DB+ SQL Server Database ......................................3CCT175/CIS175EAIntroduction to Structured QueryLanguage ..............................................................1HIM105+ Computers in Healthcare and HealthRecord Systems ................................................2ITS100 Information Security Awareness .................1+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


174 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014BPC/CIS114DE Microsoft Excel ..................................................3BPC/CIS117DMMicrosoft Access: DatabaseManagement.......................................................3GBS151 Introduction to Business ................................3GBS205Legal, Ethical, and Regulatory Issues inBusiness ...............................................................3GBS233+ Business Communication ..............................3MGT101 Techniques of Supervision ............................3MGT270AA+ Management Internship ..................................1MGT270AB+ Management Internship .................................2MGT270AC+ Management Internship .................................3MGT276 Personnel/Human ResourcesManagement.......................................................3OAS108 Business English ...............................................3Track IIIManagement of Clinical InformationTechnology: Health InformationTechnology Technical Support .............13-18Students should choose 13-18 credits from thefollowing list of courses to complete a minimum of 60credits for the AAS degree.BPC/CIS112AA Report Generator: Crystal Reports I ..........1CCT175/CIS175EAIntroduction to Structured QueryLanguage ..............................................................1CIS276DB+ SQL Server Database ......................................3HIM105+HCC145Computers in Healthcare and HealthRecord Systems ................................................2Medical Terminology for Health CareWorkers ................................................................3ITS100 Information Security Awareness .................1BPC/CIS114DE Microsoft Excel ..................................................3BPC/CIS117DMMicrosoft Access: DatabaseManagement.......................................................3GBS151 Introduction to Business ................................3GBS205Legal, Ethical, and Regulatory Issues inBusiness ...............................................................3GBS233+ Business Communication ..............................3MGT101 Techniques of Supervision ............................3MGT270AA+ Management Internship ..................................1MGT270AB+ Management Internship .................................2MGT270AC+ Management Internship .................................3MGT276 Personnel/Human ResourcesManagement.......................................................3OAS108 Business English ...............................................3Track IV Management of Clinical InformationTechnology: Practice Workflow andInformation Management Redesign .. 10-15Students should choose 10-15 credits from thefollowing list of courses to complete a minimum of 60credits for the AAS degree.BPC/CIS112AA Report Generator: Crystal Reports I ..........1CIS124AA Project Management Software: Level I .....1CIS276DB+ SQL Server Database ......................................3CCT175/CIS175EAHIM105+HCC145Introduction to Structured QueryLanguage ..............................................................1Computers in Healthcare and HealthRecord Systems ................................................2Medical Terminology for Health CareWorkers ................................................................3ITS100 Information Security Awareness .................1BPC/CIS114DE Microsoft Excel ..................................................3BPC/CIS117DMMicrosoft Access: DatabaseManagement.......................................................3GBS151 Introduction to Business ................................3GBS205Legal, Ethical, and Regulatory Issues inBusiness ...............................................................3GBS233+ Business Communication ..............................3MGT101 Techniques of Supervision ............................3MGT270AA+ Management Internship ..................................1MGT270AB+ Management Internship .................................2MGT270AC+ Management Internship .................................3MGT276 Personnel/Human ResourcesManagement.......................................................3OAS108 Business English ...............................................3Track VManagement of Clinical InformationTechnology: ImplementationManagement.................................................9-14Students should choose 9-14 credits from the followinglist of courses to complete a minimum of 60 credits forthe AAS degree.BPC/CIS112AA Report Generator: Crystal Reports I ..........1CIS276DB+ SQL Server Database ......................................3CCT175/CIS175EAIntroduction to Structured QueryLanguage ..............................................................1HIM105+ Computers in Healthcare and HealthRecord Systems ................................................2ITS100 Information Security Awareness .................1MGT227+ Training and Instructional Design forHealth Information Technology ..................3BPC/CIS114DE Microsoft Excel ..................................................3BPC/CIS117DMMicrosoft Access: DatabaseManagement.......................................................3GBS151 Introduction to Business ................................3GBS205Legal, Ethical, and Regulatory Issuesin Business ...........................................................3GBS233+ Business Communication ..............................3MGT101 Techniques of Supervision ............................3MGT270AA+ Management Internship ..................................1MGT270AB+ Management Internship .................................2MGT270AC+ Management Internship .................................3MGT276 Personnel/Human ResourcesManagement.......................................................3OAS108 Business English ...............................................3+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014175Track VIManagement of Clinical InformationTechnology: Health InformationTechnology Training .................................. 10-15Students should choose 10-15 credits from thefollowing list of courses to complete a minimum of 60credits for the AAS degree.BPC/CIS112AA Report Generator: Crystal Reports I ..........1CIS276DB+ SQL Server Database ......................................3CCT175/CIS175EAHIM105+Introduction to Structured QueryLanguage ..............................................................1Computers in Healthcare and HealthRecord Systems ................................................2BPC/CIS114DE Microsoft Excel ..................................................3BPC/CIS117DMMicrosoft Access: DatabaseManagement.......................................................3GBS151 Introduction to Business ................................3GBS205Legal, Ethical, and Regulatory Issues inBusiness ...............................................................3GBS233+ Business Communication ..............................3MGT101 Techniques of Supervision ............................3MGT270AA+ Management Internship ..................................1MGT270AB+ Management Internship .................................2MGT270AC+ Management Internship .................................3MGT276 Personnel/Human ResourcesManagement.......................................................3OAS108 Business English ...............................................3General Education Requirements ..............................19-21ECN211 Macroeconomic Principles (3) ORECN212 Microeconomic Principles (3) ORSBU200 Society and Business (3)...............................3ENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG108+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3Associate in Applied Science Degree inMedical Radiography(83-93.5 Credits; Code 3582)The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) in MedicalRadiography program provides training in patientservices using imaging modalities, as directed byphysicians qualified to order and/or perform radiologicprocedures. Curriculum includes training in patientcare essential to radiologic procedures; this includesexercising judgment when performing medical imagingprocedures. The program focuses on principles ofradiation protection for the patient, self, and others,anatomy, positioning, radiographic techniques,maintaining equipment, processing film, the digitalenvironment, keeping patient records, and performingvarious office tasks.Program Note: Students with other related healthcare experiences not listed in the following ProgramPrerequisites options may request an evaluationfor course competency equivalence through theIntegrated Competency Assessment Network (ICAN)by calling (480) 731-8924.Admission Criteria• Formal application and admission to the programis required.• Current American Heart Association Health CareProvider CPR card required.Background Check RequirementsAdmission to an Allied Health program requires thatstudents be in compliance with the Maricopa CountyCommunity College District Supplemental BackgroundCheck policy. Upon conditional program admission,the student must comply with all requirements of thecurrent MCCCD background check policy.MAT120+MAT121+MAT122+Intermediate Algebra (5) ORIntermediate Algebra (4) ORIntermediate Algebra (3) OREquivalent ORSatisfactory completion of a higher levelmathematics course………… ....................... 3-5Any general education course in the OralCommunication area ................................................................3Any general education course in the Humanities andFine Arts area ..............................................................................3Any general education course in the Natural Sciencesarea ................................................................................................ 4MEDICAL RADIOGRAPHYAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses required within the program.Division: Health SciencesChair: Edward HoskinsProgram Prerequisites ..............................................16-24.5Students must earn a GPA of 3.0 or better in allcourses within the Program Prerequisites area.Students must select Option I or Option II.Option I/Part 1 ....................................................................10-18.5For entry level students with no prior medicalradiography experience. Courses in Option I must becompleted before students are eligible to be placed inthe Medical Radiography queue.BIO160 Introduction to Human Anatomy andPhysiology .......................................................... 4COM100 Introduction to HumanCommunication (3) ORCOM110 Interpersonal Communication (3) ORCOM225+ Public Speaking (3) ORCOM230 Small Group Communication (3)................3CRE101+ College Critical Reading (3) OREquivalent by Assessment (AssetReading Placement Test) (0) ORCRE111+ Critical Reading for Business andIndustry (3) OREquivalent by Assessment (0) ............... 0-3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


176 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014MAT090+MAT091+MAT092+MAT093+EMT/HCC/RES109Developmental Algebra (5) ORIntroductory Algebra (4) ORIntroductory Algebra (3) ORIntroductory Algebra/Math AnxietyReduction (5) ORSatisfactory score on District Placementexam ORSatisfactory completion of ahigher level mathematics course...........0-5CPR for Health Care Provider (0.5) ORProof of Current American HeartAssociation Health Care Provider CPRCertification (0) ....................................... 0-0.5Option I/Part 2 ............................................................................. 6After acceptance into program and before the start ofrequired courses, students in Option I must completethe following courses:HCC130 Fundamentals in Health Care Delivery .....3HCC146 Common Medical Terminology forHealth Care Workers .......................................2DMI100 Introduction to Diagnostic MedicalRadiography: Professionalism andPatient Care .........................................................1Option II ...............................................................................16-24.5For Certified Practical Technologist in Radiography(CPTR) currently licensed and working in theradiography field with minimum six (6) months ofexperience in a hospital acute care setting OR one (1)year experience in an outpatient imaging setting.Option II is only available to medical Certified PracticalTechnologist in Radiography (CPTR) with current stateMedical Radiologic Technology Board of Examiners(MRTBE) licensure.BIO160 Introduction to Human Anatomy andPhysiology .......................................................... 4COM100 Introduction to HumanCommunication (3) ORCOM110 Interpersonal Communication (3) ORCOM225+ Public Speaking (3) ORCOM230 Small Group Communication (3)................3CRE101+ College Critical Reading (3) OREquivalent by Assessment (AssetReading Placement Test) ORCRE111+ Critical Reading for Businessand Industry (3) OREquivalent by Assessment (0) ............... 0-3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3MAT090+ Developmental Algebra (5) ORMAT091+ Introductory Algebra (4) ORMAT092+MAT093+Introductory Algebra (3) ORIntroductory Algebra/Math AnxietyReduction (5) ORSatisfactory score on DistrictPlacement exam ORSatisfactory completion of a higherlevel mathematics course .........................0-5EMT/HCC/RES109 CPR for Health Care Provider (0.5) ORProof of Current American HeartAssociation Health Care Provider CPRCertification (0) ....................................... 0-0.5HCC130 Fundamentals in Health Care Delivery .....3HCC146 Common Medical Terminology forHealth Care Workers .......................................2DMI100 Introduction to Diagnostic MedicalRadiography: Professionalism andPatient Care .........................................................1Required Course Credits .................................................. 56Students who have been admitted into Option II inPrerequisites area in lieu of enrolling in DMI101, 102,103, and 105 are required to take Credit by Evaluationfor 10.5 credits through the Integrated CompetencyAssessment Network (ICAN).DMI101+ Radiation Safety ...............................................2DMI102+ Radiographic Positioning I ........................... 4DMI103+ Introduction to Imaging .............................. 1.5DMI104+ Radiography Practicum I ........................... 3.5DMI105+ Fundamentals of Radiation Physics ..........3DMI106+ Radiographic Image Evaluation I ................1DMI107+ Digital Imaging ................................................. 4DMI112+ Radiographic Positioning II ..........................3DMI114+ Radiography Practicum II ..............................3DMI118+ Contrast Media Procedures ..........................2DMI124+ Radiography Practicum III.............................3DMI204+ Radiography Practicum IV ............................3DMI211+ Pharmacology of Contrast Agents ........0.5DMI212+ Advanced Radiographic Procedures .........1DMI214+ Radiography Practicum V .........................4.5DMI215+ Radiation Biology .............................................2DMI216+ Radiographic Image Evaluation II ...............1DMI/DMS/ICE220+ Sectional Anatomy ..........................................3DMI221+ Advanced Digital Imaging ........................ 2.5DMI222+ Advanced Radiologic Pathology .................1DMI/ICE223+ Introduction to Computed Tomography ..1DMI224+ Radiography Practicum VI ............................5DMI227+ Radiography Seminar ......................................1HCC218+ Venous Access for Diagnostic Agents .....0.5General Education Requirements ............................... 11-13ENG102+ First-Year Composition ORENG108+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3MAT120+MAT121+MAT122+Intermediate Algebra (5) ORIntermediate Algebra (4) ORIntermediate Algebra (3) OREquivalent course ORSatisfactory completion of a higherlevel mathematics course ......................... 3-5Any approved general education course from theHumanities and Fine Arts area .............................................2Any approved general education course from theSocial and Behavioral Sciences area ..................................3+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014177MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTIONCertificate of CompletionAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Health SciencesChair: Edward HoskinsCertificate of Completion in MedicalTranscription (35-41.5 Credits; Code 5622)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in MedicalTranscription program is the field of transcribingdictation by physicians and other health careprofessionals regarding patient diagnosis, treatmentand prognosis. It employs state-of-the-art electronicequipment for the transcription of a variety of medicalreports in order to document patient care and facilitatedelivery of health care services. Medical transcriptionrequires a broad knowledge of medical terminology,anatomy and physiology, surgical procedures,medications, diagnostic tests and curative proceduresand medico-legal principles. Medical Transcription isa vital part of the Health Information Managementdepartment, ensuring accurate electronic medicalrecords. Medical Transcription enforces standards andrequirements that apply to patient health informationrecords, as well as the legal significance of medicaltranscripts.A wide variety of careers exist in the medicaltranscription field including working in doctors’ offices,hospitals, outpatient diagnostic services, insurancecompanies, or private dictation services. There arejob opportunities for a “self starting” individual who isinterested in the medical field, with word processingskills, and who takes great pride in efficiency andaccuracy. After graduating with the Associate inApplied Science (AAS) degree, students can sit for theexam to become Registered Medical Transcriptionist(RMT) by taking the national certification exam offeredby the Association for Healthcare DocumentationIntegrity (AHDI).Educational Information: Completion of GateWay’sMedical Transcription program leads to an Associatein Applied Sciences degree. Transcription classes areoffered together, in a block, for effective developmentof medical terminology and transcription production.The program is delivered online in a format reflectiveof the nature of medical transcription in today’s healthinformation, electronic society using electronic medicalrecords and voice files delivered to the transcriptionistvia the internet.Admission Criteria• Formal application and admission to the programis required.• Current Health Care Provider CPR card required.Program Prerequisites .....................................................0-6Students must select one of the following 2 options:Option I: ......................................................................................... 050 WPM typing skill.Current credential in health care discipline or higherdegree in a health science discipline from a regionallyaccredited institution of higher education recognizedby Maricopa County Community College District.Option II: ........................................................................................ 650 WPM typing skillHCC130 Fundamentals in Health Care Delivery (3)ORHCC130AA Health Care Today (0.5) ANDHCC130AB Workplace Behaviors in Health Care (0.5)ANDHCC130AC Personal Wellness and Safety (0.5) ANDHCC130AD Communication and Teamwork in HealthCare Organizations (0.5) ANDHCC130AE Legal Issues in Health Care (0.5) ANDHCC130AF Decision Making in the Health CareSetting (0.5) .......................................................3HCC145 Medical Terminology for Health CareWorkers ................................................................3Required Course Credits ......................................... 35-35.5BIO160 Introduction to Human Anatomy andPhysiology .......................................................... 4EMT/HCC/RES109CPR for the Health Care Provider (0.5) ORProof of Current Health Care ProviderCPR Certification (0) ............................. 0-0.5MTR101+ Medical Transcription Applications ...........3MTR103+MTR105Pharmacology for MedicalTranscriptionists ................................................2Medical Transcription Style andGrammar ..............................................................3MTR190 Medical Transcription Technology ............3MTR201+ Physician’s Office Transcription ..................3MTR202+ Medical-Surgical Transcription ....................3MTR203+ Diagnostic Therapeutic Transcription ......3MTR225+ Speech Recognition Editing .........................3HLR/MTR270+ Advanced Medical Terminology .................3MTR271+Pathophysiology for MedicalTranscription ......................................................3MTR273+ Medical Transcription Seminar .....................1MTR273AA+ Medical Transcription Practicum .................1Associate in Applied Science in MedicalTranscription (62-74.5 Credits; Code 3036)The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) in MedicalTranscription program is the field of transcribing dictationby physicians and other health care professionalsregarding patient diagnosis, treatment and prognosis.It employs state-of-the-art electronic equipment forthe transcription of a variety of medical reports inorder to document patient care and facilitate deliveryof health care services. Medical transcription requiresa broad knowledge of medical terminology, anatomyand physiology, surgical procedures, medications,+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


178 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014diagnostic tests and curative procedures and medicolegalprinciples. Medical Transcription is a vital part of theHealth Information Management department, ensuringaccurate electronic medical records. Medical Transcriptionenforces standards and requirements that apply topatient health information records, as well as the legalsignificance of medical transcripts.A wide variety of careers exist in the medicaltranscription field including working in doctors’ offices,hospitals, outpatient diagnostic services, insurancecompanies, or private dictation services. There arejob opportunities for a “self starting” individual who isinterested in the medical field, with word processingskills, and who takes great pride in efficiency andaccuracy. After graduating with the AAS degree,students can sit for the exam to become RegisteredMedical Transcriptionist (RMT) by taking the nationalcertification exam offered by the Association forHealthcare Documentation Integrity (AHDI).Educational Information: Completion of GateWay’sMedical Transcription program leads to an Associatein Applied Sciences degree. Transcription classes areoffered together, in a block, for effective developmentof medical terminology and transcription production.The program is delivered online in a format reflectiveof the nature of medical transcription in today’s healthinformation, electronic society using electronic medicalrecords and voice files delivered to the transcriptionistvia the internet.Program Note: Students with other related healthcare experiences not listed on the following ProgramPrerequisites options may request an evaluationfor course competency equivalence through theIntegrated Competency Assessment Network (ICAN)by calling (480) 731-8924.Admission Criteria• Formal application and admission to the programis required.• Current Health Care Provider CPR card required.Program Prerequisites .....................................................0-6Students must select one of the following two options:Option I: .......................................................................................... 050 WPM typing skillCurrent credential in health care discipline or higherdegree in a health science discipline from a regionallyaccredited institution of higher education recognizedby Maricopa County Community College District.Option II: ......................................................................................... 650 WPM typing skillHCC130 Fundamentals in Health CareDelivery (3) ORHCC130AA Health Care Today (0.5) ANDHCC130AB Workplace Behaviors in Health Care(0.5) ANDHCC130AC Personal Wellness and Safety (0.5)ANDHCC130AD Communication and Teamwork inHealth Care Organizations (0.5) ANDHCC130AE Legal Issues in Health Care (0.5) ANDHCC130AF Decision Making in the Health CareSetting (0.5) .......................................................3HCC145 Medical Terminology for Health CareWorkers ................................................................3Required Course Credits .........................................45-45.5BIO160 Introduction to Human Anatomy andPhysiology .......................................................... 4EMT/HCC/RES109CPR for the Health Care Provider(0.5) ORProof of Current Health Care ProviderCPR Certification (0) ............................... 0-0.5MTR101+ Medical Transcription Applications ...........3MTR103+MTR105Pharmacology for MedicalTranscriptionists ................................................2Medical Transcription Style andGrammar ..............................................................3MTR190 Medical Transcription Technology ............3MTR201+ Physician’s Office Transcription ..................3MTR202+ Medical-Surgical Transcription ....................3MTR203+ Diagnostic Therapeutic Transcription............3MTR221+ Advanced Office Transcription ...................3MTR222+ Advanced Surgical Transcription ...............3MTR225+ Speech Recognition Editing .........................3MTR230+ Dictation by Non-native Speakers .............3HLR/MTR270+ Advanced Medical Terminology .................3MTR271+Pathophysiology for MedicalTranscription ......................................................3MTR273+ Medical Transcription Seminar .....................1MTR273AB+ Medical Transcription Practicum ................2General Education Requirements ............................. 17-23COM110 Interpersonal Communication .....................3CRE101+College Critical Reading (3) OREquivalent by assessment (0). ............... 0-3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3 )ANDENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG108+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3).............. 6MAT120+MAT121+MAT122+Intermediate Algebra (5) ORIntermediate Algebra (4) ORIntermediate Algebra (3) OREquivalent ORSatisfactory completion of a higherlevel mathematics course ......................... 3-5Any approved ENH or HUM prefix general educationcourse from the Humanities and Fine Arts area ........2-3Any approved PSY or SOC prefix general educationcourse from the Social and Behavioral Sciences area ...3+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014179NETWORKING ADMINISTRATIONAND TECHNOLOGYCertificates of CompletionAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Business and Information TechnologiesChair: S. Annette TorreyCertificate of Completion in LinuxProfessional (12 Credits; Code 5204)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in LinuxProfessional program is designed to help to preparestudents for a variety of industry-recognized Linuxcertification exams as well as provide practical handsonskills for the work place. The program includes acore of Linux classes including Linux operating systembasics, System Administration, Network Administrationand Network Security. These classes will help developa student’s knowledge and skill level in preparation foremployment or to improve current professional skills.Objectives for a variety of industry certifications areencompassed within course and program objectives.Required Course Credits .....................................................6CIS126DL Linux Operating System ................................3CIS238DL+ Linux System Administration .......................3Restricted Electives..............................................................6Students should select six (6) credits from the followingcourses in consultation with a Program Advisor.BPC170+ Computer Maintenance I: A+ EssentialsPrep .......................................................................3BPC270+ Computer Maintenance II: A+ TechnicianPrep .......................................................................3CIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems ................................................................3CIS197+ VMware ESXI Server Enterprise ................. 4CIS121AH Microsoft PowerShell/Command LineOperations ..........................................................3CIS226AL+ Internet/Intranet Server AdministrationLinux ......................................................................3CIS239DL+ Linux Shell Scripting .......................................3CIS240DL+ Linux Network Administration ....................3CIS241DL+ Apache Web Server Administration(Linux/Unix) .......................................................3CIS270+ Essentials of Network and InformationSecurity ................................................................3CIS271DL+ Linux Security ....................................................3CIS190+ Introduction to Local Area Networks(3) ORCNT140AA Cisco Networking Fundamentals (4) ORMST140 Microsoft Networking Essentials (3).... 3-4CNT150AA+ Cisco Routing Protocols and Concepts ... 4MST150++ Microsoft Windows (any suffixedcourse) ..................................................................3CIS280 Current Topics in Computing .......................3CIS290++/+ Computer Information SystemsInternship (any suffixed course) ..............1-3Certificate of Completion in MicrosoftCertified Information TechnologyProfessional (MCITP) Administrator(32-35 Credits; Code 5843)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in MicrosoftCertified Information Technology Professional (MCITP)Administrator program is designed to help preparestudents towards an intermediate- to supervisorylevelposition working with Windows networks. Itis designed to develop the skills needed to install,configure, customize, optimize, and troubleshootWindows servers, Windows client workstations andMicrosoft Office products. The courses in the programalso help to prepare for Microsoft Certified ProductSpecialist (MCP), and Microsoft Certified InformationTechnology Professional (MCITP) examinations. Thecurriculum ideally is taught by Microsoft CertifiedProfessionals.Typical tasks of a Microsoft Certified InformationTechnology Professional (MCITP) are developing alocal area network, installing and configuring software,creating and managing user and group accounts,analyzing and optimizing system performance,troubleshooting system and printing problems, trainingend users, and working as a system administrator.Program Prerequisites .....................................................0-3CIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems ORPermission of Department (0) ............... 0-3Required Course Credits ............................................ 29-32CIS121AB Microsoft Command Line Operations(1) ORCIS221AB+ Microsoft Power Shell (1)................................1BPC170+ Computer Maintenance I:A+ Essentials Prep ...........................................3BPC270+CIS190+Computer Maintenance II:A+ Technician Prep ..........................................3Introduction to Local Area Networks(3) ORCNT140AA Cisco Networking Fundamentals (4)ORMST140 Microsoft Networking Essentials (3).... 3-4MST150 Microsoft Windows Professional (3) ORMST150++ Any Microsoft Windows(any module) (3)...............................................3MST155+ Implementing Windows NetworkInfrastructure (3) ORMST155++/+ Any Windows Network InfrastructureMST157+(any module) (3-4) ..................................... 3-4Implementing Windows DirectoryServices (3) ORMST157++/+ Any Active Directory Windows ServerConfiguration (any module) (3-4) ........ 3-4MST158++/+ Any Windows Server Administration(any module) ..................................................... 4MST244+ Microsoft SQL Server Administration .......3MST259+ Designing Windows Network Security ......3+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


180 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014Certificate of Completion in MicrosoftTechnical Specialist(16-17 Credits; Code 5841)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in MicrosoftTechnical Specialist program provides training for anentry-level position working with Windows networks.Knowledge and skills are developed to install,configure, customize, optimize, and troubleshootWindows servers and Windows client workstations.The courses in the program also help to preparefor Microsoft Certified Product Specialist (MCP)and Microsoft Certified Information TechnologyProfessional (MCITP) examinations. The curriculumideally is taught by Microsoft Certified Professionals.Program Prerequisites .....................................................0-3CIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems (3) ORPermission of Department ....................... 0-3Required Course Credits .............................................. 16-17CIS121AB Microsoft Command Line Operations(1) ORCIS221AB+ Microsoft Power Shell (1)................................1BPC170+ Computer Maintenance I:A+ Essentials Prep ...........................................3BPC270+ Computer Maintenance II:A+ Technician Prep ..........................................3CIS190+ Introduction to Local Area Networks(3) ORCNT140 Cisco Networking Basics (4) ORMST140 Microsoft Networking Essentials(3)...................................................................... 3-4MST150 Microsoft Windows Professional (3)ORMST150++ Any MST150 Microsoft Windowscourse (3) ............................................................3CIS270+ Essentials of Network and InformationSecurity ................................................................3Certificate of Completion in NetworkAdministration: Microsoft Windows Server(18 Credits; Code 5124)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in NetworkAdministration: Microsoft Windows Server programprovides students with background knowledgeand skills required for learning the specific tasksand industry recognized standards associated withcomputer networks and data communications. Thisprogram also prepares students to complete therequired certification tests for Microsoft Administrator.Program Prerequisites .....................................................0-3CRE101 College Critical Reading (3) OREquivalent by assessment ........................ 0-3Required Course Credits ................................................... 18CIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems (3) ORBPC110 Computer Usage and Applications (3)....3MST150 Microsoft Windows Professional (3) ORMST150++ Microsoft Windows (any module) (3) ......3MST155DA+ Windows Server Network InfrastructureConfiguration .................................................... 4MST157DA+ Active Directory Windows ServerConfiguration .................................................... 4MST152+ Microsoft Windows Server (4) ORMST152DA+ Microsoft Windows 2000 Server (4) ORMST152DB+ Microsoft Windows 2003 Server (4) ORMST158DA+ Windows Server Administration (4) ........ 4Certificate of Completion in NetworkingAdministration: Cisco(14-18 Credits; Code 5969)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in NetworkingAdministration: Cisco program is a Cisco Systemsrecognized Regional or Local Academy that preparesstudents for industry-recognized certification. Thecurriculum is taught by Cisco Systems CertifiedProfessionals. The Certificate of Completion (CCL) inNetworking Administration: Cisco provides training fora position working with Cisco Systems networking andInternet hardware. Knowledge and skills are developedto install, configure, maintain, and troubleshoot Ciscorouters and components, advanced routing protocols,Local Area Networks (LANs), and Wide Area Networks(WANs). The courses in the program also preparestudents for the Cisco Certified Networking Associateexamination.Required Course Credits ..............................................14-18One of the following two tracks must be fulfilled:Track 1 Exploration ..................................................14–18CNT140 Cisco Networking Basics (4) ORCNT140AA Cisco Networking Fundamentals (4) ORCNT138 CCNA Discovery - Networking for Homeand Small Businesses (3) ANDCNT148+ CCNA Discovery - Working at aSmall-to-Medium Business or InternetService Provider (3) ................................... 4-6CNT150+ Cisco Networking Router Technologies(4) ORCNT150AA+ Cisco Routing Protocols and Concepts(4).......................................................................... 4CNT160+ Cisco Switching Basics and IntermediateRouting (3) ORCNT160AA+ Cisco Local Area Networking (LAN)Switching and Wireless (4) ..................... 3-4CNT170+ Cisco Wide Area Networks (WAN)Technologies (3) ORCNT170AA+ Cisco Accessing the Wide-Area Network(WAN) (4) ...................................................... 3-4+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014181Track 2 Discovery ...........................................................14CNT138 CCNA Discovery - Networking forHome and Small Businesses .........................3CNT148+ CCNA Discovery - Working at aSmall-to-Medium Business or InternetService Provider ................................................3CNT158+ CCNA Discovery - Introduction toRouting and Switching in theEnterprise ........................................................... 4CNT168+ CCNA Discovery - Designing andSupporting Computer Networks ............... 4Certificate of Completion in NetworkingTechnology: Cisco(20-24 Credits; Code 5967)A Cisco Systems recognized Regional or LocalAcademy prepares students for industry-recognizedcertification. The curriculum is taught by Cisco SystemsCertified Professionals. The Certificate of Completion(CCL) in Networking Technology: Cisco providestraining for a supervisory position working with CiscoSystems networking and Internet hardware. Knowledgeand skills are developed to install, configure, maintain,and troubleshoot Cisco routers and components,advanced routing protocols, Local Area Networks(LANs), and Wide Area Networks (WANs). The coursesin the program also prepare students for the CiscoCertified Networking Associate examination.Required Course Credits ............................................20-24BPC170+ Computer Maintenance I:A+ Essentials Prep ...........................................3CIS126+ UNIX/Linux Operating System (3)(Any module) ORMST150+ Microsoft Windows Professional (3)(Any module) .....................................................3One of the following two tracks must be fulfilled:Track 1 Exploration ..................................................14–18CNT140 Cisco Networking Basics (4) ORCNT140AA Cisco Networking Fundamentals (4) ORCNT138 CCNA Discovery - Networking for Homeand Small Businesses (3) ANDCNT148+ CCNA Discovery - Working at aSmall-to-Medium Business or InternetService Provider (3) ................................... 4-6CNT150+ Cisco Networking Router Technologies(4) ORCNT150AA+ Cisco Routing Protocols andConcepts (4) ..................................................... 4CNT160+ Cisco Switching Basics andIntermediate Routing (3) ORCNT160AA+ Cisco Local Area Networking (LAN)switching and Wireless (4)...................... 3-4CNT170+ Cisco Wide Area Networks (WAN)Technologies (3) ORCNT170AA+ Cisco Accessing the Wide-Area Network(WAN) (4) ...................................................... 3-4Track 2 Discovery ...........................................................14CNT138 CCNA Discovery - Networking forHome and Small Businesses .......................3CNT148+ CCNA Discovery - Working at aSmall-to-Medium Business or InternetService Provider ...............................................3CNT158+ CCNA Discovery - Introduction toRouting and Switching in theEnterprise ........................................................... 4CNT168+ CCNA Discovery - Designing andSupporting Computer Networks ............... 4Associate in Applied Science Degree inMicrosoft Networking Technology (60-67Credits)The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) in MicrosoftNetworking Technology program is designed todevelop skills needed to implement a networkinfrastructure and install, configure, monitor, optimize,and troubleshoot Windows server and Windowsclient workstations. Courses in the program are alsodesigned to help prepare for Microsoft CertifiedProduct Specialist (MCP), and Microsoft CertifiedInformation Technology Professional (MCITP)examinations. The curriculum is ideally taught byMicrosoft Certified Professionals.Typical tasks of a Microsoft Networking Administratorinclude developing a local area network, installing andconfiguring software, creating and managing userand group accounts, analyzing and optimizing systemperformance, troubleshooting system and printingproblems, interoperating with various operatingsystems, and working as a system administrator.Program Prerequisites .........................................................3CIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems ORPermission of Department ............................3Required Course Credits ............................................ 24-27Courses selected cannot apply in both RequiredCourses and Restricted Electives area.CIS121AB Microsoft Command Line Operations (1)ORCIS221AB+ Microsoft Power Shell (1) ...............................1BPC170+ Computer Maintenance I:A+ Essentials Prep ...........................................3CIS102 Interpersonal and Customer ServiceSkills for IT Professionals ................................1CIS126DA UNIX Operating System (3) ORCIS126AA UNIX Operating System: Level I (1) ANDCIS126BA+ UNIX Operating System: Level II (1) ANDCIS126CA+ UNIX Operating System: Level III (1) ORCIS126DL Linux Operating System (3) ORCIS126AL Linux Operating System I (1) ANDCIS126BL+ Linux Operating System II (1) ANDCIS126CL+ Linux Operating System III (1) .....................3CIS190 Introduction to Local Area Networks (3)ORCNT140AA Cisco Networking Fundamentals (4) ORMST140 Microsoft Networking Essentials (3).... 3-4+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


182 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014MST150 Microsoft Windows Professional (3) ORMST150++ Any Microsoft Windows(any module) (3)...............................................3MST155+ Implementing Windows NetworkInfrastructure (3) ORMST155++/+ Any Windows Network Infrastructure(any module) (3-4) .................................... 3-4MST157+ Implementing Windows DirectoryServices (3) ORMST157++/+ Any Active Directory Windows ServerConfiguration (any module) (3-4) ........ 3-4MST158++/+ Any Windows Server Administration(any module) ..................................................... 4Restricted Electives.......................................................14-15Students should select 14-15 credits from the followingcourses in consultation with a Program Advisor.Selected courses will not apply in both RequiredCourses and Restricted Electives.BPC171+ Recycling Used ComputerTechnology (1) ...................................................3(BPC171 may be repeated)BPC270+ Computer Maintenance II:CIS238+A+ Technician Prep ..........................................3Advanced UNIX System Administration(3) ORCIS238++/+ Any UNIX/Linux System Administration(any module) (3) .............................................3CIS239++/+ Any Linux course (any module)except CIS239DC..............................................3CIS240+ Local Area Network Planning andDesign (3) ORCIS240++/+ Any Linux course (any module) (3) ..........3CIS270+CIS15+CIS15+++CIS16+CIS16+++CIS280CIS280++Essentials of Network and InformationSecurity ................................................................3Any CIS programming language Level I(3) ORAny CIS programming language Level I(any module) (3) ORAny CIS programming language Level II(3) ORAny CIS programming language Level II(any module) (3)...............................................3Current Topics in Computing (3) ORCurrent Topics in Computing(any module) ...................................................1-3Students may select no more than four (4) creditscombined from CIS282AA-AC, CIS290AA-AC andCIS296WA-WD courses.CIS282++/+ Volunteerism for Computer InformationSystems: A Service Learning Experience(any suffixed course) (1-3) ORCIS290++/+ Computer Information SystemsInternship (any suffixed course) (1-3)ORCIS296++/+ Cooperative Education(any suffixed course) (1-4)........................ 1-4CNT+++++ Any CNT Cisco Network Technologycourse .................................................................. 4ITS+++++ Any ITS Information TechnologySecurity course ............................................ 3-4MST141+ Enterprise Desktop SupportTechnician ............................................................3MST150 Microsoft Windows Professional (3) ORMST150++ Any Microsoft Windows (any module)not selected in the Required Coursesarea (3) ................................................................3MST152+ Microsoft Windows Server (4) ORMST152++/+ Any Microsoft Windows(any module) (4) ............................................ 4MST157+ Implementing Windows DirectoryServices (3) ORMST157++/+ Any Microsoft Windows(any module) not selected in theRequired Courses area (3-4) ................. 3-4MST244+ Microsoft SQL Server Administration .......3MST259+ Designing Windows Network Security ......3MST298A+/+ Special Projects(any suffixed course) ...................................1-3CWE198++/+ Career Work Experience(any suffixed course) ...................................1-3General Education Requirements ............................ 22-25ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ANDENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ANDENG108+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) .......... 6CRE101+College Critical Reading (3) OREquivalent as indicated byassessment ..................................................... 0-3Any approved general education course in the OralCommunication area ................................................................3Any approved general education course in theMathematics are .........................................................................3Any approved general education course in theHumanities and Fine Arts area .............................................3Any approved general education course in the Socialand Behavioral Sciences area ...............................................3Any approved general education course from theNatural Sciences area .............................................................. 4Associate in Applied Science Degree inNetworking Technology: Cisco(60-64 Credits; Code 3816)A Cisco Systems-recognized Regional or LocalAcademy, prepares students for industry-recognizedcertification. The curriculum is taught by Cisco SystemsCertified Professionals. The Associate in Applied Science(AAS) in Networking Technology: Cisco providestraining for a supervisory position working with CiscoSystems networking and Internet hardware. Knowledgeand skills are developed to install, configure, maintain,and troubleshoot Cisco routers and components,advanced routing protocols, Local Area Networks(LANs), and Wide Area Networks (WANs); troubleshootproblems with various common hardware andsoftware configurations; perform administrative tasksin a network; develop methods for customer service.Courses in the program also prepare students for theCisco Certified Networking Associate examination.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014183Job Description: A Cisco networking Administratorwill be required to perform various tasks such asdesigning, installing, maintaining and troubleshootingCisco routers and components, Local Area Networks(LANs), and Wide Area Networks (WANs). Additionalskills that are necessary include troubleshootingproblems with various common hardware and softwareconfigurations, performing administrative tasks in anetwork, developing methods for customer service,and utilizing electronic systems.Program Notes: A course cannot be used to satisfyboth the Required Course and Restricted ElectivesArea.Required Course Credits ............................................20-24BPC170+ Computer Maintenance I:A+ Essentials Prep ...........................................3CIS126++ UNIX/Linux Operating System(Any Module) (3) ORMST150+MST150VI+Microsoft Windows Professional (3) ORMicrosoft Windows VistaAdministration (3) ORMST150XP+ Microsoft Windows XPProfessional (3) .................................................3One of the following two tracks must be fulfilled:Track 1 Exploration ..................................................14–18CNT140 Cisco Networking Basics (4) ORCNT140AA Cisco Networking Fundamentals (4) ORCNT138 CCNA Discovery - Networking forHome and Small Businesses (3) ANDCNT148+ CCNA Discovery - Working at aSmall-to-Medium Business or InternetService Provider (3) ................................... 4-6CNT150+ Cisco Networking Router Technologies(4) ORCNT150AA+ Cisco Routing Protocols and Concepts(4).......................................................................... 4CNT160+ Cisco Switching Basics andIntermediate Routing (3) ORCNT160AA+ Cisco Local Area Networking (LAN)Switching and Wireless (4) ..................... 3-4CNT170+ Cisco Wide Area Networks (WAN)Technologies (3) ORCNT170AA+ Cisco Accessing the Wide-AreaNetwork (WAN) (4).................................... 3-4Track 2 Discovery ...........................................................14CNT138 CCNA Discovery - Networking forHome and Small Businesses .........................3CNT148+ CCNA Discovery - Working at aSmall-to-Medium Business or InternetService Provider ................................................3CNT158+ CCNA Discovery - Introduction toRouting and Switching in theEnterprise ........................................................... 4CNT168+ CCNA Discovery - Designing andSupporting Computer Networks ............... 4Restricted Electives............................................................ 15Students may select fifteen (15) from any of thefollowing courses, except courses used to satisfy theRequired Courses area:BPC110 Computer Usage and Applications(3) ORCIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems (3).........................................................3CIS126++/+ UNIX/Linux Operating System(Any Module) (3) ORMST150+MST150VI+Microsoft Windows Professional (3) ORMicrosoft Windows Vista Administration(3) ORMST150XP+ Microsoft Windows XP Professional(3)...........................................................................3CIS190+ Introduction to Local Area Networks (3)ORMST140 Microsoft Networking Essentials (3).........3CIS270+Essentials of Network and InformationSecurity ................................................................3CIS296WA+ Cooperative Education (1) ORCIS296WB+ Cooperative Education (2) ORCIS296WC+ Cooperative Education (3) ORCIS296WD+ Cooperative Education (4)....................... 1-4CIS298AA+ Special Projects (1) ORCIS298AB+ Special Projects (2) ORCIS298AC+ Special Projects (3) ......................................1-3CIS121AB Microsoft Command Line Operations .......1CIS102 Interpersonal and Customer ServiceSkills for IT Professionals ................................1CIS110 Home Entertainment and ComputerNetworking .........................................................3ELT100 Survey of Electronics ......................................3BPC/CIS224 Project Management Microsoft Projectfor Windows ......................................................3CNT145+ Voice and Data Cabling ................................ 4CNT175+ Cisco Certified Network AssociateSecurity ............................................................... 4CNT181+ Cisco Securing IOS Networks .................... 4CNT182+CNT183+Cisco Secure Firewall ApplianceConfiguration .....................................................3Cisco Secure Virtual Private NetworkConfiguration .....................................................3CNT185+ Cisco Network Security ................................ 4CNT186+ Fundamentals of Wireless LANs ............... 4CNT190+ Cisco Network Design ....................................3CNT2++++BPC270+BPC273+Any 200 level course with a CNTPrefix ................................................................. 1-4Computer Maintenance II:A+ Technician Prep ..........................................3Advanced Server ComputerMaintenance: Server+ Prep ...........................3CIS127DL+ Linux Utilities ......................................................3CIS238DL+ Linux System Administration .......................3CIS239DL+ Linux Shell Scripting .......................................3CIS240DL+ Linux Network Administration ....................3CIS241DL+ Apache Web Server Administration(Linux/Unix) .......................................................3CIS271DL+ Linux Security ....................................................3CIS274DL+ Linux Enterprise Network Security ...........3MST152+ Microsoft Windows Server (4) ORMST152DA+ Microsoft Windows 2000 Server (4) ORMST152DB+ Microsoft Windows 2003 Server (4) ....... 4+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


184 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014MST155+ Implementing Windows NetworkInfrastructure .....................................................3MST157+ Implementing Windows DirectoryServices ................................................................3MST232+ Managing a Windows NetworkEnvironment .......................................................3CIS250+ Management of Information Systems ......3CIS280 Current Topics in Computing .......................3BPC/CIS290AA+ Computer Information SystemsInternship (1) ORBPC/CIS290AB+ Computer Information SystemsInternship (2) ORBPC/CIS290AC+ Computer Information SystemsInternship (3) ..................................................1-3General Education Requirements ...................................25CRE101+ Critical and Evaluative Reading I (3)OR Equivalent by Assessment ....................3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ANDENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG108+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ORENG111+ Technical and Professional Writing .......... 6Any general education course in the Communicationarea .................................................................................................3Any general education course in the Mathematicsarea .................................................................................................3Any general education course in the Humanities andFine Arts area ................................................................................3Any general education course in the Social andBehavioral area ...........................................................................3Any general education course in the Natural Sciencearea ................................................................................................ 4NUCLEAR MEDICINE TECHNOLOGYAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Health SciencesChair: Edward HoskinsAssociate in Applied Science Degree inNuclear Medicine Technology(111-121 Credits; Code 3688)The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) in NuclearMedicine Technology program is designed to preparestudents to function as competent members of thehealthcare team in the role of nuclear medicinetechnologists. Employment opportunities exist inhospitals, medical offices and ambulatory clinics.Upon completion of the program, the student will beeligible to apply for the certifying board examinationadministered by the American Registry of RadiologicTechnology [ARRT (N)], the nuclear MedicineTechnology Certification Board (NMTCB) and ArizonaState Licensure. The curriculum is structured toprovide appropriate didactic instruction, as well asample supervised clinical exposure, to assure sufficientopportunity to achieve all didactic and clinicalrequirements.Program Note: Students with other related healthcare experiences not listed in the following ProgramPrerequisites may request an evaluation for coursecompetency equivalence through the IntegratedCompetency Assessment Network (ICAN) by calling(480) 731-8924.Admission CriteriaHealth Care Provider CPR card required.Formal application and acceptance into the program.Health and Safety Requirements1. Students must submit a Health and SafetyDocumentation Checklist verifying completionof all requirements and maintain current statusthroughout the program.2. Students must submit the Health Declaration Formsigned by a licensed health care provider.3. Students must test negative on a timed urine drugscreen.Readmission CriteriaThe Program reserves the right to deny acceptanceof an admission application if the applicant wasdismissed from any program for issues relating toacademic integrity and/or unsafe patient care.Program Prerequisites ................................................35-44The following college courses must be completedwith a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0or higher and with a final grade of “C” or better.All previous college semester credits must be froma regionally accredited institution recognized byGateWay Community College with a cumulative gradepoint average (GPA) of 2.5 or higher. Students mustearn a grade of “B” or better in ENG101 or ENG107,ENG102 or ENG108 or ENG111, MAT150 or MAT151 orMAT152, and NUC100.Semester 1: Fall ...................................................................13-17BIO156 Introductory Biology for AlliedHealth (4) ORBIO181 General Biology (Majors) I (4) OROne year of High School biologywith a grade of “C” or better (0) ..........0-4CHM130+ Fundamental Chemistry (3) ANDCHM130LL+ Fundamental ChemistryLaboratory (1) ORCHM130AA+ Fundamental Chemistry with Lab (4) ..... 4COM110 Interpersonal Communication .....................3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3HCC145 Medical Terminology for Health CareWorkers ................................................................3+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014185Semester 2: Spring .................................................................. 12BIO201+ Human Anatomy and Physiology I ........... 4ENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG108+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ORENG111+ Technical and Professional Writing (3) ....3NUC100 Introduction to Nuclear MedicineTechnology...........................................................1PHY101+ Introduction to Physics ................................. 4With Program Director approval thesealternate physics courses may be takenin place of PHY101: (PHY111 and PHY112)OR (PHY115 and PHY116).Semester 3: Fall .................................................................. 10-15BIO202+ Human Anatomy and Physiology II .......... 4CRE101+ College Critical Reading (3) ORCRE111+ Critical Reading for Business andIndustry (3) OREquivalent as indicated byassessment (0)............................................. 0-3DMI/DMS/ICE220+ Sectional Anatomy ..........................................3MAT150+ College Algebra/Functions (5) ORMAT151+ College Algebra/Functions (4) ORMAT152+ College Algebra/Functions (3) OREquivalent course or satisfactorycompletion of a higher levelmathematics course ................................... 3-5Required Course Credits ............................................76-77Semester 1: Fall ........................................................................ 12NUC110+ Radiation Safety for Nuclear Medicine ....3NUC112+ Nuclear Medicine Lab I ....................................1NUC114+ Fundamentals of Nuclear Medicine I ........3NUC116+ Nuclear Medicine Imaging I .........................3NUC130+ Patient Care Lab for the NuclearMedicine Technologist ....................................2Semester 2: Spring ..................................................................14NUC113+ Nuclear Medicine Lab II ..................................2NUC126+ Nuclear Medicine Imaging II .........................3NUC170+ Nuclear Medicine Cardiac Imaging ............3NUC212+ Clinical Practicum I ..........................................2NUC213+ Nuclear Medicine Image Evaluation I ........1NUC214+ Fundamentals of Nuclear Medicine II .... 1.5NUC224+ Fundamentals of Nuclear Medicine III ... 1.5Semester 3: Summer ............................................................6-7NUC222+ Clinical Practicum II .........................................3NUC223+ Nuclear Medicine Image Evaluation II .......1Humanities/Fine ArtsAny approved general education coursein the Humanities and Fine Arts area ...2-3Semester 4: Fall ........................................................................ 13NUC140+ Clinical Pathology for DiagnosticImaging ................................................................3NUC232+ Clinical Practicum III ........................................3NUC233+ Nuclear Medicine Image Evaluation III ......1NUC234+ Fundamentals of Nuclear Medicine IV .....2NUC236+ Nuclear Medicine Imaging III ........................3NUC260+ Imaging Research Methods and Design ...1Semester 5: Spring .................................................................. 12NUC150+ Fundamentals of ComputedTomography for Nuclear MedicineTechnologist .......................................................2NUC242+ Clinical Practicum IV .......................................3NUC243+ Nuclear Medicine Image Evaluation IV .....1NUC244+ Fundamentals of Nuclear Medicine V ......3NUC261+ Emerging Technologies ..................................2NUC292+ Radiopharmacy Practicum ............................1Semester 6: Summer ................................................................7NUC252+ Clinical Practicum V ........................................3NUC253+ Nuclear Medicine Image Evaluation V .......1Social/BehavioralSciencesAny approved general educationcourse from the Social and BehavioralSciences area .....................................................3Semester 7: Fall ........................................................................ 12NUC262+ Capstone Practicum ........................................2NUC272+ Cardiac Practicum ............................................2NUC280+ Nuclear Medicine PET and PET/CT ...........3NUC282+ PET Practicum ...................................................2NUC290+ Nuclear Medicine CertificationPreparation Seminar ........................................3General Education Requirements .................................... 0Met by courses in Prerequisite and Required CourseareasNURSING: MARICOPA NURSING ATGATEWAY COMMUNITY COLLEGECertificates of CompletionAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses or within the program or pass in P/Zgraded courses.Division: NursingNursing Division Director: Dr. Margi SchultzThe Nursing Program is available at eight (8) of theMaricopa Community Colleges. Clinical experiencesare provided in a variety of healthcare settings. TheNursing Program provides eligibility for students toapply for the National Council Licensure Examination(NCLEX) for the registered nurse license. Licensingrequirements are the exclusive responsibility of theArizona State Board of Nursing.Accreditation: The Nursing Program is approved bythe Arizona State Board of Nursing and accredited bythe Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing(ACEN), 3343 Peachtree Rd. NE, Suite 850, Atlanta,GA 30326, (404) 975-5000, www.nlnac.org.Program Offerings:This program is offered at the following sites:Chandler-Gilbert Community College, EstrellaMountain Community College, GateWay CommunityCollege, Glendale Community College, Mesa+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


186 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014Community College, Mesa Community College/Boswell, Paradise Valley Community College, PhoenixCollege, Scottsdale Community CollegeGateWay Community College offers a variety ofscheduling options in nursing that may includetraditional, accelerated, and part-time options. Not allscheduling options are available every semester.Waiver of Licensure/Certification Guarantee:Admission or graduation from the Nursing Programdoes not guarantee obtaining a license to practicenursing. Licensure requirements and the subsequentprocedures are the exclusive right and responsibilityof the Arizona State Board of Nursing. Students mustsatisfy the requirements of the Nurse Practice Act:Statutes, Rules and Regulations, independently of anycollege or school requirements for graduation.Pursuant to A.R.S. 32-1606(B)(17), an applicant forprofessional or practical nurse license by examinationis not eligible for licensure if the applicant has anyfelony convictions and has not received an absolutedischarge from the sentences for all felony convictions.The absolute discharge must be received five or moreyears before submitting this application. If you cannotprove that the absolute discharge date is five or moreyears, the Board cannot process your application.All nursing applicants for licensure will be fingerprintedto permit the Department of Public Safety to obtainstate and federal criminal history information. Allapplicants with a positive history are investigated. Ifthere is any question about eligibility for licensure orcertification, contact the nursing education consultantat the Arizona State Board of Nursing (602-889-5150).Health Declaration: It is essential that Nursingstudents be able to perform a number of physicalactivities in the clinical portion of the program. At aminimum, students will be required to lift patients,stand for several hours at a time and perform bendingactivities. The clinical nursing experience also placesstudents under considerable mental and emotionalstress as they undertake responsibilities and dutiesimpacting patients’ lives. Students must be able todemonstrate rational and appropriate behavior understressful conditions. Individuals should give carefulconsideration to the mental and physical demands ofthe program prior to making application.Health and Safety Requirements1. Students must submit a Health and SafetyDocumentation Checklist verifying completionof all requirements and maintain current statusthroughout the program.2. Students must submit the Health Declaration Formsigned by a licensed health care provider.3. Students must test negative on a timed urine drugscreen.4. Students must provide a copy of their current andvalid Finger Print Clearance Card upon application.Grade Requirements: Students must obtain a “C” gradeor better in all courses required within the program.Course Fee Information: Please see class schedule forcourse fees information.University Transfer Students: Students who areplanning to earn the Bachelor of Science in Nursingmay obtain their prerequisite courses at the MaricopaCommunity Colleges. For information on courses thatmeet requirements for admission into a baccalaureateprogram, please contact a program advisor.NURSE ASSISTINGCertificate of Completion in Nurse Assisting(6 Credits; Code 5963)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in Nurse Assistingprepares students for entry level employment invarious health care settings as a nursing assistant. Theprogram combines classroom instruction with clinicallaboratory, skilled care and acute care experiences.Students who complete the program are eligible totake a written and practical certification examinationand work as a Certified Nursing Assistant. Licensingrequirements are the exclusive responsibility of theArizona State Board of Nursing. The GateWay NurseAssisting Program is approved by the Arizona StateBoard of Nursing.The Nurse Assisting PathwayThe nurse assisting pathway is designed to preparestudents to complete the Nurse Assistant Certificationthrough the Arizona State Board of Nursing to practicein a health care agency as a certified nurse assistant.Completion of the nurse assistant program of studyprovides job ready skills as a nursing assistant.Students may apply to the Nursing Program aftercompleting the prerequisite courses and admissionrequirements.Admission Criteria• Application and acceptance into the program.• High School graduate or GED.• Current Health Care Provider CPR Card requiredbefore beginning courses.• All students must submit a copy of a fingerprintclearance card with their application for theMaricopa Community College District NursingProgram.Required Course Credits .....................................................6NUR158+ Nurse Assisting ................................................. 6NURSING REFRESHERCertificate of Completion in NursingRefresher (10 Credits; Code 5739)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in Nurse Refresherprogram provides registered nurses with a reviewand update of nursing theory and practice. The NurseRefresher program is approved by the Arizona StateBoard of Nursing. Successful program completionsatisfies the Arizona State Board of Nursing RN licenserenewal requirement for applicants who do not meetthe practice mandate as stated in The Nurse PracticeAct, R4-19312 (B).+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014187Admission Criteria• Formal application and admission to the programis required.• All applicants must have an active RN license oran inactive RN license that is eligible for renewalper Regulatory Board requirements.• A minimum of 1 year work experience as aregistered nurse following licensure is required.Applicants must have practiced nursing no longerthan 15 years ago.• Participation in a specialty track clinical experiencerequires at least 1 year prior RN work experience inthe identified nursing specialty.• All applicants must be in good standing with theRegulatory Board. RN’s with restricted licensesare not eligible for the program. Once enrolled,students receiving any disciplinary actions againsttheir license must notify the Nursing ProgramChair within five (5) school days. The NursingProgram Chair reserves the right to restrict thestudent’s participation in clinical experiences andinvolvement in patient care until the license is validand unrestricted.Required Course Credits ...................................................10NUR228 Registered Nurse Refresher ........................ 6NUR229+ Registered Nurse Preceptorship ............... 4FAST TRACK PRACTICAL NURSINGCertificate of Completion in Fast TrackPractical Nursing (28 Credits; Code 5114)The Fast Track Practical Nursing Certificate ofCompletion (CCL) Program provides students withthe theory and skills required to practice as a practicalnurse in acute care, extended care, and intermediatecare settings. The program of study combines nursingtheory lectures with planned patient care learningexperiences in hospitals, nursing homes and healthcare agencies. Graduates are eligible to take theNational Council Licensing Examination (NCLEX-PN)to become a licensed practical nurse (LPN). Licensingrequirements are the exclusive responsibility of theArizona State Board of Nursing according to Title 32,Chapter 15 of the Arizona Revised Statues.Admission Criteria• Application and acceptance into Fast-TrackPractical Nursing Program.• Documentation of Health and Safety Requirements.• Fingerprint Clearance Card.• College Placement Exam or Nurse Entrance Exam(NET).• High school graduate or G.E.D. or permission ofprogram chair.Program Prerequisites .........................................................6NUR158+ Nurse Assisting (6) ORCurrent CNA or Advanced Placement ...... 6Required Course Credits ...................................................22NUR160PN+ Practical Nursing Theoryand Science I ..................................................... 11NUR180PN+ Practical Nursing Theoryand Science II .................................................... 11PRACTICAL NURSINGCertificate of Completion in PracticalNursing (31-41 Credits; Code 5957)The Practical Nursing Certificate of Completion(CCL) Program is available at eight of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges. Clinical experiences are providedin a variety of healthcare settings. The Practical NursingProgram provides eligibility for students to apply for thenational exam for the practical nurse license. Licensingrequirements are the exclusive responsibility of theArizona State Board of Nursing. The Practical NursingCertificate of Completion (CCL) Program is approved bythe Arizona State Board of Nursing.Practical Nurse Exit Option: Following completion ofthe practical nurse level program of study, the studentis eligible to apply for licensure as a practical nurse.Licensed Practical Nurses (L.P.N.) are employed inacute, long-term, and community-based health careagencies under the direction of a registered nurse.Practical Nurses function within their legal scope ofpractice and use professional standards of care inillness care and health promotion activities for clientsand families across the life span.Admission Criteria• High School diploma or GED.• Formal application and admission to the programis required.• A passing score on a nursing program admissiontest is required to complete an application.• The Nursing Program Chair reserves the rightto deny acceptance of an admission applicationif the applicant was dismissed for issues relating toacademic integrity, unsafe patient care, and/or two(2) or more failures from any nursing program.• All applicants holding or receiving a certificate asa Nursing Assisting and/or license as a PracticalNurse must remain in good standing with theBoard of Nursing. Once enrolled, studentsreceiving any disciplinary actions against theircertificate or license must notify the NursingProgram Chair within five (5) school days. TheNursing Program Chair reserves the right torestrict the student’s participation in clinicalexperiences and involvement in patient careuntil the certificate and/or license is valid andunrestricted.Program Prerequisites .................................................10-20BIO156+ Introductory Biology for Allied Health(4) ORBIO181+ General Biology (Majors) I (4) OROne year of high school biology ...........0-4BIO201+ Human Anatomy and Physiology I ........... 4+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


188 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014CHM130+ Fundamental Chemistry (3) ANDCHM130LL+ Fundamental Chemistry Laboratory (1)OROne year of high school chemistry.......0-4MAT120+ Intermediate Algebra (5) ORMAT121+ Intermediate Algebra (4) ORMAT122+ Intermediate Algebra (3) ORSatisfactory completion of higher levelmathematics course ................................... 3-5PSY101 Introduction to Psychology (3) ORPSY240+ Developmental Psychology (3)...................3Required Course Credits ................................................... 21NUR151+ Nursing Theory and Science I ....................10NUR171+ Nursing Theory and Science II ....................8NUR191+ Practical Nursing Transition Course ..........3NURSING (REGISTERED NURSE)Associate of Applied Science in Nursing(61-74 Credits; Code 3812)The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) NursingProgram is available at eight (8) of the MaricopaCommunity Colleges. Clinical experiences are providedin a variety of healthcare settings. The NursingProgram provides eligibility for students to apply forthe national exam for the registered nurse license.Licensing requirements are the exclusive responsibilityof the State Board of Nursing.The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) NursingProgram is approved by the Arizona State Boardof Nursing and accredited by the AccreditationCommission for Education in Nursing (ACEN), 3343Peachtree Rd. NE, Suite 850, Atlanta, GA 30326,(404) 975-5000, www.nlnac.org.Registered Nurse Pathway: The Associate in AppliedScience (AAS) degree in Nursing graduate is eligibleto apply for licensure as a Registered Nurse (RN).The RN is educated as a generalist who delivershealth care to clients and family groups and hascompetencies related to the art and science of nursing.The RN may be employed in a variety of acute, longterm, and community based health care settings. TheAAS degree in Nursing provides the graduate withan educational foundation for articulation into theuniversity setting.Admission Criteria• High School diploma or GED.• Formal application and admission to the programis required.• A passing score on a nursing program admissiontest is required to complete an application.• Applicants for Advanced Placement must receive apassing score on a practical nursing content examfor placement into Block 3.• The final decision rests with the Nursing ProgramChair at the College to which the student isaccepted.• The Nursing Program Chair reserves the right todeny acceptance of an admission application ifthe applicant was dismissed for issues relating toacademic integrity, unsafe patient care, and/or two(2) or more failures from any nursing program.• All applicants holding or receiving a certificate asa Nursing Assisting and/or license as a PracticalNurse must remain in good standing with theRegulatory Board. Once enrolled, studentsreceiving any disciplinary actions against theircertificate or license must notify the NursingProgram Chair within five (5) school days. TheNursing Program Chair reserves the right torestrict the student’s participation in clinicalexperiences and involvement in patient careuntil the certificate and/or license is valid andunrestricted.Program Prerequisites .................................................10-20The credit hour range is subject to change dependingon the student’s educational experiences.BIO156+ Introductory Biology for Allied Health(4) ORBIO181+ General Biology (Majors) I (4) OROne year of high school biology ...........0-4BIO201+ Human Anatomy and Physiology I ........... 4CHM130+ Fundamental Chemistry (3) ANDCHM130LL+ Fundamental Chemistry Laboratory (1)OROne year of high school chemistry.......0-4MAT120+ Intermediate Algebra (5) ORMAT121+MAT122+Intermediate Algebra (4) ORIntermediate Algebra (3) ORSatisfactory completion of higher levelmathematics course ................................... 3-5PSY101 Introduction to Psychology (3) ORPSY240+ Developmental Psychology (3)...................3Required Course Credits ...................................................35NUR151+ Nursing Theory and Science I ....................10NUR171+ Nursing Theory and Science II ....................8NUR251+ Nursing Theory and Science III ...................8NUR271+ Nursing Theory and Science IV ...................7NUR291+ Nursing Clinical Capstone .............................2General Education Requirements ..............................16-19BIO202+ Human Anatomy and Physiology II(4) ANDBIO205+ Microbiology (4)...............................................8CRE101+ Critical and Evaluative Reading I (3)OR Equivalent by assessment ................ 0-3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3)ANDENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG108+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) .......... 6Any general education course in the Humanities andFine Arts area ..............................................................................2+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014189OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY ANDHEALTH TECHNOLOGYCertificate of CompletionAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Industrial TechnologyChair: John KellyCertificate of Completion in OccupationalSafety and Health Technology(22-26 Credits; Code 5859)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in OccupationalSafety and Health Technology program is designedto prepare a safety professional to manage healthand safety programs that comply with OccupationalSafety and Health Act (OSHA) standards in a variety ofsettings. Occupational Safety and Health professionalshave specialized knowledge of state and federal rulesand regulations and code books that serve as safetyguidelines. They identify safety problems and developprograms to apply those rules in specific industrialsetting.Required Course Credits ........................................... 22-26HMT/OSH101 Introduction to Occupational Safety,Health, and EnvironmentalTechnology..........................................................3OSH102 Introduction to Industrial Hygiene .............3OSH105AAOSH106AAConstruction Safety (3) ORIndustrial Safety (3) OR30 hour OSHA card (0) ............................ 0-3OSH110 OSH Standards for Construction (2) OROSH111 OSH Standards for General Industry (2)..2OSH107+ANDOccupational Safety Principles andPractice.................................................................3Students must select one (1) of the following three (3)tracks:Track 1 Safety Management ...................................... 12OSH203+ Safety Program Management I ...................3OSH204+ Health and Safety ProgramManagement II ...................................................3OSH206 Risk Management and Loss Control .........3OSH220+ Safety and Emergency Management (3)ORFAC/OSH240+Facilities Special Systems andCodes (3) .............................................................3Track 2 Safety Professional ........................................ 12OSH203+ Safety Program Management I (3) OROSH205+ OSHA General Industry Training forInstructors (3)....................................................3OSH230+ Safety and Environmental Responseto Hazardous Spills and Waste (3) ORFAC/OSH240+ Facilities Special Systems andCodes (3).............................................................3OSH214+ Machine Guarding (3) OROSH218+ Ergonomics (3) .................................................3OSH220+ Safety and Emergency Management .......3Track 3 Construction Safety Specialist ..............11-12OSH230 Safety and Environmental Responseto Hazardous Spills and Waste (3) OROSH201+ Fall Arrest Systems (2)...............................2-3OSH113 Urban Workplace Response: First AidCardiopulmonary Resuscitation (1) OROSH212+ Electrical Safety Arc Flash (1).......................1OSH203+ Safety Program Management I (3) OROSH207+ OSHA Construction Training forInstructors (3)....................................................3OSH210+ Electrical Standards Low Voltage (3) ORFAC/OSH240+ Facilities Special Systems andCodes (3).............................................................3OSH213+ Excavation, Trenching and SoilMechanics ............................................................2Associate in Applied Science Degree inOccupational Safety and Health Technology(63-70 Credits; Code 3762)The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) inOccupational Safety and Health program is a two-yeardegree program which is designed to prepare a safetyprofessional to manage health and safety programsthat comply with Occupational Safety and Health Act(OSHA) standards in a variety of settings. OccupationalSafety and Health professionals have specializedknowledge of state and federal rules and regulationsand code books that serve as safety guidelines. Theyidentify safety problems and develop programs toapply those rules in specific industrial setting.Program Prerequisites .....................................................3-8MAT courses in program prerequisites area may bewaived based on work experience as determined byProgram Director.MAT090+ Developmental Algebra (5) ORMAT091+ Introductory Algebra (4) ORMAT092+MAT093+Introductory Algebra (3) ORIntroductory Algebra/Math AnxietyReduction (5) OREquivalent ORSatisfactory score on DistrictPlacement exam...........................................0-5ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


190 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014Required Course Credits ............................................ 33-35BIO160 Introduction to Human Anatomyand Physiology ................................................. 4CHM130+ Fundamental Chemistry (3) ANDCHM130LL+ Fundamental Chemistry Laboratory (1)ORCHM151+ General Chemistry I (3) ANDCHM151LL+ General Chemistry I Laboratory (1) .......... 4GBS110 Human Relations in Business andIndustry (3) ORMGT101 Techniques of Supervision (3).....................3HMT/OSH101 Introduction to Occupational Safety,Health, and Environmental Technology ...3OSH102 Introduction to Industrial Hygiene .............3OSH105AA Construction Safety (3) OROSH106AA Industrial Safety (3) OROSH110 OSH Standards for Construction (2) OROSH111 OSH Standards for GeneralOSH107+Industry (2).....................................................2-3Occupational Safety Principles andPractice.................................................................3ANDStudents must follow one of the following tracks:Track 1 Safety Management ...................................... 12OSH203+ Safety Program Management I ...................3OSH204+ Health and Safety ProgramManagement II ...................................................3OSH206 Risk Management and Loss Control .........3OSH220+ Safety and Emergency Management(3) ORFAC/OSH240+Facilities Special Systems andCodes (3) .............................................................3Track 2 Safety Professional ........................................ 12OSH203+ Safety Program Management I (3) OROSH205+ OSHA General Industry Trainingfor Instructors (3).............................................3OSH230+ Safety and Environmental Response toHazardous Spills and Waste (3) ORFAC/OSH240+ Facilities Special Systems andCodes (3).............................................................3OSH214+ Machine Guarding (3) OROSH218+ Ergonomics (3) .................................................3OSH220+ Safety and Emergency Management .......3Track 3 Construction Specialist ............................11-12OSH230 Safety and Environmental Response toHazardous Spills and Waste (3) OROSH201+ Fall Arrest Systems (2)...............................2-3OSH113 Urban Workplace Response: First Aid/Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (1) OROSH212+ Electrical Safety Arc Flash (1).......................1OSH203+ Safety Program Management I (3) OROSH207+ OSHA Construction Training forInstructors (3)....................................................3OSH210+ Electrical Standards Low Voltage (3) ORFAC/OSH240+ Facilities Special Systems andCodes (3).............................................................3OSH213+ Excavation, Trenching and SoilMechanics ............................................................2Restricted Electives............................................................ 12Students should select twelve (12) credits from thefollowing courses in consultation with a ProgramAdvisor. Any 100/200 level prefixed courses may beselected, except courses used to satisfy the RequiredCourses area. Any BIO, CHM, CIS, ENV, PHY, PHS,MAT prefixed courses selected must be approved byProgram Director.BIO+++++ Any BIO Biology course(s)CHM+++++ Any CHM Chemistry course(s)CIS+++++ Any CIS Computer InformationSystems course(s)ENV+++++ Any ENV Environmental Sciencescourse(s)PHY+++++ Any PHY Physics course(s)PHS+++++ Any PHS Physical Science course(s)MAT+++++ Any MAT Mathematics course(s)OSH+++++ Any OSH Occupational Safety andHealth course(s)FAC+++++ Any FAC Facilities Managementcourse(s)WRT+++++ Any WRT Water Resource Technologycourse(s)IND+++++ Any IND Industry course(s)SPA+++++ Any SPA Spanish courses(s)BLT121 Electrical Codes ................................................3BLT124 Designing for the Americans withBLT142Disabilities Act (ADA).....................................3Green Building Codes, Standards andRating Systems ..................................................3EMT/HCC/RES109 CPR for Health Care Provider ..................0.5FSC105 Hazardous Materials/First Responder ......3HCC130AA Health Care Today ........................................0.5HCC130AB Workplace Behaviors in Health Care ....0.5HCC130AC Personal Wellness and Safety..................0.5General Education Requirements .............................15-20COM110 Interpersonal Communication (3) ORCOM230+ Small Group Communication (3)................3CRE101+CRE111+College Critical Reading (3) ORCritical Reading for Business andIndustry (3) OREquivalent by Assessment ....................... 0-3ENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG108+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3MAT120+MAT121+MAT122+Intermediate Algebra (5) ORIntermediate Algebra (4) ORIntermediate Algebra (3) OREquivalent course ORSatisfactory completion of a higher levelmathematics course. .................................. 3-5Any approved general education course from theHumanities and Fine Arts area .............................................3Any approved general education course from theSocial and Behavioral Sciences area ..................................3+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014191OFFICE TECHNOLOGYCertificate of CompletionTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Business and Information TechnologiesChair: S. Annette TorreyCertificate of Completion in OfficeTechnology (18 Credits; Code 5261)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in OfficeTechnology can be completed in one semester. Manyclasses are offered on a flexible schedule. Trainingin this area provides students with keyboarding,language, customer service, and computer skills.A wide variety of careers exist in the office field.Office technology positions include office assistant,receptionist, and customer service representative. Theposition offers opportunities to learn and advance inthe office environment.Required Course Credits ................................................... 18Either OAS101AA or OAS103AA may be waived if 30wpm (accurately) assessment is achieved. See youradvisor for course exception.BPC110 Computer Usage andApplications (3) ORCIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems (3) ORBPC/CIS118AB PowerPoint: Level I (1) ANDBPC/OAS130DK+ Beginning Word (1) ANDCIS117AMDatabase Management:Microsoft Access - Level I (1) .......................3BPC/CIS114DE Excel Spreadsheet ............................................3GBS110 Human Relations in Business andIndustry ................................................................3OAS108 Business English ...............................................3OAS118 Ten-Key by Touch ..............................................1OAS101AA Computer Typing I:Keyboard Mastery (1) OROAS103AA+ Computer Typing:Skill Building I (1) ...............................................1OAS101AB+ Computer Typing I: Letters, Tablesand Reports .........................................................1CSM/TQM101 Quality Customer Service .............................3ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIPAND MANAGEMENTCertificate of CompletionAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Business and Information TechnologiesChair: S. Annette TorreyCertificate of Completion in OrganizationalLeadership (18 Credits; Code 5731)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in OrganizationalLeadership provides students with knowledge and skillsneeded in today’s changing workplace. The programdevelops leadership and communication skills and techniquesfor planning, directing, and evaluating business situations.This program also emphasizes procedures for effectiveallocation of time, money, materials, space, and personnel.Required Course Credits ................................................... 18BPC110 Computer Usage and Application (3) ORCIS105 Survey of Computer InformationGBS110Systems (3).........................................................3Human Relations in Business andIndustry (3) ORMGT251 Human Relations in Business (3)................3GBS151 Introduction to Business ................................3GBS233+ Business Communication ..............................3MGT175 Business Organization andManagement (3) ORTQM240 Project Management in QualityOrganizations (3) .............................................3MGT101 Techniques of Supervision (3) ORMGT229 Management and Leadership I (3) ............3Associate in Applied Science Degree inOrganizational Management(60 Credits; Code 3727)The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) inOrganizational Management program providesstudents with a customized curriculum specific to thestudent’s individual needs in addition to the knowledgeand skills needed in today’s changing workplace. Theprogram develops leadership and communicationskills and techniques for planning, directing, andevaluating business situations, with an emphasis oneffective allocation of time, money, materials, space,and personnel. The curriculum combines coursework inleadership with a general education component.Required Course Credits ................................................... 18Certificate of Completion in Organizational Leadership(5731) ..............................................................................................18Restricted Electives...................................................... 19-25Students must choose 19-25 industry/job relatedcourse credits from any MCCCD occupational programand/or Academic Certificate. Industry/job relatedcourse credits must include a minimum of 9 creditswith a common subject or theme. Program of studymust be approved by the business department chair ordesignee.General Education Requirements .............................22-27CRE101+ College Critical Reading (3) OREquivalent by assessment ........................ 0-3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3ANDENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG108+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


192 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014Any general education course in the OralCommunication area ................................................................3Any general education course in the Humanities andFine Arts area ..............................................................................3Any general education course in the Mathematicsarea ............................................................................................ 3-5Any general education course in the Natural Sciencesarea ................................................................................................ 4Any general education course in the Social andBehavioral Sciences area ........................................................3PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTINGAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Health SciencesChair: Edward HoskinsAssociate in Applied Science Degree inPhysical Therapist Assisting(66-73 Credits; Code 3675)The Physical Therapist Assisting program preparesstudents to use physical therapy modalities andprocedures under the direction of a physical therapist.The physical therapist assistant works with patientswho have physical impairments requiring physicaltherapy services to relieve pain and heal damagedtissue; improve range of motion, strength, andfunctional mobility. Physical therapy treatments includebut are not limited to the application of therapeuticmodalities; therapeutic exercise including stretching,range of motion, and strengthening; mobility skillsincluding ambulation, transfers, and wheelchairmobility activities; balance exercises; and wound caremanagement.The Physical Therapist Assisting program is accreditedby the Commission on Accreditation in PhysicalTherapy Education. Only graduates of an accreditedtraining program may practice as a physical therapistassistant in the state of Arizona. Program graduatesare eligible to apply for the certification examadministered by the Federation of State Boards ofPhysical Therapy. A passing score on this exam isrequired for licensure/certification to practice as aphysical therapist assistant in Arizona and in manyother states.Program Note: Students with other related healthcare experiences not listed on the following ProgramPrerequisites options may request an evaluationfor course competency equivalence through theIntegrated Competency Assessment Network (ICAN)by calling (480) 731-8924.Admission Criteria• Formal application and admission to the programby a point system is required. See point systemdescription in Physical Therapy Assisting Programpacket in Health Sciences Division of college.• Current Health Care Provider CPR card required.Program Prerequisites .........................................................7Forty (40) hours of paid or volunteer experience ina physical therapy setting supervised by a licensedphysical therapist. Successful completion of thefollowing college courses with a cumulative gradepoint average (GPA) of 2.4 or higher and with a gradeof “C” or better.BIO160Introduction to Human Anatomy andPhysiology (4) ORBIO201+ Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4).... 4ENG101+ First-Year Composition ...................................3Required Course Credits ........................................... 55-58HCC130 Fundamentals in Health Care Delivery(3) OREquivalent course as evaluated by theIntegrated Competency AssessmentNetwork (ICAN) (0) ................................... 0-3HCC146 Common Medical Terminology forHealth Care Workers .......................................2PTA101+ Survey of Physical Therapy ....................... 1.5PTA103+ Kinesiology .........................................................3PTA104+ Musculo-Skeletal AssessmentTechniques ....................................................... 1.5PTA200+ Patient Mobility Techniques ........................ 4PTA202+ Therapeutic Modalities ...................................5PTA203+ Clinical Pathology ............................................3PTA205+ Communication in Physical Therapy ...... 1.5PTA206+ Clinical Practicum I ..........................................3PTA207+ Clinical Practicum Seminar I ..........................1PTA208+ Rehabilitation of Special Populations .......5PTA210+ Orthopedic Physical Therapy ..................... 4PTA214+ Electromodalities .......................................... 2.5PTA215+ Wound Care for the PhysicalTherapist Assistant ...........................................1PTA217+ Clinical Neurology ............................................2PTA230+ Physical Therapy Seminar .............................2PTA280+ Clinical Practicum II .........................................3PTA281+ Clinical Practicum Seminar II ........................1PTA290+ Clinical Practicum III ........................................3PTA292+ Clinical Practicum Seminar III .......................1PTA295+ Physical Therapist AssistantExamination Review ........................................2PSY101 Introduction to Psychology ..........................3General Education Requirements ............................... 11-15CRE101+ College Critical Reading (3) ORCRE111+ Critical Reading for Business andIndustry (3) OREquivalent by assessment (0) ................ 0-3ENG102+ First-Year Composition ...................................3Any general education course in the OralCommunication area ................................................................3Any general education course in the Mathematicsarea .................................................................................................3Any general education course in the Humanities andFine Arts area ..........................................................................2-3+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014193POLYSOMNOGRAPHICTECHNOLOGYCertificate of CompletionAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses required within the program.Division: Health ScienceChair: Edward HoskinsCertificate of Completion inPolysomnographic Technology(36-44 Credits; Code 5695)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) inPolysomnographic Technology program includesparallel clinical training in various Valley hospitalsand free-standing sleep centers. PolysomnographicTechnology program prepares polysomnographictechnologists (sleep technologists) to assistphysicians specializing in sleep medicine in the clinicalassessment, physiological monitoring and testing,diagnosis, management, and treatment of sleep relateddisorders with the use of various diagnostic andtherapeutic tools providing care to patients of all ages.Successful completion of the CCL in PolysomnographicTechnology program enables the student to take theBoard of Registered Polysomnographic Technologists(BRPT) examination to become a RegisteredPolysomnographic Technologist (RPSGT).Admission Criteria• Formal application and admission to the programis required.• Current American Heart Association CPR forHealth Care Provider card.• Graduate of postsecondary higher learninginstitution program in Respiratory Therapyaccredited by the Higher Learning Commission,a Commission of the North Central Associationof Colleges and Schools, and the Commissionon Accreditation of Allied Health EducationalPrograms (CAAHEP) with recommendation fromCommittee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care(CoARC); or an accrediting agency recognized bythe US Secretary of Education and the Commissionon Accreditation of Allied Health EducationalPrograms (CAAHEP) with recommendation fromCommittee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care(CoARC). Applicant must be in good standing withthe National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC)and the state licensing body for the RespiratoryCare (RCP) license.ORCurrent registered nurse.ORCurrent registered electroneurodiagnostictechnologist (END/EEG).Background Check RequirementsAdmission to an Allied Health program requires thatstudents be in compliance with the Maricopa CountyCommunity College District Supplemental BackgroundCheck policy. Program applications will not beaccepted without a copy of an Arizona Department ofPublic Safety Level-one Fingerprint Clearance Card.Upon conditional program admission, the student mustcomply with all requirements of the current MCCCD.Required Course Credits ...........................................36-44HCE115+ Biomedical Electronic Technology I ..........2HCE116+ Biomedical Electronic Technology II .........3PSG150+ Introduction to Sleep Medicine .................. 4PSG160+ Polysomnographic Procedures ...................3PSG165+ Clinical Polysomnography I ..........................3PSG170+ Sleep Therapeutics ..........................................3PSG250+ Record Scoring ..................................................3PSG260+ Special Topics in Polysomnography .........2PSG265+ Clinical Polysomnography II .........................2PSG275+ Clinical Polysomnography III ........................3PSG282AA+ Volunteerism for PolysomnographicTechnology: Service LearningExperience ...........................................................1ANDBased on selected healthcare professional, completethe required courses indicated.Registered Respiratory Care Technologist .....................7EEG130+ Introduction to EEG ........................................ 4EEG210+ Applied Neurophysiology .............................3ORRegistered Nurses .............................................................. 15EEG130+ Introduction to EEG ........................................ 4EEG210+ Applied Neurophysiology .............................3RES130+ Respiratory Care Fundamentals I ...............5RES240+ Respiratory Physiology ..................................3ORRegistered END/EEG Technologists ................................8RES130+ Respiratory Care Fundamentals I ...............5RES240+ Respiratory Physiology ..................................3Associate in Applied Science inPolysomnographic Technology(72.5-77.5 Credits; Code 3135)The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) inPolysomnographic Technology program includesparallel clinical training in various Valley hospitalsand free-standing sleep centers. PolysomnographicTechnology program prepares polysomnographictechnologists (sleep technologists) to assistphysicians specializing in sleep medicine in the clinicalassessment; physiological monitoring and testing,diagnosis, management, and treatment of sleep relateddisorders with the use of various diagnostic andtherapeutic tools providing care to patients of all ages.+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


194 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014Successful completion of the AAS degree inPolysomnographic Technology program enablesthe student to take the Board of RegisteredPolysomnographic Technologists (BRPT) examinationto become a Registered PolysomnographicTechnologist (RPSGT).Admission Criteria• Formal application and admission to the programis required.• Current American Heart Association CPR forHealth Care Provider card.• Immunizations as required.• A high school diploma or GED equivalency isrequired.• Documentation of successful completion ofprerequisites.• Drug test required prior to clinical experience.Background Check RequirementsAdmission to an Allied Health program requires thatstudents be in compliance with the Maricopa CountyCommunity College District Supplemental BackgroundCheck policy. Program applications will not beaccepted without a copy of an Arizona Department ofPublic Safety Level-one Fingerprint Clearance Card.Upon conditional program admission, the student mustcomply with all requirements of the current MCCCDbackground check policy.Program Prerequisites ........................................... 16.5-21.5BIO160 Introduction to Human Anatomyand Physiology ................................................ 4CRE101+ College Critical Reading (3) ORCRE111+ Critical Reading for Business andIndustry (3) OREquivalent as indicated byAssessment ................................................... 0-3EMT/HCC/RES109 CPR for Health Care Provider .................0.5ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3HCC130 Fundamentals in HealthCare Delivery (3) ORHCC130AA Health Care Today (0.5) ANDHCC130AB Workplace Behaviors inHealth Care (0.5) ANDHCC130AC Personal Wellness and Safety (0.5) ANDHCC130AD Communication and Teamwork in HealthCare Organizations (0.5) ANDHCC130AE Legal Issues in Health Care (0.5) ANDHCC130AF Decision Making in the Health CareSetting (0.5) .......................................................3HCC146 Common Medical Terminology forHealth Care Workers .......................................2HCC164+ Pharmacology for Allied Health ............0.5HCC200+ Basic Client Care for Allied Health .......0.5MAT120+ Intermediate Algebra (5) ORMAT121+ Intermediate Algebra (4) ORMAT122+ Intermediate Algebra (3) OREquivalent course ORSatisfactory completion of a higher levelmathematics course ................................... 3-5Required Course Credits ................................................. 44EEG130+ Introduction to EEG ........................................ 4EEG210+ Applied Neurophysiology .............................3HCE115+ Biomedical Electronic Technology I ..........2HCE116+ Biomedical Electronic Technology II .........3PSG150+ Introduction to Sleep Medicine .................. 4PSG160+ Polysomnographic Procedures ...................3PSG165+ Clinical Polysomnography I ..........................3PSG170+ Sleep Therapeutics ..........................................3PSG250+ Record Scoring ..................................................3PSG260+ Special Topics in Polysomnography .........2PSG265+ Clinical Polysomnography II .........................2PSG275+ Clinical Polysomnography III ........................3PSG282AA+ Volunteerism for PolysomnographicTechnology: Service LearningExperience ...........................................................1RES130+ Respiratory Care Fundamentals I ...............5RES240+ Respiratory Physiology ..................................3General Education Requirements ................................... 12COM100 Introduction to Human Communication(3) ORCOM110 Interpersonal Communication (3) ORCOM230 Small Group Communication (3) ..............3ENG102+ENG108+ENG111+First-Year Composition (3) ORFirst-Year Composition for ESL (3) ORTechnical and Professional Writing(3)...........................................................................3PSY101 Introduction to Psychology .........................3Any approved general education course from theHumanities and Fine Arts area .............................................3PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGYCertificates of CompletionAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Industrial TechnologyChair: John KellyCertificate of Completion in ProductionTechnology: CNC Technology(24 Credits; Code 5440)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) ProductionTechnology: CNC Technology program is designed forstudents to obtain the skills required to be consideredas a Computer Numerical Control CNC technician in amanufacturing environment.Program Prerequisites .....................................................0-6MAT082 Basic Arithmetic (3) ORHigher level mathematics course ORSatisfactory score on DistrictPlacement exam ANDA minimum of one-year documentedwork experience in the Manufacturingfield ................................................................... 0-3+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014195MET109Machine Trades Print Reading (3) OROne year direct work experience withMechanical machine drawing ORSatisfactory placement ondepartmental placement exam .............. 0-3Required Course Credits .................................................. 24MET112+ Inspection Techniques ....................................3MET113+ Applied Geometric Dimensioning andTolerancing ..........................................................3GTC/MET206+ CNC Programming ...........................................3MET207+ CNC Mill: Operator Training I .......................3MET208+ CNC Lathe: Operator Training I ...................3MET215+ Advanced CNC Operation ............................3MET231+ Manufacturing Processes and Materials ..3MET286AD+ Solid Design I: Unigraphics NX (3) ORMET286AE+ Solid Design I: Part Modeling:SolidWorks (3)...................................................3Certificate of Completion in ProductionTechnology: Quality Assurance(24 Credits; Code 5441)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in ProductionTechnology: Quality Assurance program is designed forstudents to obtain the skills required to be consideredas a quality technician in a manufacturing environment.Admission CriteriaMath assessment score on District placement examplacing students into MAT090 or higher, or permissionof department.Program Prerequisites .....................................................0-3MET109 Machine Trades Print Reading (3) OROne year direct work experience withMechanical machine drawing ORSatisfactory placement on departmentalplacement exam........................................... 0-3Required Course Credits .................................................. 24MET112+ Inspection Techniques ....................................3MET113+ Applied Geometric Dimensioningand Tolerancing .................................................3MET119 Workplace Quality Systems .........................3MET220+ Fundamentals of Coordinate MeasuringMachines (CMM) ...............................................3MET224+ Applied Statistical Process ControlMethods ...............................................................3MET231+ Manufacturing Processes and Materials ....3MET254+ Lean and Six Sigma Applied Concepts ....3MET284+ Advanced Quality Process Methods .........3Associate in Applied Science in ProductionTechnology (66-72 Credits; Code 3255)The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) in ProductionTechnology program prepares students foremployment in various engineering, manufacturingand quality disciplines related to productivityimprovement, in a variety of manufacturing industries.Students develop skills with a specialization emphasisin Computer Numerical Control Computer AidedDesign/Computer Aided Manufacturing ProgrammingTechnician (CNC CAD/CAM), and Quality Systemsand Process Improvement. The program of studyincludes quality practices and leadership principleswith an emphasis on skills and knowledge essentialfor technicians who will be working in the relateddisciplines.Upon completion of the Associate in Applied ScienceDegree, a student will have acquired a workingknowledge of how to function as a technician andperform duties typically associated in ProductionTechnology as a CNC technician with Quality Systemstraining and Process Improvement expertise.Admission CriteriaMath assessment score on District placement examplacing students into MAT090 or higher, or permissionof department.Program Prerequisites .....................................................0-3MET109 Machine Trades Print Reading (3) OROne year direct work experience withMechanical machine drawing ORSatisfactory placement on departmentalplacement exam........................................... 0-3Required Course Credits ................................................. 45MET112+ Inspection Techniques ....................................3MET113+ Geometric Dimensioning andTolerancing ..........................................................3MET119 Workplace Quality Systems .........................3GTC/MET206 CNC Programming ...........................................3MET207+ CNC Mill: Operator Training I .......................3MET208+ CNC Lathe: Operator Training I ...................3MET215+ Advanced CNC Operation ............................3MET220+ Fundamentals of Coordinate MeasuringMET224+Machines (CMM) ...............................................3Applied Statistical Process ControlMethods ...............................................................3MET231+ Manufacturing Processes and Materials ..3MET236AD+ CAD/CAM Computer Numerical Control(CNC) Programming: MasterCam ..............3MET246AD+ Advanced CAD/CAM CNCProgramming: MasterCam ............................3MET254+ Lean and Six Sigma Applied Concepts ....3MET284+ Advanced Quality Process Methods .........3MET286AE+ Solid Design I: Part Modeling:Solid Works .........................................................3+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


196 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014General Education Requirements ............................. 21-27ENG101 First Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3ENG111+ Technical and Professional Writing ...........3COM100 Introduction to Human Communication(3) ORCOM100AA Introduction to Human CommunicationPart I (1) ANDCOM100AB Introduction to Human CommunicationPart II (1) ANDCOM100AC Introduction to Human CommunicationPart III (1) ORCOM110 Interpersonal Communication (3) ORCOM110AA Interpersonal Communication Part I (1)ANDCOM110AB Interpersonal Communication Part II (1)ANDCOM110AC Interpersonal Communication Part III (1) ....3CRE101+CRE111+MAT120MATI21MAT122Critical and Evaluative Reading I ORReading for Business and Industry OREquivalent as indicated by assessmenton District Placement Exam .................... 0-3Intermediate Algebra (5) ORIntermediate Algebra (4) ORIntermediate Algebra (3) OREquivalent course ORSatisfactory completion of a higherlevel mathematics course ......................... 3-5Any general education course in the Humanities andFine Arts area ..........................................................................2-3Any general education course in the Social andBehavioral Science area .........................................................3Any general education course in the Natural Sciencearea ................................................................................................ 4RADIATION THERAPYCertificate of CompletionTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Health SciencesChair: Edward HoskinsCertificate of Completion in RadiationTherapy (55 Credits; Code 5453)The Certificate of Completion (CCL) in Radiation Therapyprogram prepares participants for an entry level positionas a Radiation Therapist to be members of the health careteam using ionizing radiation in the treatment of cancerand some benign diseases. A primary responsibility inradiation therapy is the assessment of the patient prior toand during treatment to ensure quality of care. Attentionto detail, accuracy, empathy for others, integrity andhigh ethical standards are essential characteristics inthe field. In addition, knowledge of anatomy, physiologyand physics is applied and utilized daily. Daily dutiesin radiation therapy include administering radiationtreatments, treatment documentation, immobilizationconstruction, dosage calculations, patient assessment,treatment planning and patient education. The programincludes didactic instruction and requires participationin a clinical internship to apply knowledge in a real lifesituation. Program graduates are eligible to apply to takethe national certification exam offered by the AmericanRegistry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT).Admission Criteria• Formal application and admission to the programis required.• Graduate of postsecondary higher learninginstitution program in Medical Radiographyaccredited by the Higher Learning Commission,a Commission of the North Central Associationof Colleges and Schools, and the Joint ReviewCommittee on Education in Radiologic Technology(JRCERT); or an accrediting agency recognized bythe US Secretary of Education and the JRCERT.• American Registry of Radiologic Technologists(ARRT) certification in Radiologic Technology byJune 15th of the applicant academic year.• Current Health Care Provider CPR card.• Valid and unrestricted Arizona DPS finger printclearance card.Background Check RequirementsAdmission to the program requires that students bein compliance with the Maricopa County CommunityCollege District Background Check policy. Uponconditional program admission, the student must havean unrestricted Arizona Department of Public SafetyLevel One Fingerprint Clearance Card, in addition tocomplying with the requirements of the supplementalcurrent MCCCD background check policy.Clinical Health and Safety RequirementsUpon conditional program admission the student mustdemonstrate compliance with all MCCCD Health andSafety clinical requirements.Required Course Credits ..................................................55DMI/DMS/ICE220+ Sectional Anatomy ...........................................3RTT101+ Foundations in Radiation Therapy .............2RTT110+ Radiation Therapy Patient Care ..................3RTT115+ Radiobiology for Radiation Therapy .........2RTT121+ Radiation Therapy I: PhysicsRTT122+and Calculations ................................................3Radiation Therapy II: Physicsand Calculations ................................................3RTT130+ Clinical Internship I ...........................................5RTT131+ Clinical Internship II ..........................................5RTT132+ Clinical Internship III .........................................5RTT133+ Internship Seminar I .........................................2RTT134+ Internship Seminar II ........................................2RTT135+ Internship Seminar III .......................................2RTT141+ Dosimetry/Treatment Planning ...................3RTT145+ Radiation Oncology ........................................ 4RTT150+ Clinical Radiation Therapy I ..........................3RTT151+ Clinical Radiation Therapy II .........................2RTT155+ Professional Issues in Radiation Therapy ....2RTT156+ Quality Control/Organizational Issues ......2RTT160+ Seminar in Radiation Therapy ......................2+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014197RESPIRATORY CAREAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all required courses within the program.Division: Health ScienceChair: Mr. Edward HoskinsAssociate in Applied Science Degree inRespiratory Care (72-73 Credits; Code 3284)The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) Degree inRespiratory Care is a full-time or part-time programduring the day and includes parallel clinical trainingin various Valley hospitals. Certified RespiratoryTherapists with three years of work experience mightbe able to fulfill all or part of their clinical training in anon-traditional manner.Successful completion of the AAS Degree RespiratoryCare Program enables the student to take the NationalBoard of Respiratory Care Entry Level examinationand the National Board for Respiratory Care AdvancedPractitioner Examination.Certified and Registered Respiratory Therapists assess,teach and treat patients with pulmonary problems inthe hospital critical care areas, in the patient’s homeor in physicians’ offices or clinics. The employmentoutlook for practitioners in Arizona is good.Program Note: Students with other related healthcare experiences not listed on the following ProgramPrerequisites options may request an evaluationfor course competency equivalence through theIntegrated Competency Assessment Network (ICAN)by calling (480) 731-8924.Admission Criteria• Formal application and admission to the programis required.• Current Health Care Provider CPR card required.Program Prerequisites ...............................................13-19.5BIO160 Introduction to Human Anatomyand Physiology ................................................. 4CRE101+ Critical and Evaluative Reading I (3) ORCRE111+ Critical Reading for Businessand Industry (3) OREquivalent by assessment .............................3ENG101+ First-Year Composition ...................................3MAT122+ Intermediate Algebra (3) OREquivalent course ORSatisfactory completion of a higher levelmathematics course ........................................3Students must also select one of the following twooptions.Option I:Completion of an Associate in Applied Science degreeor higher degree in a health science discipline from aregionally accredited institution of higher educationrecognized by Maricopa County Community CollegeDistrictOROption 2:HCC130HCC130AAHCC130ABHCC130ACHCC130ADHCC130AEHCC130AFEMT/HCC/RES109HCC146Fundamentals in Health CareDelivery (3) ORHealth Care Today (0.5) ANDWorkplace Behaviors inHealth Care (0.5) ANDPersonal Wellnessand Safety (0.5) ANDCommunication and Teamworkin Health Care Organizations (0.5) ANDLegal Issues in Health Care (0.5) ANDDecision Making in theHealth Care Setting (0.5) ..............................3CPR for Health Care Provider ORAmerican Heart Association HealthCare Provider CPR certification ..............0.5Common Medical Terminology forHealth Care Workers .......................................2Pharmacology for Allied Health..............0.5HCC164+HCC200+ Basic Client Care for Allied Health ........0.5Required Course Credits .................................................. 61BIO205+ Microbiology (4) ORRES200+ Microbiology for Respiratory Care (4).... 4CHM130+ Fundamental Chemistry ................................3CHM130LL+ Fundamental Chemistry Lab .........................1HCC204+ Clinical Pathophysiology ...............................3HCC208+ Health Care Leadership ...................................1NCE173+ LPN–Venipuncture ............................................1RES130+ Respiratory Care Fundamentals I ...............5RES133+ Respiratory Care Clinical Seminar .............3RES134+ Advanced Respiratory CarePharmacology ....................................................2RES136+ Applied Biophysics for Respiratory Care ....3RES140+ Respiratory Care Fundamentals II .............5RES142+ Respiratory Care Clinical I .............................3RES220+ Respiratory Care Fundamentals III ............5RES226+ Respiratory Care Clinical II ............................3RES230+ Respiratory Care Fundamentals IV ........... 4RES232+ Respiratory Care Clinical III ..........................3RES235+ Respiratory Care Pharmacology II .............2RES240+ Respiratory Physiology ..................................3RES270+ Neonatal and Pediatric Respiratory Care....2RES280+ Respiratory Care Review ...............................2RES291+ Respiratory Care Advanced LifeSupport .................................................................1RES297+ Respiratory Care Seminar .............................2General Education Requirements ............................... 11-12COM100 Introduction to Human Communication(3) ORCOM110 Interpersonal Communication (3)..............3ENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG111+ Technical and Professional Writing (3) ....3PSY101 Introduction to Psychology ..........................3Any general education course in the Humanities andFine Arts area ..........................................................................2-3+ Indicates course has prerequisites and/or co-requisites ++ Indicates any module/suffixed courses


198 Degrees and Certificates 2013-2014RETAIL MANAGEMENTCertificate of CompletionAssociate in Applied Science DegreeTo qualify, students must earn a grade of “C” or betterin all courses within the program.Division: Business and Information TechnologiesChair: S. Annette TorreyCertificate of Completion in RetailManagement (33 Credits; Code 5286)The Retail Management Certificate of Completion(CCL) is designed to prepare individuals working in thefood industry, and related fields, for the managementchallenges of the future. The curriculum encompassesseveral business essentials and also emphasizesthe skill sets needed for effective management andcommunication in the work environment.Required Course Credits ..................................................33ACC111 Accounting Principles I ..................................3BPC110 Computer Usage and Applications (3)ORCIS105 Survey of Computer InformationSystems (3).........................................................3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ...........3GBS110 Human Relations in Business & Industry(3) ORMGT251+ Human Relations in Business (3)................3GBS131 Business Calculations (3) ORMAT102+ Mathematical Concepts andApplications (3) ................................................3GBS233+ Business Communication ..............................3COM110 Interpersonal Communication (3) ORIND133 Speaking in Business (3) ...............................3MGT101 Techniques of Supervision (3) ORMGT229 Management and Leadership I (3) ............3MGT179 Utilizing the Human ResourcesDepartment (3) ORMGT276 Personnel/Human ResourcesManagement (3) ...............................................3MKT268 Merchandising....................................................3MKT271 Principles of Marketing ...................................3Associate in Applied Science in RetailManagement (64 Credits; Code 3048)The Retail Management degree is designed toprepare individuals working in the retail management,food industry, and related fields, for the mid-levelmanagement position challenges of the future. Thecurriculum encompasses business essentials andalso emphasizes the skill sets needed for effectivemanagement and communication in the workenvironment. Instruction will provide the backgroundand knowledge necessary for students to developthe judgment skills they must exercise as businessmanagers.Required Course Credits ................................................. 39ACC111 Accounting Principles I ..................................3ACC230+ Uses of Accounting Information I ..............3ACC240+ Uses of Accounting Information II .............3BPC110 Computer Usage and Applications (3) ORCISI05 Survey of Computer InformationSystems (3).........................................................3COM110 Interpersonal Communication (3) ORIND133 Speaking in Business (3) ...............................3GBS110 Human Relations in Businessand Industry (3) ORMGT251 Human Relations in Business (3)................3GBS131 Business Calculations (3) ORGBS161+ Mathematics of Business (3)........................3GBS205 Legal, Ethical, & Regulatory Issues inBusiness ...............................................................3GBS233+ Business Communication ..............................3MGT101 Techniques of Supervision (3) ORMGT229 Management and Leadership I (3) ............3MGT179 Utilizing the Human ResourcesDepartment (3) ORMGT276 Personnel/Human ResourcesManagement (3) ...............................................3MKT268 Merchandising....................................................3MKT271 Principles of Marketing ...................................3General Education Requirements ...................................25COM230 Small Group Communication ......................3CRE101+Critical and Evaluative Reading I (3) OREquivalent by assessment .............................3ENG101+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG107+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ANDENG102+ First-Year Composition (3) ORENG108+ First-Year Composition for ESL (3) ORENG111+ Technical and Professional Writing (3) ... 6ENG102 or ENG108 recommended forstudents pursuing a BAS degree at anArizona university.MAT102+ Mathematical Concepts/Applications (3)ORSatisfactory completion of a higherlevel mathematics course ..............................3SBU200 Society and Business ......................................3Any general education course in the Humanities andFine Arts area ..............................................................................3Any general education course in the Natural Sciencesarea ................................................................................................ 4+ Indicates course has prerequisites