jrasc june 1998 final - The Royal Astronomical Society of Canada

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jrasc june 1998 final - The Royal Astronomical Society of Canada

Left: This photo was taken just before the beginning of totality (2 nd contact) when some small prominences and the chromosphere and inner coronabecame visible. Right: More of Bailey’s Beads and less of the chromosphere and inner corona are evident in this photo which was taken just after theend of totality (3 rd contact). A Meade 4-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope (1000-mm at f/11) and a 1/500 second exposure on Agfacolor HDC (ISO 100)print film was used to capture both photos. (Photos by Don Hladiuk)ring effect came next, though Bailey’s beads were pretty muchnon-existent. In binoculars some prominences could be seen,but the corona was quite bright and they did not stand out aswell as in some eclipses. Jupiter, Venus, and Mercury werebrightly seen on either side of the eclipsed Sun. Every eclipseI forget to do one thing or another in the excitement of themoment, and this time I failed to look for Mars and Saturnfarther to the left. The corona was a beautiful pearly white, withpolar brushes visible in binoculars. In a few very short minuteswe could see the edge of the Sun start to glow pink from a forestof small prominences, and we knew that it was time to try tocatch the outgoing events. Again a beautiful, but longer, diamondring, more shadow bands, and it was time to celebrate withchampagne!To view some of our beautiful eclipse photos try our websiteat http://www.syz.com/rasc/. Look under “Centre Activities.”The Cruise option participants were led by Alister Lingof the Edmonton Centre, and successfully positioned theNorwegian Sea cruise ship right on the centre line to observea full 3.75 minutes of totality.Before leaving the site, Terry Dickinson had an interviewwith Jay Ingram on the Discovery Channel which was viewedacross Canada later that evening. Local TV interviewed AlanDyer and Don Hladiuk, and a team from France’s Canal 2 TVslipped me into a documentary on eclipses they were preparing.The only problem we encountered was a flat tire on theway back to the hotel. That delayed us a mere 15 minutes beforea replacement bus arrived, yet another indication of how wellthe people of Curaçao were prepared for the big event.That evening we had a party at the hotel beach, with a bigbuffet spread and an open bar. The Sun slipped beneath thehorizon and we partied until midnight (well, Rob Dick of Ottawaand I had our rum punches till midnight, anyway).The rest of the week was snorkelling, sleeping in, a littlescuba diving, and even just lying in the sunshine before headinghome. Many eclipse chasers collected souvenir T-shirts, stamps,commemorative beer cans, lapel pins, sea shells and a host ofother Caribbean delights. On Friday evening (February 27 th ) athin crescent Moon and the planet Mars shone in the beautifulCaribbean sunset skies.Although the people of Curaçao will have to wait another500 years for an eclipse to cross their tiny island again, theRASC Calgary Centre has another tour planned for the August11, 1999, eclipse in Turkey. For more information contact theTurkish Travel Specialists at 1-888-488-7226. A total solar eclipseis an event you must see at least once in your lifetime.On behalf of the Calgary Centre I would like to thank ourco-sponsors the Calgary Science Centre (especially Alan Dyer),the Travel Exchange (especially Nicole Neidermayer and AllenLeong), Alister Ling of the Edmonton Centre, Don Hladiuk ofthe Calgary Centre and Taber Tours (especially Marcial Garcia)for making the expedition one of the most successful.Glenn Hawley has witnessed five solar eclipses (partials and annularsdon’t count) and is currently serving as President of the CalgaryCentre. He processes seismic data for a living, wrestling computersin the quest for oil and gas. The time off he is permitted to take forStar Parties and General Assemblies is always greatly appreciated.118JRASC June/juin 1998

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