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"Developing a Better Business Model" - Commercial Executive Magazine

Doug Wilson knew he wanted to create a different business model when he started his namesake company 26 years ago. He had a résumé full of development projects, but having been in the real estate business for years, he knew that for a company to have longevity and withstand the ups and downs, he needed to expand the typical model for a development firm. /// He accomplished this by creating a counter-cyclical business model that allowed for Douglas Wilson Companies (DWC) to provide a wide-range of problem resolution and real estate services. This unique business model opened up more opportunities for the DWC team to impact markets in a positive way even during challenging economic times.

"Developing a Better Business Model" - Commercial Executive

The East in theWESTdeveloping a betterbusiness modelDoug Wilson (center), surrounded by his sons Nicholas Wilson (left) & Michael Wilson (right)Doug Wilson knew he wanted to create a different business model when he started his namesakecompany 26 years ago. He had a résumé full of development projects, but having been in the realestate business for years, he knew that for a company to have longevity and withstand the ups anddowns, he needed to expand the typical model for a development firm. /// He accomplished thisby creating a counter-cyclical business model that allowed for Douglas Wilson Companies (DWC)to provide a wide-range of problem resolution and real estate services. This unique businessmodel opened up more opportunities for the DWC team to impact markets in a positive wayeven during challenging economic times.dwcTo-date, that business model has resulted in DWC becoming the largest company in the U.S. for fiduciarymatters, providing problem resolution services for 1,200 individual and court-appointed cases with assetsvalued in excess of $15 billion in 35 states. Doug realized that there were a lot of transferable skills and sharedknowledge between the development industry and the problem resolution/management/consulting industry.///With DWC, he created a company that included a core group of employees, most who have been theresince day one, that are able to seamlessly work with a diverse client base. /// According to Managing DirectorNicholas Wilson, DWC’s resume of experience includes a wide variety of projects. “We like the challenge oftaking on complicated and unique projects, from managing gas stations, to running the largest tomato growingcompany in Southern California.” /// One of those unique and challenging projects was the National Oceanicand Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) headquarters in Maryland. DWC was the court-appointed receiverfor the project which was over budget and unfinished. /// Capitalizing on the varying expertise of the DWCteam members, they were able to take over the fiduciary oversight, work out the budget issues and – at thesame time – step in as the developer and complete the 268,762-square-foot, LEED certified office and researchfacility.Doug started his real estate career in Denver, but his experience as a developer was launched in San Diego whenhe and his business partner saw a need for Class A office product in the Downtown submarket. As they lookedfor opportunities for a new development, one location stood out: the site that occupied by the Fox Theater andhome to the San Diego Symphony. /// Mindful that as a developer he had a responsibility to his new community,they proposed a radical concept for the building. The proposed development included keeping the theater andincorporating it into the overall project which included a 1.2 million-SF, two-tower office and hotel complex.Overseeing the project from conception through final sale, Doug was able to develop Symphony Towers whichis considered one of the premier office and hotel complexes in downtown San Diego today.responsibilityof adeveloper16 /// commercial executive magazine © Copyright 2015 by MP Media, LLC