jrasc june 1998 final - The Royal Astronomical Society of Canada

rasc.ca

jrasc june 1998 final - The Royal Astronomical Society of Canada

see such isolated neutron stars as they move through cloudsof gas in the Milky Way. Indeed, several candidates have recentlybeen observed (regular readers of this column may rememberthat I wrote about one in October 1997, vol. 91, p. 203), butthere have been fewer found than expected. Perhaps most suchisolated, non-pulsating neutron stars move through the cloudsso quickly that their observational signature is not at all whatwe expect, which is why we have found so few. Theorists andobservers will need to get together to see if the lack of observedisolated neutron stars is connected to their speed. If it is,that would seem to be good support for Spruit and Phinney’smodel.Dr. Leslie J. Sage is Assistant Editor, Physical Sciences, for Nature Magazineand a Research Associate in the Astronomy Department at the Universityof Maryland. He grew up in Burlington, Ontario, where even the brightlights of Toronto did not dim his enthusiasm for astronomy. Currently hestudies molecular gas and star formation in galaxies, particularlyinteracting ones.STAR QUOTES“But that which will excite the greatest astonishment by far, and which indeed especially moved me to call attention to all astronomersand philosophers, is this: namely that I have observed four planets, neither known nor observed by any of the astronomers before mytime, which have their orbits around a certain bright star [Jupiter], one of those previously known, like Venus or Mercury round theSun, and are sometimes in front of it, sometimes behind it, though they never depart from it beyond certain limits. All of which factswere discovered and observed a few days ago by the help of a telescope devised by me, through God’s grace first enlightening mymind.”Galileo GalileiItalian astronomer/physicist (1564–1642)June/juin 1998 JRASC125

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines