scientific program - World Allergy Organization

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scientific program - World Allergy Organization

FINAL PROGRAM

World Allergy Organization Congress–XVIII ICACI

Vancouver, Canada

7-12 September 2003


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

Downtown Vancouver at night

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Welcome

President’s Message ....................................................... 2

Co-Chairs’ Message ........................................................ 3

About the World Allergy Organization ......................................... 4-5

WAO Board of Directors ................................................................. 6

Congress Committees.................................................................. 7

General Congress Information .............................................. 11-14

House of Delegates .................................................................... 15

Sponsorship Report ............................................................... 16-17

Travel Grant Recipients ............................................................... 18

About Vancouver ........................................................................... 19

Social Events ............................................................................... 21

Optional Tours ......................................................................... 22-23

Continuing Medical Education Credits ....................................... 25

Program at a Glance ................................................................... 29

Individual Daily Course Listings ............................................ 31-60

Scientific Program: Sunday, 7 September ..................... 31

Scientific Program: Monday, 8 September ..................... 31

Scientific Program: Tuesday, 9 September ................... 38

Scientific Program: Wednesday, 10 September ............ 45

Scientific Program: Thursday, 11 September ................ 53

Scientific Program: Friday, 12 September ..................... 59

Poster Sessions ..................................................................... 62-94

Poster Sessions: Monday, 8 September ....................... 62

Poster Sessions: Tuesday, 9 September .................... 70

Poster Sessions: Wednesday, 10 September .............. 80

Poster Sessions: Thursday, 11 September................... 88

Faculty ...................................................................................97-100

Exhibit Directory ................................................................. 102-108

Floor Plans .......................................................................... 110-113

Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre (VCEC) .... 110

VCEC Exhibition Hall ..................................................... 111

Fairmont Waterfront Hotel – Headquarters Hotel ....... 112

Pan Pacific Hotel – Headquarters Hotel ...................... 113

Hotel Map and Contact Information ................................... 114-115

Vancouver Map .......................................................................... 116

* Final Program contents subject to change

** Photos provided by Tourism Vancouver unless otherwise indicated

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WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

It is with great pleasure that I present the Final Program of the World Allergy Organization (WAO)

Congress—XVIII ICACI. This WAO Congress offers a unique opportunity to hear the most up-to-date

information regarding the etiology, pathogenesis and treatment of diseases we traditionally associate with

Allergy and Clinical Immunology” as well as discussions and debates where controversy exists. We are

fortunate to have speakers, chairpersons and submitted abstracts that are truly international, with substantial

representation from every continent (and most countries), so the common and the unique facets of allergy

and clinical immunology can be explored. The therapeutic modalities we employ are about to undergo

considerable change with the addition of new approaches to immunomodulation including use of cloned

allergens, modification of immunotherapy to include agents that enhance immunodeviation from a Th2 to Th1 response and

production of monoclonal antibodies to interrupt the inflammatory response. These approaches and other similar ones represent the

therapy of the future. The future is near and the prospects for improved treatment of our patients are exciting indeed. We must,

however, not lose sight of the fact that most therapies are the result of years of basic studies regarding the mechanisms for initiation and

perpetuation of the immune response. Our program will present a fine balance between the basic and clinically relevant.

We are fortunate to host this meeting in Vancouver, one of the world’s most enjoyable cities. We have planned a social event program

that we hope will be enjoyed by all.

We are particularly indebted to our many sponsors, including the Platinum Supporters - Aventis Pharmaceuticals, GlaxoSmithKline,

Merck Sharp & Dohme, Novartis Pharma and UCB Pharma and the Gold Supporters - Alcon Laboratories and MedPointe

Pharmaceuticals. Each has contributed not only resources for the meeting, but also to the development of excellent symposia and the

exhibits displaying the latest in pharmacotherapeutics. The Local Arrangements Committee, chaired by Drs. Robert Schellenberg and

Donald Stark, did an excellent job in providing for our stay while in Vancouver. The expertise of our Scientific Program Committee

was invaluable for development of the overall program. I wish to thank the WAO Secretariat and in particular Denise Lemke, Andi

Raabe and Kay Whalen for their hard work and support to make this Congress a success. Finally, a special thanks to Drs. Estelle

Simons and Michael Kaliner who co-chaired the Organizing Committee. Their dedication, enthusiasm and ability are unmatched

and they have had a major role in every aspect of this Congress.

We all wish you a productive and enjoyable time in Vancouver. Our next WAO Congress will be held jointly with EAACI in

Munich, Germany from 26 June -1 July 2005.

Sincerely,

Allen P. Kaplan, MD

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

CO-CHAIRS’ MESSAGE

Welcome to Vancouver, and to the World Allergy Organization (WAO) Congress—XVIII

ICACI! The process of developing this meeting began seven years ago and has involved

countless hours of careful planning and many dedicated individuals. This is reflected in the

strong scientific program and the exciting social program, which will be of considerable

interest to all delegates and their guests.

This WAO Congress program evolved through a defined democratic process. The majority of

the chairs, speakers and moderators in the five plenary sessions, 26 symposia, eight Meet the

Professor sessions, four Debate of the Day sessions, 12 interactive workshops and more than 112 breakfast and luncheon seminars were

nominated by their own WAO Member Societies. In addition, several entire symposia were planned by and supported by WAO National

and Regional Member Societies. Based on these nominations, and on timely suggestions from the WAO Scientific Program Committee

members, superb, highly informative sessions have been developed. We sincerely thank all the allergy and immunology researchers and

educators from around the globe who have accepted our invitation to participate in these events.

More than 800 abstracts were accepted for the 2003 WAO Congress, reflecting cutting-edge allergy and immunology research from

laboratories and clinics in many nations. The free communication sessions and the poster sessions include presentations by the 30 Congress

Travel Grant recipients: nine young scientists from Europe; eight from Asia and Australia; eight from North, Central, and South America;

and four from Africa and the Middle East.

This Congress takes place in a uniquely attractive, accessible and affordable city, which provides an unparalleled range of social activities.

On Sunday, 7 September, we hope that everyone will enjoy the Opening Ceremony at the Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre.

This event will focus on the proud heritage and fascinating traditions of First Nations People, told through music, story and dance. It will

be followed by a Welcome Reception during which delegates and their guests will gather for hors d’oeuvres and drinks and have the

opportunity to reconnect with colleagues and friends in a convivial setting. On Wednesday, 10 September, the aurora borealis will be

recreated as the magical backdrop for the Northern Lights Gala Dinner and Dance, featuring an evening of exceptional dining, followed

by dancing to the sounds of a 16-piece band. Finally, on Thursday, 11 September, the All-Congress Event will be an informal Western

Barbecue and Dance. A complimentary orientation and sightseeing tour of Vancouver has been organized for early Congress registrants.

Optional tours to spectacular locations in Vancouver and surrounding areas, including the internationally renowned resort village of

Whistler, are available. During all these events, allergists and immunologists from around the world will renew old friendships and make

new and lasting friendships.

We are extremely grateful to our five Platinum Supporters - Aventis Pharmaceuticals, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck Sharp & Dohme, Novartis

Pharma and UCB Pharma, and to our Gold Supporters - Alcon Laboratories and MedPointe Pharmaceuticals for their generous support

of this Congress. We thank the Local Arrangements Committee headed by Drs. Robert Schellenberg and Donald Stark, the Vancouver

Convention and Exhibition Centre, and our local events coordinator, PGI. We appreciate the expert assistance of Denise Lemke, WAO

Executive Director; Andi Raabe, WAO Director of Meetings; and all the other staff members at the WAO Secretariat who have worked

tirelessly to ensure the success of the Congress. We also acknowledge the wisdom and expertise of our fellow Scientific Program Committee

members, Professors Carlos Baena-Cagnani, Stephen Durham, Takeru Ishikawa, Cassiem Motala, Johannes Ring, Lanny Rosenwasser,

Robert Schellenberg, Daniel Vervloet and Pakit Vichyanond.

Dr. Allen Kaplan is an outstanding and extraordinarily involved WAO President. We sincerely thank him for his dedication to WAO and

for his inspiration and practical assistance during the planning sessions for the WAO Congress scientific and social events, particularly for

chairing the Scientific Program Committee and the Abstract Review/Travel Grant Review Committee meetings.

Finally! Seven years in international planning, five wonderful days in our lives and, we hope, a lifetime of memories.... A warm welcome

to Vancouver, and have a fantastic time!

Sincerely,

F. Estelle R. Simons, MD

Michael A. Kaliner, MD

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World Allergy Organization (WAO)–IAACI

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

ABOUT THE WORLD ALLERGY ORGANIZATION

The World Allergy Organization (WAO)–IAACI is an international umbrella organization whose members consist of 60 national allergology and

clinical immunology societies, three regional and two affiliate organizations from around the world. By collaborating with Member Societies,

WAO provides educational outreach programs, symposia and lectureships to approximately 38,000 individual members in 92 countries.

World Allergy Organization Mission

The World Allergy Organization (WAO)–IAACI exists to build a global alliance of allergy

societies to advance excellence in clinical care, research, education and training.

Programs

The GLORIA program educates medical professionals worldwide through

regional and national presentations and local training. GLORIA educational

modules are developed to promote the World Allergy Organization’s (WAO)

mission - to optimize allergy care worldwide. GLORIA broke ground in 2001

with its first module focusing on allergic rhinitis and allergic conjunctivitis.

Local dissemination is achieved as each WAO Member Society is given training and educational materials to present to health professionals

throughout their country. Potential audiences include: emergency room specialists, ophthalmologists, ENT specialists, family/general practitioners,

allied health professionals, medical students, pharmacists, patients and caregivers.

Future modules will cover the symptomatic treatment of allergic asthma and allergic emergencies and immunotherapy – from immediate

treatment to diagnosis and long-term management. These modules will be available to Member Societies in 2004. Aspects of the World Health

Organization (WHO)/World Allergy Organization (WAO) project, Prevention of Allergy and Asthma (PAA), will be incorporated into future

GLORIA programs.

To apply to host a GLORIA program, please contact the WAO Secretariat at: 611 East Wells Street, Milwaukee, WI 53202 USA, Tel: +1 414

276 1791, Fax: +1 414 276 3349, E-mail: info@worldallergy.org Web site: www.worldallergy.org

Supported through an unrestricted educational grant from AstraZeneca, Novartis and Pharmacia.

www.worldallergy.org

World Allergy Forum (WAF) is the longest running educational program series sponsored by the World Allergy

Organization-IAACI (WAO). World Allergy Forum symposia are held at major international allergy meetings. Each

symposium is developed by an international expert advisory panel to provide up-to-the-minute presentations on

scientific and clinical developments in the field of allergic disease.

Supported through an unrestricted educational grant from Novartis.

Visit the World Allergy Organization’s Web site www.worldallergy.org to find a wealth of

resources on different aspects of allergy.

As the premier allergy site on the Web, www.worldallergy.org supports all WAO educational activities, providing materials specifically designed for

learning and training. Discover syllabus materials of WAO’s flagship program, Global Resources in Allergy (GLORIA), view abstracts and slides from

the World Allergy Forum (WAF) program series or gain further insight into allergic diseases through educational modules specifically designed for

health professionals.

To emphasize advice given in consultations, direct your patients and their caregivers to www.worldallergy.org for patient specific versions of the

educational modules. The new interactive body image in the Allergic Diseases Resource Center enables patients to highlight a body area and link

directly to information describing an allergy that commonly affects that body part.

The WAO site links to a vast network of major allergy organizations around the globe. Find useful information on WAO Member Societies and in

some instances, link directly to Member Society Web sites for further information. Check the calendar of Worldwide Allergy Meetings for details of

allergy meetings throughout the world.

WAO sends a monthly e-newsletter to over 8,000 health professionals and patients. These e-newsletters announce new educational materials or press

releases on the site and important information regarding WAO Congresses and other meeting activities. Sign up to receive our e-newsletter by

contacting the WAO Secretariat by visiting www.worldallergy.org or emailing info@worldallergy.org.

Supported through an unrestricted educational grant from Genentech, Inc. and Novartis.


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

ABOUT THE WORLD ALLERGY ORGANIZATION

Albanian Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

Argentine Association of Allergy and Immunology

Argentine Society of Allergy and Immunopathology

Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy

Austrian Society for Allergology and Immunology

Azerbaijan Society for Asthma, Allergy and Clinical Immunology*

Belgian Society of Allergology and Immunology

Brazilian Society of Allergy and Immunopathology

Bulgarian National Society of Allergology

British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology

Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

Chilean Society of Allergy and Immunology

China Allergology Society and Chinese Allergists

(Chinese) Hong Kong Institute of Allergy*

Croatian Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology

Cuban Society of Allergology

Cyprus Society of Allergology and Immunology

Czech Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology*

Danish Society for Allergology

Ecuadorian Society of Allergology and Affiliated Sciences

Ecuadorian Society of Allergy and Immunology

Egyptian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

Finnish Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology

French Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology

Georgian Association of Allergy and Clinical Immunology*

German Society for Allergology and Clinical Immunology

Hellenic Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology

Hungarian Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology

Indian College of Allergy and Applied Immunology

Regional Members

The Asia Pacific Association of Allergology and Clinical Immunology

Commonwealth of Independent States Society of Allergology and

Clinical Immunology*

European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology

National Member Societies

Indonesian Society for Allergy and Immunology

Iranian Society of Immunology and Allergy

Israel Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

Italian Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology

Japanese Society of Allergology

Korean Society of Allergology

Malaysian Society of Allergy and Immunology

Mexican College of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

Mexican College of Pediatric Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

Netherlands Society of Allergology

Norwegian Society of Allergology and Immunopathology

Paraguayan Society of Immunology and Allergy

Peruvian Society of Allergy and Immunology

Philippine Society of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

Polish Society of Allergology

Portuguese Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology

Russian Association of Allergology and Clinical Immunology

Allergy Society of South Africa

Singapore Society of Immunology, Allergy and Rheumatology*

Spanish Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology

Swedish Association for Allergology

Swiss Society of Allergology and Immunology

The Allergy and Immunology Society of Thailand

Turkish National Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

Ukrainian Association of Specialists in Problems of Bronchial

Asthma and Allergy*

Uruguayan Society of Allergology

Venezuelan Society of Allergy and Immunology

Vietnamese Association of Allergy, Asthma and Clinical

Immunology

Zimbabwe Allergy Society*

Affiliate Members

International Association of Asthmology

Latin American Society of Allergy and Immunology

*Member Societies pending an affirmative vote by the House of Delegates, Vancouver 2003.

Based upon Member Societies approved by the Board of Directors, March 2003.

For WAO membership information please contact the Secretariat

World Allergy Organization–IAACI (WAO) 611 East Wells Street Milwaukee, WI 53202 USA

tel: + 1 414 276 1791 fax: +1 414 276 3349

e-mail: info@worldallergy.org

Web site: www.worldallergy.org

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WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

2000-2003 WORLD ALLERGY ORGANIZATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS

President

Allen P. Kaplan

Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC)

Charleston, SC, United States

Secretary-General

G. Walter Canonica

University of Genova DIMI

Genova, Italy

Treasurer

Connie Katelaris

Westmead Medical Centre

Westmead, Australia

President-Elect

Carlos E. Baena-Cagnani

Hospital Infantil de Córdoba

Córdoba, Argentina

Past-President

S.G.O. Johansson

Karolinska Hospital

Stockholm, Sweden

1st Vice President

Daniel Vervloet

Hôpital Sainte Marguerite

Marseille, France

2nd Vice President

Michael A. Kaliner

Institute for Asthma and Allergy

Chevy Chase and Wheaton, MD, United States

3rd Vice President

João F. de Mello

São Paulo, Brazil

Historian

Johannes Ring

Technische Universität München

München, Germany

Members-at-Large

Richard F. Lockey

University of South Florida College of Medicine

James A. Haley Veterans Hospital

Tampa, FL United States

Ronald Dahl

Aarhus University Hospital

Aarhus, Denmark

Stephen R. Durham

Imperial College School of Medicine/MHLI

London, United Kingdom

Cassiem Motala

Red Cross Children’s Hospital

Cape Town, South Africa

Ruby Pawankar

Nippon Medical School

Tokyo, Japan

Joaquín Sastre

Fundación Jiménez Díaz

Madrid, Spain

F. Estelle R. Simons

University of Manitoba

Winnipeg, Canada


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

CONGRESS COMMITTEES

Committees of the World Allergy Organization

(WAO) Congress—XVIII ICACI

WAO would like to extend a heartfelt thank you to the following

individuals. Without their dedication and expertise, this Congress

would not have been possible.

Congress Organizing Committee

Michael Kaliner, United States - Co-Chair

F. Estelle R. Simons, Canada - Co-Chair

Carlos Baena-Cagnani, Argentina

G. Walter Canonica, Italy

S.G.O. Johansson, Sweden

Allen Kaplan, United States

Connie Katelaris, Australia

Scientific Program Committee

Allen Kaplan, United States - Chair

Carlos Baena-Cagnani, Argentina

Stephen Durham, United Kingdom

Takeru Ishikawa, Japan

Michael Kaliner, United States

Cassiem Motala, South Africa

Johannes Ring, Germany

Lanny Rosenwasser, United States

Robert Schellenberg, Canada

F. Estelle R. Simons, Canada

Daniel Vervloet, France

Pakit Vichyanond, Thailand

Local Arrangements Subcommittee

Robert Schellenberg, Canada - Co-Chair

Donald Stark, Canada - Co-Chair

Gloria Schellenberg, Canada

Patricia Stark, Canada

Michael Mandl, Canada

Jo-Anne Gillespie, Canada

Ross Chang, Canada

Leslie Chang, Canada

Alexander Ferguson, Canada

Joyce Ferguson, Canada

John Dean, Canada

H.C. George Wong, Canada

Liliane Gendreau-Reid, Canada

Parminder Singh, Canada

Narinder Chauhan, Canada

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sneezing

runny nose

itchy nose

itchy eyes

Presentation: 10 mg cetirizine dihydrochloride

white film-coated tablet with

breakline. Uses: Treatment of seasonal and

perennial allergic rhinitis and chronic

idiopathic urticaria. Dosage and administration:

Adult and children over 6 years:

10mg daily. In patients with moderate to

severe renal impairment, adapt dosage.

Contra-indications: Hypersensitivity to

constituents and patients with severe renal

impairment at less than 10ml/min creatinine

clearance. Avoid use in pregnancy and

during lactation. Precautions: Do not exceed

recommended dose if driving or operating

machinery. Drug interactions: to date no

known interactions with other drugs. As

with other antihistamines avoid excessive

alcohol consumption. Side effects: fatigue,

mild to transient somnolence, headache,

dizziness, agitation, dry mouth and gastrointestinal

discomfort have been reported.

Once-a-day

Cetirizine dihydrochloride

A L L E R G Y

Take control of your allergy. Fast

EURO RSCG LIFE


65-4573-00-5

® ZYRTEC ®

(cetirizine hydrochloride)

Tablets and Syrup

For Oral Use

DESCRIPTION

Cetirizine hydrochloride, the active component of ZYRTEC ® tablets and syrup, is an orally active and selective H1-receptor antagonist.

The chemical name is (±) - [2- [4- [ (4-chlorophenyl)phenylmethyl] -1- piperazinyl] ethoxy]acetic acid, dihydrochloride.

Cetirizine hydrochloride is a racemic compound with an empirical formula of C21H25ClN2O3•2HCI. The molecular weight is 461.82

and the chemical structure is shown below:

Cl–

CH - N N - CH 2 - CH 2 - O - CH 2 - COOH . 2HCl

Cetirizine hydrochloride is a white, crystalline powder and is water soluble. ZYRTEC tablets are formulated as white, filmcoated,

rounded-off rectangular shaped tablets for oral administration and are available in 5 and 10 mg strengths. Inactive ingredients

are: lactose; magnesium stearate; povidone; titanium dioxide; hydroxypropyl methylcellulose; polyethylene glycol; and

corn starch.

ZYRTEC syrup is a colorless to slightly yellow syrup containing cetirizine hydrochloride at a concentration of 1 mg/mL

(5 mg/5 mL) for oral administration. The pH is between 4 and 5. The inactive ingredients of the syrup are: banana flavor; glacial

acetic acid; glycerin; grape flavor; methylparaben; propylene glycol; propylparaben; sodium acetate; sugar syrup; and water.

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

Mechanism of Actions: Cetirizine, a human metabolite of hydroxyzine, is an antihistamine; its principal effects are mediated via

selective inhibition of peripheral H1 receptors. The antihistaminic activity of cetirizine has been clearly documented in a variety of

animal and human models. In vivo and ex vivo animal models have shown negligible anticholinergic and antiserotonergic activity.

In clinical studies, however, dry mouth was more common with cetirizine than with placebo. In vitro receptor binding studies

have shown no measurable affinity for other than H1 receptors. Autoradiographic studies with radiolabeled cetirizine in the rat

have shown negligible penetration into the brain. Ex vivo experiments in the mouse have shown that systemically administered

cetirizine does not significantly occupy cerebral H1 receptors.

Pharmacokinetics:

Absorption: Cetirizine was rapidly absorbed with a time to maximum concentration (Tmax) of approximately 1 hour following

oral administration of tablets or syrup in adults. Comparable bioavailability was found between the tablet and syrup dosage

forms. When healthy volunteers were administered multiple doses of cetirizine (10 mg tablets once daily for 10 days), a mean

peak plasma concentration (Cmax) of 311 ng/mL was observed. No accumulation was observed. Cetirizine pharmacokinetics

were linear for oral doses ranging from 5 to 60 mg. Food had no effect on the extent of cetirizine exposure (AUC) but Tmax was

delayed by 1.7 hours and Cmax was decreased by 23% in the presence of food.

Distribution: The mean plasma protein binding of cetirizine is 93%, independent of concentration in the range of

25-1000 ng/mL, which includes the therapeutic plasma levels observed.

Metabolism: A mass balance study in 6 healthy male volunteers indicated that 70% of the administered radioactivity was

recovered in the urine and 10% in the feces. Approximately 50% of the radioactivity was identified in the urine as unchanged

drug. Most of the rapid increase in peak plasma radioactivity was associated with parent drug, suggesting a low degree of

first-pass metabolism. Cetirizine is metabolized to a limited extent by oxidative O-dealkylation to a metabolite with negligible

antihistaminic activity. The enzyme or enzymes responsible for this metabolism have not been identified.

Elimination: The mean elimination half-life in 146 healthy volunteers across multiple pharmacokinetic studies was

8.3 hours and the apparent total body clearance for cetirizine was approximately 53 mL/min.

Interaction Studies

Pharmacokinetic interaction studies with cetirizine in adults were conducted with pseudoephedrine, antipyrine, ketoconazole,

erythromycin and azithromycin. No interactions were observed. In a multiple dose study of theophylline (400 mg once daily for 3

days) and cetirizine (20 mg once daily for 3 days), a 16% decrease in the clearance of cetirizine was observed. The disposition of

theophylline was not altered by concomitant cetirizine administration.

Special Populations

Pediatric Patients: When pediatric patients aged 7 to 12 years received a single, 5-mg oral cetirizine capsule, the mean Cmax

was 275 ng/mL. Based on cross-study comparisons, the weight-normalized, apparent total body clearance was 33% greater and

the elimination half-life was 33% shorter in this pediatric population than in adults. In pediatric patients aged 2 to 5 years who

received 5 mg of cetirizine, the mean Cmax was 660 ng/mL. Based on cross-study comparisons, the weight-normalized apparent

total body clearance was 81 to 111% greater and the elimination half-life was 33 to 41% shorter in this pediatric population than

in adults. In pediatric patients aged 6 to 23 months who received a single dose of 0.25 mg/kg cetirizine oral solution (mean dose

2.3 mg), the mean Cmax was 390 ng/mL. Based on cross-study comparisons, the weight-normalized, apparent total body clearance

was 304% greater and the elimination half-life was 63% shorter in this pediatric population compared to adults. The average

AUC(0-t) in children 6 months to


10

PRECAUTIONS (continued) ADVERSE REACTIONS (continued)

Pediatric Use: The safety of ZYRTEC has been demonstrated in pediatric patients aged 6 months to 11 years. The safety of

ZYRTEC, at daily doses of 5 or 10 mg, has been demonstrated in 376 pediatric patients aged 6 to 11 years in placebo-controlled

trials lasting up to four weeks and in 254 patients in a non-placebo-controlled 12-week trial. The safety of cetirizine has been

demonstrated in 168 patients aged 2 to 5 years in placebo-controlled trials of up to 4 weeks duration. On a mg/kg basis, most of

the 168 patients received between 0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg of cetirizine HCl. The safety of cetirizine in 399 patients aged 12 to 24

months has been demonstrated in a placebo-controlled 18-month trial, in which the average dose was 0.25 mg/kg bid, corresponding

to a range of 4 to 11 mg/day. The safety of ZYRTEC syrup has been demonstrated in 42 patients aged 6 to 11 months in

a placebo-controlled 7-day trial. The prescribed dose was 0.25 mg/kg bid, which corresponded to a mean of 4.5 mg/day, with a

range of 3.4 to 6.2 mg/day.

The effectiveness of ZYRTEC for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and chronic idiopathic urticaria in pediatric patients aged

6 months to 11 years is based on an extrapolation of the demonstrated efficacy of ZYRTEC in adults with these conditions and the

likelihood that the disease course, pathophysiology and the drug’s effect are substantially similar between these two populations.

Efficacy is extrapolated down to 6 months of age for perennial allergic rhinitis and down to 2 years of age for seasonal allergic

rhinitis because these diseases are thought to occur down to these ages in children. The recommended doses for the pediatric

population are based on cross-study comparisons of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cetirizine in adult and

pediatric subjects and on the safety profile of cetirizine in both adult and pediatric patients at doses equal to or higher than the

recommended doses. The cetirizine AUC and Cmax in pediatric subjects aged 6 to 23 months who received a mean of 2.3 mg in a

single dose, and in subjects aged 2 to 5 years who received a single dose of 5 mg of cetirizine syrup and in pediatric subjects

aged 6 to 11 years who received a single dose of 10 mg of cetirizine syrup were estimated to be intermediate between that

observed in adults who received a single dose of 10 mg of cetirizine tablets and those who received a single dose of 20 mg of

cetirizine tablets.

The safety and effectiveness of cetirizine in pediatric patients under the age of 6 months have not been established.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

Controlled and uncontrolled clinical trials conducted in the United States and Canada included more than 6000 patients aged

12 years and older, with more than 3900 receiving ZYRTEC at doses of 5 to 20 mg per day. The duration of treatment ranged from

1 week to 6 months, with a mean exposure of 30 days.

Most adverse reactions reported during therapy with ZYRTEC were mild or moderate. In placebo-controlled trials, the incidence

of discontinuations due to adverse reactions in patients receiving ZYRTEC 5 or 10 mg was not significantly different from

placebo (2.9% vs. 2.4%, respectively).

The most common adverse reaction in patients aged 12 years and older that occurred more frequently on ZYRTEC than

placebo was somnolence. The incidence of somnolence associated with ZYRTEC was dose related, 6% in placebo, 11% at 5 mg

and 14% at 10 mg. Discontinuations due to somnolence for ZYRTEC were uncommon (1.0% on ZYRTEC vs. 0.6% on placebo).

Fatigue and dry mouth also appeared to be treatment-related adverse reactions. There were no differences by age, race, gender

or by body weight with regard to the incidence of adverse reactions.

Table 1 lists adverse experiences in patients aged 12 years and older which were reported for ZYRTEC 5 and 10 mg in controlled

clinical trials in the United States and that were more common with ZYRTEC than placebo.

Table 1.

Adverse Experiences Reported in Patients Aged 12 Years and Older in

Placebo-Controlled United States ZYRTEC Trials (Maximum Dose of 10 mg)

at Rates of 2% or Greater (Percent Incidence)

Adverse ZYRTEC Placebo

Experience (N=2034) (N=1612)

Somnolence 13.7 6.3

Fatigue 15.9 2.6

Dry Mouth 15.0 2.3

Pharyngitis 12.0 1.9

Dizziness 12.0 1.2

In addition, headache and nausea occurred in more than 2% of the patients, but were more common in placebo patients.

Pediatric studies were also conducted with ZYRTEC. More than 1300 pediatric patients aged 6 to 11 years with more than 900

treated with ZYRTEC at doses of 1.25 to 10 mg per day were included in controlled and uncontrolled clinical trials conducted in

the United States. The duration of treatment ranged from 2 to 12 weeks. Placebo-controlled trials up to

4 weeks duration included 168 pediatric patients aged 2 to 5 years who received cetirizine, the majority of whom received single

daily doses of 5 mg. A placebo-controlled trial 18 months in duration included 399 patients aged 12 to 24 months treated with

cetirizine (0.25 mg/kg bid), and another placebo-controlled trial of 7 days duration included 42 patients aged 6 to 11 months who

were treated with cetirizine (0.25 mg/kg bid).

The majority of adverse reactions reported in pediatric patients aged 2 to 11 years with ZYRTEC were mild or moderate. In

placebo-controlled trials, the incidence of discontinuations due to adverse reactions in pediatric patients receiving up to 10 mg of

ZYRTEC was uncommon (0.4% on ZYRTEC vs. 1.0% on placebo).

Table 2 lists adverse experiences which were reported for ZYRTEC 5 and 10 mg in pediatric patients aged 6 to 11 years in

placebo-controlled clinical trials in the United States and were more common with ZYRTEC than placebo. Of these, abdominal

pain was considered treatment-related and somnolence appeared to be dose-related, 1.3% in placebo, 1.9% at 5 mg and 4.2% at

10 mg. The adverse experiences reported in pediatric patients aged 2 to 5 years in placebo-controlled trials were qualitatively

similar in nature and generally similar in frequency to those reported in trials with children aged 6 to 11 years.

In the placebo-controlled trials of pediatric patients 6 to 24 months of age, the incidences of adverse experiences, were similar

in the cetirizine and placebo treatment groups in each study. Somnolence occurred with essentially the same frequency in

patients who received cetirizine and patients who received placebo. In a study of 1 week duration in children 6-11 months of age,

patients who received cetirizine exhibited greater irritability/fussiness than patients on placebo. In a study of 18 months duration

in patients 12 months and older, insomnia occurred more frequently in patients who received cetirizine compared to patients who

received placebo (9.0% v. 5.3%). In those patients who received 5 mg or more per day of cetirizine as compared to patients who

received placebo, fatigue (3.6% v. 1.3%) and malaise (3.6% v. 1.8%) occurred more frequently.

Table 2.

Adverse Experiences Reported in Pediatric Patients Aged 6 to 11 Years in

Placebo-Controlled United States ZYRTEC Trials (5 or 10 mg Dose) Which Occurred

at a Frequency of �2% in Either the 5-mg or the 10-mg ZYRTEC Group, and More

Frequently Than in the Placebo Group

ZYRTEC

Adverse Placebo 5 mg 10 mg

Experiences (N=309) (N=161) (N=215)

Headache 12.3% 11.0% 14.0%

Pharyngitis 2.9% 6.2% 2.8%

Abdominal pain 1.9% 4.4% 5.6%

Coughing 3.9% 4.4% 2.8%

Somnolence 1.3% 1.9% 4.2%

Diarrhea 1.3% 3.1% 1.9%

Epistaxis 2.9% 3.7% 1.9%

Bronchospasm 1.9% 3.1% 1.9%

Nausea 1.9% 1.9% 2.8%

Vomiting 1.0% 2.5% 2.3%

The following events were observed infrequently (less than 2%), in either 3982 adults and children 12 years and older or in 659

pediatric patients aged 6 to 11 years who received ZYRTEC in U.S. trials, including an open adult study of six months duration.

A causal relationship of these infrequent events with ZYRTEC administration has not been established.

Autonomic Nervous System: anorexia, flushing, increased salivation, urinary retention.

Cardiovascular: cardiac failure, hypertension, palpitation, tachycardia.

Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems: abnormal coordination, ataxia, confusion, dysphonia, hyperesthesia, hyperkinesia,

hypertonia, hypoesthesia, leg cramps, migraine, myelitis, paralysis, paresthesia, ptosis, syncope, tremor, twitching, vertigo,

visual field defect.

Gastrointestinal: abnormal hepatic function, aggravated tooth caries, constipation, dyspepsia, eructation, flatulence, gastritis,

hemorrhoids, increased appetite, melena, rectal hemorrhage, stomatitis including ulcerative stomatitis, tongue discoloration,

tongue edema.

Genitourinary: cystitis, dysuria, hematuria, micturition frequency, polyuria, urinary incontinence, urinary tract infection.

Hearing and Vestibular: deafness, earache, ototoxicity, tinnitus.

Metabolic/Nutritional: dehydration, diabetes mellitus, thirst.

Musculoskeletal: arthralgia, arthritis, arthrosis, muscle weakness, myalgia.

Psychiatric: abnormal thinking, agitation, amnesia, anxiety, decreased libido, depersonalization, depression, emotional lability,

euphoria, impaired concentration, insomnia, nervousness, paroniria, sleep disorder.

Respiratory System: bronchitis, dyspnea, hyperventilation, increased sputum, pneumonia, respiratory disorder, rhinitis, sinusitis,

upper respiratory tract infection.

Reproductive: dysmenorrhea, female breast pain, intermenstrual bleeding, leukorrhea, menorrhagia, vaginitis.

Reticuloendothelial: lymphadenopathy.

Skin: acne, alopecia, angioedema, bullous eruption, dermatitis, dry skin, eczema, erythematous rash, furunculosis, hyperkeratosis,

hypertrichosis, increased sweating, maculopapular rash, photosensitivity reaction, photosensitivity toxic reaction, pruritus,

purpura, rash, seborrhea, skin disorder, skin nodule, urticaria.

Special Senses: parosmia, taste loss, taste perversion.

Vision: blindness, conjunctivitis, eye pain, glaucoma, loss of accommodation, ocular hemorrhage, xerophthalmia.

Body as a Whole: accidental injury, asthenia, back pain, chest pain, enlarged abdomen, face edema, fever, generalized edema,

hot flashes, increased weight, leg edema, malaise, nasal polyp, pain, pallor, periorbital edema, peripheral edema, rigors.

Occasional instances of transient, reversible hepatic transaminase elevations have occurred during cetirizine therapy. Hepatitis

with significant transaminase elevation and elevated bilirubin in association with the use of ZYRTEC has been reported.

In foreign marketing experience the following additional rare, but potentially severe adverse events have been reported: anaphylaxis,

cholestasis, glomerulonephritis, hemolytic anemia, hepatitis, orofacial dyskinesia, severe hypotension, stillbirth, and

thrombocytopenia.

DRUG ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE

There is no information to indicate that abuse or dependency occurs with ZYRTEC.

OVERDOSAGE

Overdosage has been reported with ZYRTEC. In one adult patient who took 150 mg of ZYRTEC, the patient was somnolent but did

not display any other clinical signs or abnormal blood chemistry or hematology results. In an 18 month old pediatric patient who

took an overdose of ZYRTEC (approximately 180 mg), restlessness and irritability were observed initially; this was followed by

drowsiness. Should overdose occur, treatment should be symptomatic or supportive, taking into account any concomitantly

ingested medications. There is no known specific antidote to ZYRTEC. ZYRTEC is not effectively removed by dialysis, and dialysis

will be ineffective unless a dialyzable agent has been concomitantly ingested. The acute minimal lethal oral doses were 237 mg/kg

in mice (approximately 95 times the maximum recommended daily oral dose in adults on a mg/m2 basis, or approximately 40

times the maximum recommended daily oral dose in infants on a mg/m2 basis) and 562 mg/kg in rats (approximately 460 times

the maximum recommended daily oral dose in adults on a mg/m2 basis, or approximately 190 times the maximum recommended

daily oral dose in infants on a mg/m2 basis). In rodents, the target of acute toxicity was the central nervous system, and the target

of multiple-dose toxicity was the liver.

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

Adults and Children 12 Years and Older: The recommended initial dose of ZYRTEC is 5 or 10 mg per day in adults and children

12 years and older, depending on symptom severity. Most patients in clinical trials started at 10 mg. ZYRTEC is given as a single

daily dose, with or without food. The time of administration may be varied to suit individual patient needs.

Children 6 to 11 Years: The recommended initial dose of ZYRTEC in children aged 6 to 11 years is 5 or 10 mg (1 or 2 teaspoons)

once daily depending on symptom severity. The time of administration may be varied to suit individual patient needs.

Children 2 to 5 Years: The recommended initial dose of ZYRTEC syrup in children aged 2 to 5 years is 2.5 mg (1/2 teaspoon) once

daily. The dosage in this age group can be increased to a maximum dose of 5 mg per day given as 1 teaspoon (5 mg) once daily, or

as 1/2 teaspoon (2.5 mg) given every 12 hours.

Children 6 months to


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

Venues

Located in the heart of downtown Vancouver, the Vancouver

Convention & Exhibition Centre (VCEC) and adjacent headquarters

hotels, the Pan Pacific Hotel and Fairmont Waterfront Hotel host the

Scientific Program and exhibits. These three venues are well-known

for award-winning catering/restaurants, first-rate conference facilities

and spectacular views of the city, harbor and Coastal Mountains.

Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

999 Canada Place

Vancouver, BC V6C 3C1

Canada

Pan Pacific Hotel - Headquarters Hotel

300-999 Canada Place

Vancouver, BC V6C 3B5

Canada

Fairmont Waterfront Hotel - Headquarters Hotel

900 Canada Place

Vancouver, BC V6C 3L5

Canada

General Information Desk

Location: Lobby, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

WAO staff are available to give directions to scientific sessions, arrange

for special accessibility and special dietary needs and accept completed

evaluations and CME self-report forms.

General Information Desk Hours

Saturday, 6 September 15:00-19:00

Sunday, 7 September 8:00-18:00

Monday, 8 September 6:00-18:00

Tuesday, 9 September 6:00-18:00

Wednesday, 10 September 6:00-18:00

Thursday, 11 September 6:00-18:00

Friday, 12 September 6:00-16:00

GENERAL CONGRESS INFORMATION

Vancouver Convention and Exhibition Centre

11

Registration Desk

Location: Lobby, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

For those who registered in advance, registration packets, including

name badges and session tickets will be available at the registration desk.

Please be prepared to show your registration confirmation and photo

identification when picking up your materials at the registration desk.

On-site registration is also handled at the registration desk.

Registration Desk Hours

Saturday, 6 September 15:00-19:00

Sunday, 7 September 8:00-18:00

Monday, 8 September 6:00-18:00

Tuesday, 9 September 6:00-18:00

Wednesday, 10 September 6:00-18:00

Thursday, 11 September 6:00-18:00

Friday, 12 September 6:00-16:00

On-site Registration

The basic registration fee includes admission to the major education

sessions, Exhibit Hall, Opening Ceremony, Welcome Reception and

All-Congress Event.

On-site Registration Fees

Delegate $600 USD

Fellow-in-Training $275 USD

Accompanying Person $175 USD

Ticket Purchase and Exchange

Location: Registration Desk, Lobby, Vancouver Convention &

Exhibition Centre.

To purchase, return or exchange a session ticket, please bring the ticket

to the registration desk. Refunds for returned tickets, provided they

are resold, will be mailed to the delegates after the Congress. No

refunds will be given on-site.


12

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

GENERAL CONGRESS INFORMATION

Name Badges

Each Congress participant must wear his/her name badge at all times

while inside the Congress venues, as it will be used for identification.

Delegates are cautioned from wearing their name badges while away

from Congress activities.

Delegate Blue

Guest Red

Exhibitor Orange

Exhibitor/Delegate Purple

Press Black

Staff Grey

Admission to Scientific Sessions

Admission to educational sessions is either by name badge or ticket.

Those sessions that are included in the basic registration fee do not

require an additional ticket for entry and are accessible by name badge.

Tickets are required for sessions designated “Pre-registration required.

Admission by ticket only”. Individuals without tickets will not be

admitted to these sessions. To purchase, return or exchange a session

ticket, please visit the registration desk.

Special Accessibility Needs

If you require special arrangements in order to fully participate in the

activities of the Congress, please speak with WAO staff at the general

information desk.

Special Dietary Requirements

If you require special meals (i.e. vegetarian, allergen-free, diabetic, kosher,

etc.), alternative options can be made available at the breakfast, lunch

and dinner sessions and at the Northern Lights Dinner and Dance on

Wednesday evening. Inform WAO staff at the general information

desk as soon as possible to ensure arrangements can be made. Special

meals require at least 24 hours advance notice.

Language

The official language of the Congress is English.

No Smoking

Smoking is not permitted in any Congress venue or during any

Congress activity or event.

Mobile Telephones

Delegates are advised to turn off their mobile telephones and pagers

during all sessions and in the exhibit hall.

Insurance/Liabilities Disclaimer

WAO will not be held liable for personal injuries or for loss or damage

to property incurred by participants and guests at the Congress,

including those participating in tours and social events. Visitors to

Canada are not covered by Canadian health insurance plans. Congress

participants must arrange their own personal health and accident

insurance. Participants and guests are also urged to take out insurance

to cover loss incurred in the event of cancellation, medical expenses

and damage to or loss of personal effects when traveling outside of

their own country. WAO cannot be held liable for any hindrance or

disruption of Congress proceedings arising from political, social or

economic events or other unforeseen incidents beyond its control.

Registration of a participant implies acceptance of this condition.

Kayaking in False Creek

Scientific Sessions – A Brief Summary

Plenary Sessions

These large sessions will feature international leaders in allergy, asthma

and immunology who will offer postgraduate updates on topics of

interest to the majority of Congress delegates.

Parallel, Platinum and Satellite Symposia

Informative lectures will be presented by renowned speakers; limited

audience participation will be possible.

Meet the Professor Seminars

Open, informal discussions will be led by well-known experts and will

promote learning through audience interaction.

Debate of the Day

Hot, clinically-relevant topics in allergy will be debated by dynamic

specialists.

Interactive Workshops

Small, informal discussions will concentrate on global issues in allergy

and immunology.

Breakfast and Luncheon Seminars

Roundtable discussions will focus on emerging topics in allergy and

immunology. Some seminars will be offered more than once, featuring

different moderators.

Grand Luncheon Seminars and Dinner Symposia

Presentations will be held over lunch or dinner. Attendance is limited

and is available on a first come, first served basis.

Free Communication Sessions

Investigators from around the world will present their research.

Poster Sessions

Posters will be on display in different thematic groups each day. Authors

will be present each day from 15:45-17:00 to discuss their research.


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

Abstract Volume & Abstracts on CD-ROM

Abstracts accepted for oral and poster presentation at the Congress have

been published in ACII – Journal of the World Allergy Organization,

Supplement 1, 2003. A copy of the Abstract Volume is included with

each delegate’s Congress bag.

The published abstracts are also available on the WAO Web site

www.worldallergy.org and on CD-ROM. Pick-up the Abstracts on CD-

ROM at the Merck Sharp & Dohme Exhibit Booth #618 located in

Exhibit Hall B, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre. Abstracts

on CD-ROM are funded through an unrestricted educational grant

from Merck Sharp & Dohme.

Evaluations

Please take time to complete the evaluation forms distributed in each

educational session. Delegate input and comments are essential in

planning for the future. When completed, evaluation forms can be

handed to any usher or you may return them to the general information

desk located in the lobby of the Vancouver Convention & Exhibition

Centre.

Exhibits

Location: Exhibit Hall B, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

All delegates and their registered guests are encouraged to visit the

exhibits. Exhibitors will display the latest information on products and

services in the field of allergy, asthma and immunology.

Monday, 8 September 9:00-17:00

Tuesday, 9 September 9:00-17:00

Wednesday, 10 September 9:00-17:00

Thursday, 11 September 9:00-17:00

Coffee Breaks

Coffee/tea is served daily in the exhibit hall and is included in the basic

registration fee. Lunches and snacks are not included.

Monday, 8 September 10:15-10:45

Tuesday, 9 September 10:15-10:45

Wednesday, 10 September 10:15-10:45

Thursday, 11 September 10:15-10:45

Internet Café

Location: Exhibit Hall B, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Internet access is available during the Congress at the Internet Café

located in the exhibit hall.

Monday, 8 September 9:00-17:00

Tuesday, 9 September 9:00-17:00

Wednesday, 10 September 9:00-17:00

Thursday, 11 September 9:00-17:00

GENERAL CONGRESS INFORMATION

13

Lead Retrieval System

Exhibitors may collect a delegate’s demographic and contact information

through the use of a lead retrieval system. This system enables delegates

to request information from specific exhibitors by swiping their name

badges. Exhibitors use this information to distribute correspondence

to individuals interested in their products and services. Fax numbers

and e-mail addresses are included. Telephone numbers are not given to

exhibitors.

Guest Hospitality Suite

Location: Governor General Suite D, Pan Pacific Hotel

Registered guests are welcome to relax in the Guest Hospitality Suite.

Stop for information on local attractions and shopping, or just rest

your feet and enjoy some coffee and friendly conversation. Members

of the Local Arrangements Committee will be available to answer

questions and offer suggestions regarding local activities.

Monday, 8 September 8:00-17:00

Tuesday, 9 September 8:00-17:00

Wednesday, 10 September 8:00-17:00

Thursday, 11 September 8:00-17:00

Friday, 12 September 8:00-15:00

Children

Delegates are asked to refrain from bringing children to the educational

sessions at the Congress. At all times, an adult must accompany children

under the age of 18 years.

Tourism Vancouver Information Desk

Location: Lobby, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Volunteers from Tourism Vancouver will be available during the

Congress to offer assistance in booking tours and making dinner

reservations. They are also able to make suggestions for things to see

and do after the Congress.

Monday, 8 September 8:00-17:00

Tuesday, 9 September 8:00-17:00

Wednesday, 10 September 8:00-17:00

Thursday, 11 September 8:00-17:00

Friday, 12 September 8:00-16:00


14

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

Press Room

Location: Room 4, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Members of the working media may register without charge for the

Congress in the on-site press room where they will receive a Press badge

and other Congress materials. Interview space, computers, telephones

and facsimile services are available in the press room. Only members of

the media with a Press badge and invited delegates will be allowed access

to the press room. Press conferences will be conducted at various times

throughout the Congress.

Speaker Resource Room

Location: Room 6, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

To ensure their audiovisual needs are properly attended to, all speakers

are asked to report to the Speaker Resource Room immediately after

picking up their registration materials at the Registration Desk. A copy

machine, computers and technical support are available in the Speaker

Resource Room. Speakers who were required to submit their PowerPoint

presentation in advance may review and edit their presentation. All

PowerPoint presentations must be finalized at least two hours before the

start of the corresponding session.

Saturday, 6 September 15:00-19:00

Sunday, 7 September 6:00-18:00

Monday, 8 September 6:00-18:00

Tuesday, 9 September 6:00-18:00

Wednesday, 10 September 6:00-18:00

Thursday, 11 September 6:00-18:00

Friday, 12 September 6:00-16:00

Emergency Contact Information

In the event of an emergency, your family or office may contact the

WAO Secretariat home office. The home office is able to contact on-site

staff at any time. The on-site staff will relay emergency messages as

quickly as possible.

WAO Secretariat

Tel. +1 414 276 1791

Fax +1 414 276 3349

GENERAL CONGRESS INFORMATION

Sailboats at Granville Island


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

2003-2005 WORLD ALLERGY ORGANIZATION HOUSE OF DELEGATES

American Academy of Allergy,

Asthma and Immunology

Lanny Rosenwasser

Dean Metcalfe

Tom Platts-Mills

American College of Allergy, Asthma

and Immunology

William Berger

Michael Blaiss

Bobby Lanier

Argentine Association of Allergy

and Immunology

Anahi Yanez

Edgardo Jares

Australasian Society of Clinical

Immunology and Allergy

John Ruhno

Austrian Society for Allergology

and Immunology

Dietrich Kraft

Rudolph Valenta

Brazilian Society of Allergy and

Immunopathology

Nelson Rosario

Joao de Mello

Walfrido da Cunha Antunes Neto

British Society for Allergy and

Clinical Immunology

P.W. Ewan

A.J. Frew

Bulgarian National Society of

Allergology

Vasil Dimitrov

Canadian Society of Allergy and

Clinical Immunology

Robert Schellenberg

F. Estelle R. Simons

Chilean Society of Allergy and

Immunology

Edgardo Carrasco

China Allergology Society and

Chinese Allergists

Lianglu Wang

Danish Society for Allergology

Ronald Dahl

Lars Poulsen

Ecuadorian Society of Allergy and

Immunology

Manuel Viteri-Acaiturri

Egyptian Society of Allergy

and Clinical Immunology

Kamal Maurice Hanna

Includes delegates nominated as of 14 July 2003

Finnish Society of Allergology and

Clinical Immunology

Erkka Valovirta

French Society of Allergology

and Clinical Immunology

Pierre Scheinmann

German Society for Allergology and

Clinical Immunology

Gerhard Schultze-Werninghaus

Johannes Ring

Hungarian Society of Allergology

and Clinical Immunology

Kristof Nekam

Lajos Kosa

Indian College of Allergy and

Applied Immunology

V.K. Vijayan

Indonesian Society for Allergy and

Immunology

Heru Sundaru

Italian Society of Allergology and

Clinical Immunology

Gianni Marone

Japanese Society of Allergology

Ken Ohta

Yohichi Kohno

Takemasa Nakagawa

Korean Society of Allergology

You Young Kim

Yang-Ki Min

Malaysian Society of Allergy and

Immunology

Ranbir Kaulsay

Mexican College of Pediatric

Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

Juan Jose Sienra Monge

Netherlands Society of Allergology

Anthony E.J. Dubois

Philippine Society of Allergy,

Asthma and Immunology

Felicidad Cua-Lim

Polish Society of Allergology

Pawel Gorski

Marek Kowalski

Portuguese Society of Allergology

and Clinical Immunology

Ana Todo Bom

Carlos Nunes

Russian Association of Allergology

and Clinical Immunology

Rakhim Khaitov

Allergy Society of South Africa

Paul Potter

Spanish Society of Allergology

and Clinical Immunology

Carlos Colas

Swedish Association for Allergology

Sabina Rak

Maria Skedinger

Swiss Society of Allergology and

Immunology

François Spertini

Beda Stadler

15

The Allergy and Immunology Society

of Thailand

Pakit Vichyanond

Turkish National Society of Allergy

and Clinical Immunology

Sevim Bavbek

Uruguayan Society of Allergology

Juan Schuhl

Venezuelan Society of Allergy, Asthma

and Immunology

Mario Sanchez Borges

Vietnamese Association of Allergy,

Asthma and Clinical Immunology

Nguyen Nang An

The Asia Pacific Association

of Allergology and Clinical

Immunology

You Young Kim

European Academy of Allergology

and Clinical Immunology

A.J. Frew

International Association of

Asthmology

Hugo Neffen

Latin American Society of Allergy

and Immunology

Carlos D. Crisci

WAO Board Members not represented

by other societies

Carlos Baena-Cagnani

G. Walter Canonica

Stephen Durham

S.G.O. Johansson

Michael Kaliner

Allen Kaplan

Connie Katelaris

Richard Lockey

Cassiem Motala

Ruby Pawankar

Joaquin Sastre

Daniel Vervloet


16

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

Member Society Sponsors

Sponsored by:

Co-sponsored by:

Industry Supporters

Platinum

Gold

SPONSORSHIP REPORT

WAO would like to extend a sincere thank you to the following organizations that have supported Congress

activities through unrestricted educational grants.


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

Alcon Laboratories

Gold Sponsor

Gold Luncheon Symposium

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and

Immunology (AAAAI)

Member Society Sponsor

Parallel Symposium

American College of Allergy, Asthma and

Immunology (ACAAI)

Member Society Co-Sponsor

Parallel Symposium

Aventis Pharmaceuticals

Platinum Sponsor

Platinum Symposium

Dinner Symposium

Congress Bags

President’s Dinner

Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical

Immunology (CSACI)

Member Society Sponsor

Parallel Symposium

European Academy of Allergology and Clinical

Immunology (EAACI)

Parallel Symposium

Forest Pharmaceuticals

Pocket Guide

GlaxoSmithKline

Platinum Sponsor

Platinum Symposium

Travel Grants

SPONSORSHIP REPORT

Japanese Society of Allergology (JSA)

Parallel Symposium

MedPointe Pharmaceuticals

Gold Sponsor

Gold Satellite Symposium

Lanyards

Merck Sharp & Dohme

Platinum Sponsor

Platinum Symposium

Abstracts on CD-ROM

Congress Notepads & Pens

Schedule Board

Novartis Pharma

Platinum Sponsor

Platinum Symposium

Grand Luncheon Seminar

Ono Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd.

Dinner Symposium

Pharmacia Allergy Research Foundation

(PhARF) & Pharmacia Diagnostics AB

PhARF Awards Ceremony & Luncheon

UCB Pharma

Platinum Sponsor

Platinum Symposium

Grand Luncheon Seminar

17


18

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

Marina Atanaskovic-Markovic

Yugoslavia

Laura Bilenki

Canada

Maria Blandon

Mexico

Jose Boechat

Brazil

Claudio D’Ambrosio

Italy

Wei Duan

Singapore

Swantje Duncker

Germany

Carsten Flohr

United Kingdom

Maximiliano Gomez

Argentina

Okan Gulbahar

Turkey

Xiaobing Han

Canada

Mohammed Herrag

Morocco

Musa Khaitov

Russia

Pawan Kumar

India

Michael Levin

South Africa

TRAVEL GRANT RECIPIENTS

The following delegates have been awarded travel grants for the World Allergy Organization (WAO) Congress—

XVIII ICACI in recognition of their outstanding abstract contributions and future prospects in the field of allergy,

asthma and clinical immunology.

These travel grants were made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from GlaxoSmithKline.

Emmanuel Moses-Fynn

Ghana

Niclas Olsson

Sweden

Kentaro Omoya

Japan

Helen Peake

Australia

Tania Raymond

Cuba

Jurgen Reisinger

Austria

Supinda Saengpanich

Thailand

Yazan Said

Saudi Arabia

Elinor Simons

United States

Monika Swierczynska

Poland

Ines Swoboda

Austria

Meri Tulic

Canada

Roman Vatseba

Ukraine

Tiia Voor

Estonia

Stephan Weidinger

Germany


Vancouver scene

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

ABOUT VANCOUVER

In Vancouver, a modern cosmopolitan city, majestic mountains, sparkling ocean, a

spectacular harbor and sandy beaches set the mood for a warm West Coast welcome.

So Much to See and Do

Visitors to downtown Vancouver can explore Stanley Park, a magnificent

setting of 1,000 acres of lush forest surrounded by the sea; Gastown,

a restored heritage area where the city began; Chinatown, the second

largest in North America; Robson Street, a delightful European style

shopping section; as well as the Vancouver Museum, Art Gallery and

the impressive new city library. Nearby places of interest include

Granville Island, with its large market and specialty restaurants; Queen

Elizabeth Park and its Sunken Garden; and the University of British

Columbia with its outstanding Museum of Anthropology and Nitobe

Gardens. Shopping for exquisite West Coast native carvings, masks

and prints is a must. Enjoy world-class dining; fine French cuisine,

sumptuous Chinese cooking, delectable Indian food and elegant

Japanese sushi. The local delicacies are fresh fish and seafood from the

Pacific Ocean and fresh fruits and vegetables from the Fraser Valley.

Getting Around Vancouver – Public Transit

A modern public transit system reaches every area of the city. Buses

serve Vancouver and its surrounding suburbs. The SkyTrain (a light

rapid transit train) connects the downtown area to the outlying areas.

The SeaBus, a 10 minute cruise and sightseeing delight, is an extension

of the SkyTrain and travels across the harbor between downtown and

the North Shore. Weekly and daily passes on public transit allowing

unlimited travel may be purchased. Tickets and transfers are dispensed

by bus drivers (exact change only), by machines at SkyTrain stations

and SeaBus terminals and at corner store ticket outlets located

throughout the city. Transportation information is available at the

Tourism Vancouver information desk located in the lobby of the

Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre.

Language

English is the predominant language in British Columbia. Many hotels,

restaurants, stores, taxis, banks, airline offices and major visitor attractions

have multilingual staff.

Credit Cards

Major credit cards are accepted in hotels, restaurants and stores.

First Nations Totem Pole

19

Taxes

A Provincial sales tax of 7% is applied to most purchases; however, goods

purchased by a visitor and shipped directly to their home outside of the

province of British Columbia are exempt from this tax.

A Goods and Services Tax (GST) of 7% is applied to most goods and

services. Hotel accommodations in the Vancouver area are taxed at 10%

plus 7% GST. Visitors residing outside of Canada are eligible for a GST

rebate and must have their receipts stamped by Canadian Customs

upon departure. Details, restrictions and rebate forms are available at

government agencies (border crossings, post offices), at the airport and

at the Tourism Vancouver information desk located in the lobby of the

Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre.

Upon departure from Vancouver, a small airport tax is charged.

Currency

Canada has a currency system based on dollars and cents; $1=100

cents. In July 2003 the exchange rate was $1.35 Canadian dollars (CDN)

= $1 US dollar (USD). This exchange rate is subject to change. Currency

exchange services are available at points of entry, at Vancouver financial

institutions and at most hotels.

Weather

Vancouver has the mildest climate in Canada. The average high

temperature in September is a very pleasant 18°C (65°F). The average

low is 10°C (50°F).

Electricity

Electricity in Canada is 110 volt AC (alternating current), as in the

United States.

Time Difference

During the Congress, Vancouver will be eight hours behind Greenwich

Mean Time.


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

SOCIAL EVENTS

Sunday, 7 September

Opening Ceremony & Welcome Reception 18:00 - 20:00

Location: Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

18:00 - 19:00 Opening Ceremony: First Nations People will

describe their proud heritage and unique cultures

through traditional storytelling, music and dance.

Their performance will close with the ceremonial

passing of the honored Talking Stick to Dr. Allen

Kaplan, WAO President, signifying the

commencement of the 2003 WAO Congress.

19:00 - 20:00 Welcome Reception: The Opening Ceremony

will be followed by a reception where old and

new friends will gather over musical

entertainment, light hors d’oeuvres and drinks.

Both the Opening Ceremony and Welcome Reception are open to all registered

delegates and their registered guests at no additional fee. Name badges are

required.

Thursday, 11 September

All-Congress Event:

The WAO Western Barbecue 19:30 - 23:00

Location: BC Place Stadium

As you enter BC Place Stadium, you will be transported into the Old

West. Two stages featuring local bands will play music from a variety of

eras. Delegates and guests will be greeted by strolling costumed

entertainers and will enjoy an authentic Western barbecue, after which

they can prospect for gold and dance the night away. You are encouraged

to wear jeans or other casual, comfortable clothes.

The All-Congress Event is open to all registered delegates and their registered

guests at no additional fee. Name badges are required.

21

Wednesday, 10 September

Congress Banquet: Northern Lights

Gala Dinner and Dance 19:00 - 23:00

Location: Westin Bayshore Hotel

The aurora borealis will be recreated as a magical backdrop for a Northern

Lights Gala Dinner and Dance, featuring an evening of exceptional

dining followed by dancing to the sounds of a 16-piece band. Dress as

you would for an elegant restaurant or theatre performance. For men, a

coat and tie is appropriate. For women, an evening dress or pants suit is

appropriate.

Attendance at the Congress Banquet is limited . Tickets for registered delegates

and their guests ($75 USD each) are available on a first-come, first-served

basis.

Tickets are still available and may be purchased at the registration desk.

Social event photos provided by PGI


22

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

Vancouver offers visitors a vast array of sightseeing opportunities and

cultural activities. Many exciting tour options are available. Please visit

the Tourism Vancouver Desk located in the Lobby of the Vancouver

Convention & Exhibition Centre or the Hospitality Suite located in

the Governor General Suite D of the Pan Pacific Hotel for information.

They will be able to provided numerous suggestions and assist in booking

tours.

WAO Congress attendees will receive discounted rates on Gray Line

Tours. A Gray Line representative will be present at the Tourism

Vancouver Desk located in the Lobby of the Vancouver Convention &

Exhibition Centre. Gray Line offers complimentary hotel pick-up for

pre-registered tour guests. Prices below are listed in Canadian dollars

(CDN); tours that have the 7% Goods and Services Tax (GST) already

included in their prices are indicated. A 24-hour cancellation policy

applies to local tours.

Complimentary Vancouver City Tour

Sunday, 7 September only

Take advantage of this complimentary 1½ hour bus tour and orient

yourself to downtown Vancouver. The tour will pass by Chinatown,

Gastown, Robson Street and English Bay Beach. You will also see

beautiful Stanley Park and stop briefly at the First Nations Totem Poles.

The tour is available only to delegates and guests of WAO. The first tour

of the day will depart from the Vancouver Convention & Exhibition

Centre at 8:30. Additional tours will depart at 30 minute intervals

throughout the day. The final tour of the day is scheduled to depart at

15:00. Space is limited and name badges will be required. For additional

information, please visit the General Information Desk located in the

Lobby of the Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre.

The Double Decker/Trolley Attraction Loop

Tour - 2-day pass

Create your own tour by getting on and off the trolley at any or all of the

major attractions in Vancouver. You have a choice of visiting more than

20 locations, including: Robson Street Shopping, Stanley Park, Granville

Island, Science World, Chinatown and Gastown. This tour departs

daily, every half hour beginning at 8:00. Prices (including 7% GST) -

Adult: $25.20 CDN, Child: $15.30 CDN.

Double Decker tour bus

OPTIONAL TOURS

Deluxe Grand City Tour - 3½ hours

See the sights of Vancouver: 1,000 Acre Stanley Park (First Nations

Totem Poles, Prospect Point and English Bay Beaches), Chinatown,

historic Gastown and the prestigious Shaughnessy residential area, Queen

Elizabeth Park with a panoramic view and photo stop at the Sunken

Gardens, City Centre and Financial District. This tour departs twice

daily at 9:15 and 14:00. Prices (including 7% GST) - Adult: $42.37

CDN, Child: $30.82 CDN.

West Coast Spectacular Tour - 6½ hours

On this all-day tour you will visit Stanley Park and Queen Elizabeth Park

as well as the other local sites described in the Deluxe Grand City Tour.

You will cross the magnificent Lions Gate Bridge to Grouse Mountain

on Vancouver’s North Shore, take the famous Grouse Mountain Skyride

to the mountaintop chalet for panoramic sea and city views. Later, visit

the world-renowned Capilano Suspension Bridge. This tour departs

daily at 9:15. All admission fees are included in the price of the tour.

Prices (including 7% GST) - Adult: $85.71 CDN, Child: $66.45 CDN.

Grouse Mountain Skyride

Coast Rainforest Adventure - 4 Hours

Experience the Pacific Rain Forest located minutes from downtown

Vancouver. Knowledgeable nature guides will lead a “walk and talk”

through the rain forest where you will find giant 500 year old trees

and marvel at the beauty of Capilano Canyon. You will see the natural

habitat of the Pacific salmon and learn how these fish make the

incredible journey from the sea up-river to the spawning grounds. A

gourmet snack and drink are provided at the end of the walk. Sensible

walking shoes are necessary. This tour departs daily at 9:15. All admission

fees are included in the price of the tour. Prices (including 7% GST) -

Adult: $75.11 CDN, Child: $62.59 CDN.

Museum of Anthropology

Located at the University of British Columbia, the Museum of

Anthropology displays one of the world’s finest collections of Northwest

Coast First Nations art and artifacts. See impressive sculptures by

renowned modern-day carvers. Explore the museum’s unique galleries

where more than 15,000 artifacts are displayed, capturing the dramatic

beauty of traditional Northwest Coast architecture and design. Free

guided tours are offered. This activity is not coordinated by Gray Line

Tours. Admission fees start at $5 CDN.

Photos provided by Gray Line of Vancouver


Whistler alpine resort

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

OPTIONAL TOURS

Whale Watching Tour - 12-13 hours

The tour begins with service to Victoria on BC Ferries through the

beautiful Gulf Islands. At the floats in front of the Empress Hotel you

will board high-speed cruisers. Although nature offers no guarantees,

the Whale Spotting Network has an average 90 percent success rate in

locating whales. The tour can be shortened by using seaplane

transportation to and from Victoria. This tour departs daily at 9:15.

Prices start at $180.83 CDN.

Whistler Overnight - 2 days & 1 night

Begin your trip to Whistler with a scenic drive up the “Sea to Sky

Highway,” which overlooks spectacular fjord-like Howe Sound. Watch

for circling bald eagles as you continue on to the year-round alpine

resort of Whistler. Spend some time shopping or sightseeing before

dining at one of the area’s fine restaurants. Before you leave, make sure

to explore the village and its surroundings and take a gondola ride to

the top of Whistler Mountain. Other options include the River of

Golden Dreams canoe trip or a Floatplane Glacier Tour. The price of

this tour includes one night accommodation and the Whistler Resort

Excursion Tour. Prices start at $197.95 CDN.

Visit

Tourism Vancouver

Information Desk or the

Hospitality Suite for

additional tour options

Victoria

23

Victoria Overnight - 2 days & 1 night

This tour begins with a 90-minute ferry ride through the Gulf Islands

followed by a tour of the city of Victoria. You will see the University of

Victoria, the Royal Victoria Yacht Club, Uplands and Oak Bay residential

areas and Beacon Hill Park. There will also be plenty of time to explore

the world-famous Empress Hotel, British Import shops, Parliament

buildings and other attractions around the Inner Harbor. Before leaving

the city, enjoy high tea at the Empress. The price of the tour includes

one night accommodations in Victoria, Victoria Excursion Tour

including Butchart Gardens and City Tour, and high tea at the Empress

Hotel. Prices start at $123.05 CDN.

Rocky Mountain Railway Tour - 2 days & 1 night

The journey of a lifetime awaits you onboard the Rocky Mountaineer.

Climb aboard and enjoy the vast, ever-changing panorama of Canada’s

West. Outstanding guest service and commentary enhance spectacular

views of mountain peaks, shimmering lakes, lush green forests and

mighty rivers. Guests enjoy two days of daylight travel onboard the

Rocky Mountaineer, breakfast and lunch served daily and overnight

accommodation in Kamloops, BC. Cancellation fees may apply. Prices

start at $700 CDN (one-way). Please contact Gray Line to register for

this tour. Be sure to identify yourself as a delegate or guest of WAO.


24

When managing

exacerbations, do asthma

therapies give patients

enough room to manoeuver?

Symbicort ®

is indicated for maintenance treatment of asthma in patients

with reversible obstructive airways disease, where the use of a combination

product is appropriate. This may include patients on effective maintenance

doses of long-acting ß2-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids or patients who

are symptomatic on current inhaled corticosteroid therapy. Symbicort ®

is

contraindicated in patients with a known hypersensitivity to inhaled lactose. 1

Dosage should be individualized according to disease severity and should be

titrated to the lowest dose at which symptom control is maintained. 1

There is no data on the use of Symbicort ®

as a rescue medication in the

treatment of an acute asthma attack. It is crucial to inform patients of this

and prescribe a fast-acting ß2-agonist for this purpose. Medical attention

should be sought if patients find that fast-acting relief bronchodilator treatment

becomes less effective or if they need more inhalations than usual. 1

HPA-axis function status should be assessed periodically.

Most common (>1%) side effects associated with budesonide or

formoterol are headache, palpitations, tremor, candidiasis of the oropharynx,

mild throat irritation, coughing, and hoarseness. 1

®

Symbicort

offers the

flexibility to respond

to patients’ needs

with a single inhaler. 1

Reduction in asthma exacerbations. 1

The only combination that allows you to

increase dosing at the first sign of asthma

worsening to maintain control without

adding or switching inhalers. 1

Control and flexibility in a single inhaler.

Symbicort ® , Turbuhaler ® , and the AstraZeneca logo are trademarks of the AstraZeneca Group.

Reference: 1. Symbicort ® Turbuhaler ® Product Monograph. AstraZeneca Canada Inc. February 2002.


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION CREDITS

Accreditation Statement

This educational activity has been planned and implemented in

accordance with the Essential Areas and Policies of the Accreditation

Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the

joint sponsorship of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and

Immunology (AAAAI) and the World Allergy Organization–IAACI

(WAO). The AAAAI is accredited by ACCME to provide Continuing

Medical Education for physicians.

Designation Statement

The AAAAI designates this educational activity, on an hour-for-hour

basis, for a maximum of 45.0 hours, in Category 1 credit towards the

AMA Physician’s Recognition Award. Each physician should claim

only those hours of credit he/she actually spends in the activity.

Target Audience

The Congress is designed for scientists and physicians specializing in

allergy and immunology, pulmonology (respirology), dermatology and

otolaryngology (ENT), as well as internists, pediatricians, other health

care professionals and trainees.

Goal

The overall purpose of the Congress is to offer a global perspective on

the latest advances in allergy, asthma and clinical immunology and to

encourage study, treatment and research in allergy and asthma.

Aerial view of downtown Vancouver and Stanley Park

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this Congress, participants will be able to:

Describe the state-of-the-art research occurring in allergic

rhinoconjunctivitis, sinusitis, asthma, urticaria, atopic

dermatitis, food and drug reactions, anaphylaxis and other

allergic/immunologic disorders.

Outline the key basic science concepts that will lead to improved

diagnosis and treatment of allergic disorders in the early 21st century.

Discuss the role played by genetics and by the environment in

allergic diseases.

Treat patients with allergic disorders using the most effective

currently available approaches.

List potential new techniques for administering allergen-specific

vaccines.

25

Awarding of Credit

A self-report form will be placed in each delegate’s registration bag.

The self-report form lists all sessions at the Congress, as well as the type

and amount of credit offered.

The AAAAI will collect a true and accurate listing of all sessions attended

by each delegate. Delegates must complete the form and submit it to

the General Information Desk in Vancouver or mail it to the WAO

Secretariat after the Congress. CME hour certificates will be issued

based on these reported sessions. If a form is not completed and returned

by the delegate, a certificate of credit cannot be issued.

For educational accreditation from other organizations, please contact

them directly.


26

©2002 Novartis Pharma AG 09/02

Introducing the

New Non-Steroid

Cream for the

Treatment of

Mild to Moderate

Atopic Eczema

Eczema relief. Flare control.

Summary of product characteristics as agreed by 13 member states of the European Union. Indication: Elidel is indicated in patients with mild to moderate atopic dermatitis (eczema) aged 2 years

and over for short-term treatment of signs and symptoms and intermittent long-term treatment for prevention of progression to flares. Posology and administration: Elidel should be prescribed by physicians

with experience in the topical treatment of atopic dermatitis. Data from clinical studies support intermittent treatment with Elidel for up to 12 months. If no improvement occurs after 6 weeks, or in case of disease

exacerbation, Elidel should be stopped and further therapeutic options considered. Contraindications: Hypersensitivity to pimecrolimus, other macrolactams or to any of the excipients. Special warnings and

precautions for use: Elidel should not be applied to areas affected by acute cutaneous viral infections (herpes simplex, chicken pox). Elidel has not been evaluated for its efficacy and safety in the treatment of

clinically infected atopic dermatitis. Before commencing treatment with Elidel, clinical infections at treatment sites should be cleared.While patients with atopic dermatitis are predisposed to superficial skin infections

including eczema herpeticum (Kaposi's varicelliform eruption), treatment with Elidel may be associated with an increased risk of skin herpes simplex virus infection, or eczema herpeticum (manifesting as rapid spread

of vesicular and erosive lesions). In the presence of herpes simplex skin infection, Elidel treatment at the site of infection should be discontinued until the viral infection has cleared.Although patients treated with

Elidel experienced overall a lower incidence of bacterial skin infections as compared to patients treated with the vehicle, patients with severe atopic dermatitis may have an increased risk of skin bacterial infections

(impetigo) during treatment with Elidel. Use of Elidel may cause mild and transient reactions at the site of application, such as a feeling of warmth and/or burning sensation. If the application site reaction is severe,

the risk-benefit of treatment should be re-evaluated. Care should be taken to avoid contact with eyes and mucous membranes. If accidentally applied to these areas, the cream should be thoroughly wiped off and/or

rinsed off with water.The use of Elidel under occlusion has not been studied in patients. Occlusive dressings are not recommended.As the safety of Elidel has not been established in erythrodermic patients, the

use of the product in this patient population cannot be recommended. Elidel has not been studied in patients with Netherton's syndrome. Due to the potential for increased systemic absorption of pimecrolimus,

Elidel is not recommended in patients with Netherton's syndrome. Physicians should advise patients on appropriate sun protection measures, such as minimisation of the time in the sun, use of sunscreen product

and covering the skin with appropriate clothing. Elidel has not been studied in immunocompromised patients and in patients with evidence of skin malignancies and there is no data to support its use in these patients.

Long-term effect on the local skin immune response and on the incidence of skin malignancies is unknown. Elidel contains cetyl alcohol and stearyl alcohol which may cause local skin reactions. Elidel also contains

propylene glycol, which may cause skin irritation.


XXIII EAACI Congress

12-16 June 2004

Amsterdam

Young investigators at the frontiers of allergy

Come and visit the XXIII EAACI Congress in Amsterdam. We offer you a well balanced

scientific programme tailored to the needs of clinicians and basic scientists,

of young investigators and established senior researchers, of physicians and

allied health professionals. Attend the Allergy Forums and the unopposed poster

sessions focused on young investigators. Go to the Year in Review sessions to

have an update of scientific highlights.

Amsterdam is the place to be. This international but yet compact city allows you

to enjoy all kinds of culture or simply provides you with the pleasure of a relaxed

stay.

Visit www.congrex.com/eaaci2004

27


Before prescribing, consult the full local prescribing

information for complete details.

Abridged summary of prescribing details

SINGULAIR (montelukast sodium, MSD) is indicated in adult and pediatric patients 6 months of age and older for the prophylaxis and chronic

treatment of asthma, including the prevention of day- and nighttime symptoms, the treatment of aspirin-sensitive asthmatic patients, and the prevention

of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

SINGULAIR is indicated in adult and pediatric patients 2 years of age and older for the relief of daytime and nighttime symptoms of seasonal allergic

rhinitis.

Precautions - SINGULAIR should not be used to treat acute asthma attacks. Patients should be advised to have appropriate rescue medication

available.

SINGULAIR should not be abruptly substituted for inhaled or oral corticosteroids.

The reduction in systemic corticosteroid dose in patients receiving anti-asthma agents including leukotriene receptor antagonists has been followed

in rare cases by the occurrence of one or more of the following: eosinophilia, vasculitic rash, worsening pulmonary symptoms, cardiac complications,

and/or neuropathy sometimes diagnosed as Churg-Strauss syndrome, a systemic eosinophilic vasculitis. Although a causal relationship with

leukotriene receptor antagonism has not been established, caution and appropriate clinical monitoring are recommended when systemic corticosteroid

reduction is considered in patients receiving SINGULAIR.

SINGULAIR has not been studied in pregnant or nursing women and thus should not be used in these patients unless considered to be essential.

The 4 and 5 mg chewable tablets of SINGULAIR contain aspartame, which is a source of phenylalanine (.842 mg phenylalanine per 5 mg chewable

tablet and .647 mg phenylalanine per 4 mg chewable tablet).

Interactions - SINGULAIR may be administered with other medications commonly used in the prophylaxis and chronic treatment of asthma and in

the treatment of allergic rhinitis.

*The area under the plasma concentration curve for SINGULAIR was decreased by approximately 40% when coadministered with phenobarbital.

No dosage adjustment for SINGULAIR is recommended.

Side effects - The overall incidence of side effects was comparable to placebo. In two similarly designed 12-week studies of asthma patients

15 years of age and older, only headache and abdominal pain were reported as drug related in ≥ 1% of patients and at a greater incidence than

placebo. In an 8-week study of pediatric patients 6 to 14 years of age, only headache was reported as drug related in > 1% of patients and at a

greater incidence than placebo. In a 12-week study of pediatric patients 2 to 5 years of age with asthma, only thirst was reported as a drug-related

adverse experience in >1% of patients occurring at a greater incidence that placebo. In separate studies in allergic rhinitis in patients 2–14 years of

age (2-week study) and adults 15 years of age and older (2- and 4-week studies), no drug related adverse experiences occurred in >1% of patients

at a greater incidence that placebo.

asthma

&

allergic

rhinitis

TWO RELATED CONDITIONS—

ONE COMMON AIRWAY

INTRODUCING

YOUR ONE THERAPY

FOR BOTH

One Airway, One Approach, One Tablet

SINGULAIR (montelukast sodium) is a trademark of Merck & Co., Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA.

Copyright © 2003 Merck & Co., Inc. All rights reserved. 12-03 SGA 2003-W-6723-J Printed in USA

VISIT US ON THE WORLD WIDE WEB AT http://www.merck.com


7:00

8:00

9:00

10:00

11:00

12:00

13:00

14:00

15:00

16:00

17:00

18:00

19:00

20:00

21:00

22:00

23:00

Gold Satellite

Symposium

Opening

Ceremony

Welcome

Reception

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

Breakfast

Seminars

Plenary

Session

Coffee

Break

Platinum

Symposium

Parallel

Symposia

Luncheon Seminars

Grand Luncheon

Seminar

Gold Luncheon

Symposium

Poster Sessions

Free Communication

Sessions

Meet the Professor

Workshops

Dinner

Symposia

*

PROGRAM AT A GLANCE

7-12 September 2003

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

Debate of Day

Parallel

Symposium

EXHIBIT HALL AND POSTER HALL OPEN 9:00 - 17:00

Breakfast

Seminars

Plenary

Session

Coffee

Break

Platinum

Symposium

Parallel

Symposia

Luncheon Seminars

PhARF Awards &

Luncheon

Debate of Day

Parallel

Symposium

Poster Sessions

Free Communication

Sessions

Meet the Professor

Workshops

Breakfast

Seminars

Plenary

Session

Coffee

Break

Platinum

Symposium

Parallel

Symposia

Luncheon Seminars

Grand Luncheon

Seminar

Debate of Day

Platinum

Symposium

Congress

Banquet

Breakfast

Seminars

Plenary

Session

Coffee

Break

Platinum

Symposium

Parallel

Symposia

Luncheon Seminars

Debate of Day

Parallel

Symposium

All-Congress

Event

*Authors are present to discuss their posters from 15:45-17:00. However the posters are available to view each day from 9:00-17:00.

The Scientific Program is subject to change.

*

EXHIBIT HALL AND POSTER HALL OPEN 9:00 - 17:00

*

Poster Sessions

Free Communication

Sessions

Meet the Professor

Workshops

EXHIBIT HALL AND POSTER HALL OPEN 9:00 - 17:00

Poster Sessions *

Free Communication

Sessions

Meet the Professor

Workshops

EXHIBIT HALL AND POSTER HALL OPEN 9:00 - 17:00

Breakfast

Seminars

Plenary

Session

Coffee

Parallel Break

Symposia

29

Luncheon Seminars

Parallel

Symposia


30

The XIXth International

Congress of Allergology

and Clinical Immunology

(ICACI)

June 26 - July 1, 2005

Munich, Germany

Invitation

The XXIVth Congress of

the European Academy of

Allergology and Clinical

Immunology (EAACI)

Welcome to Munich in the year 2005!

Join your colleagues from around the world to learn about the latest advances in

allergy, immunology and major allergic diseases of airways (asthma, rhinitis), skin

(eczema, urticaria, drug eruptions) and other organs.

The XIXth World Allergy Congress in Munich will cover all important new aspects

of experimental and clinical allergology and related fields. It will be an opportunity

to gain a global perspective through presentations of experts from all over the

world.

Along with the extensive scientific agenda, a carefully planned social programme

for both delegates and accompanying persons will provide plenty of opportunities

to savour the flair of the 850 year old city of Munich located in the heart of Europe.

www.congrex.com/wac2005


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

SUNDAY, 7 SEPTEMBER

Gold Satellite Symposium 16:00 - 17:30

GS1 - Rhinitis: Better Understanding of a

Multifaceted Disease

Crystal Pavilion Ballroom, Pan Pacific Hotel

Supported through an unrestricted educational grant from

MedPointe Pharmaceuticals

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: William Berger, United States

Rhinitis: A Dose of Epidemiologic Reality

Russell Settipane, United States

Pathophysiology of Non-Allergic Rhinitis

Alkis Togias, United States

Optimally Treating Rhinitis: Is There a Progressive

Management Strategy?

Michael Kaliner, United States

Opening Ceremony &

Welcome Reception 18:00 - 20:00

Location: Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

18:00 - 19:00 Opening Ceremony: First Nations People will

describe their proud heritage and unique cultures

through traditional storytelling, music and dance.

Their performance will close with the ceremonial

passing of the honored Talking Stick to Dr. Allen

Kaplan, WAO President, signifying the

commencement of the 2003 WAO Congress.

19:00 - 20:00 Welcome Reception: The Opening Ceremony

will be followed by a reception where old and

new friends will gather over musical

entertainment, light hors d’oeuvres and drinks.

Both the Opening Ceremony and Welcome Reception are open to all registered

delegates and their registered guests at no additional fee. Name badges are

required.

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

31

MONDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER

Breakfast Seminars 7:00 - 8:30

Pre-registration required. Admission by ticket only. Sessions are limited

to the first 25 delegates. Breakfast Seminar tickets may be purchased,

returned and exchanged at the Registration Desk located in the Lobby

of the Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre.

BR1 - Food Allergy

Room 10, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Motohiro Ebisawa, Japan

BR2 - Genetically Modified Foods

Room 13, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Wesley Burks, United States

Samuel Lehrer, United States

BR3 - Inhaled Corticosteroids

Room 14, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Alexander Ferguson, Canada

Stanley Szefler, United States

BR4 - Aspirin Induced Asthma

Room 16, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Marek Kowalski, Poland

BR5 - Fungal Sinusitis

Room 17, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Stephen Kemp, United States

Raymond Slavin, United States

BR6 - Clinical Immunology for the Allergist

Room 18, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

John Condemi, United States

Burton Zweiman, United States

BR7 - Allergic Rhinitis in Asthma

Room 19, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Richard Nicklas, United States

Paul Van Cauwenberge, Belgium

BR8 - Bronchoprovocation

Gazebo I, Pan Pacific Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Donald Cockcroft, Canada

Robert Townley, United States

BR9 - Nasal Polyposis

Gazebo II, Pan Pacific Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Daniel Hamilos, United States

Frank Virant, United States

BR10 - Animal Models in Allergic Diseases

MacKenzie Room 1, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Erwin Gelfand, United States

SUNDAY, 7 SEPTEMBER

MONDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER


MONDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER

32

MONDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER - continued

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

BR11 - Endotoxin Exposure in Allergy and Asthma

MacKenzie Room 2, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

David Peden, United States

BR12 - Bioterrorism: Relevance to the Practice of Allergy

Cheakamus Room, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

James Baker, United States

Renata Engler, United States

Plenary Session 8:45 - 10:15

PL1 - The Science of Allergy, Part 1: Initiating

Mechanisms

Exhibit Hall A, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition

Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: S.G.O. Johansson, Sweden

Co-Chair: Allen Kaplan, United States

Why Are We Allergic?

Kent HayGlass, Canada

Regulation of the Immune Response

William Paul, United States

Chemokines and Inflammation

Andrew Luster, United States

Exhibit Hall & Poster Hall Open 9:00 - 17:00

Exhibit Halls B & C, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Coffee Break 10:15 - 10:45

Exhibit Hall B, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Parallel Symposia 10:30 - 12:00

PR1 - World Allergy Forum (WAF): The Impact of

Upper Airway Allergic Inflammation on Asthma

Parkview Terrace, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

A program of the World Allergy Organization (WAO)—IAACI

Supported through an unrestricted educational grant from

Novartis

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: K. Frank Austen, United States

Co-Chair: Ronald Walls, Australia

The Allergist’s Perspective on Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma

William Busse, United States

Pathophysiological Links Between Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma

Wytske Fokkens, The Netherlands

Pathophysiological Links Between Sinusitis and Asthma

Richard Lockey, United States

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

PR2 - Anaphylaxis

Ballroom A, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Dean Metcalfe, United States

Co-Chair: Hugh Sampson, United States

Anaphylaxis: A Clinician’s Perspective

Philip Lieberman, United States

The Role of the Mast Cell in Anaphylaxis

A. Dean Befus, Canada

First Aid Treatment of Anaphylaxis

F. Estelle R. Simons, Canada

PR3 - Allergen Structure: New Diagnostics and

Therapeutics

Ballroom C, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Yitzhak Katz, Israel

Co-Chair: Dietrich Kraft, Austria

Allergenic Peptides Involved in Diagnosis and Treatment

Rudolf Valenta, Austria

Indoor Allergens

L. Karla Arruda, Brazil

Pollen Isoallergens

Wolf-Meinhard Becker, Germany

Mite Recombinant Allergens

Marianne Van Hage-Hamsten, Sweden

Platinum Symposium 10:30 - 12:00

PR4 - New Frontiers in the Treatment of Allergic Disease

Ballroom B, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Supported through an unrestricted educational grant from Aventis

Pharmaceuticals

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Michael Blaiss, United States

Co-Chair: Erwin Gelfand, United States

Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Antihistamines

Gianni Marone, Italy

Comparing the Safety Consequences of the Newer

Antihistamines

Ian Hindmarch, United Kingdom

The Role of Antihistamines in Allergic Disorders

Peter Howarth, United Kingdom


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

MONDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER - continued

Grand Luncheon Seminar 12:15 - 13:45

GLS1 - Atopic Dermatitis: Can Early Intervention

Halt the Atopic March?

No fee. Lunch included. Meal and session limited to the first

300 delegates.

Waterfront Ballroom, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

Supported through an unrestricted educational grant from Novartis

Pharma AG

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Johannes Ring, Germany

Co-Chair: Jonathan Spergel, United States

Cellular and Molecular Aspects of the Atopic Diseases - A

Common Thread

Thomas Luger, Germany

Flare Prevention as a Measure of Disease Control Leading to

Disease Modification

Vincent Ho, Canada

Outlook: Can the Atopic March Be Slowed Down By Early

Intervention in Atopic Eczema?

Jonathan Spergel, United States

Gold Luncheon Symposium 12:15 - 13:45

GS2 - Keys to the Diagnosis and Management of Ocular

Allergy

No fee. Lunch included. Pre-registration required. Admission

by ticket only.

Crystal Pavilion Ballroom, Pan Pacific Hotel

Supported through an unrestricted educational grant from Alcon

Laboratories

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Paul Van Cauwenberge, Belgium

To Be or Not to Be: Ocular Allergy Diagnosis

Robert Gross, United States

Targeted Therapy

Peter D’Arienzo, United States

Allergic Rhinitis: The Pearls of Diagnosis and Management

Sergio Bonini, Italy

Luncheon Seminars 12:15 - 13:45

Pre-registration required. Admission by ticket only. Sessions are limited to

the first 25 delegates. Luncheon Seminar tickets may be purchased,

returned and exchanged at the Registration Desk located in the Lobby of

the Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre.

LU1 - Eosinophils and Asthma

Room 10, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Judah Denburg, Canada

Peter Weller, United States

LU2 - Systemic Mastocytosis

Room 13, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Yoseph Mekori, Israel

Dean Metcalfe, United States

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

LU3 - H 4 -Receptor Relevance in Allergic Disease

Room 14, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Claudia Hofstra, The Netherlands

Lars Karlsson, United States

LU4 - Allergy Avoidance

Room 16, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Adnan Custovic, United Kingdom

LU5 - Probiotics and Gut Microflora: A New Approach

to the Management of Food Allergy

Room 19, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Erika Isolauri, Finland

Ulrich Wahn, Germany

LU6 - The Trials and Tribulations of IL-5

Room 18, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Stephen Holgate, United Kingdom

Paul O’Byrne, Canada

LU7 - Acute Asthma Treatment

Room 17, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Bradley Chipps, United States

E. Regis McFadden, United States

LU8 - Stinging Insect Hypersensitivity

Gazebo I, Pan Pacific Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Anthony Dubois, The Netherlands

David Golden, United States

LU9 - Allergens as Inflammatory Agents

Gazebo II, Pan Pacific Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Heidrun Behrendt, Germany

Martin Chapman, United States

LU10 - Nasal Polyposis

MacKenzie Room 1, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Claus Bachert, Belgium

Takeru Ishikawa, Japan

LU11 - Occupational Allergy

MacKenzie Room 2, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Andre Cartier, Canada

Santiago Quirce, Spain

LU12 - Allergy in the Tropical Environment: A Challenge

to the Hygiene Hypothesis

Nootka Room, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Isabel Hagel, Venezuela

Charles Naspitz, Brazil

33

MONDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER


MONDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER

34

MONDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER - continued

LU13 - Adverse Reactions to Food Additives

Cheakamus Room, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Robert Bush, United States

Ronald Simon, United States

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

Debate of the Day 14:00 - 15:30

D1 - Immunotherapy for Asthma: Yes/No

Room 15, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Richard Lockey, United States

Yes - Anthony Frew, United Kingdom

No - N. Franklin Adkinson, United States

Parallel Symposium 14:00 - 15:30

PR5 - Frontiers in Science

Ballroom B, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Sponsored by the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and

Immunology (AAAAI)

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Lanny Rosenwasser, United States

Co-Chair: Robert Schleimer, United States

Anti-Adhesion Molecules: The Role of Anti-VLA-4

Bruce Bochner, United States

Chemokine Antagonists

Jose-Carlos Gutierrez-Ramos, United States

Th1 Responses and the Role of CXCR3

Sergio Romagnani, Italy

Meet the Professor 15:45 - 17:15

MP1 - Risks and Benefits of Immunotherapy for

Allergic Airway Disease

Room 1, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Alain de Weck, Switzerland

Professor: Stephen Durham, United Kingdom

MP2 - Leukotrienes in Asthma

Room 2, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Stephen Holgate, United Kingdom

Professor: K. Frank Austen, United States

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

Interactive Workshops 15:45 - 17:15

WK1 -Urticaria: Evaluation and Treatment

Room 15, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Felicidad Cua-Lim, Philippines

Clive Grattan, United Kingdom

Malcolm Greaves, Singapore

Kiyoshi Nishioka, Japan

WK2 - Asthma in Children

Malaspina Room, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Frank Virant, United States

Allan Becker, Canada

Pakit Vichyanond, Thailand

Eugene Weinberg, South Africa

WK3 - Clinical Immunodeficiency Syndromes

Governor General Suite, Pan Pacific Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Hans Ochs, United States

Mark Ballow, United States

Rebecca Buckley, United States

Erwin Gelfand, United States

Poster Sessions 15:45 - 17:00

Exhibit Hall C, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Posters are on display 9:00 – 17:00. Authors are present to discuss

their posters 15:45 – 17:00.

No CME Credit will be awarded for this activity.

Poster Categories:

Airway Disease

Asthma: Therapy

Basic Mechanisms

Infection and Immunity

Skin Disease and Dermatitis

Refer to page 62 for abstract title and authors.


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

MONDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER - continued

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

Free Communication Session 15:45 - 17:15

FC1 -Allergen Characterization

Room 12, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Martin Chapman, United States

Co-Chair: John Zambrano-Haboud, Ecuador

Abstract #O-1-1

Tryptase-mediated allergen cleavage: a general mechanism for

terminating allergen-induced mast cell degranulation

Rauter I 1 , Flicker S 1 , Krauth MT 2 , Valent P 2 , Vrtala S 1 , Valenta R 1 ,

Pittner G 1 , Semper H 2

1 Department of Pathophysiology, University of Vienna Medical School,

Vienna, Austria, 2 Department of Internal Medicine, University of

Vienna Medical School, Vienna, Austria

Abstract #O-1-2

Molecular cloning and characterization of major allergen of sea squirt

asthma

Shigeta SS 1 , Wakisaka TW 1 , Katsutani TK 2 , Aki TA 1 , Ono KO 1

1 Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Japan, 2 Katsutani-

Ogasahara Clinic, Hatsukaiti, Japan

Abstract #O-1-3

Characterization of recombinant major pollen allergen Phl p 4 from

Timothy grass (Phleum pratense)

Nandy A1 , Wald M1 , Suck R1 , Kahlert H1 , Cromwell O1 , Fiebig H1 1Allergopharma Joachim Ganzer KG, R&D Department, Reinbek,

Germany

Abstract # O-1-4

Heat-denaturation of recombinant ProDer p 1: consequences for its

structural and allergenic properties

Magi M 1 , Garcia L 1 , Vandenbranden M 1 , Jacquet A 1

1 Université Libre de Bruxelles, Gosselies, Belgium

Abstract # O-1-5

The dust mite proteome: what are the major components of extracts

apart from the allergens?

Bi XZ 1 , Angus AC 1 , Ong ST 1 , Chew FT 1

1 Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore,

Singapore, Singapore

Abstract # O-1-6

Structure-function relationships of the cockroach allergen Bla g 2

Wuenschmann S 1 , Chapman MD 1 , Gustchina A 2 , Pomes A 1

1 INDOOR Biotechnologies Inc., Charlottesville, VA, USA, 2 National

Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD, USA

Presenting authors indicated in bold.

Free Communication Session 15:45 - 17:15

FC2 -Animal Models of Disease

Gazebo I, Pan Pacific Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Zuhair Ballas, United States

Co-Chair: John Ruhno, Australia

Abstract #O-2-1

Nerve growth factor expression in itchy skins of atopic NC/Nga mice

Tanaka A 1 , Fujisawa C 1 , Matsuda H 1

1 Tokyo University of Agriculture & Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo, Japan

Abstract #O-2-2

The effect of stress duration and intensity on airway inflammation in

mice

Forsythe P 1 , Ebeling C 1 , Befus AD 1 , Vliagoftis H 1

1 University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Abstract #O-2-3

Th1-predominant cytokine response of splenocytes to bacterial antigen

in DS-Nh mice, model mouse of atopic dermatitis

Matsukura S 1 , Aihara M 1 , Ikezawa Y 1 , Nakazawa M 2 , Minami M 2 ,

Ikezawa Z 1

1 Dept. of Dermatology, Yokohama City Uni School of Medicine,

Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan, 2 Dept. of Immunology, Yokohama City

Uni School of Medicine, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan

Abstract #O-2-4

Concurrent exposure to OVA and house dust mite subverts OVA’s

innocuous nature, resulting in OVA-specific Th2 sensitization and

airway inflammation

Fattouh R 1 , Pouladi MA 1 , Alvarez DA 1 , Johnson JR 1 , Inman MD 2 ,

Jordana M 1

1 McMaster University, Centre for Gene Therapeutics, Hamilton,

Ontario, Canada, 2 McMaster University, Firestone Institute for

Respiratory Health, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Abstract #O-2-5

Effect of maternal asthma and methacholine-induced hypoxia during

gestation on asthma phenotypes of offspring in mice

Chang YS 1 , Kim SS 1 , Park HK 1 , Cho SH 1 , Min KU 1 , Kim YY 1 , Oh

JW 1

1 Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Seoul National University,

Seoul, Republic of Korea

Abstract #O-2-6

The influence of probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 on the GALT

of young pigs

Duncker S 1 , Breves G 1 , Bischoff SC 2

1 School of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover, Germany, 2 Medical School

of Hannover, Hannover, Germany

35

MONDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER


MONDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER

36

MONDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER - continued

Presenting authors indicated in bold.

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

Free Communication Session 15:45 - 17:15

FC3 -Asthma Therapy I

Ballroom A, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Marek Kowalski, Poland

Co-Chair: Juan Schuhl, Uruguay

Abstract #O-3-1

Amelioration of asthma-like syndrome with a monoclonal antibody

(mAb) specific for complement component C5

Peng T 1 , Hao L 2 , Sievers C 1 , Kristan J 1 , Wang Y 1

1 Alexion Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cheshire, CT, USA, 2 Yale University

School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

Abstract #O-3-2

Anti-inflammatory effects of U0126, a MEK inhibitor, on a mouse

model of asthma

Duan W 1

1 National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore

Abstract #O-17-5

Allergen avoidance and nasal topical corticosteroid in children with

allergic rhinitis and mild asthma

Reis AP 1 , Machado JAN 1 , Reis LL 1

1 Climed Clinics, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil

Abstract #O-3-4

Inpatient and emergency department visits among patients treated with

fluticasone propionate and montelukast sodium

Riedel AA 1 , Weiss KB 2 , Allen-Ramey FC 3 , Duong PT 3 , Markson LE 3

1 Ingenix, Inc., Economic and Outcomes Research Division, Eden Prairie,

MN, USA, 2 Midwest Center for Health Services & Policy Research,

Hines VA Hosp, Chicago, IL, USA, 3 Merck & Co., Inc., Outcomes

Research & Management, West Point, PA, USA

Abstract #O-3-5

Deposition of extrafine HFA-BDP inhaled via pMDI-spacer in

asthmatic children

Roller CM1 , Owen JL1 , Troedson RG2 , Le Souef PN1 , Devadason SG1 1University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia,

2Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, Western Australia,

Australia

Abstract #O-3-6

Effect of long-acting tulobuterol tape, a β-agonist transdermally

absorbed, on airway hyperresponsiveness in pediatric patients with

asthma

Kurihara K 1 , Nishima S 2 , Baba M 3

1 Kanagawa Children’s Medical Center, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan,

2 National Minami-Fukuoka Hospital, Fukuoka, Fukuoka, Japan, 3 Doai

Memorial Hospital, Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

Free Communication Session 15:45 - 17:15

FC4 -Basic Mechanisms I

Ballroom C, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Ken Ohta, Japan

Co-Chair: Marc Rothenberg, United States

Abstract #O-4-1

Regulation of interleukin-9 receptor expression by human neutrophils

Takhar MK 1 , Soussi-Gounni A 1

1 Department of Immunology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg,

Manitoba, Canada

Abstract #O-4-2

Participation of Syk kinase in integrin signaling in airway epithelium

Ulanova M 1 , Puttagunta L 1 , Schreiber AD 2 , Befus AD 1

1 University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada, 2 University of Pennsylvania

School of Medicine, Philadelphia, USA

Abstract #O-4-3

Mechanisms of redirection of established allergen-specific Th2 biased

responses in vivo: IFN-γ

production and IL-12 responsiveness are critical

Lewkowich IP 1 , HayGlass KT 1

1 Department of Immunology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg,

Manitoba, Canada

Abstract #O-4-4

Pollen associated lipid mediators (PALMs) inhibit dendritic cell IL-12

production resulting in a reduced capacity to initiate Th1 responses

Jakob T 1 , Traidl-Hoffmann C 1 , Mariani V 1 , Hochrein H 2 , Ring J 3 ,

Behrendt H 1

1 ZAUM Center for Allergy and Environment TUM/GSF, Munich,

Bavaria, Germany, 2 Institute of Medical Microbiology, Immunology

and Hygiene, TUM, Munich, Germany, 3 Dept. of Dermatology and

Allergy, Technische Universität, Munich, Germany

Abstract #O-4-5

The ability of neonatal antigen presenting cells to undergo in-vitro

maturation is associated with variations in allergen specific immune

responses

Upham JW 1 , Holt PG 1 , Thornton CA 2 , Prescott SL 3

1 Institute for Child Health Research, Perth, WA, Australia, 2 University

of Southampton, Southampton, UK, 3 University of Western Australia,

Perth, WA, Australia

Abstract #O-4-6

FDC-SP is a novel chemoattractant for B cells activated by T-dependent

signals

Du Q 1 , Marshall AJ 1

1 University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

MONDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER - continued

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

Free Communication Session 15:45 - 17:15

FC5 -Dermatitis

Room 11, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: To be announced

Abstract #O-5-1

Prevalence and associated factors of atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome

in rural and urban Ethiopia

Flohr C 1 , Venn A 2 , Lewis SA 3 , Britton J 2 , Bekele Z 4 , Williams HC 1 ,

Parry E 5 , Yemaneberhan H 6

1 Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham,

Nottingham, UK, 2 Division of Epidemiology and Public Health,

University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK, 3 Division of Respiratory

Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK, 4 Jimma

Institute of Health Sciences, Jimma, Ethiopia, 5 Department Clin. Sci.,

London Sch. Hyg. & Trop. Med., London, UK, 6 University of Jimma,

Jimma, Ethiopia

Abstract #O-5-2

Prevalence of atopic dermatitis in early childhood in Japan: a nationwide

survey

Shimojo N 1 , Yamaguchi K 1 , Arima T 1 , Tomiita M 1 , Suzuki S 1 , Kohno Y 1

1 Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba Univ,

Chiba, Japan

Abstract #O-5-3

Efficacy of efomycine M in an animal model for contact dermatitis

Zollner TM 1 , Schoen MP 2 , Podda M 3 , Asadullah K 1 , Boehncke WH 3

1 Research Business Area Dermatology, Schering AG, Berlin, Germany,

2 Dept. of Dermatology, Univ. of Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany,

3 Dept. of Dermatology, Univ. of Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany

Abstract #O-5-4

Role of interleukin-18 in the development of dermatitis in atopic

dermatitis-model mice NC/Nga

Tanaka T 1 , Higa S 1 , Hirano T 1 , Kawase I 1

1 Department III Internal Medicine, Osaka University Medical School,

Suita City, Osaka, Japan

Abstract #O-5-5

Reduced cutaneous reactivity to vasoactive peptides in patients with atopic

eczema

Brockow K 1 , Reindel U 1 , Hermann K 2 , Huss-Marp J 2 , Abeck D 1 , Ring J 1

1 Dept. of Dermatology and Allergy Biederstein, TU Munich, Munich,

Germany, 2 Division of Environmental Dermatology and Allergy GSF/

TUM, Munich, Germany

Abstract #O-5-6

T cell reactions to paraphenylendiamine and its metabolites and different

individual risk factors for sensitization

Merk HF 1 , AlMasaoudi T 1 , Kawakubo Y 1 , Brams B 1 , Bloemeke B 1

1 Dept. of Dermatology & Allergy - RWTH Aachen, Aachen, Germany

Presenting authors indicated in bold.

Dinner Symposia 18:00 - 20:30

DS1 - Leukotriene Antagonists in the Treatment of

Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis

No fee. Dinner included. Meal and session limited to the

first 300 delegates.

Crystal Pavilion Ballroom, Pan Pacific Hotel

Supported through an unrestricted educational grant from Ono

Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd.

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Terumasa Miyamoto, Japan

Leukotriene Antagonists in the Management of Adult Asthma

Paul O’Byrne, Canada

Effect of Leukotriene Antagonists on Exercise Induced

Asthma in Children

Hiroyuki Mochizuki, Japan

Clinical Consideration of Leukotriene Modifiers in the

Treatment of Rhinitis

Peter Creticos, United States

DS2 - A Look to the Future: Advances in Inhaled

Corticosteroid Therapy

No fee. Dinner included. Meal and session limited to the

first 300 delegates.

Waterfront Ballroom, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

Supported through an unrestricted educational grant from

Aventis Pharmaceuticals and ALTANA Pharma

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Michael Kaliner, United States

Asthma Epidemiology

Gregory Diette, United States

What is the Best Marker for Inhaled Corticosteroid Safety?

Robert Dluhy, United States

The “Ideal” Inhaled Corticosteroid

Michael Kaliner, United States

Downtown Vancouver

37

MONDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER


TUESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER

38

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

TUESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER

Breakfast Seminars 7:00 - 8:30

Pre-registration required. Admission by ticket only. Sessions are limited

to the first 25 delegates. Breakfast Seminar tickets may be purchased,

returned and exchanged at the Registration Desk located in the Lobby

of the Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre.

BR20 - Eosinophils and Asthma

Room 10, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Erwin Gelfand, United States

BR21 - Antibody Deficiency

Room 14, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Mark Ballow, United States

Ricardo Sorensen, United States

BR22 - New Antihistamines

Room 13, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Peter Howarth, United Kingdom

Joaquin Sastre, Spain

BR23 - New Treatments for Allergic Rhinitis

Room 16, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Chul Hee Lee, Korea

Alkis Togias, United States

BR24 - Recombinant Allergens

Room 17, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Martin Chapman, United States

Dietrich Kraft, Austria

BR25 - Genetics of Asthma

Room 18, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Malcolm Blumenthal, United States

Stephen Holgate, United Kingdom

BR26 - What Makes Substances Allergenic?

Room 19, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Wolf-Meinhard Becker, Germany

Gerald Reese, Germany

BR27 - Penicillin and Cephalosporin Allergy

Cheakamus Room, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Richard Warrington, Canada

BR28 - Remodeling in Asthma: Extracellular Matrix and

Growth Factors

MacKenzie Room 2, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Hae-Sim Park, Korea

Robert Schellenberg, Canada

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

BR29 - Complement Deficiencies

MacKenzie Room 1, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Michael Frank, United States

BR30 - Sleep and Allergic Diseases

Gazebo I, Pan Pacific Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Timothy Craig, United States

Ian Hindmarch, United Kingdom

BR31 - Asthma in the Elderly

Nootka Room, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Ana Todo-Bom, Portugal

Daniel Vervloet, France

BR32 - Diagnosing Asthma in Pre-School Children

Gazebo II, Pan Pacific Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Allan Becker, Canada

Nelson Rosario, Brazil

Plenary Session 8:45 - 10:15

PL2 - The Science of Allergy, Part 2: Effector

Mechanisms

Exhibit Hall A, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: G. Walter Canonica, Italy

Co-Chair: Joaquin Sastre, Spain

Mast Cells

Dean Metcalfe, United States

Eosinophils

Marc Rothenberg, United States

Modulation of Inflammation in Allergic Disease

A. Barry Kay, United Kingdom

Exhibit Hall & Poster Hall Open 9:00 - 17:00

Exhibit Halls B & C, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Coffee Break 10:15 - 10:45

Exhibit Hall B, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Parallel Symposia 10:30 - 12:00

PR6 - Urticaria and Angioedema

Parkview Terrace, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Motohiro Kurosawa, Japan

Co-Chair: Bob Lanier, United States

Diagnostic Considerations

Vincent Beltrani, United States

Angioedema: Hereditary and Non-Hereditary Causes

Bruce Zuraw, United States

Treatment of Urticaria and Angioedema

Clive Grattan, United Kingdom


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

TUESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER - continued

PR7 - Sinusitis and Nasal Polyposis

Ballroom A, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Rakhim Khaitov, Russia

Co-Chair: Ruby Pawankar, Japan

Infection and Nasal Polyposis

Claus Bachert, Belgium

Sinusitis and Aspirin Sensitivity

Andrzej Szczeklik, Poland

Allergic Fungal Sinusitis

Raymond Slavin, United States

Evidence-Based Treatment of Sinusitis

Mark Dykewicz, United States

PR8 - Genetics and IgE

Ballroom C, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Gianni Marone, Italy

Co-Chair: Anand Singh, India

Regulation of IgE Synthesis

Donata Vercelli, United States

Genetics of Allergic Responsiveness

Lanny Rosenwasser, United States

Genetics and Environmental Interactions in Asthma

Peter LeSouef, Australia

HLA Restriction in Allergen-Dependent IgE Production

Sho Matsushita, Japan

First Nations Totem Poles in Stanley Park

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

Hiking in Stanley Park

39

Platinum Symposium 10:30 - 12:00

PR9 - Opening Up New Horizons in Allergy: The Role

of Antihistamines

Ballroom B, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Supported through an unrestricted educational grant from UCB

Pharma

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Charles Naspitz, Brazil

Co-Chair: F. Estelle R. Simons, Canada

Do We Need Allergists? Insights Into an Epidemic

Ulrich Wahn, Germany

Psychological Factors Related to the Management and Natural

History of Allergy

Jim Stevenson, United Kingdom

Globalization and New Guidelines: Avoiding the Confusion

Paul Van Cauwenberge, Belgium

Can We Prevent Allergies and Asthma?

John Warner, United Kingdom

TUESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER


TUESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER

40

TUESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER - continued

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

Pharmacia Allergy Research Foundation

(PhARF) Awards Ceremony and

Luncheon 12:15 - 13:45

No fee. Lunch included. Meal and session limited to the first 300 delegates.

Waterfront Ballroom, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

Supported through an unrestricted educational grant from the Pharmacia

Allergy Research Foundation (PhARF) and Pharmacia Diagnostics AB

No CME Credit will be awarded for this activity.

Chair: Allen Kaplan, United States

Subject: Novel Developments in the Understanding of IgE

Associated Diseases

Award Recipient: Gesine Hansen, Germany

Luncheon Seminars 12:15 - 13:45

Pre-registration required. Admission by ticket only. Sessions are limited

to the first 25 delegates. Luncheon Seminar tickets may be purchased,

returned and exchanged at the Registration Desk located in the Lobby

of the Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre.

LU20 - Pediatric Asthma

Room 10, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

A. El Hefni, Egypt

Eugene Weinberg, South Africa

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

LU22 - Chemokines: Afferent and Efferent Roles in

Allergy

Cheakamus Room, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Kent HayGlass, Canada

Sergio Romagnani, Italy

LU23 - Insect Allergy

Room 13, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

David Golden, United States

Chein-Soo Hong, Korea

LU24 - Anti-Cytokine Therapies

Room 17, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

William Busse, United States

Takeru Ishikawa, Japan


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

TUESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER - continued

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

LU25 - Indoor Allergens

Room 18, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

L. Karla Arruda, Brazil

Peyton Eggleston, United States

LU26 - Pathophysiology of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma:

Similarities and Differences

Room 19, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Wytske Fokkens, The Netherlands

Qutayba Hamid, Canada

LU27 - Cellular Immune Deficiencies

Gazebo I, Pan Pacific Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

William Shearer, United States

LU28 - Cox 2 Inhibitors in Allergic Patients

Gazebo II, Pan Pacific Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Sevim Bavbek, Turkey

Mario Sanchez Borges, Venezuela

LU29 - Mucosal Immunity

MacKenzie Room 1, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Stephan Bischoff, Germany

LU30 - Adverse Reactions to Vaccines for Prevention of

Infectious Diseases

MacKenzie Room 2, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Renata Engler, United States

Burton Zweiman, United States

Debate of the Day 14:00 - 15:30

D2 - Kill the Cat, or Buy One?

Room 15, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Stephen Durham, United Kingdom

Kill - Adnan Custovic, United Kingdom

Buy - Thomas Platts-Mills, United States

Parallel Symposium 14:00 - 15:30

PR10 - Pediatric Asthma: Issues and Answers

Ballroom B, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Sponsored by the American College of Allergy, Asthma and

Immunology (ACAAI)

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Bob Lanier, United States

Co-Chair: Myron Zitt, United States

Airway Remodeling: Does It Occur in Children?

Stanley Szefler, United States

Rating Delivery Systems in Pediatric Asthma

Jay Portnoy, United States

Outcomes in Pediatric Asthma: What’s Important

Michael Blaiss, United States

41

Meet the Professor 15:45 - 17:15

MP3 - New Therapeutic Strategies for Allergic Rhinitis

Room 1, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Terumasa Miyamoto, Japan

Professor: Eli Meltzer, United States

MP4 - Th1/Th2 Polarized Immunity

Room 2, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: William Busse, United States

Professor: Patrick Holt, Australia

Interactive Workshops 15:45 - 17:15

WK4 - Food Allergy: Diagnosis and Treatment

Room 15, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Dan Atkins, United States

Wesley Burks, United States

David Hill, Australia

Jonathan Hourihane, United Kingdom

WK5 - Sinusitis: Evaluation and Treatment

Governor General Suite, Pan Pacific Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Roger Garsia, Australia

Daniel Hamilos, United States

Gary Rachelefsky, United States

WK6 - Indoor Air Pollution

Malaspina Room, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Edgardo Carrasco, Chile

Emil Bardana, United States

Bengt Bjorksten, Sweden

Ragnar Rylander, Sweden

Poster Sessions 15:45 - 17:00

Exhibit Hall C, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Posters are on display 9:00 – 17:00. Authors are present to discuss

their posters 15:45 – 17:00.

No CME Credit will be awarded for this activity.

Poster Categories:

Asthma: Epidemiology

Autoimmune Disease

Clinical Asthma

Clinical Immunology: Cytokines and Chemokines

Environment: Indoor and Outdoor

Immunodeficiency and Immunomodulation

Refer to page 70 for abstract titles and authors.

TUESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER


TUESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER

42

TUESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER - continued

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

Free Communication Session 15:45 - 17:15

FC6 -Asthma: Epidemiology

Waterfront Ballroom B, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Jose Huerta-Lopez, Mexico

Co-Chair: David Stempel, United States

Abstract #O-6-1

Does exposure to cats or dogs protect children from asthma?

Kozyrskyj AL 1 , Becker AB 1

1 University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Abstract #O-6-2

Fatty acid levels and asthma risk in young adults

Woods RK 1 , Walters EH 2 , Raven JM 3 , Abramson MJ 1 , Thien FCK 4

1 Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 2 University of

Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, 3 Alfred Hospital, Melbourne,

Victoria, Australia, 4 Alfred Hospital & Monash University, Melbourne,

Victoria, Australia

Abstract #O-6-3

Association between IL-18 gene polymorphism 105A/C and asthma

Hirano T 1 , Higa S 1 , Katada Y 2 , Miyatake A 3 , Kawase I 1 , Tanaka T 1

1 Department III Internal Medicine, Osaka University Medical School,

Suita City, Osaka, Japan, 2 Department of Allergy, Osaka Minami

National Hospital, Kawachinagano City, Osaka, Japan, 3 Miyatake

Asthma Clinic, Osaka City, Osaka, Japan

Abstract #O-6-4

National “Asthma Registry Plan” and asthma frequency in Iranian

children

Gharagozlou M 1 , Moin M 1 , Parsikia A 1 , Bazargan N 2 , Farid Hosseini

R 3 , Mohammadzadeh I 4

1 Immunology, Asthma & Allergy Research Institute, Tehran, Iran,

2 Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran, 3 Khorasan

University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran, 4 Babol University of

Medical Sciences, Babol, Iran

Abstract #O-6-5

Teenager smokers at greater risk of current wheezing but not of rhinitis

Gomez M 1 , Caceres ME 2 , Jossen R 2 , Loutayf JJ 1 , Astudillo J 1

1 Hospital San Bernardo, Salta, Salta, Argentina, 2 Hospital de Niños,

Salta, Salta, Argentina

Abstract #O-6-6

Respiratory allergy and inflammation due to ambient particles (RAIAP):

a European-wide assessment; allergy screening

Lovdal T 1 , Groeng EC 1 , Dybing E 1 , Lovik M 1

1 Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway

Presenting authors indicated in bold.

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

Free Communication Session 15:45 - 17:15

FC7 -Clinical Immunology:

Cytokines & Chemokines

Waterfront Ballroom A, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Kent HayGlass, Canada

Abstract #O-7-1

Structural basis of interleukin-18 binding

Kato Z 1 , Shikano H 1 , Jee JG 2 , Shirakawa M 2 , Kondo N 1

1 Dept. Ped., Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu, Gifu, Japan,

2 Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan

Abstract #O-7-2

IL-4 may contribute to the switch from a Th2 to a Th1-like cytokine

pattern in eczematous skin lesions of atopic dermatitis patients

Wittmann M 1 , Janssen S 1 , Alter M 1 , Kapp A 1 , Werfel T 1

1 Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Hannover Medical

University, Hannover, Germany

Abstract #O-7-3

Antigen-specific induction of CRTH2 in peripheral blood

mononuclear cells in allergic patients

Noma T 1 , Sugawara Y 1 , Tanaka R 1 , Ogawa N 1 , Saeki T 1 , Nagata K 2 ,

Ishikawa Y 1 , Kawano Y 1

1 Departments of Pediatrics, Kitasato University School of Medicine,

Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan, 2 Research and Development Center,

BioMedical Laboratories, Inc, Kawagoe, Saitama, Japan

Abstract #O-7-4

Inflammatory cells influx after nasal application of IL-8 in patients

suffering from seasonal allergic rhinitis

Kuna P 1 , Kupczyk M 1 , Bochenska-Marciniak M 1 , Górski P 1

1 Dept. of Pneumonology and Allergy, Medical University of Lodz,

Lodz, Poland

Abstract #O-7-5

Roles of Toll-like receptors in IL-15 production by upper respiratory

epithelial cells

Ishimitsu R 1 , Kawauchi H 1 , Yoshikai Y 2

1 Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Shimane Medical University, Izumo,

Shimane, Japan, 2 Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University,

Fukuoka, Japan

Abstract #O-7-6

Immunologic features of drug resistant TB

Farid R 1 , Pishnamaz R 1 , Ranjbar A 2 , Moin M 3 , Sadeghi M 1 , Behmanesh

F 1

1 Mashad University of Medical Sciences, Mashad, Khorasan, Iran,

2 Pediatric practice for clinical immunology and allergy, Colonge,

Georgia, 3 Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

TUESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER - continued

Free Communication Session 15:45 - 17:15

FC8 -Mast Cells and Basophils

Room 12, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: A. Dean Befus, Canada

Abstract #O-8-1

Regulation of human mast cell survival after IgE-receptor activation

Nilsson G 1 , Möller C 1 , Xiang Z 1

1 Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala, Sweden

Abstract #O-8-2

SCF inhibits chemotaxis of mast cells toward IgE-specific antigen

Sawada J 1 , Matsuda H 1

1 Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo, Japan

Abstract #O-8-3

IL-4 and TNF-α act as mast cell chemoattractants

Olsson N 1 , Taub D 2 , Nilsson G 1

1 Dept. of Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala, Sweden, 2 Laboratory of

Immunology, Baltimore, MD, USA

Abstract #O-8-4

The membrane proximal region of the high affinity IgE receptor plays

a unique role in receptor signaling and mast cell/basophil activation

Kricek F1 , Nechansky A2 , Gstach H1 , Ruf C1 , Auer M1 , de Vries J1 ,

Schmied M1 1 2 Novartis Forschungsinstitut, Vienna, Austria, Igeneon AG, Vienna,

Austria

Abstract #O-8-5

Selective cyclooxygenase-2-inhibitors fail to inhibit IgE-mediated

histamine release in vitro and in vivo

Gibbs B 1 , Boehncke WH 2

1 Dept. of Dermatology, Univ. of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany, 2 Dept.

of Dermatology, Univ. of Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany

Abstract #O-8-6

Flavonoids as potential anti-allergic substances

Higa S 1 , Hirano T 1 , Kawase I 1 , Tanaka T 1

1 Department III of Internal Medicine, Osaka University Medical School,

Suita-City, Osaka, Japan

Presenting authors indicated in bold.

Free Communication Session 15:45 - 17:15

FC9 -Pediatrics

Room 11, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Peyton Eggleston, United States

Co-Chair: Erkka Valovirta, Finland

Abstract #O-9-1

Atopic sensitization and clinical allergy in Estonian and Swedish infants

Voor T 1 , Julge K 1 , Böttcher MF 2 , Jenmalm M 2 , Björksten B 3

1 Children’s Clinic of Tartu University, Tartu, Estonia, 2 Clinical Research

Centre, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping, Sweden, 3 Center for

Allergy Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden

43

Abstract #O-9-2

Effects of probiotic bacteria on atopic dermatitis symptoms in infants

Viljanen M 1 , Savilahti E 2 , Haahtela T 1 , Juntunen-Backman K 1 , Korpela

R 3 , Poussa T 4 , Tuure T 3 , Kuitunen M 1

1 The Skin and Allergy Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki,

Finland, 2 Hospital for Children and Adolescents, University of Helsinki,

Helsinki, Finland, 3 Valio Research and Development, Helsinki, Finland,

4 STAT-Consulting, Tampere, Finland

Abstract #O-9-3

Symptomatic improvement of atopic dermatitis in infants following

modulation of intestinal microflora by bifidobacterium

Taniuchi S 1 , Hattori K 1 , Yamamoto A 1 , Kojima T 1 , Hatano Y 1 , Iwamoto

H 2 , Kobayashi Y 1 , Sasai M 1 , Namba K 2 , Yaeshima T 2

1 Department of Pediatrics, Kansai Medical University, Moriguchi,

Osaka, Japan, 2 Nutritional Science Laboratory, Morinaga Milk Ind.

Co., Ltd., Zama, Kanagawa, Japan

Abstract #O-9-4

Impact of airborne environmental conditions on atopic eczema: first panel

study evaluating short- and long-term variations of disease status

Weidinger S 1 , Kraemer U 2 , Mohrenschlager M 1 , Behrendt H 3 , Ring J 1

1 Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Technical University Munich,

Munich, Germany, 2 Medical Institute of Environmental Hygiene,

Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf, Germany, 3 Center for Environment and Health,

Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany

Abstract #O-9-5

The relation of emergency room visits for asthma and respiratory tract

infections of children to viral isolations

Johnston NW 1 , Childs A 2 , Dai J 1 , Sears MR 1

1 Firestone Institute for Respiratory Health, Hamilton, ON, Canada,

2 McMaster University Department of Mathematics and Statistics,

Hamilton, ON, Canada

Abstract #O-9-6

Australian national surveillance of anaphylaxis in children following

food ingestion: preliminary data

Dosen A 1 , Ziegler JB 2 , Peake J 3 , Loh R 4 , Gold M 5

1 Sydney Children’s Hospital and APSU, Sydney, NSW, Australia,

2 Sydney Children’s Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 3 Royal Brisbane

Children’s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, 4 Princess Margaret

Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia, 5 Women and Children’s

Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

TUESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER


TUESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER

44

TUESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER - continued

Presenting authors indicated in bold.

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

Free Communication Session 15:45 - 17:15

FC10 -Rhinitis

Waterfront Ballroom C, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Richard Honsinger, United States

Co-Chair: Lars Poulsen, Denmark

Abstract #O-10-1

Epidemiological characterization of the intermittent and persistent subtypes

of allergic rhinitis (new ARIA classification)

Bauchau V 1 , Durham SR 2

1 UCB Pharma, Braine-l’Alleud, Belgium, 2 Faculty of Medicine, Imperial

College, London, UK

Abstract #O-10-2

Cockroach hypersensitivity in children suffering from perennial allergic

rhinitis

Kaczmarek J1 , Kupczyk M1 , Kuprys I1 , Górski P1 , Kuna P1 1Dept. of Pneumonology and Allergy, Mecal University of Lodz, Lodz,

Poland

Abstract #O-10-3

The impact of compliance on treatment efficacy in persistent allergic

rhinitis

Loh CY1 , Wang DY1 , Chao SS1 , Koh YH1 , Chan YH1 1Dept. of Otolaryngology, National University Hospital, Singapore,

Singapore

Abstract #O-10-4

Single versus combination therapy with intranasal steroid and oral

antihistamine in persistent allergic rhinitis

Chao SS 1

, Wang DY 1

, Chan YH 2

, Raza MT 1

, Pang YT 1

1

National University Hospital, Singapore, Singapore, 2

Clinical Trials &

Epidemiology Research Unit, Ministry of Health, Singapore, Singapore

Abstract #O-10-5

Efficacy and safety of immunotherapy in the treatment of the allergic

rhinitis: meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials

Penagos-Paniagua MJ 1 , Huerta-Lopez JG 1 , Zaragoza-Benitez JM 1

1 Instituto Nacional de Pediatria, Mexico City, DF, Mexico

Abstract #O-10-6

Efficacy of montelukast and loratadine combination in perennial allergic

rhinitis

Agache I 1

1 Faculty of Medicine, Transilvania University, Brasov, Romania

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

Cycling in Vancouver


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

WEDNESDAY, 10 SEPTEMBER

Breakfast Seminars 7:00 – 8:30

Pre-registration required. Admission by ticket only. Sessions are limited

to the first 25 delegates. Breakfast Seminar tickets may be purchased,

returned and exchanged at the Registration Desk located in the Lobby

of the Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre.

BR40 - Latex Allergy

Room 10, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Robyn O’Hehir, Australia

Gordon Sussman, Canada

BR41 - Alternative Medicine and Allergy

Room 13, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Xiu-Min Li, United States

H.C. George Wong, Canada

BR42 - Prevention of Asthma in Children

Room 19, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Ulrich Wahn, Germany

John Warner, United Kingdom

BR43 - Allergic Rhinitis in Asthma

Room 16, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Carlos Baena-Cagnani, Argentina

Ruby Pawankar, Japan

BR44 - Should Infants at Risk for Allergy Be Breastfed?

Room 17, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Bengt Bjorksten, Sweden

BR45 - Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis

Gazebo II, Pan Pacific Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Edgardo Carrasco, Chile

Jordan Fink, United States

BR46 - Prevention of Asthma in a Clinical Setting

Room 14, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Tari Haahtela, Finland

Paul Potter, South Africa

BR47 - The Molecular Basis of Allergic Disorders:

Regulation of IgE Synthesis

MacKenzie Room 2, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Rudolf Valenta, Austria

Donata Vercelli, United States

BR48 - Diagnosing Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary

Disease vs. Asthma

Room 18, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

James Hogg, Canada

BR49 - New Concepts: Urticaria

MacKenzie Room 1, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Vincent Beltrani, United States

Malcolm Greaves, Singapore

BR50 - Neural Mechanisms of Inflammation

Gazebo I, Pan Pacific Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

James Baraniuk, United States

BR51 - Bradykinin-Induced Swelling: Angioedema and

ACE Inhibitors

Cheakamus Room, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Allen Kaplan, United States

Bruce Zuraw, United States

Plenary Session 8:45 - 10:15

PL3 - New Concepts, Part 1: Asthma

Exhibit Hall A, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition

Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Ronald Dahl, Denmark

Co-Chair: F. Estelle R. Simons, Canada

New Insights Into Asthma Pathogenesis

Stephen Holgate, United Kingdom

The Small Airways in Asthma

Richard Martin, United States

Airway Hyperreactivity

Paul O’Byrne, Canada

Exhibit Hall & Poster Hall Open 9:00 - 17:00

Exhibit Halls B & C, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Coffee Break 10:15 - 10:45

Exhibit Hall B, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

45

Parallel Symposia 10:30 - 12:00

PR11 - Occupational Allergy

Parkview Terrace, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Sponsored by the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical

Immunology (CSACI)

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Robert Schellenberg, Canada

Co-Chair: Donald Stark, Canada

Occupational Asthma: A Global Perspective

Moira Chan-Yeung, Canada

Diagnosing Occupational Asthma

Andre Cartier, Canada

Latex as an Occupational Allergen

Susan Tarlo, Canada

WEDNESDAY, 10 SEPTEMBER


WEDNESDAY, 10 SEPTEMBER

46

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

WEDNESDAY, 10 SEPTEMBER - continued

PR12 - Primary Immunodeficiency: Basic Aspects

Ballroom A, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Cassiem Motala, South Africa

Co-Chair: Hugo Neffen, Argentina

Immunodeficiency Diseases: Overview

Rebecca Buckley, United States

Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome

Hans Ochs, United States

Phagocytic Defects

Magda Carneiro-Sampaio, Brazil

PR13 - Food Allergy

Ballroom C, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Stephan Bischoff, Germany

Co-Chair: Johannes Ring, Germany

Investigating Food Allergy

Hugh Sampson, United States

T Cells and Food Hypersensitivity

Thomas Werfel, Germany

Cross-Reactivity in Food Allergy

Gabrielle Pauli, France

Platinum Symposium 10:30 - 12:00

PR14 - Asthma: From Research to Real World Data

Ballroom B, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Supported through an unrestricted educational grant from

GlaxoSmithKline

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Frederick Hargreave, Canada

Co-Chair: Daniel Vervloet, France

Mechanisms of Action of Inhaled Corticosteroids

Robert Schleimer, United States

Optimizing Dual Therapy for Asthma: The Clinical Trials

Harold Nelson, United States

“Real World” Health Outcome Studies

David Stempel, United States

Grand Luncheon Seminar 12:15 - 13:45

GLS2 - Development of New Concepts in Allergy

No fee. Lunch included. Meal and session limited to the first

150 delegates.

Crystal Pavilion Ballroom A, Pan Pacific Hotel

Supported through an unrestricted educational grant from UCB

Pharma

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Stephen Durham, United Kingdom

Anatomy of an Epidemic

Ralph Mosges, Germany

Inverse Agonism for Dummies: The Mechanism of Action of

Antihistamines

Martin Church, United Kingdom

Are Antihistamines Useful in Managing Asthma?

Andrew Wilson, United Kingdom

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

Luncheon Seminars 12:15 - 13:45

Pre-registration required. Admission by ticket only. Sessions are limited

to the first 25 delegates. Luncheon Seminar tickets may be purchased,

returned and exchanged at the Registration Desk located in the Lobby

of the Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre.

LU40 - Anaphylaxis

Room 10, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Philip Lieberman, United States

LU41 - Food Allergy

Room 13, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Philippe Eigenmann, Switzerland

Cassiem Motala, South Africa

LU42 - Indoor Air Pollution

Room 17, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Emil Bardana, United States

Jonathan Bernstein, United States

LU43 - Immunomodulation

Room 16, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Kurt Blaser, Switzerland

LU44 - Asthma in Adults: A Global Issue

Room 14, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

William Busse, United States

Felicidad Cua-Lim, Philippines

LU45 - Tests for Impairment from H 1 -

Antihistamines

Room 18, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Ian Hindmarch, United Kingdom

John Weiler, United States

LU46 - Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy:

Subcutaneous Injections and Beyond

Room 19, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

G. Walter Canonica, Italy

Richard Lockey, United States

LU47 - Adverse Reactions to Alternative

Medications

Cheakamus Room, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Leonard Bielory, United States

Renata Engler, United States

LU48 - Cytokines and Allergy

Gazebo II, Pan Pacific Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Piotr Kuna, Poland


WEDNESDAY WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER 10 10:30 AM–12 PM

ASTHMA

FROM RESEARCH

TO REAL

Vancouver Convention &

Exhibition Centre

Ballroom B

PR14 Platinum Symposium

Co-Chair

Frederick E. Hargreave, MD

Professor

Department of Medicine

McMaster University

Hamilton, Ontario

Co-Chair

Daniel Vervloet, MD

Professor of Pneumology

Head of the Chest Diseases and Allergy Division

Université de la Méditerranée

Hôpital Sainte Marguerite

Marseille, France

Mechanisms of Action of Inhaled Corticosteroids

Robert P. Schleimer, PhD

Professor of Medicine

Department of Medicine/Division

of Clinical Immunology

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Baltimore, Maryland

Optimizing Dual Therapy for Asthma:

The Clinical Trials

Harold S. Nelson, MD

Professor, Department of Medicine

National Jewish Medical & Research Center

Professor of Medicine

University of Colorado Health Sciences Center

Denver, Colorado

“Real World” Health Outcome Studies

David A. Stempel, MD

Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics

University of Washington School of Medicine

Seattle, Washington

WORLD DATA

Jointly Sponsored for Continuing Medical Education (CME) credit by

World Allergy Organization–IAACI (WAO) and the American Academy

of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI).

Supported through an unrestricted educational grant from

WAO and the AAAAI designate this educational activity for a maximum of

1.5 hours in category 1 credit towards the AMA Physician’s Recognition Award.

Each attendee should claim only those hours of credit he/she actually spends

in the activity.


WEDNESDAY, 10 SEPTEMBER

48

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

WEDNESDAY, 10 SEPTEMBER - continued

LU49 - Non-Allergic Rhinitis

MacKenzie Room 1, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

James Baraniuk, United States

Alain Didier, France

LU50 - Risk/Benefit of Allergen Immunotherapy

in Rhinitis and Asthma

MacKenzie Room 2, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Moises Calderon, United Kingdom

Hans-Jorgen Malling, Denmark

LU51 - Anti-Inflammatory Effects of H - 1

Antihistamines

Gazebo I, Pan Pacific Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Erwin Gelfand, United States

Gianni Marone, Italy

Debate of the Day 14:00 - 15:30

D3 - Is the Eosinophil a Player or Interested Bystander

in Asthma?

Room 15, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Judah Denburg, Canada

Player - Redwan Moqbel, Canada

Bystander - Robert Schleimer, United States

Platinum Symposium 14:00 - 15:30

PR15 - Evaluation and Management of Patients with Co-

Morbid Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis: Exploring

Strategies for Integrated Treatment

Ballroom B, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Supported through an unrestricted educational grant from Merck

Sharp & Dohme

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Eli Meltzer, United States

Co-Chair: Malcolm Sears, Canada

Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma: Exploring the

Epidemiology, Prevalence and Socio-Economic Need for

Integrated Management Guidelines

Glenis Scadding, United Kingdom

Physiology and Mediator Links Between the Nose and Lungs

Sven-Erik Dahlen, Sweden

New Approaches to the Management of Allergic Rhinitis and

Asthma

Allan Luskin, United States

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

Meet the Professor 15:45 - 17:15

MP5 - Cellular and Molecular Aspects of Airway

Inflammation

Room 1, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Takeshi Fukuda, Japan

Professor: A. Barry Kay, United Kingdom

MP6 - Eczema and Dermatitis

Room 2, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: To Be Announced

Professor: Johannes Ring, Germany

World Allergy Congress Munich 2005

Interactive Symposium 15:45 - 17:15

WK7 - New Trigger Factors of Atopic Diseases

Room 15, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Erwin Schoepf, Germany

Co-Chair: Ulrich Wahn, Germany

Heidrun Behrendt, Germany

Alexander Kapp, Germany

Gerhard Schultze-Werninghaus, Germany

Interactive Workshops 15:45 - 17:15

WK8 - Immunotherapy: Who Gets It, How, and for

How Long

Governor General Suite, Pan Pacific Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Hans-Jorgen Malling, Denmark

Peter Creticos, United States

Ronald Dahl, Denmark

Kenji Minoguchi, Japan

Sabina Rak, Sweden

WK9 - Drug Allergy

Malaspina Room, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Alain de Weck, Switzerland

N. Franklin Adkinson, United States

Daniel Vervloet, France

Richard Warrington, Canada

Poster Sessions 15:45 - 17:00

Exhibit Hall C, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Posters are on display 9:00 – 17:00. Authors are present to discuss their

posters 15:45 – 17:00.

No CME Credit will be awarded for this activity.

Poster Categories:

Animal Models of Disease

Asthma: Mechanisms

IgE and In-vitro Testing

Immunotherapy

Rhinosinusitis

Refer to page 80 for abstract titles and authors.


www.annualmeeting.aaaai.org

Visit www.annualmeeting.aaaai.org

for the most up-to-date information on the 60th

Annual Meeting in San Francisco!

Don’t forget to submit your Abstract.

Deadline: September 19, 2003

49


WEDNESDAY, 10 SEPTEMBER

50

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

WEDNESDAY, 10 SEPTEMBER - continued

Free Communication Session 15:45 - 17:15

FC11 - Asthma Mechanisms

Room 12, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Harold Nelson, United States

Co-Chair: Anahi Yanez, Argentina

Abstract #O-11-1

A key role for neutrophils in nonatopic asthma

van Houwelingen AH 1 , Kool M 1 , de Jager SCA 2 , Kraneveld AD 1 ,

Nijkamp FP 1

1 Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands, 2 Leiden University, Leiden,

Netherlands

Abstract #O-11-2

Human airway smooth muscle cells express the high affinity receptor for

IgE (FcεRI)

Soussi Gounni A 1 , Wellemans V 2 , Kamrouz K 1 , Halayko A 1 , Hamid Q 3 ,

Lamkhioued B 2

1 Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba,

Canada, 2 CHUM Research Center, University of Montreal, Montreal,

Quebec, Canada, 3 Meakins-Christie Labs, McGill University, Montreal,

Quebec, Canada

Abstract #O-11-3

Exposure of cat-allergic patients to natural cat allergen induces a late asthmatic

response in small, but not large, airways

Corren J 1 , Goldin J 2 , Zeidler M 2 , Silverman J 3 , Newman KB 4 , Tashkin DP 2

1 Allergy Research Foundation, Inc., Los Angeles, CA, USA, 2 David Geffen

School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA, 3 USC Keck School of

Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA, 4 Forest Laboratories, Inc., New York, NY,

USA

Abstract #O-11-4

Induced sputum in asthma by cockroaches

Lluch M 1 , Sastre J 1 , Fernandez-Nieto M 1 , Fernandez-Caldas E 2 , Quirce S 1

1 Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, Madrid, Spain, 2 CBF Leti, Madrid, Spain

Abstract #O-11-5

Respiratory viruses and bronchial asthma, HLA-associated markers of

susceptibility

Khaitov MR 1 , Trofimov DU 1 , Petrova TV 1 , Yakovleva KP 1 , Boldyreva

MN 1 , Alexeev LP 1

1 Institute of Immunology, Moscow, Russian Federation

Abstract #O-11-6

Mechanism of chitosan IFN-γ gene nanoparticle (CIN) therapy for asthma

Mohapatra S 1 , Lockey RF 1 , Kumar M 1 , Kong X 1 , Behera A 1 , Hellerman G 1 ,

Zhang W 1

1 University of South Florida College of Medicine & VA Hospital, Tampa,

FL, USA

Presenting authors indicated in bold.

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

Free Communication Session 15:45 - 17:15

FC12 - Atopy: Prediction and Prevention

Waterfront Ballroom B, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Patrick Holt, Australia

Co-Chair: Yoichi Kohno, Japan

Abstract #O-12-1

Sensitization in a birth cohort of unselected Danish children from

birth to 15 years of age

Halken S 1 , Hoest A 2 , Jacobsen HP 3 , Mortensen S 2 , Estmann A 4

1 Dept. of Pediatrics, Soenderborg Hospital, Soenderborg, Denmark,

2 Dept. of Pediatrics, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark,

3 Dept. of Pediatrics, Kolding Hospital, Kolding, Denmark, 4 Dept. of

Pediatrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark

Abstract #O-12-2

Early life viral infection increases ryegrass sensitization: a prospective birth

cohort study

Kemp AS 1 , Ponsonby AL 2 , Dwyer T 3 , Lim L 2 , Cochrane J 3 , Carmichael

A 4 , Couper J 3

1 The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, University of Sydney, Sydney,

NSW, Australia, 2 National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health

Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, 3 Menzies Centre for

Population Health Research, Hobart, Australia, 4 Department of Pediatrics

and Child Health, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia

Abstract #O-12-3

Maternal breast milk long chain n-3 fatty acids are associated with increased

risk of atopy in breast-fed infants

Stoney RM 1 , Woods RK 2 , Hosking CS 3 , Hill DJ 3 , Abramson MJ 2 , Thien

FCK 4

1 Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 2 Monash University,

Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 3 Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne,

Victoria, Australia, 4 Alfred Hospital & Monash University, Melbourne,

Victoria, Australia

Abstract #O-12-4

Polymorphisms of cytokine genes in atopic dermatitis

Sediva A 1 , Sismova K 1 , Vernerova E 1 , Capkova S 2 , Cinek O 3 , Malinova V 4

1 Institute of Immunology, University Hospital Motol, Prague, Czech

Republic, 2 Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Motol,

Prague, Czech Republic, 3 Second Clinic of Pediatrics, University Hospital

Motol, Prague, Czech Republic, 4 Clinic of Pediatrics, First Medical Faculty,

Prague, Czech Republic

Abstract #O-12-5

Differential response of peripheral blood T and B lymphocytes in adults

and children following ex vivo stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide

Tulic MK 1 , Zheng H 1 , Mazer BD 1 , Hamid Q 1

1 Meakins-Christie Laboratories, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada

Abstract #O-12-6

Influence of antiallergic agents on expression of costimulatory molecules in

immunized mice

Tryka E 1 , Asano K 2 , Suzaki H 3 , Ito J 3 , Hisamitsu T 2

1 Department of Otolaryngology, Medical Academy, Lublin, Poland,

2 Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Showa University, Tokyo,

Shinagawa-ku, Japan, 3 Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine,

Showa University, Tokyo, Shinagawa-ku, Japan


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

WEDNESDAY, 10 SEPTEMBER - continued

Free Communication Session 15:45 - 17:15

FC13 -Basic Mechanisms II

Waterfront Ballroom A, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Robyn O’Hehir, Australia

Abstract #P-3-1

C57BL/6 and BALB/c do not represent default Th1 and Th2 strains

in exogenous antigen-driven immune responses

Nashed BF 1 , Marshall A 1 , Thomas W 2 , HayGlass KT 1

1 University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, 2 University

of Western Australia, Perth, Australia

Abstract #O-13-2

Diagnostic value of abnormal regulation of arachidonic acid metabolism

in leukocytes from aspirin-sensitive asthmatics

Kowalski ML 1 , Ptasinska A 1 , Bienkiewicz B 1 , DuBuske L 2

1 Dept. of Clinical Immunology & Allergology, Medical University,

Lodz, Poland, 2 The Immunology Research Institute of New England,

Fitchburg, MA, USA

Abstract #O-13-3

Differences in local eosinophil infiltration for several pollen allergens in

seasonal allergic rhinitis

Narita S 1 , Shirasaki H 2 , Chin S 1 , Takano Y 1 , Kobayashi K 1 , Itoh J 1 ,

Himi T 2

1 Hakodate Municipal Hospital, Hakodate, Hokkaido, Japan, 2 Sapporo

Medical University, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan

Abstract #O-13-4

Inhibition of peroxidase release from human eosinophils: role of

SNAREs in granule-derived mediator secretion

Logan MR 1 , Odemuyiwa SO 1 , Lacy P 1 , Moqbel R 1

1 University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Abstract #O-13-5

Potential role of human eosinophils in the regulation of T-cell function

through induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

Odemuyiwa SO 1 , Ghahary AD 1 , Li Y 1 , Ghahary AG 1 , Moqbel R 1

1 University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Abstract #O-13-6

Chromosomal mapping and candidate gene sequencing of a hyper IgE

mouse mutant generated by genome wide mutagenesis reveals a novel

mutation in ZAP70

Jakob T 1 , Hrabe de Angelis M 2 , Behrendt H 1 , Ring J 1 , Wolf E 3 ,

Flaswinkel H 3

1 Division of Environmental Dermatology and Allergy GSF/TUM,

Munich, Germany, 2 Institute for Experimental Genetics, GSF, Munich,

Germany, 3 Institute of Molecular Animal Breeding, Gene Center, LMU,

Munich, Germany

Presenting authors indicated in bold.

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

Free Communication Session 15:45 - 17:15

FC14 -Immunotherapy

Waterfront Ballroom C, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Kurt Blaser, Switzerland

Co-Chair: Linda Cox, United States

Abstract #O-14-1

Double blind placebo controlled study of specific immunotherapy

(SIT) with Alutard SQ grass pollen for seasonal allergic

rhinoconjunctivitis

Calderon M 1 , Durham SR 1 , Frew AJ 2

1 National Heart and Lung Institute, London, UK, 2 Southampton

General Hospital, Southampton, UK

Abstract #O-14-3

Biodegradable microparticles for few-shot treatment of type I allergy

Schöll I 1 , Weissenböck A 2 , Förster-Waldl E 3 , Untersmayr E 1 , Gabor

F 2 , Jensen-Jarolim E 1 , Walter F 1 , Willheim M 1 , Boltz-Nitulescu G 1 ,

Scheiner O 1

1 Inst. of Pathophysiology, Vienna, Austria, 2 Inst. of Pharmaceutical

Technology and Biopharmaceutics, Vienna, Austria, 3 Dept. of Pediatrics

and Juvenile Medicine, Vienna, Austria

Abstract #O-14-4

Nasal immunization of proteosome adjuvanted birch pollen extract

inhibits the allergic skin reaction in sensitized mice

Rioux CR1 , Gelinas AM1 , Diamantakis H1 , Bellerose N1 , Poirier D1 ,

Vachon D1 , Lowell GH1 , Burt DS1 1ID Biomedical Corporation of Quebec, Ville St-Laurent, Quebec,

Canada

Abstract #O-14-5

Non-specific plasma proteins during sublingual immunotherapy

Reich M 1 , Zwacka G 2 , Markert UR 1

1 Depts. of Dermatology and Obstetrics, Friedrich Schiller University,

Jena, Germany, 2 Robert Koch Hospital, Apolda, Germany

Abstract #P-15-20

Cat allergen Fel d 1 coupled to carbohydrate-based particles: interaction

with human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

Gafvelin G 1 , Grönlund H 1 , Neimert-Andersson T 1 , Buentke E 2 ,

Jacobsson-Ekman G 2 , van Hage-Hamsten M 1 , Scheynius A 2

1 Karolinska Institutet/Dept. of Medicine, Clin. Immunol. & Allergy,

Stockholm, Sweden, 2 Karolinska Institutet/Dept. of Medicine, Clin.

Allergy Research, Stockholm, Sweden

51

Abstract #O-14-2

Successful grass pollen immunotherapy inhibits eosinophil accumulation

in the nasal mucosa: role of adhesion molecules and apoptosis

Watanabe H1 , Nouri-Aria KT1 , Jacobson MR1 , Wilson DR1 , Durham SR1 1Imperial College London at the National Heart & Lung Institute, London,

UK

WEDNESDAY, 10 SEPTEMBER


WEDNESDAY, 10 SEPTEMBER

52

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

WEDNESDAY, 10 SEPTEMBER - continued

Free Communication Session 15:45 - 17:15

FC15 -Rhinitis Therapy

Room 11, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Susan Waserman, Canada

Abstract #O-15-1

Additional benefit of montelukast for asthma in patients with both

asthma and allergic rhinitis: analysis from the COMPACT trial

Price DB 1 , Swern AS 2 , Tozzi CA 2 , Philip G 2 , Polos P 2

1 General Practice and Primary Care, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen,

UK, 2 Merck & Co., Inc., Rahway, NJ, USA

Abstract #O-15-2

Effects of fexofenadine HCl on quality of life and work productivity

in Japanese patients with cedar pollenosis

Okubo K 1 , Okuda M 2 , Gotoh M 1 , Leahy MJ 3 , Crawford B 4 , Fujita

M 5

1 Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan, 2 Shimbashi Allergy

Rheumatism Clinic, Tokyo, Japan, 3 Aventis Pharmaceuticals,

Bridgewater, NJ, USA, 4 MAPI Value, Boston, MA, USA, 5 Waseda

Clinic, Tokyo, Japan

Abstract #O-15-3

The enhancement of effect by an intranasal placebo spray on the

efficacy of an oral allergy tablet comparator

Philpot E 1 , Toler T 1 , Rickard K 1

1 GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA

Abstract #O-15-4

Assessment of sensory perceptions and preference to intranasal

corticosteroid sprays in patients with allergic rhinitis in Delhi

Khanna P 1 , Shah A 1

1 V P Chest Institute, University of Delhi, Delhi, India

Abstract #O-15-5

Efficacy and safety of fexofenadine HCl 180 mg vs cetirizine 10 mg:

a double-blind, randomized comparison

Stewart II GE 1 , Meeves S 2 , Liao Y 2 , Georges G 2

1 Allergy and Asthma Care of Florida, Ocala, FL, USA, 2 Aventis

Pharmaceuticals, Bridgewater, NJ, USA

Abstract #O-15-6

Triamcinolone acetonide (Nasacort ® AQ) improves quality of life in

persistent allergic rhinitis

Potter PC 1 , Shoeman H 2 , Van Niekerk C 2

1 University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa, 2 Aventis Pharma.,

Johannesburg, South Africa

Presenting authors indicated in bold.

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

Congress Banquet: Northern Lights

Gala Dinner and Dance 19:00 - 23:00

Location: Westin Bayshore Hotel

The aurora borealis will be recreated as a magical backdrop for a Northern

Lights Gala Dinner and Dance, featuring an evening of exceptional

dining followed by dancing to the sounds of a 16-piece band. Dress as

you would for an elegant restaurant or theatre performance. For men, a

coat and tie is appropriate. For women, an evening dress or pants suit is

appropriate.

Attendance at the Congress Banquet is limited . Tickets for registered delegates

and their guests ($75 USD each) are available on a first-come, first-served

basis.

Tickets are still available and may be purchased at the registration desk.


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

THURSDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

Breakfast Seminars 7:00 - 8:30

Pre-registration required. Admission by ticket only. Sessions are limited

to the first 25 delegates. Breakfast Seminar tickets may be purchased,

returned and exchanged at the Registration Desk located in the Lobby

of the Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre.

BR60 - Bronchitis and Asthma

Room 10, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Qutayba Hamid, Canada

Richard Martin, United States

BR61 - Asthma in Children: A Global Issue

Room 13, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Juan Jose Sienra Monge, Mexico

Pakit Vichyanond, Thailand

BR62 - Latex Allergy

Room 14, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Jordan Fink, United States

Susan Tarlo, Canada

BR63 - The Role of Allergy in Otitis Media

Room 16, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

David Skoner, United States

Paul Van Cauwenberge, Belgium

BR64 - Co-Existence of Th1 and Th2 Diseases: How

Frequently Does It Occur?

Room 19, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Sergio Romagnani, Italy

BR65 - Atopic Dermatitis

Room 18, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Thomas Werfel, Germany

BR66 - H 1 -Antihistamines: Anti-Inflammatory Effects

Room 17, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

G. Walter Canonica, Italy

Marek Jutel, Poland

BR67 - Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases

MacKenzie Room 1, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Rebecca Buckley, United States

Hans Ochs, United States

BR68 - Quality-of-Life in Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma

Gazebo II, Pan Pacific Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Michael Blaiss, United States

Eli Meltzer, United States

53

BR69 - Antibody Deficiency Syndromes and Intravenous

Gamma Globulin Therapy

Gazebo I, Pan Pacific Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Melvin Berger, United States

Paula Busse, United States

BR70 - Basophils

MacKenzie Room 2, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

A. Dean Befus, Canada

John Schroeder, United States

BR71 - Asthma and Pregnancy

Cheakamus Room, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Connie Katelaris, Australia

Michael Schatz, United States

Plenary Session 8:45 - 10:15

PL4 - New Concepts, Part 2: Allergic Skin Disease

Exhibit Hall A, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Michael Kaliner, United States

Co-Chair: Connie Katelaris, Australia

Pathogenesis of Chronic Urticaria: Idiopathic No Longer?

Allen Kaplan, United States

New Concepts of Inflammation in Atopic Dermatitis

Thomas Bieber, Germany

Eczema and Dermatitis

Johannes Ring, Germany

Exhibit Hall & Poster Hall Open 9:00 - 17:00

Exhibit Halls B & C, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Coffee Break 10:15 - 10:45

Exhibit Hall B, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Parallel Symposia 10:30 - 12:00

PR16 - Prevention of Asthma and Allergy (PAA)

Parkview Terrace, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

A program of the World Allergy Organization—IAACI (WAO)

and the World Health Organization (WHO)

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Allen Kaplan, United States

Co-Chair: Nikolai Khaltaev, Switzerland

Environmental Influences

Innes Asher, New Zealand

Early Immunological Influences

Patrick Holt, Australia

Preventive Measures

Arne Host, Denmark

Recommendations

Tari Haahtela, Finland

THURSDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER


THURSDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER

54

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

THURSDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER - continued

PR17 - Allergy Trends in Europe

Ballroom A, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Sponsored by the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical

Immunology (EAACI)

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Sergio Bonini, Italy

Co-Chair: Anthony Frew, United Kingdom

Immunological Basis of the Hygiene Hypothesis

Harald Renz, Germany

Can Allergy Avoidance in the Home Provide Protection?

Adnan Custovic, United Kingdom

The Tree Nut and Peanut Allergy Epidemics

Jonathan Hourihane, United Kingdom

PR18 - Advances in Immunology

Ballroom C, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Sponsored by the Japanese Society of Allergology (JSA)

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Takeru Ishikawa, Japan

Co-Chair: Terumasa Miyamoto, Japan

IL-9 and Allergic Inflammation

Qutayba Hamid, Canada

IL-6: Past, Present and Future

Tadamitsu Kishimoto, Japan

Th1/Th2 Polarization and Chemokine Receptors

Koji Matsushima, Japan

Platinum Symposium 10:30 - 12:00

PR19 - Controlling Allergic Asthma with Anti-IgE

Therapy

Ballroom B, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Supported through an unrestricted educational grant from

Novartis Pharma AG

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: S.G.O. Johansson, Sweden

Co-Chair: Paul O’Byrne, Canada

History of IgE: Should the Cat Stay?

Thomas Platts-Mills, United States

Allergic Asthma Today: Is It Controlled?

Louis-Philippe Boulet, Canada

Omalizumab: A Novel Anti-IgE in Clinical Studies in Asthma

Eli Meltzer, United States

IgE: The Future from the Past

S.G.O. Johansson, Sweden

Luncheon Seminars 12:15 - 13:45

Pre-registration required. Admission by ticket only. Sessions are limited

to the first 25 delegates. Luncheon Seminar tickets may be purchased,

returned and exchanged at the Registration Desk located in the Lobby

of the Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre.

LU60 - Airway Remodeling

Room 10, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Philip Lieberman, United States

Robert Schellenberg, Canada

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

LU61 - Immunotherapy for Asthma

Room 19, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Peter Creticos, United States

Stephen Durham, United Kingdom

LU62 - Eosinophils and Allergy

Room 14, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Judah Denburg, Canada

Redwan Moqbel, Canada

LU63 - Anti-IgE and Immunotherapy

Room 18, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Thomas Casale, United States

Sabina Rak, Sweden

LU64 - Mites (House Dust, Storage, Outdoor Spider)

and Asthma

Room 17, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Chein-Soo Hong, Korea

You-Young Kim, Korea

LU65 - Asthma Education for Children and Their

Families

Room 16, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Carlos Baena-Cagnani, Argentina

Yu Zhi Chen, China

LU66 - Allergic Conjunctivitis

Room 13, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

William Berger, United States

Sergio Bonini, Italy

LU67 - Vasculitis

MacKenzie Room 1, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

John Condemi, United States

LU68 - Pan-Allergens

MacKenzie Room 2, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Kurt Blaser, Switzerland

Rudolf Valenta, Austria

LU69 - Chronic Cough

Cheakamus Room, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Hee-Bom Moon, Korea

Debate of the Day 14:00 - 15:30

D4 - Chronic Sinusitis: Infection or Allergy?

Room 15, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Eli Meltzer, United States

Infection - Claus Bachert, Belgium

Allergy - Michael Kaliner, United States


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

THURSDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER - continued

Parallel Symposium 14:00 - 15:30

PR20 - Atopic Eczema and Allergy

Ballroom B, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Vincent Beltrani, United States

Co-Chair: Gary Rachelefsky, United States

Eczema Morphology and Immunopathology

Carla Bruijnzeel-Koomen, The Netherlands

Pathogenesis of Atopic Dermatitis

Donald Leung, United States

The Atopy Patch Test

Ulf Darsow, Germany

Meet the Professor 15:45 - 17:15

MP7 - Food Allergy

Room 1, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Pakit Vichyanond, Thailand

Professor: Hugh Sampson, United States

MP8 - Asthma: Inflammatory Markers in Induced

Sputum

Room 2, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Rajendra Prasad, India

Professor: Frederick Hargreave, Canada

Interactive Workshops 15:45 - 17:15

WK10 - Anaphylaxis: Causes and Controls

Room 15, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Anthony Dubois, The Netherlands

Pamela Ewan, United Kingdom

David Golden, United States

Lee Bee Wah, Singapore

WK11 - Atopic Dermatitis: Treatment and the Allergic

March

Governor General Suite, Pan Pacific Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Thomas Bieber, Germany

Mark Boguniewicz, United States

Charles Naspitz, Brazil

John Warner, United Kingdom

WK12 - Asthma in Adults

Malaspina Room, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Chair: Felicidad Cua-Lim, Philippines

E. Regis McFadden, United States

Harold Nelson, United States

55

Poster Sessions 15:45 - 17:00

Exhibit Hall C, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Posters are on display 9:00 – 17:00. Authors are present to discuss their

posters 15:45 – 17:00.

No CME Credit will be awarded for this activity.

Poster Categories:

Allergens

Drug Allergy

Food Hypersensitivity

Occupational Asthma and Allergy

Pharmacotherapy

Urticaria, Angioedema and Anaphylaxis

Refer to page 88 for abstract titles and authors.

Robson Street

THURSDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER


THURSDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER

56

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

THURSDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER - continued

Free Communication Session 15:45 - 17:15

FC16 - Allergens: Clinical Implications

Waterfront Ballroom B, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Kamal Hanna, Egypt

Co-Chair: Rudolf Valenta, Austria

Abstract #O-16-1

Incidence of IgE against Ascaris lumbricoides and Toxocara canis in

patients with very high IgE, and with abdominal discomfort, eczema

or wheezing

Nordling K 1 , Whist JE 2 , Skaar OH 3

1 Sykehuset Innlandet Health Authority, Gjovik, Oppland, Norway,

2 Sykehuset Ostfold Health Authority, Fredrikstad, Ostfold, Norway,

3 DPC Scandinavia, Drammen, Buskerud, Norway

Abstract #O-16-2

Trichophyton rubrum, an important fungal allergen in the pathogenesis

of nasal polyposis and sinusitis

Hao J 1 , Shang HS 1 , Pang YT 1 , Bi XZ 1 , Chew FT 1 , Wang D 1

1 National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore

Abstract #O-16-3

Evaluation of cross-reactivity between Holoptelea integrifolia and

Parietaria judaica pollen members of Urticaceae

Sharma S 1 , Panzani R 2 , shah A 3 , Kumar P 4 , Singh AB 5

1 Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, Delhi, India,

2 Laboratoire de Recherches, Marseilles, France, 3 V. P. Chest Institute,

Delhi, India, 4 Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, Delhi,

India, 5 Institute of genomics and Integrative Biology, Delhi, India

Abstract #O-16-4

Common aeroallergens and the role of hyposensitization in allergic

rhinitis and its comorbidities

Sharma S 1

1 Dr Sanjiv’s E.N.T. Care & Allergy Centre, Jalandhar, Punjab, India

Abstract #O-16-5

Allergenicity of homologs to fungal, pollen, food and insect allergens

in dust mite, Blomia tropicalis: identification of new classes of panallergens

Shang HS 1 , Kuay KT 1 , Wang WL 1 , Lim SH 1 , Chew FT 1

1 National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore

Abstract #O-16-6

The importance of knowing the actual pollination season for common

allergenic trees

Coates LL 1 , Coates FC 1 , Yang WH 2

1 Aerobiology Research Laboratories, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, 2 Allergy

and Asthma Research Centre, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Presenting authors indicated in bold.

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

Free Communication Session 15:45 - 17:15

FC17 - Asthma Therapy II

Waterfront Ballroom C, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Motohiro Kurosawa, Japan

Co-Chair: Richard Nicklas, United States

Abstract #O-17-1

Ciclesonide, a novel inhaled corticosteroid (ICS), does not suppress

hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis function

Kaliner M 1 , White M 1 , Chervinsky P 2 , Amin D 3 , Rohatagi S 3 , Williams

J 3 , Kundu S 3 , Banerji D 3 , Hamedani P 3

1 Institute for Allergy and Asthma, Wheaton, MD, USA, 2 New England

Clinical Studies, North Dartmouth, MA, USA, 3 Aventis, Bridgewater,

NJ, USA

Abstract #O-17-2

Novel immunomodulatory oligonucleotides (IMOs) prevent

development of allergic airway inflammation and airway

hyperresponsiveness in asthma

Agrawal DK 1 , Edwan J 1 , Kandimalla ER 2 , Yu D 2 , Agrawal S 2

1 Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE, USA,

2 Hybridon Inc., Cambridge, MA, USA

Abstract #O-17-3

Omalizumab, an anti-IgE antibody, suppresses airway inflammation in mild

allergic asthma via a reduction in mast cell surface-associated interleukin-4

Djukanovic R 1 , Wilson SJ 1 , Kraft M 2 , Jarjour N 3 , Steel M 1 , Chung KF 4 ,

Bau W 5 , Fowler-Taylor A 5 , Matthews J 5 , Busse WW 5 , Holgate ST 5 , Fahy J 5

1 University of Southampton, Southampton, UK, 2 National Jewish Center,

Denver, USA, 3 University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA, 4 National Heart

and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, UK, 5 East Hanover, USA

Abstract #O-17-4

Omalizumab, an anti-IgE antibody, decreases the rate of asthma

deterioration-related incidents in patients with poorly controlled allergic

asthma

Chung KF 1 , Britton M 2 , Harnest U 3 , Ayre G 4 , Blogg M 4 , Fox H 4

1 National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, UK, 2 St

Peters Hospital, Chertsey, UK, 3 CLIN-GUARD GMBH, Munich,

Germany, 4 Novartis Horsham Research Centre, Horsham, UK

Abstract #O-3-3

De novo synthesis of an antagonistic natriuretic peptide in the lung

attenuates allergic asthma in mice

Mohapatra S 1 , Lockey RF 1 , Hellerman G 1 , Kong X 1 , San Juan H 1 ,

Zhang W 1 , Gonnarsdottir J 1

1 University of South Florida College of Medicine & VA Hospital,

Tampa, FL, USA

Abstract #O-17-6

The effect of swimming training on aerobic capacity and pulmonary

functions in children with asthma

Altintas D 1 , Cevit O 1 , Ergen N 2 , Karakoc G 1 , Inci D 1

1 Cukurova University, Faculty of Medicine, Pediatric Allergy-

Immunology, Adana, Turkey, 2 Cukurova University, Faculty of

Medicine, Physiology Department, Adana, Turkey


Presenting authors indicated in bold.

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

THURSDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER - continued

Free Communication Session 15:45 - 17:15

FC18 -Drug Allergy

Room 12, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Juan Ivancevich, Argentina

Co-Chair: Robert Schellenberg, Canada

Abstract #O-18-1

Clinical and biochemical differences in nasal and pulmonary

hypersensitivity responses to aspirin

Swierczynska M 1 , Nizankowska E 1 , Radwan J 1 , Nagraba K 1 , Gielicz

A 1 , Szczeklik A 1

1 Dept. of Medicine CMUJ, Cracow, Poland

Abstract #O-18-2

Celecoxib is well tolerated in patients with NSAID intolerance

Elshorst-Schmidt T 1 , Kleinhans M 1 , Koeberich V 1 , Kaufmann R 1 ,

Boehncke WH 1

1 Dept. of Dermatology, Univ. of Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany

Abstract #O-18-3

Excessive medication adverse events in women with chronic fatigue

syndrome (CFS)

Baraniuk JN 1 , Maibach H 1

1 Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA

Abstract #O-18-4

Tolerance to fondaparinux in a patient allergic to heparins and

heparinoids

Ludwig RJ 1 , Beier C 1 , Lindhoff-Last E 2 , Kaufmann R 1 , Boehncke

WH 1

1 Dept. of Dermatology, Univ. of Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany,

2 Dept. of Internal Medicine, Univ. of Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany

Abstract #O-18-5

A novel, time-efficient clinical practice pathway reduces prophylactic

vancomycin use in surgical patients with history of penicillin allergy

Madaan A 1 , Markus P 1 , Li JT 1

1 Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA

Abstract #O-18-6

Allergic reaction to cephalosporins and their cross-reactivity with

penicillins in children

Atanaskovic-Markovic M 1 , Vuckovic O 2 , Todoric D 3 , Nestorovic B 1

1 University Children’s Hospital, Beograd, Yugoslavia, 2 Institute for

Immunology and Virusology, Torlak, Beograd, Yugoslavia, 3 Primary Care

DZ, Beograd, Yugoslavia

Free Communication Session 15:45 - 17:15

FC19 -Food Allergy

Room 11, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: John Dean, Canada

Co-Chair: Wade Watson, Canada

Abstract #P-19-7

CD86 regulates peanut-specific cytokine responses in non-allergic

humans

Thottingal T 1 , Simons FER 1 , Stanley S 2 , Bannon GA 2 , HayGlass KT 1

1 University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, 2 University

of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA

Abstract #O-19-2

Prognostic factors of cow’s milk allergy presenting with gastrointestinal

symptoms in early infancy

Suzuki S 1 , Shimojo N 1 , Hoshioka A 1 , Numata T 1 , Tomiita M 1 , Kohno

Y 1 , Arima T 1 , Tateno N 1 , Kojima H 1

1 Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Chiba, Japan

Abstract #O-19-3

Evaluation of food challenge tests in terms of clinical applications

Shinoda S 1 , Inoue R 2 , Teramoto T 2 , Kondo N 2

1 Gujo Central Hospital, Gifu University, School of Medicine, Gujo,

Japan, 2 Gifu University, School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics,

Gifu, Japan

Abstract #O-19-4

The Norwegian national reporting system and register of severe allergic

reactions to food

Lovik M 1 , Wiker HG 1 , Kjelkevik R 2 , Egaas E 3 , Stensby BA 1 , Gondrosen

B 2

1 Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway, 2 Norwegian Food

Control Authority, Oslo, Norway, 3 Veterinary Institute, Oslo, Norway

57

Abstract #O-19-5

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration: approaches to food allergens

Vierk KA 1

1 U.S. Food and Drug Administration, College Park, MD, USA

Abstract #O-19-6

Prevalence and severity of oral allergy syndrome

Zauli D1 , Zucchini S1 , Grassi A1 , Vukatana G1 , Ballardini G1 , Bianchi

FB1 1Dept. Int Med, Cardioangiol, Hepatol, University of Bologna, Bologna,

Italy

THURSDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER


THURSDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER

58

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

THURSDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER - continued

Free Communication Session 15:45 - 17:15

FC20 -Occupational Asthma

Waterfront Ballroom A, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Donald Stark, Canada

Co-Chair: Ashok Shah, India

Abstract #O-20-1

Airborne concentrations of asthmagenic snow crab proteins

immunochemically quantified for Canadian shore stationed processing

facilities

Swanson MC 1 , Pelley B 2 , Helleur R 2 , Chretien P 3 , Lehrer S 4 , Neis B 2 ,

Cartier A 5

1 Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN, USA, 2 Memorial University of

Newfoundland, St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada, 3 CLSC et Centre

d’hebergement de Manicouagan, Baie-Comeau, Quebec, Canada,

4 Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA, 5 Sacre-coeur Hospital,

Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Abstract #O-20-2

One-week variation of cotton dust and endotoxin levels in a cottonmill:

relation with the daily change of the expiratory flow rates

Torres Costa J 1 , Ferreira JA 1 , Castro E 1 , Vaz M 1

1 Allergy Unit, Hospital S. João, Porto, Portugal

Abstract #O-20-3

Risk factors for annual FEV 1 decrease in textile industry workers

Torres Costa J 1 , Ferreira JA 1 , Castro E 1 , Vaz M 1

1 Allergy Unit, Hospital S. João, Porto, Portugal

Abstract #O-20-4

Chronic and acute occupational exposure of researchers and animal

house workers to rat allergen

Tovey ER 1 , Mitakakis TZ 2 , Johnson AR 3 , Yates DH 3 , Sercombe JK 3 ,

Marks GB 1

1 CRC for Asthma/Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, Sydney,

NSW, Australia, 2 Dept. of Epidemiology, Monash University,

Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 3 CRC for Asthma, Sydney, NSW,

Australia

Abstract #O-20-5

Increased level of specific IgG to cytokeratin (CK) 19 in toluene

diisocyanate (TDI)-induced asthma patients

Park HS 1 , Kim HA 1 , Nahm DH 1 , Bahn JW 2 , Choi JH 1 , Suh YJ 1 , Suh

CH 1

1 Ajou University Hospital, Suwon, Republic of Korea, 2 Hallym

University Sacred Heart Hospital, Pyungchon, Republic of Korea

Abstract #O-20-6

Chemical worker’s lung due to an epoxy component in polyester powder

paint.

Quirce S 1 , Fernandez-Nieto M 1 , Fernandez-Caldas E 2 , Gorgolas M 1 ,

Sastre J 1

1 Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, Madrid, Spain, 2 CBF Leti, Madrid, Spain

Presenting authors indicated in bold.

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

All-Congress Event:

The WAO Western Barbecue 19:30 - 23:00

Location: BC Place Stadium

As you enter BC Place Stadium, you will be transported into the Old

West. Two stages featuring local bands will play music from a variety of

eras. Delegates and guests will be greeted by strolling costumed

entertainers and will enjoy an authentic Western barbecue, after which

they can prospect for gold and dance the night away. You are encouraged

to wear jeans or other casual, comfortable clothes.

The All-Congress Event is open to all registered delegates and their registered

guests at no additional fee. Name badges are required.


FRIDAY, 12 SEPTEMBER

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

Breakfast Seminars 7:00 - 8:30

Pre-registration required. Admission by ticket only. Sessions are limited

to the first 25 delegates. Breakfast Seminar tickets may be purchased,

returned and exchanged at the Registration Desk located in the Lobby

of the Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre.

BR80 - Oral Allergy Syndrome

Room 13, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Dietrich Kraft, Austria

BR81 - Food-Induced Anaphylaxis

Room 10, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Dan Atkins, United States

Hugh Sampson, United States

BR82 - Diagnostic Tests for Food Allergy

Room 19, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Ulf Darsow, Germany

Alain de Weck, Switzerland

BR83 - Use of Induced Sputum in Asthma

Room 16, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Louis-Philippe Boulet, Canada

Frederick Hargreave, Canada

BR84 - Viral Infection and Asthma

Room 17, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Robert Lemanske, United States

BR85 - Exercise-Induced Asthma

Room 18, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Tari Haahtela, Finland

Connie Katelaris, Australia

BR86 - Inhalation Devices in Asthma and Rhinitis

Room 14, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Myrna Dolovich, Canada

Eugene Weinberg, South Africa

BR87 - Topical Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

Gazebo I, Pan Pacific Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Thomas Bieber, Germany

Knut Brockow, Germany

BR88 - Contact Allergy: Dermatitis

Gazebo II, Pan Pacific Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Jurgen Knop, Germany

Axel Schnuch, Germany

Plenary Session 8:45 - 10:15

PL5 - New Concepts, Part 3: Allergen Immunotherapy/

Vaccines

Exhibit Hall A, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Carlos Baena-Cagnani, Argentina

Co-Chair: Richard Lockey, United States

Mechanisms

Kurt Blaser, Switzerland

Efficacy in Rhinitis and Asthma

Hans-Jorgen Malling, Denmark

Alternate Routes

G. Walter Canonica, Italy

Novel Approaches

Dale Umetsu, United States

Exhibit Hall & Poster Hall Open 9:00 - 17:00

Exhibit Halls B & C, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Coffee Break 10:15 - 10:45

Exhibit Hall B, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Parallel Symposia 10:30 - 12:00

PR21 - Primary Prevention of Allergic Diseases

Ballroom A, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Karnen Baratawidjaja, Indonesia

Co-Chair: Ranbir Kaulsay, Malaysia

Role of Dietary Factors

Susan Prescott, Australia

Role of Early Allergen Exposure

Wayne Thomas, Australia

Role of Environmental Pollutants

Stephen Stick, Australia

PR22 - Asthma: Special Issues

Ballroom B, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Joao de Mello, Brazil

Co-Chair: Pakit Vichyanond, Thailand

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

Alvin Ing, Australia

Asthma and Pregnancy

Michael Schatz, United States

Steroid-Resistant Asthma

Robert Lemanske, United States

59

FRIDAY, 12 SEPTEMBER


FRIDAY, 12 SEPTEMBER

60

FRIDAY, 12 SEPTEMBER - continued

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

Luncheon Seminars 12:15 - 13:45

Pre-registration required. Admission by ticket only. Sessions are limited

to the first 25 delegates. Luncheon Seminar tickets may be purchased,

returned and exchanged at the Registration Desk located in the Lobby

of the Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre.

LU80 - Atopic Dermatitis

Room 10, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Carla Bruijnzeel-Koomen, The Netherlands

Alexander Kapp, Germany

LU81 - International Study of Asthma and Allergies in

Childhood: Moving Forward

Room 13, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Innes Asher, New Zealand

LU82 - Drug Allergy

Room 14, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Alain de Weck, Switzerland

Y.Y. Adrian Wu, China

LU83 - Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

Room 16, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Alvin Ing, Australia

Mark Stein, United States

LU84 - Acquired Immunodeficiency Disease

Room 17, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

William Shearer, United States

LU85 - Pollinosis and Food Allergy

Room 18, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Christina Santa Marta, United States

LU86 - Treatment of Allergic Rhinitis

Room 19, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Joao de Mello, Brazil

Ruby Pawankar, Japan

LU87 - Anaphylaxis in Schools

Gazebo I, Pan Pacific Hotel

CME Credit: 1.5

Michael Gold, Australia

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

Parallel Symposia 14:00 - 15:30

PR23 - Future Therapies of Allergy

Ballroom A, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Emil Bardana, United States

Co-Chair: Lanny Rosenwasser, United States

DNA-Based Vaccines for Allergic Disorders

David Broide, United States

New Approaches to the Treatment of Asthma

Thomas Casale, United States

New Pharmacologic Approaches to Allergic Rhinitis

Stephen Durham, United Kingdom

PR24 - Allergy and Asthma: A Worldwide Perspective

Ballroom B, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

CME Credit: 1.5

Co-Chair: Alain de Weck, Switzerland

Co-Chair: Revaz Sepiashvili, Russia

Asthma in Africa

Cassiem Motala, South Africa

Asthma Mortality in Latin America

Hugo Neffen, Argentina

Asthma Education and Implementation in India

Raj Singh, India

Prevalence of Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis in Asia

You-Young Kim, Korea


Imagine research targeting IgE, a key component of the

immune mechanism underlying allergic asthma, 1 to better

understand its role in the disease

Imagine pursuing strategies to interrupt the allergicinflammatory

cascade before inflammatory mediators

are released to do their damage 1,2

Imagine understanding why many asthma patients remain

suboptimally controlled despite current management strategies 3

1. Respiratory insufficiency—pathophysiology, diagnosis, oxygen therapy. In: Guyton AC, Hall JE, eds. Textbook of Medical Physiology.

9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: WB Saunders Company; 1996:537–545. 2. Corry DB, Kheradmand F. Induction and regulation of the IgE

response. Nature. 1999;402(suppl):B18–B23. 3. Global Initiative for Asthma® (GINA). Global Strategy for Asthma Management and

Prevention. Bethesda, Md: National Institutes of Health. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; revised 2002. NIH publication 02-3659.

©2003 Genentech, Inc. and Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation

M00292-R1/CXOL-1002 2/03 Printed in U.S.A.

RESEARCH TARGETING IgE—

Imagine where the science can take us

®

61


MONDAY

62

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

MONDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER

Poster Sessions 15:45 - 17:00

Exhibit Hall C, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Posters are on display 9:00 – 17:00. Authors are present to

discuss their posters 15:45 – 17:00.

No CME Credit will be awarded for this activity.

Airway Disease

P-1-1 Factors of airway hyperresponsiveness in patientswith

chronic airflow limitation

Choi BW1 , Park IW2 , Kim JY1 1Chung-Ang University Yongsan Hospital, Seoul, Republic of

Korea, 2Chung-Ang University Pildong Hospital, Seoul, Republic

of Korea

P-1-2 Can nasal allergy lead to secretory otitis media? Our

experience

Passàli D1 , Damiani V1 , Saginario V1 , Bellussi L11ENT Department, University of Siena, Siena, Italy

P-1-3 Differences in pulmonary function and allergic tests

between COPD patients with wheeze and those without

wheeze

Sakamoto Y1 , Takei T1 , Ito K1 , Kuboshima M2 , Kuboshima Y2 ,

Fukushi M2 , Kikuchi S2 , Nishi Y2 , Sakata K2 , Nagata M2 ,

Kuramitsu K2 1Yugawara Kousei Nenkin Hospital, Yugawara, Kanagawa, Japan,

2Saitama Medical School, Moroyama, Saitama, Japan

P-1-4 Cytokine status of patients with chronic bronchitis

development caused by secondary immunodeficiency

Sepiashvili YR1 , Slavyanskaya TA1 , Chikhladze MV1 1National Institute of Clinical Immunology, Allergology and

Asthma, Moscow, Russian Federation

P-1-5 Acute bagassosis masquerading respectively as pulmonary

infection, tuberculosis and congestive cardiac failure

Ishaq IM1 1Al-Junaid Hospital, Nowshera, NWFP, Pakistan

P-1-6 Elevated C reactive protein in asthma

Condemi JJ1 , Pattanaik D2 1Allergy Asthma Immunology of Rochester PC, Rochester, NY,

USA, 2University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA

P-1-7 Allergic diseases: defending and compensative immune

reactions, clinical symptoms and determination of efficient

treatment

Koryukina IP1 , Mishlanov VJu1 , Sidorov DV2 , Tuev AV1 1 2 Perm State Medical Academy, Perm, Russian Federation, "Ust-

Kachka resort”, Ust-Kachka, Perm region, Russian Federation

P-1-8 Role of the condensate of exhaled air in the objectification

of the degree of gravity of smoking patients with chronic

obstructive pulmonary disease

Ivashkevich DL1 1Belorushian State Medical University, Minsk, Belarus

P-1-9 Clinical features differentiating patients with atopic asthma

(AA), nonatopic asthma (NA) and COPD

Halasa M1 , Halasa J2 , Machalinski B1 1General Pathology Department, Pomeranian Academy of

Medicine, Szczecin, Poland, 2Microbiology and Immunology

Department, Pomeranian Academy of Medicine, Szczecin, Poland

P-1-10 Immune changes in patients with chronic obstructive

bronchitis

Samoylova NE1 , Sokurenco SI1 , Ershova OV1 , Karaulov AV1 ,

Bondarenko NL1 1Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy, Moscow, Russian

Federation

POSTER SESSIONS

P-1-11 Serum levels of oncostatin-M in relation to respiratory

syncytial virus infection in wheezy infants

Nisli K1 , Önes SÜ1 , Tamay Z1 , Güler N1 1Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Department of

Pediatrics, Istanbul, Turkey

Asthma: Therapy

P-2-1 Effect of suplatast tosilate (IPD), a Th2 cytokine inhibitor,

on moderate to severe persistent asthma

Nakagawa T1 , Miyamoto T2 1Dept. Int. Med., St. Marianna University Sch. Med., Kawasaki,

Kanagawa, Japan, 2Japan Clinical Allergy Institute, Tokyo, Tokyo,

Japan

P-2-2 Identifying predictors of response to suplatast tosilate

among patients with moderate or severe asthma on steroid

therapy

Nakagawa T1 , Okayama Y2 , Oka T2 1Dept. Int. Med., St. Marianna University Sch. Med., Kawasaki,

Kanagawa, Japan, 2Res. Lab. Optimal Medication, Taiho Pharm.

Co. Ltd, Tokushima, Tokushima, Japan

P-2-3 Budesonide/formoterol adjustable maintenance dosing

reduces asthma exacerbations compared with fixed dosing: a

5-month study in Canada

FitzGerald M1 , Boulet LP2 , McIvor A3 , Becker A4 , Sears MR5 ,

Ernst P6 , Smiljanic-Georgijev N7 , Lee J7 1University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia,

Canada, 2Laval University, Quebec, Quebec, Canada, 3Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, 4University of

Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, 5McMaster University,

Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, 6McGill University, Montreal,

Quebec, Canada, 7AstraZeneca Canada Inc., Mississauga, Canada

P-2-4 Assessment of infectious nonatopic asthma and COPD

patients’ treatment with autovaccine: double-blind placebocontrolled

trial

Halasa M1 , Halasa J2 1General Pathology Department, Pomeranian Academy of

Medicine, Szczecin, Poland, 2Microbiology and Immunology

Department, Pomeranian Academy of Medicine, Szczecin, Poland

P-2-5 Budesonide/formoterol adjustable maintenance dosing

effectively improves asthma symptom severity: a multicentre

Canadian study

Sears MR1 , McIvor A2 , Becker A3 , FitzGerald M4 , Boulet LP5 ,

Ernst P6 , Smiljanic-Georgijev N7 , Lee J7 1 2 McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, Dalhousie

University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, 3University of

Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, 4University of British

Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, 5Laval University, Quebec, Quebec, Canada, 6McGill University,

Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 7AstraZeneca Canada Inc.,

Mississauga, Canada

P-2-6 Study of asthmatic children with treatment of Ketotifen

Douglas Campbell MDC1 110 de Octobre Pediatric - Obstetric Hospital, Havana, Havana

City, Cuba

P-2-7 Ipratropium bromide plus nebulized β-2 agonist for the

treatment of hospitalized children with acute asthma attack

Özdemir M 1 , Akçakaya N 1 , Camcioglu Y 1 , Çokugras H 1

1 IU. Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Dept. of Pediatrics, Allergy

Division, Istanbul, Turkey


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

MONDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER - continued

POSTER SESSIONS

P-2-8 Nedocromil sodium in the treatment of moderate and severe

asthma

Zdraveska MM1 , Dimitrioevska DT1 , Gjorcev AS1 , Todevski D1 ,

Dokic D1 1Pulmology and Allergy Clinic, Skopje, Macedonia

P-2-9 Onset of action and duration of bronchodilator effect of

nebulized formoterol solution

Rosario NA1 , Mascarenhas E1 , Riedi CA1 , Kamoi T1 1Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, Parana, Brazil

P-2-10 The effects of montelukast on pulmonary function and

bronchial hyperresponsiveness in asthmatic children

Visitsunthorn N1 , Chirdjirapong V1 , Santadusit S1 ,

Jirapongsananuruk O1 , Kolmontri C2 , Vichyanond P1 1Department of Pediatrics, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University,

Bangkok, Thailand, 2Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University,

Bangkok, Thailand

P-2-11 Patients suffering with asthma exacerbations treatment with

high doses of inhaled corticosteroids and their quality of life

Gogunskaya IV1 , Yashina LA2 , Gorovenko NG3 1 2 City Hospital, Melitopol, Zaporizhzhya, Ukraine, Institute of

Ftisiopulmonology, Kiev, Ukraine, 3Postgraduate Medical

Academy, Kiev, Ukraine

P-2-12 Effect of cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist on airway

wall remodeling

Toda M1 , Cheng G1 , Masuda H1 , Honda K1 , Eda F1 , Aoki Y1 ,

Fukuda T1 1Dokkyo University School of Medicine, Mibu, Tochigi, Japan

P-2-13 Poor adherence to NAEPP2 guidelines of patients with mild

to moderate asthma

Wineinger JC1 , Naguwa S1 , Teuber S1 , Ziboh V1 , Gershwin ME1 1UC Davis School of Medicine, Davis, CA, USA

P-2-14 The effectiveness of pranlukast hydrate, a leukotriene

receptor antagonist, in the treatment of childhood bronchial

asthma

Ikeda M1 , Araki T1 , Takahashi A1 , Kanbe T1 , Takemoto Y1 ,

Kitamura T2 1National Fukuyama Hospital, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, Japan,

2Nihonkokan Fukuyama Hospital, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, Japan

P-2-15 Efficacy of local nasal immunotherapy for Dp2-induced

airway inflammation in mice: using Dp2 peptide and fungal

immunomodulatory peptide

Liu YH1 , Kao MC2 , Lai YL2 , Tsai JJ1 1Section of Allergy and Immunology, Cathay General Hospital-

Taipei, Taipei, Taiwan, 2Graduate Institute of Physiology, College

of Medicine, NTU, Taipei, Taiwan

P-2-16 Improvement of asthma control with the use of combined

medicine salmeterol + fluticasone (two-in-one)

Feschenko YI1 , Yashyna LA1 , Polyanska MA1 , Gymenuk GL1 ,

Sidun GV1 , Klochko LT1 1Institute of Phthisiology and Pulmonology, Kiev, Ukraine

P-2-17 Effectiveness of HFA beclomethasone dipropionate vs CFC

beclomethasone dipropionate in moderately asthmatic

patients

Feschenko YI1 , Yashyna LA1 , Polyanska MA1 , Tumanov AN1 ,

Djavad IV1 , Chepel JA1 1Institute of Phthisiology and Pulmonology, Kiev, Ukraine

63

P-2-18 Is well-controlled asthma weeks a useful measure? Fewer

exacerbations in patients treated with budesonide/

formoterol than salmeterol/fluticasone

Aalbers R1 , Backer V2 , Kava TTK3 , Welte T4 , Omenaas ER5 ,

Bergqvist PBF6 , Sandström T7 1Department of Pulmonology, Martini Hospital, Groningen,

Netherlands, 2Respiratory Unit, Dept. of Internal Medicine,

Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark, 3Lääkärikeskus ITE

Oy Siltakatu 10 A 3 krs, Joensuu, Finland, 4Dept. of Pneumology

& Intensive Care Medicine, University of Magdeburg,

Magdeburg, Germany, 5Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland

University Hospital, Bergen, Norway, 6AstraZeneca R&D Lund,

Lund, Sweden, 7Dept. of Respiratory Medicine & Allergy,

University Hospital, Umea, Sweden

P-2-19 Improvements in FEV are greater with budesonide/

1

formoterol than with salmeterol/fluticasone

Aalbers R1 , Backer V2 , Kava TTK3 , Welte T4 , Omenaas ER5 ,

Bergqvist PBF6 , Sandström T7 1Department of Pulmonology, Martini Hospital, Groningen,

Netherlands, 2Respiratory Unit, Dept. of Internal Medicine,

Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark, 3Lääkärikeskus ITE

Oy Siltakatu 10 A 3 krs, Joensuu, Finland, 4Dept. of Pneumology

& Intensive Care Medicine, University of Magdeburg,

Magdeburg, Germany, 5Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland

University Hospital, Bergen, Norway, 6AstraZeneca R&D Lund,

Lund, Sweden, 7Dept. of Respiratory Medicine & Allergy,

University Hospital, Umea, Sweden

P-2-20 Adjustable dosing with budesonide/formoterol reduces the

rate of asthma exacerbations compared with fixed dosing

salmeterol/fluticasone

Aalbers R1 , Backer V2 , Kava TTK3 , Welte T4 , Omenaas ER5 ,

Bergqvist PBF6 , Sandström T7 1Department of Pulmonology, Martini Hospital, Groningen,

Netherlands, 2Respiratory Unit, Dept. of Internal Medicine,

Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark, 3Lääkärikeskus ITE

Oy Siltakatu 10 A 3 krs, Joensuu, Finland, 4Dept. of Pneumology

& Intensive Care Medicine, University of Magdeburg,

Magdeburg, Germany, 5Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland

University Hospital, Bergen, Norway, 6AstraZeneca R&D Lund,

Lund, Sweden, 7Dept. of Respiratory Medicine & Allergy,

University Hospital, Umea, Sweden

P-2-21 Influences of inhaled fluticasone propionate (FP) and

pranlukast hydrate on asthmatic children in National

Ootake Hospital night clinic

Okahata H1 1National Ootake Hospital, Ootake, Hiroshima, Japan

P-2-22 Oral delivery of recombinant Der p 2 allergen can alleviate

airway inflammation in murine model of asthma

Ho H1 , Jeng ST2 , Chiang BL1 1Graduate Institute of Immunology, College of Medicine, NTU,

Taipei, Taiwan, 2Department of Botany, College of National

Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan

P-2-23 Further data about the treatment of allergic asthma with

acupuncture

Cucci M1 , Garofano G1 , Geroldi GF1 , Pirino A2 1Italian Advanced Institute of Acupuncture, Milano, Italy,

2Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari,

Italy

P-2-24 Importance of early intervention with salmeterol plus

inhaled corticosteroids in the treatment of asthma

Suzuki N 1 , Fueta M 1 , To M 1 , Yamada H 1 , Ogawa C 1 , Sano Y 1

1 Dept. Allergy & Resp. Med., Doai Memorial Hospital, Tokyo,

Japan

MONDAY


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WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

P-2-25 Clinical effects of salmeterol on patients with bronchial

asthma: assessment of respiratory function and QOL

Tochigi T1 , Minowa K1 , Egashira Y2 1 2 Kamoike Seikyo Clinic, Kagoshima-shi, Japan, Kyusyu

University of Nursing and Social Welfare, Tamana-shi, Japan

P-2-26 Short term therapy of budesonide reduces reactivity to

inhaled adenosine 5'-monophosphate

Gaszczyk G1 , Latos T1 , Bokiej J1 1National Research Institute of Mother and Child, Karpacz,

Dolnoslaskie, Poland

P-2-27 Secretary of Health of Rio de Janeiro/Brazil: survey on

pediatricians’ knowledge of inhalation therapy for

asthmatic children

Galvao MG1 , Santos MS1 , Ibiapina AI2 , Cunha AC2 1Secretaria Municipal de Saúde do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro,

Brazil, 2Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro,

Brazil

P-2-28 Comparison of traditional Chinese-Japanese herbal

medicine bakumondo-to with emedastine difumarate on

asthmatic patients with increased cough sensitivity

Watanabe NW1 , Gang CG1 , Fukuda TF1 1Dokkyo University School of Medicine, Shimotsuga-gun,

Tochigi-ken, Japan

P-2-29 Inhibition of airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation

by a nonenzymatic antioxidant-lipoic acid in a mouse

model of asthma

Cho YS1 , Kim YY1 , Lee HR2 , Lee EY1 , Yoo B1 , Moon HB1 , Lee

J1 1Division of Allergy and Rheumatology, Asan Medical Center,

Seoul, Republic of Korea, 2Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Seoul,

Republic of Korea

P-2-30 Comparison of salmeterol inhaler with tulobuterol tape by

QOL questionnaire, Asthma Health Questionnaire-34,

Japan

Komase Y1 , Saitoh H1 , Nakagawa T2 1St. Marianna University, Yokohama-city Hospital, Yokohama,

Kanagawa, Japan, 2St. Marianna University, Kawasaki,

Kanagawa, Japan

P-2-31 New holding chamber improves inhaled dose of HFA

salbutamol

Donnell D1 13M Pharmaceuticals, Loughborough, Leics, UK

P-2-32 A cost comparison of asthma control in children using a

staged dose reduction design of fluticasone (F) or

beclomethasone extrafine aerosol (Q)

Price DA1 1Aberdeen University, Aberdeen, UK

P-2-33 Dose-response comparison of beclomethasone extrafine

aerosol (Q) from two devices in patients with moderate

asthma

Gross G1 , Donnell D2 1University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX,

USA, 23M Pharmaceuticals, Loughborough, Leics, UK

POSTER SESSIONS

P-2-34 A dose reduction comparison of beclomethasone extrafine

aerosol (Q) and fluticasone (F) in children with

symptomatic asthma

Price DA1 , Van Aalderen WMC2 , Price JF3 1 2 Aberdeen University, Aberdeen, UK, Emma’s Children’s

Hospital, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands,

3King’s College Hospital, London, UK

P-2-35 Compliance with the treatment in asthmatic school-age

children

Volonaki HM1 , Volonakis KM1 , Papaioannou DI1 , Volonakis

MK1 1Agia Sofia Children’s Hospital, Athens, Greece

P-2-36 IL-2 intravenous application as one of the methods of

steroid-saving therapy of the patients with severe steroiddependent

asthma

Tofimov VI1 , Shaporova NL1 , Shiri ZA1 , Ses TP2 1Saint-Petersburg Pavlov’s State Medical University, Saint-

Petersburg, Russian Federation, 2Saint-Petersburg Institute of

Pulmonology, Saint-Petersburg, Russian Federation

P-2-37 Asthma quality of life and systemic safety of

beclomethasone extrafine aerosol (Q) and fluticasone (F) in

children

Van Aalderen WMC1 , Hugen CAC2 , Tiddens HAWM3 1Emma Children’s Hospital, University of Amsterdam,

Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2University Lung Centre, Dekkerswald,

Netherlands, 3Erasmus Medical Centre/Sophia, Erasmus

University, Rotterdam, Netherlands

P-2-38 Sparing effect of coenzyme Q10, α-tocopherol and ascorbic

acid on the consumption of corticosteroids in allergic

asthmatics

Gazdik F1 , Gazdikova K1 , Jahnova E1 , Pijak MR1 1Institute of Preventive and Clinical Medicine, Bratislava, Slovak

Republic

P-2-39 SURF Study: real-life effectiveness of budesonide/

formoterol (B/F) adjustable maintenance dosing

Michilis A1 , Peché RVJ2 , Verbraecken JA3 , Vandenhoven G4 ,

Wollaert L5 , Duquenne V5 1 2 CUB Erasme, Brussels, Belgium, CHU Vesale, Montigny-Le-

Tilleul, Belgium, 3University Hospital Antwerp, Antwerp,

Belgium, 4SA AstraZeneca NV, Brussels, Belgium, 5Belgium P-2-40 Treatment with Serevent and Flixotide under pressurized

aerosols form (MDI) on a lot of children from Galatzi

Ierima GA1 1Emergency Hospital for Children, Galatzi, Romania

P-2-41 Immediate and long time clinical effect and safety after

high-dose of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in

patients with severe asthma

Klos K1 , Kruszewski J1 1Department of Infectious Diseases and Allergology, Warsaw,

Poland

P-2-42 Four-week administration of inhaled budesonide prevents

exercise-induced asthma in adolescents with asthma

Yagi K 1 , Onda T 2 , Obata T 3

1 Division of Pediatrics, Yagi Clinic, Yokosuka, Kanagawa, Japan,

2 Onda Clinic, Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan, 3 Obata Pediatric

Clinic, Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

MONDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER - continued

POSTER SESSIONS

P-2-43 Epinephrine injection produces adverse effects frequently in

asthmatics without β-agonists use

Taniguchi M1 , Takeuchi Y1 , Morita S1 , Higashi N1 , Higashi A1 ,

Akiyama K1 1National Sagamihara Hospital, Sagamihara, Japan

P-2-44 Effect of zafirlukast on hyperosmolar nebulized solution

induced airway hyperreponsiveness in patients with mild

asthma

Estruch I1 , Mallorca W1 , Bouly J1 , Ginard A1 , Alfonso L1 , Rodriguez

JC1 , Bencomo M1 1Hospital C. Q. “Hnos. Ameijiras,” Ciudad de la Habana, Cuba

P-2-45 Effect of a botanical preparation on patients with moderately

severe steroid-dependent asthma and allergic rhinitis

Luciuk GH1 , Towers GH2 1Richmond Hospital, Richmond, British Columbia, Canada,

2University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia,

Canada

Basic Mechanisms

P-3-1 This abstract has been rescheduled and can be found on p. 25

P-3-2 The ratio between different fractions of phospholipids in

lymphocyte membranes of peripheral blood in atopic

children

Terechtchenko S1 , Babushkin V2 , Tereshchenko V2 , Karatchenceva

N2 1State Medical Research Institute for Northern Problems,

Krasnoyarsk, Russian Federation, 2State Krasnoyarsk Medical

Academy, Krasnoyarsk, Russian Federation

P-3-3 Increased peripheral IL-4 expressing CD4+ (Th2) and IFNgamma

expressing CD8+ (Tc1) T cells in patients with

Kimura’s Disease

Ohta N1 , Fukase S1 , Aoyagi M1 1Yamagata Univ. School of Medicine, Dept. of Otolaryngology,

Yamagata, Yamagata, Japan

P-3-4 Role of Stat5a in T helper 2 cell differentiation

Takatori HT1 , Nakajima HN1 , Hirose KH1 , Kagami SK1 , Saito

YS1 , Iwamoto II1 1Chiba University School of Medicine, Chiba, Chiba, Japan

P-3-5 The influence of myelopeptides on lymphocyte activation in

cultures of PBMC in patients with allergic diseases

Titova LD1 , Gudima GO1 , Sidorovitch IG1 1Institute of Immunology, Moscow, Russian Federation

P-3-6 Expression of proteins associated with regulated exocytosis in

human lymphocytes

Odemuyiwa SO1 , Lo K1 , Logan MR1 , Garofoli D1 , Lacy P1 ,

Moqbel R1 1University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

P-3-7 T cell IL-5 production to Candida albicans secretory aspartic

protease 2 is related to non-IgE-mediated late-phase bronchial

response

Mori A1 , Hashimoto T1 , Taniguchi M1 , Maeda Y1 , Hasegawa M1 ,

Mita H1 , Akiyama K1 1National Sagamihara Hospital, Clinical Research Center,

Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan

P-3-8 Successful treatment of hypereosinophilic syndrome with

azelastine and cepharanthin

Ito T1 , Hattori T1 , Ito S2 1Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Democratic People’s

Republic of Korea, 2Tokatsu Hospital, Chiba, Japan

65

P-3-9 The reason why the serum ECP shows a higher value than

the blood plasma ECP

Watanabe K1 , Misu T1 , Yamaguchi S1 1Dokkyo University School of Medicine, Koshigaya, Saitama,

Japan

P-3-10 German cockroach extract enhances effector function, IL-8

production, CD69 expression and activation of p38 MAPK

of human eosinophils

Sohn MH1 , Kim KE1 , Shin MH1 1Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea

P-3-11 Effect of ozone exposure on the intracellular glutathione

redox state in cultured human airway epithelial cells

Todokoro MT1 , Mochizuki HM1 , Tokuyama KT1 , Morikawa

AM1 , Dobashi KD2 , Mori MM2 1Department of Pediatrics, Gunma University School of Medicine,

Maebashi, Gunma, Japan, 2Department of First Internal

Medicine, Gunma University School of Medi, Maebashi, Gunma,

Japan

P-3-12 Humanized RBL-cells as a standardized in vitro test for the

determination of the allergenic potency of proteins using

human sera

Löttkopf D1 , Vogel L1 , Hatahet L1 , Haustein D1 , Vieths S1 1Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, Langen, Germany

P-3-13 Possible mechanism involved in the process of mast cell

migration in non-allergic condition

Kurosawa M1 , Inamura H1 , Okano A1 1Gunma Clinical Research Center for Allergy and Regeneration,

Takasaki, Gunma, Japan

P-3-14 Isoforms of FcεRIα (RIα) from human basophils are

protected against turnover by IgE

Jensen BM1 , Hansen SK1 , Skov PS1 , Poulsen LK1 1Allergy Unit FIN 7551, National University Hospital,

Copenhagen, Denmark

P-3-15 Expression and function of E-cadherin and its hetroligand

integrin αE (CD103) β7 on mast cells

Tegoshi T1 , Nishida M1 , Arizono N1 1Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan

P-3-16 The action mechanism of dexamethasone for the inhibition

of the antigen-induced interleukin-13 production in RBL-

2H3 cells

Hirasawa N1 , Izumi I1 , Ohuchi K1 1Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tohoku University,

Sendai, Miyagi, Japan

P-3-17 The adjuvant effects of alum are exerted through activation

of a wide variety of cells: implication for allergic diseases

Haile S1 , HayGlass KT1 1Dept. of Immunology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg,

Manitoba, Canada

P-3-18 Alternative maturation of mast cells acquiring the

responsiveness to substance P

Okabe T1 , Hide M1 , Hiragun T1 , Morita E1 , Yamamoto S1 1Department of Dermatology, Hiroshima Univ. Graduate School

of Medicine, Hiroshima, Japan

P-3-19 Olopatadine hydrochloride differentially modulates IL-4

expression and degranulation by FcεRI signal transduction

in RBL-2H3 cells

Hasegawa K 1 , Matsubara M 1 , Ohmori K 1

1 Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Kyowa Hakko Kogyo Co.,

Ltd., Sunto-gun, Shizuoka, Japan

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WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

P-3-20 Effect of anti-asthma drugs on human basophil apoptosis

Suzaki N1 , Tanimoto Y1 , Sakugawa M1 , Ikeda K1 , Tanimoto M1 ,

Takahashi K2 , Hamada N1 , Takao K1 , Kanehiro A1 , Kataoka M1 ,

Imajo K3 1Department of Internal Medicine II, Okayama University Medical

School, Okayama, Japan, 2National Minami-Okayama Hospital,

Okayama, Japan, 3Okayama Municipal Hospital, Okayama, Japan

P-3-21 Human basophils can release interleukin-18 upon FcεRI

cross-linking

Sakugawa M1 , Tanimoto Y1 , Suzaki N1 , Nakajima T2 , Saito H2 ,

Tanimoto M1 , Inoue Y1 , Ikeda K1 , Imajo K3 1Department of Internal Medicine II, Okayama University Medical

School, Okayama, Japan, 2National Center for Child Health and

Development, Tokyo, Japan, 3Okayama Municipal Hospital,

Okayama, Japan

P-3-22 Safety and efficacy of Aller-7, a novel botanical extract

formulation for allergic rhinitis

Bagchi D1 , Saxena VS2 , Bagchi M3 , Amit A2 , Pratibha N2 1Creighton University Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA,

2Natural Remedies Research Center, Bangalore, Mysore, India,

3InterHealth Research Center, Benicia, CA, USA

P-3-23 Up-regulation of fatty acid binding protein (aP2) expression

in airway epithelium during allergic inflammation

Shum B1 , Frost M1 , Zimmer S1 , Mackay CR1 , Rolph MS1 1Garvan Institute for Medical Research, Sydney, NSW, Australia

P-3-24 Association of polymorphisms of candidate genes on

chromosome 5q31-33 and atopic diseases in Singapore

Liang XH1 , Heng CK1 , Cheung W1 , Wang DY1 1National University of Singapore, Singpore, Singapore

P-3-25 Association of protein expression of kinases with signal

intensity of IgE-mediated histamine release

Kumar P1 , Singh B2 , Rhembotkar GW3 , Lal R4 , Singh AB1 1 2 Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, Delhi, India, Guru

Teg Bahadur Hospital, Delhi, India, 3Institute of Genomics and

Integrative Biology, Delhi, India, 4University of Delhi, Delhi, India

P-3-26 Human lung epithelial cells release allergen-specific cytokine

profiles.

Kristensen Soni N1 , Roggen EL1 1Novozymes A/S, Bagsvaerd, Denmark

P-3-27 Functional defect of regulatory CD8-positive CD28-negative

cytotoxic T cells in atopic dermatitis: perforin (Perf)

reduction and hyperreleasability

Ambach A1 , Weren A1 , Bonnekoh B1 , Schraven B2 , Gollnick H1 1Otto-von-Guericke-University, Dept. of Dermatology &

Venereology, Magdeburg, Germany, 2Otto-von-Guericke- University, Inst. of Immunology/CIR, Magdeburg, Germany

P-3-28 Inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production and

cyclooxygenase (COX2) expression by Chinese herbal

medicine

Lenon GB1 , Xue CCL1 , Li CG1 , DaCosta C1 , Thien FCK2 1Chinese Medicine Research Group RMIT University, Melbourne,

Victoria, Australia, 2Alfred Hospital & Monash University,

Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

P-3-29 Pranlukast inhibits NF-kB activation in cultured airway

epithelial cells

Takeuchi K1 , Ishinaga H1 , Kishioka C1 , Majima Y1 1Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Mie University School of

Medicine, Tsu, Mie, Japan

POSTER SESSIONS

P-3-30 The effect of thrombin on the permeability of human

epithelial cell monolayers

Hayashi S1 , Takeuchi K1 , Suzuki S1 , Tsunoda T1 , Kishioka C1 ,

Majima Y1 1Mie University School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie, Japan

P-3-31 Dendritic cells and immunity/tolerance decision

Usharauli D1 1Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tbilisi, Georgia

P-3-32 Role of dendritic cells in Chlamydia-mediated inhibition of

allergic responses to ovalbumin

Han X1 , Yang X1 1University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

P-3-33 House dust mite allergy, HLA-DR and DQ

Hassanzadeh A1 , Akcakaya N1 , Camcioglu Y1 , Cokugras H1 1Allergy Division, Department of Pediatrics, Cerrahpasa Medical

Faculty, Istanbul, Turkey

P-3-34 Glycosylation as a target for pharmacotherapy of allergy

Kuznecova G1 , Joksta I2 , Kuznecovs S1 1Allergy Unit, Public Health Research Laboratory, Riga, Latvia,

2Latvian Medical Academy, Riga, Latvia

P-3-35 Human hematopoietic PGD2 synthase: inhibition by 15deoxy-Delta12,14-PGJ2

and sulindac sulfide, and localization

to mast cells

Greig GM1 , Masse F1 , Nantel F2 , Chateauneuf A1 , ONeill G1 1Merck Frosst Centre for Therapeutic Research, Kirkland,

Quebec, Canada, 2IPS Pharma Inc, Sherbrook, Quebec, Canada

P-3-36 Expression of the prostaglandin D2 receptors DP and

CRTH2 in human nasal mucosa

Nantel F1 , Lamontagne S2 , Fong C2 , Sawyer N2 , Gervais F2 ,

O’Neill GNeill G> 2 , Wright DH2 , Giaid DH3 , Desrosiers M4 ,

Metters KM2 1IPS Pharma Inc, Institute of Pharmacology of Sherbrooke,

Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada, 2Merck Frosst Canada & Co,

Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 3Montreal General Hospital, McGill

University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 4McGill University,

Montreal, Quebec, Canada

P-3-37 Allergic disease associated with disorders of HLA-mediated

apoptosis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells

Kaidashev IP1 , Grzegorczyk JL2 , Smoravsky E2 , DuBuske LM3 1Ukrainian Medical Stomatological Academy, Poltava, Ukraine,

2 3 Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland, Immunology Research

Institute of New England, Fitchburg, MA, USA

P-3-38 IFN gamma enhances penetration of allergens across

respiratory epithelium

Reisinger J1 , Kuechler E2 , Bohle B3 , Valent P4 , Valenta R3 ,

Niederberger V1 1 2 Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Vienna, Austria, Dept. of Medical

Biochemistry, Vienna, Austria, 3Dept. of Pathophysiology, Vienna,

Austria, 4Dept. of Internal Medicine, Vienna, Austria

P-3-39 Metallothionein gene in dinitrofluorobenzene-induced

mouse allergic contact dermatitis

Li LF1 , Lu XY1 , Wang WH1 1Department of Dermatology, Peking University Third Hospital,

Beijing, China

P-3-40 Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are capable of

osteogenic, chondrogenic, adipogenic, myogenic and

neurogenic differentiation

Ito T 1 , Hattori T 1 , Kamakura M 2

1 Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, 2 Teikyo

University, Tokyo, Japan


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

MONDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER - continued

POSTER SESSIONS

Infection and Immunity

P-4-1 Do respiratory tract infections influence lung function by

two years of age?

Håland G1 , Lodrup Carlsen KCdrup Carlsen KC> 1 , Pettersen M1 ,

Melby KK2 , Skar AG2 , Devulapalli CS3 , Carlsen K-H3 1Department of Pediatrics, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo,

Norway, 2Department of Microbiology, Ullevål University Hospital,

Oslo, Norway, 3Voksentoppen, Department of Pediatrics, National

Hospital, Oslo, Norway

P-4-2 Frequency of allergic disorders in HTLV-I infected subjects

Machado AS1 , Cruz AA1 , Galvao TS1 , Aguiar F1 , Damasceno EP2 ,

Carvalho EM1 1 2 Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, Escola

Bahiana de Medicina e Saude Publica, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

P-4-3 Clinical experience of the combined therapy of relapsing

herpes keratitis

Ershova OV1 , Sokurenco SI1 , Kotelin IV1 , Karaulov AV1 1Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy, Moscow, Russian Federation

P-4-4 Immunological aspects of interleukin-2 therapy in patients

with chronic viral hepatitis B

Panina AA1 , Antonov UV1 , Nedogoda SV2 1 2 CDCACI, Volgograd, Russian Federation, MU, Volgograd,

Russian Federation

P-4-5 Prevalence of respiratory virus specific, T cell dependent,

cytokine responses in humans

Douville RN1 , Coombs K1 , Li Y1 , Simons FER1 , HayGlass KT1 1University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

P-4-6 Application of heat-killed mycobacterium BOVIS-BCG into

the lung inhibits the development of allergen-induced Th2

responses

Major T1 , Erb KJ2 1 2 Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary, University of

Wuerzburg, Center for Infectious Diseases, Wuerzburg, Germany

P-4-7 Apoptosis as a possible mechanism of immunodeficiency in

the plague

Vasilieva GI1 , Kozlovsky VN1 , Mishankin MB1 , Mishankin BN1 1Research Institute for Plague Control, Rostov on Don, Russian

Federation

P-4-8 Secondary immunodeficiency in cholera is formed as a result

of the development of superantigenic activity of cholera toxin

Kozlovsky VN1 , Vasilieva GI1 , Mishankin MB1 , Mishankin BN1 ,

Kabolova SS1 1Research Institute for Plague Control, Rostov on Don, Russian

Federation

P-4-9 Protective role of hepatitis B virus infection and vaccination in

the development of rheumatoid arthritis

Pijak MR1 , Gazdik F1 1Institute of Preventive and Clinical Medicine, Bratislava, Slovakia

P-4-10 Paradoxical coexistence of atopic asthma and human Tlymphotropic

virus type I (HTLV-I) infection: a case report

Machado AS1 , Cruz AA1 , Galvao TS1 , Porto A1 , Braga S1 , Carvalho

EM1 1Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

P-4-11 Relation of smokeless tobacco and other antigen on

respiratory infections: an animal model study

Mehrotra V1 , Lahiri VL2 1Himalayan Institute of Medical Sciences, Dehradun, Uttranchal,

India, 2SN Medical College, Agra, Uttarpradesh, India

67

P-4-12 The role of sICAM, sVCAM and sP-selectin in Helicobacter

pylori infection in children

Maciorkowska EM1 , Kaczmarski MK1 , Kasacka IK2 , Kondej-

Muszynska KM1 13rd Department of Children’s Diseases in the Medical University,

Bialystok, Poland, 2Medical University, Bialystok, Poland

P-4-13 Helicobacter pylori infection and IgE-dependent allergic

reaction of gastric mucosa in children

Maciorkowska EM1 , Kaczmarski MK1 , Kondej-Muszynska KM1 ,

Kasacka IK2 , Skowronska JS1 13rd Department of Children’s Diseases in the Medical University,

Bialystok, Poland, 2Medical University, Bialystok, Poland

P-4-14 Role of the low affinity IgE receptor (CD23) on the IgE

response against Ascaris lumbricoides in Warao Amerindian

children from Venezuela

Hagel I1 , Rodriguez OL1 , Hurtado MA1 , Sanchez P2 , Puccio F1 ,

Di Prisco MC1 1Instituto de Biomedicina, Caracas, Distrito Federal, Venezuela,

2Banco Municipal de Sangre, Caracas, Distrito Federal, Venezuela

P-4-15 B and T lymphocytes in tonsil tissue

Jurkiewicz DJ 1 , Zielnik Jurkiewicz BD 1

1 ENT Department, Warsaw, Poland

P-4-16 Cellular and humoral immune status and serum levels of

α 1-antitrypsin during Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection

in children.

Stelmach IS 1 , Grzelewski TG 1 , Podsiadlowicz-Borzecka MPB 1 ,

Korzeniewska AK 1 , Stelmach WS 2 , Kuna PK 3

1 Department of Pediatrics and Allergy, M. Curie Hospital, Zgierz,

Poland, 2 Regional Health Authority, Lodz, Poland, 3 Department

of Allergy and Pneumonology, Medical University, Lodz, Poland

P-4-17 Incidence of allergen airborne fungi in Isfahan

Chadeganipour M1 , Shadzi S1 , Zahraei M1 1Isfahan Medical School, Isfahan, Iran

P-4-18 Diagnostics of infection by Helicobacter pylori in HIV

positive patient: effectiveness of serological methods vs

Ureasa Test and biopsy of mucous gastri

Flores ME1 , Chacon MR1 , Ramos J1 , Pinto A2 , Pacheco M3 1Universidad de Carabobo, Valencia, Carabobo, Venezuela,

2 3 Centro Medico, Valencia, Carabobo, Venezuela, Unidad de

Inmunología, Valencia, Carabobo, Venezuela

P-4-19 Effectiveness of the serology anti-Helicobacter pylori as

diagnostic method in infected patients with HIV vs

amplification of the DNA

Chacon MR1 , Gutiérrez S2 , Flores ME3 , Pinto A4 , Pacheco MT2 1Universidad de Carabobo, Valencia, Carabobo, Venezuela,

2 3 INSALUD, Valencia, Carabobo, Venezuela, Universidad de

Carabobo-INSALUD, Valencia, Carabobo, Venezuela, 4Centro Medico Guerra Mendez, Valencia, Carabobo, Venezuela

P-4-20 Analysis of some parameters of immunoregulation in allergic

diseases during infection of herpes virus in children

Stamenkovic H1 , Kamenov B1 , Tasic G2 , Saranac LJ1 , Brankovic

LJ1 , Milicevic R1 1 2 Clinic of Pediatrics, Clinic Center, Nis, Yugoslavia, Health

Center, Nis, Yugoslavia

P-4-21 Cancer and tuberculosis’ association of the stomach

Herrag M1 , Jouadi A1 , Arsalane A1 1Hospital, Rabat, Morocco

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WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

P-4-22 Oropharyngeal vaccinia virus presence after smallpox

vaccination

Klote MM1 , Ludwig G2 , Hershey J1 , Black L1 , Engler RJM1 ,

Martin BL1 1Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA,

2United States Army Medical Institute of Infectious Diseases, Ft.

Detrick, MD, USA

O-13-1 Effect of Mycoplasma pneumoniae on IL-8 gene expression

from human respiratory epithelial cells

Sohn MH1 , Lee KE1 , Kim KE1 1Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea

Skin Disease and Dermatitis

P-5-1 The effect of a probiotic on intestinal permeability in

childhood eczema

Gold M1 , Keatley D1 , Butler R1 1Adelaide University Department of Paediatrics, Adelaide, South

Australia, Australia

P-5-2 Serum eotaxin level in patients with atopic dermatitis

syndrome

Paluchowska B1 , Targowski T2 , Jahnz-Rozyk K2 , Zabielski S1 ,

Plusa T2 1Department of Dermatology, Military Institute of Medicine,

Warsaw, Poland, 2Department of Allergology, Military Institute

of Medicine, Warsaw, Poland

P-5-3 Bedding endotoxin levels are inversely related to disease

severity in children with atopic eczema

Siebers R1 , Kelly R1 , Sistek D1 , Stanley T2 , Fitzharris P1 , Crane J1 1Wellington Asthma Research Group, Wellington, New Zealand,

2Wellington Hospital, Wellington, New Zealand

P-5-4 Expression of cysteinyl leukotriene receptor-1 in atopic

dermatitis and psoriasis skin lesions

Hussain I1 , Stone M1 , Kitagaki K1 , Businga T1 , Kline J1 1University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA

P-5-5 Fexofenadine effectively suppresses the spontaneous

scratching behavior in NC/Nga mice (a model of human

atopic dermatitis)

Watanabe N1 , Wada A1 , Matsuda H2 , Takahashi H3 , Igarashi

M3 , Tateda C3 1 2 The Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, Tokyo

University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo, Japan, 3New Drug Development Research Center, INC, Hokkaido, Japan

P-5-6 Optimal treatment of atopic dermatitis: a telemedical

approach

Bolle R1 , Danielsen I1 , Nyheim B1 1University Hospital North-Norway, Tromso, Norway

P-5-7 Forty cases with contact allergy to topical corticosteroids

Kato YK1 , Sugiura MS1 , Hayakawa RH1 1Environmental Dermatology, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan

P-5-8 Resting energy expenditure, oxygen consumption, and

carbon dioxide production in children with atopic dermatitis

Hon KL1 , Leung TF1 , Ma KC1 , Wong Y1 , Yin JA1 , Fok TF1 , Li

MC1 MONDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER - continued

1Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, Hong Kong

POSTER SESSIONS

P-5-9 The involvement of staphylococcal superantigen in spinal

and duodenal lesions in patients with atopic dermatitis

Sugimoto K1 , Shimojo N2 , Terano T3 , Kubosawa H4 , Hattori T5 ,

Ito S5 , Ishikawa N1 1Department of Pediatrics, Chiba Municipal Hospital, Chiba,

Japan, 2Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medicine,

Chiba University, Chiba, Japan, 3Department of Internal Medicine,

Chiba Municipal Hospital, Chiba, Japan, 4Department of Clinical

Pathology, Chiba Municipal Hospital, Chiba, Japan, 5Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University,

Chiba, Japan

P-5-10 Effect of antihistamines on astaetotic eczema

Takeda K1 , Tachikawa N2 1Keijyu Medical Center, Department of Dermatology, Nanao,

Ishikawa, Japan, 2Keijyu Medical Center, Department of

Dermatology, Nanao, Ishikawa, Japan

P-5-11 A case series of montelukast as a therapeutic agent for atopic

dermatitis in children

Hon KL1 , Leung TF1 , Ma KV1 , Wong Y1 , Li AM1 , Fok TF1 1Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, Hong Kong

P-5-12 A pilot study of an amino acid-based milk formula in treating

young children with atopic dermatitis

Leung TF1 , Cheung LTF2 , Ma KC1 , Wong E3 , Wan H1 , Hon

KL1 , Fok TF1 1Department of Pediatrics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong,

Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 2Dietetic Department, Prince of Wales

Hospital, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 3Center for Clinical Trials and

Epidemiological Research, C.U.H.K., Hong Kong, Hong Kong

P-5-13 Change of QOL score (SF-36 Japanese version) in patients

with atopic dermatitis according to medical treatment

Fukuroku K1 , Nagano T2 , Ogino S1 1School of Allied Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka

University, Osaka, Japan, 2Nagano Dermatology Allergology Clinic,

Osaka, Japan

P-5-14 Decreased cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA) +CD4+ T

cells in children with severe atopic dermatitis after the

treatment of cyclosporin

Lee SY1 , Kim JH1 , Kim BS1 , Choi SO2 , Jang SO2 , Hong SJ1 1Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, Ulsan University,

Seoul, Republic of Korea, 2Asan Institute for Life Science, Seoul,

Republic of Korea

P-5-15 Expression of B7:1 (CD80) and B7.2 (CD86) in atopic

dermatitis and correlation with IgE synthesis

Kim MN1 , Tak WJ1 , Kim BJ1 , Hong CK1 1Department of Dermatology, College of Medicine, Chung Ang

University, Seoul, Republic of Korea

P-5-16 The role of staphylococcal superantigens in the pathogenesis

of atopic dermatitis

Lehmann HS1 , Mallon DFJ2 1Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, Subiaco, WA,

Australia, 2Princess Margaret Hospital, Subiaco, WA, Australia

P-5-17 Treatment of severe atopic dermatitis with cyclosporin A in

2002

Nowicki R1 , Baranska-Rybak W1 1Department of Dermatology, Venerology and Allergology, Gdansk,

Pomorskie, Poland

P-5-18 Extrinsic and intrinsic type atopic dermatitis: local experience

at an allergy clinic in the Philippines

Vicencio JV1 , Gonzalez-Andaya AM1 1University of Santo Tomas Hospital, Manila, Philippines


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

MONDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER - continued

POSTER SESSIONS

P-5-19 Treatment of infants with atopic dermatitis with

pimecrolimus cream 1% improves parents’ quality of life

Staab D1 , Kaufmann R2 , Foelster-Holst R3 , Hoeger P4 , Thaci D2 ,

Wahn U5 1 2 Krankenhaus Zehlendorf, Berlin, Germany, Johann Wolfgang

Goethe Universität, Hautklinik, Frankfurt, Germany, 3Christian- Albrechts-Universität, Hautklinik, Kiel, Germany,

4Universitätsklinikum Eppendorf, Hautklinik, Hamburg,

Germany, 5 P-5-20

Charite-Virchow Klinikum, Kinderklinik und Poliklinik,

Berlin, Germany

The characteristic of the immune status parameter in atopic

dermatitis in children

Andreeva II1 , Petrov SS1 1State Medical University, Rostov-on-Don, Russian Federation

P-5-21 Pimecrolimus cream 1%: bridging clinical trials into clinical

practice

Langley R1 , Friedlander S2 , Ring J3 , Wuethrich B4 , Leclerc P5 ,

McGeown C6 , On behalf of the NOBEL Study Group

1Dalhousie University, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Center,

Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, 2Children’s Hospital, San Diego,

CA, USA, 3Technische Universität, Muenchen, Germany,

4 5 Universitätsspital, Zurich, Germany, Novartis Pharmaceuticals

Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA, 6Novartis Pharma AG, Basel,

Switzerland

P-5-22 Long-term control of atopic dermatitis with pimecrolimus

cream 1% in infants: a 2-year cohort study

Papp K1 , Potter P2 , Kapp A3 , de Prost Y4 , Goertz HP5 , Paul C5 1Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada,

2Allergology, Diagnostic & Clinical Research Center, Cape Town,

South Africa, 3Hannover Medical University, Hannover, Germany,

4 5 Necker Hospital for Sick Children, Paris, France, Novartis Pharma

AG, Basel, Switzerland

P-5-23 Pimecrolimus cream 1% significantly improves atopic

dermatitis in infants aged 3-23 months within 3 days of

treatment

Kaufmann R1 , Foelster-Holst R2 , Hoeger P3 , Thaci D1 , Braeutigam

M4 , Wahn U5 1J. W. Goethe-Universität, Hautklinik, Frankfurt, Germany,

2Christian-Albrechts-Universität, Hautklinik, Kiel, Germany,

3Universitätsklinikum Eppendorf, Hautklinik, Hamburg,

Germany, 4Novartis Pharma GmbH, Clinical Research, Nuernberg,

Germany, 5Charite-Virchow Klinikum, Kinderklinik und Poliklinik,

Berlin, Germany

P-5-24 Patch testing: a six years experience

Mateo Borrega MB1 , Sanz SG2 , Camacho D3 , Otero D3 1Allergy Unit, Unmequi Sanatorios SL & Clínica Dr. Sanz Vázquez,

Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Spain, 2Allergy Unit, Centro Médico

La Paloma, Torrejón de Ardoz, Madrid, Spain, 3Dermatology Unit,

Unmequi Sanatorios SL, Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Spain

P-5-25 Linkage between the occurrence of the anticardiolipin IgM

and mite allergen specific IgE antibodies in children with

atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome

Szakos E1 , Lakos G2 , Alexa M2 , Hunyadi J3 , Sólyom E1 , Sipka S2 ,

Gyimesi E2 1Borsod-A-Z County and University Teaching Hospital, Pediatric

Health C, Miskolc, Hungary, 23rd Department of Internal

Medicine, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary,

3Department of Dermatology, University of Debrecen, Debrecen,

Hungary

69

P-5-26 Lymphocyte composition of dermal infiltrates in chronic

atopic dermatitis

Drannik GN1 , Kurchenko AI1 , DuBuske LM2 1 2 National Medical University, Kiev, Ukraine, Immunology

Research Institute of New England, Fitchburg, MA, USA

P-5-27 Dermatological evidence of the use of alternative therapies

in some allergic respiratory disorders

Wong HCG1 , Wong NYY1 1University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

P-5-28 A case of pigmented purpuric eruption successfully treated

with oral cyclosporin A

Taskapan MO1 , Dogan B1 , Harmanyeri Y1 1GATA H. Pasa Teaching Hospital, Dept. of Dermatology-Allergy,

Acibadem-Istanbul, Turkey

Joggers in Stanley Park

MONDAY


TUESDAY

70

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

TUESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER

Poster Sessions 15:45 - 17:00

Exhibit Hall C, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Posters are on display 9:00 – 17:00. Authors are present to discuss

their posters 15:45 – 17:00.

No CME Credit will be awarded for this activity.

Asthma: Epidemiology

P-6-1 Skin prick test with inhaled allergens in general population

of Lodz province’s citizens

Kuprys I1 , Elgalal A1 , Korzycka-Zaborowska B1 , Gorski P1 , Kuna

P 1

1Dept. of Pneumonology and Allergy, Medical University of Lodz,

Lodz, Poland

P-6-2 The risk factors for bronchial asthma among children in rural

Bangladesh: Is the hygiene hypothesis accepted?

Iwata T1 , Takeuchi H2 , Zaman K3 , Yunus M3 , Arifeen SE3 ,

Chowdhury HR3 , Charkraborty J3 , Baqui AH4 , Takahashi J5 , Wakai

S1 1 2 University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, International Medical Center,

Tokyo, Japan, 3International Center for Diarrhoeal Disease

Research, Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh, 4Johns Hopkins

University, Baltimore, MD, USA, 5Wako Junyaka Co., Japan

P-6-3 The seasonal trend of asthma death by age in Japan and the

relationship between asthma death and influenza death

between 1979 and 1999

Matsui T1 1Tokyo Metropolitan Ebara General Hospital, Ota, Tokyo, Japan

P-6-4 Screening for allergy in a large adolescent population

Takacs ET1 , Spitze TS1 1Center of Allergy and Pulmonology, Debrecen, Hungary

P-6-5 The sleeping environment and frequent wheeze in

childhood: a population-based study of six thousand children

Ponsonby A L1 , Kemp A2 , Dwyer T3 , Trevillian L1 , Cochrane J3 ,

Couper D4 , Carmichael A5 1National Center for Epidemiology and Population Health,

Australian Nat, Canberra, Australia, 2The Children’s Hospital at

Westmead, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia,

3Menzies Center for Population Health, University of Tasmania,

Hobart, Australia, 4Department of Biostatistics, University of North

Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA, 5Department of Pediatrics and Child

Health, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia

P-6-6 ER revisits for pediatric asthma: role of primary care

physicians versus asthma specialists

Lateef A1 , McGeady SJ1 , Yousef E1 1Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA

P-6-7 Atopy prevalence in children with antibodies against hepatitis

A and B

Kocabas E1 , Kendirli SG2 , Yildizdas D1 , Yildizdas H1 1Çukurova University, Faculty of Medicine, Adana, Turkey,

2Çukurova University, Faculty of Medicine, Pediatric Allergy-

Immunology, Adana, Turkey

P-6-8 Etiology of chronic cough in a population of children

referred to a pediatric pulmonologist

Herrag M1 , Mahraoui M2 , El-Malkitazi A2 1 2 Ibnsina Hospital, Rabat, Morocco, Hopital d’enfants, Rabat,

Morocco

POSTER SESSIONS

P-6-9 Immune responses and nutritional status in children from a

parasite-endemic area in Brazil

Arruda LK1 , Dantas VCR2 , Medeiros RC2 , Schwarzschild LFCP2 ,

Santos AKD2 , Sales VSF2 1 2 University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil, Federal

University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN, Brazil

P-6-10 Atopy patch tests with mites allergens: an approach to

appropriate allergen concentration

Porebski G1 , Woloszynski J1 , Filemonowicz A1 , Obtulowicz K1 1Dep. of Industrial Allergology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow,

Poland

P-6-11 Etiopathogenic role of fume of fish’s flour factories in the

development of allergic manifestations in children

Aguilar JL1 , Hurtado PCE1 , Goyzueta IR1 , Sanchez EE2 , Rojas

PA1 , Marcelo A1 1Section Immunology, Universidad Peruana Catetano Heredia,

Lima, Peru, 2CAPIS, Center for Assistance and Whole Health

Promotion, Villa El Salvador, Lima, Peru

P-6-12 Appearance of allergic symptomatology in a group of

Brazilian infants: a prospective study

Guedes HTV1 , Marcílio de Saouza CA2 , Souza LSF2 1Universidade Federal da Bahia - Brazil, Hospital Aliança, Salvador,

Bahia, Brazil, 2Universidade Federal da Bahia - Brazil, Salvador,

Bahia, Brazil

P-6-13 IL-13 gene polymorphism might be related to atopy and

asthma in adult population

Crisci CD1 , Molinas JL1 , Perichón AM2 , Marcipar A1 , Nardone

L 1

1National University of Rosario, Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina,

2CUDAIO, Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina

P-6-14 Is the incidence of atopic dermatitis and wheezing in early

infancy related to family history and breast feeding?

Kuzume K1 1Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA

P-6-15 The incidence of atopic disease, plasma IgE levels, and

positive radioallergosorbent test (RAST) in early infancy are

related to the season of birth

Kuzume K1 1Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA

P-6-16 Determinants of atopic sensitization in Turkish school

children: effects of pre- and postnatal events and maternal

atopy

Kuyucu S1 , Saraclar Y2 , Tuncer A2 , Adalioglu G2 , Sackesen C2 ,

Sumbuloglu V3 , Sekerel B2 1Mersin University, Pediatric Allergy Unit, Mersin, Turkey,

2Hacettepe University, Pediatric Allergy and Asthma Unit, Ankara,

Turkey, 3Hacettepe University, Department of Biostatistics,

Ankara, Turkey

P-6-17 Allergic diseases in relation to vaccinations and infectious

diseases: two cross-sectional studies in schoolchildren 4 years

apart

Pierdomenico R1 , D’Ambrosio C2 , Rasi G2 , Lapucci G2 , Torre

A2 , Matricardi PM2 , Carlucci A1 , Bonini S2 1 2 ASL-AP13, Ascoli Piceno, Italy, Institute of Neurobiology and

Molecular Medicine/CNR, Rome, Italy

P-6-18 Enhanced reactive oxygen radicals generation by peripheral

blood mononuclear cells in atopic dermatitis

Kim JT 1 , Lee MH 1 , Lee JS 1

1 Catholic University Medical College Uijongbu St Mary’s Hospital,

Uijongbu-City, Kyunggi-Do, Republic of Korea


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

TUESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER - continued

POSTER SESSIONS

P-6-19 Exogenous factors and asthma severity in children

Doniec Z1 , Pisiewicz K1 , Tomalak W1 , Kurzawa R1 1Institute for TBC and Lung Dis., Rabka, Poland

P-6-20 Comparative prevalence of asthma, rhinitis and eczema

symptoms in 6 and 7-year-old children who live in urban and

rural areas of the Argentine Wet Pampa

Crisci CD1 , Medina I2 , Marcipar A1 , Molinas JL1 , Ardusso L1 1National University of Rosario, Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina,

2Hospital Venado Tuerto, Venado Tuerto, Santa Fe, Argentina

P-6-21 Comparative urban vs. rural prevalence of symptoms of

asthma, rhinitis and eczema in 13 and 14-year-old adolescents

living in Argentina

Crisci CD1 , Nardone L1 , Trojavchich MC2 , Ardusso LRF1 , Molinas

JL1 1National University of Rosario, Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina,

2Hospital Areco, San Antonio de Areco, Buenos Aires, Argentina

P-6-22 Obesity and asthma in 11- to 12-year-old New Zealand

children in 1989 and 2000

Wickens KL1 , Barry D2 , Friezema A3 , Rhodius R3 , Purdie G1 ,

Crane J1 1 2 University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand, Healthcare

Hawkes Bay, Hastings, New Zealand, 3University of Groningen,

Groningen, Netherlands

P-6-23 Statistical survey on the incidence of respiratory symptoms

influenced by smoking in university students with allergic

and nonallergic history

Horiuchi HY1 1Osaka Kyoiku University, Kasiwara-shi, Osaka, Japan

P-6-24 Profile of asthma camps in urban and rural locales in India

Vedanthan PK1 1University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO,

USA

P-6-25 Prevalence of allergic diseases among Thai children: the

ISAAC III results

Vichyanond P1 , Kaewsomboon S2 , Ruangrak S1 , Simasathien T1 ,

Visitsunthorn N1 1Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital,

Bangkok, Thailand, 2Department of Department of Pediatrics,

Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Ho, Bangkok, Thailand

P-6-26 The peculiarities of clinical and allergic indices in elite

sportsmen

Shartanova NV1 1Institute of Immunology, Moscow, Russian Federation

P-6-27 Severe persistent asthma in children

Sidorenko IV1 , Zenokhov SA2 1Moscow Medical Academy of I. M. Setchenov, Moscow, Russian

Federation, 2Scientific Research Institute of Physical and Chemical

Medicine, Moscow, Russian Federation

P-6-28 Epidemiology of bronchial asthma in an underdeveloped

region northwest of Pakistan Afghanistan

Ishaq IM1 1Al-Junaid Hospital, Nowshera, NWFP, Pakistan

P-6-29 The relationship between allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma

in the patients with autumnal pollinosis in China

Yin J1 , Yue FM1 , Wang LL1 , He HJ1 , Zhang HY1 , Xu WB1 , Li H1 ,

Sun JL1 , Wen LP1 , Gu JQ1 , Guan K1 , Ye ST1 1Department of Allergy, Peking Union Medical College Hospital,

Beijing, China

71

P-6-30 Factors influencing the increase of asthma prevalence in

school children

Kartasasmita CB1 1Department of Child Health, Hasan Sadikin General Hospital,

Bandung, Jawa Barat, Indonesia

P-6-31 Racial difference exists in the prevalence of asthma among

adolescent students in Trinidad & Tobago, West Indies

Monteil MA1 , Joseph G1 , Chang Kit C1 , Siung-Chang A2 , Wheeler

G3 , McIntosh D4 , Antoine RA1 , Rajkumar W4 1University of the West Indies, Mt. Hope, Trinidad and Tobago,

2Pan American Health Organization, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and

Tobago, 3Tobago Regional Health Authority, Scarborough,

Trinidad and Tobago, 4Environmental Management Agency, Portof-Spain,

Trinidad and Tobago

P-6-32 Rhinitis and asthma in schoolchildren: rural versus urban

areas

Minale P1 , Voltolini S1 , Bignardi D1 , Troise C1 , Tazzer C1 1AO San Martino, Genova, Italy

P-6-33 Frequency of emergency room visits for acute asthma attacks

in inner-city children

Chong Neto HJ1 , Silva DC1 , Rosario NA1 , Lara J1 1Federal University of Parana, Curituba, Parana, Brazil

P-6-34 Prevalence of asthma and asthma-related symptoms among

schoolchildren living in the State of Sao Paulo, Brazil: ISAAC

Phase III 2002-preliminary data

Solé D1 , Patorino AC2 , Melo K1 , Gonzales C3 , Camelo Nunes

IC1 , Manchini V3 , Wandalsen NF3 , Leone C2 , Naspitz CK1 1 2 UNIFESP-EPM, Sao Paulo, Brazil, USP-SP, Sao Paulo, Brazil,

3FM-FUABC, Santo André, Sao Paulo, Brazil

P-6-35 Decreasing asthma mortality rates and sales of inhaled

corticosteroids (ICS) in Argentina (1990-1999)

Neffen HE1 , Baena-Cagnani CE2 , Rocco D3 1Orlando Alassia Children’s Hospital, Santa Fe, Argentina,

2 3 Municipal Infantile Hospital, Cordoba, Argentina, Emilio Coni

National Epidemiological Institute, Santa Fe, Argentina

P-6-36 Differences in definitions of respiratory medical terminology

exacerbates language barriers between doctors and non-

English-speaking patients

Levin ME1 1Allergy Clinic, Red Cross Children’s Hospital, Cape Town, South

Africa

P-6-37 The impact of the way of nutrition on development of

allergic diseases in children

Kherkheulidze M1 , Kavlashvili N1 , Broladze S2 , Lominadze M2 ,

Chilachava L2 , Nareklishvili N2 1 2 State Medical University, Tbilisi, Georgia, M. Guramishvili

Pediatric Clinic, Tbilisi, Georgia

Autoimmune Disease

P-7-1 Atopy and thyroid autoimmunity

Zauli D1 , Vukatana G1 , Grassi A1 , Zucchini S1 , Ballardini G1 ,

Bianchi FB1 1Dept. of Int Med, Cardioangiol, Hepatol, University of Bologna,

Bologna, Italy

P-7-2 Therapy of recurrent idiopathic pericarditis

Palmieri G1 , Brucato A1 , Brambilla G1 , Tombini V1 , Canesi B2 1Ospedale Niguarda Divisione di Medicina II, Milano, Italy,

2Ospedale Niguarda Divisione di Reumatologia, Milano, Italy

TUESDAY


TUESDAY

72

TUESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER - continued

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

P-7-3 Soluble form of Fas (CD95) in serum in patients with noninsulin-dependent

diabetes mellitus

Tiuleneva Katerina KB1 , Sokurenko Sergej SI1 , Karaulov Alexsander

AV1 1Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy, Moscow, Russian

Federation

P-7-4 Pregnancy outcome in 100 women with autoimmune

diseases and anti-Ro/SSA antibodies: a prospective controlled

study

Palmieri G1 , Tincani A2 , Brucato A1 , Brambilla G1 , Tombini V1 ,

Canesi B3 1 2 Ospedale Niguarda Divisione di Medicina II, Milan, Italy, Spedali

Civili di Brescia, Brescia, Italy, 3Ospedale Niguarda Divisione di

Reumatologia, Milan, Italy

P-7-5 Pregnancy outcome in 32 women with undifferentiated

connective tissue disease: comparison with primary Sjogren’s

Syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

Palmieri G1 , Tincani A2 , Brucato A1 , Tombini V1 , Brambilla G1 ,

Canesi B3 1Ospedale Niguarda Divisione di Medicina II, Milano, Italy,

2 3 Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia, Italy, Ospedale Niguarda

Divisione di Reumatologia, Milano, Italy

P-7-6 Identification of the nucleosomal epitopes for autoreactive

T cells with bone marrow-derived dendritic cells in murine

lupus

Suen JL1 , Chiang BL1 1Department of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital,

Taipei, Taiwan

P-7-7 Hom s 4, an IgE-reactive autoantigen belonging to a new

subfamily of calcium-binding proteins, induces

lymphoproliferative responses and release of IFN-gamma

Aichberger K1 , Mittermann I1 , Reininger R2 , Stingl G3 , Valent

P4 , Valenta R1 , Seiberler S2 1 2 Institute of Pathophysiology, Vienna, Austria, Institute of

Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics, Vienna, Austria,

3 4 Department of Dermatology, Vienna, Austria, Department of

Internal Medicine I, Division of Hematology, Vienna, Austria

P-7-8 Ribavirin suppression of latent autoimmune hepatitis

manifested after discontinuation of interferon therapy in a

patient with chronic hepatitis C

Pijak MR1 , Gazdik F1 , Gazdikova K1 1Institute of Preventive and Clinical Medicine, Bratislava,

Slovakia

P-7-9 Pemphigus vulgaris: a retrospective study to compare steroid

therapy and combined tetracycline-steroid therapy

Amiruddin MD1 , Muchtar SV1 , Amiruddin D1 1Hasanuddin University, Makassar, South Sulawesi, Indonesia

P-7-10 Role of the system of neutrophilic granulocytes in the

development of immunodeficiency in autoimmune

thyroiditis

Balabas EY1 , Bondarenko AG2 , Kozlovsky VN1 , Vasilieva GI3 1Regional hospital N2, Rostov on Don, Russian Federation,

2Regional hospital N1, Rostov on Don, Russian Federation,

3Research Institute for Plague Control, Rostov on Don, Russian

Federation

P-7-11 Treatment of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

Bondarenko AG1 , Kozlovsky VN2 , Vasilieva GI3 1Regional hospital N1, Rostov on Don, Russian Federation,

2Regional hospital N2, Rostov on Don, Russian Federation,

3Research Institute for Plague Control, Rostov on Don, Russian

Federation

POSTER SESSIONS

P-7-12 Infantile case of juvenile dermatomyositis complicated

interstitial pneumonia and bronchial asthma

Kondo T1 , Yamazaki M1 , Iwata H1 , Iwata S1 , Shikano H1 , Ito A1 1Department of Pediatrics, Ogaki Municipal Hospital, Ogaki,

Gifu, Japan

P-7-13 Determination of anti dsDNA antibody levels in patients

with systemic lupus erythematosus by ELISA, RIA and

Crithidia methods: changes in antibodies

Amirghofran Z1 , Samangoii S1 , Farsangi MH1 1Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

P-7-14 Main genetic markers for type 1 diabetes among some

population groups from European territory of Russia

Alexeev LP1 , Dedov II2 , Boldyreva MN1 , Evseeva IV1 ,

Groudakova EG1 , Khaitov RM1 1Institute of Immunology, Moscow, Russian Federation,

2Endocrinology Research Center, Moscow, Russian Federation

P-7-15 The immune response of vitamin E supplementation on

different dietary oil

Hsieh CC1 , Lin BF1 1National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan

P-7-16 Anti-DNA autoantibodies (autoAbs) from autoimmune

uveitis (AU) patients as a tool to control in vitro cytotoxicity

Suchkov SV1 , Ryabtseva AA1 , Gabibov AG2 , Syroedova ON3 ,

Tretyak EB4 1Moscow Regional Clinical Research Institute, Moscow, Russian

Federation, 2Shemyakin & Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic

Chemistry, Moscow, Russian Federation, 3Moscow Municipal

Center of Endocrinology, Moscow, Russian Federation, 4Moscow Medical Academy, Moscow, Russian Federation

P-7-17 Markers of interstitial pneumonitis in rheumatological

diseases

Sagawa A1 , Tanimura K1 , Shinohara M1 , Shimizu M1 , Kitano A1 ,

Mikami M1 , Matsuhashi M1 , Hennmi M1 , Narita A1 1Center for Rheumatic Disease, Sapporo Yamanoue Hospital,

Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan

P-7-18 Apoptotic body as the major source of self-antigen for

autoreactive T cells in murine lupus

Tzeng TC1 , Suen JL2 , Chiang BL2 1 2 Graduate Institute of Immunology, Taipei, Taiwan, Department

of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan

P-7-19 Catalytic autoantibodies in clinical and experimental

pathology

Suchkov SV1 , Durova OM1 , Khitrov AN2 , Mysikov VK1 ,

Gabibov AG3 1 2 MONIKI, Moscow, Russian Federation, Moscow Medical

Academy, Moscow, Russian Federation, 3Institute of Bioorganic

Chemistry, Moscow, Russian Federation

P-7-20 Cytokine mosaics in patients with multiple sclerosis

Mysikov VK1 , Kotov SV1 , Panteleeva EA1 , Pinegin BV2 , Suchkov

SV1 1 2 MONIKI, Moscow, Russian Federation, Institute of

Immunology, Moscow, Russian Federation

P-7-21 Specific and non-specific autoantibodies in the local

ophthalmic autoimmunity

Suchkov SV 1 , Syroedova ON 2 , Tretyak EB 3 , Ryabtseva AA 1 ,

Gabibov AG 4

1 MONIKI, Moscow, Russian Federation, 2 Moscow Municipal

Endocrinology Center, Moscow, Russian Federation, 3 Moscow

Medical Academy, Moscow, Russian Federation, 4 Institute of

Bioorganic Chemistry, Moscow, Russian Federation


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

TUESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER - continued

POSTER SESSIONS

P-7-22 Viral and autoimmune myocarditis: some aspects of

immunopathogenesis

Paleev FN1 , Kotova AN1 , Suchkov SV1 1MONIKI, Moscow, Russian Federation

P-7-23 Apoptosis in multiple sclerosis

Mysikov VK1 , Kotov SV1 , Panteleeva SA1 , Suchkov SV1 1MONIKI, Moscow, Russian Federation

P-7-24 Vascular involvement in connective tissue diseases is

associated with autoantibody production

Sushchuk EA1 , Alexandrov AV2 , Maslakova LA2 , Salman Rasem1 ,

Gontar’ IP IP> 2 , Zborovskaya IA1 1Volgograd State Medical University, Volgograd, Russian

Federation, 2Scientific Research Institute for Clinical Experimental

Rheumatology, Volgograd, Russian Federation

P-7-25 Two cases of Sweet’s syndrome

Lee C S1 , Sussman GL1 1University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

P-7-26 Anti-C1q-autoantibodies in patients with viral hepatitis

Titov LP1 , Tarasiuk VV1 , Peregud YA1 , Charnashey DA1 , Sadallah

S2 , DuBuske LM3 , Schifferli J2 1Research Institute for Epidemiology and Microbiology, Minsk,

Belarus, 2University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland, 3Immunology Research Institute of New England, Fitchburg, MA, USA

Clinical Asthma

P-8-1 Role of atopy in exercise-induced bronchospasm in

asthmatics

Joshi SV1 , Tripathi DM1 , Dhar HL1 1Medical Research Center, Bombay Hospital Trust, Mumbai,

Maharastra, India

P-8-2 Effectiveness of school-based asthma management program

Kolski GB1 , Miller SM1 1Crozer Chester Medical Center, Upland, PA, USA

P-8-3 Free running as a screening test for exercise-induced

bronchospasm in school children from the Edirne region of

Turkey

Yazicioglu M1 , Celtik C1 , Tuna H2 , Assa’ad Aad A> 3 , Kuru T4 ,

Pala O1 1Department of Pediatrics, Trakya University, Edirne, Turkey,

2Department of Physical Therapy, Trakya University, Edirne, Turkey,

3Division of Allergy & Immunology, Children’s Hospital Medical

Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA, 4Division of Pulmonology,

Department of Medicine, Georgetown University, Washington,

DC, USA

P-8-4 Bronchial lavage (BL) and broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) in

differentiation diagnosis of asthma and COPD

Halasa J1 , Teodorczyk U1 , Halasa M2 1Microbiology and Immunology Department, Pomeranian

Academy of Medicine, Szczecin, Poland, 2General Pathology

Department, Pomeranian Academy of Medicine, Szczecin, Poland

P-8-5 Asthma: costs from childhood to adulthood

Nunes C1 , Ladeira S1 1Center of Allergy and Immunology of Algarve, Portimao, Portugal

P-8-6 Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis: a review from India

Shah A1 , Panchal N1 , Panjabi C1 1V P Chest Institute, University of Delhi, Delhi, India

73

P-8-7 The clinical application of asthma guidelines: from generic

paper document to patient-specific electronic records

Cooke R1 , Brokke F1 , Holgate S2 , Warner J3 1Isle of Wight Healthcare NHS Trust, Newport, Isle of Wight,

UK, 2University of Southhampton, Southampton, Hampshire,

UK, 3University of Southampton, Southampton, Hampshire, UK

P-8-8 Association between candidate SNPs of eotaxin2 gene and

blood eotaxin2 levels in asthma in Korea

Lee JH1 , Min JW1 , Park SW1 , Chung SH1 , Shin HD2 , Park CS1 1Asthma Genome Research Group, Soonchunhyang University

Hospital, Bucheon, Kyungki-do, Republic of Korea, 2SNP Genetics, Seoul, Republic of Korea

P-8-9 Establishing food sensitization in patients with respiratory

allergy

Kumar R1 , Kumari D2 , Sridhara S2 , Arora N2 , Gaur SN3 , Singh

BP2 1Vallabhbhai Patel Chest Institute, University of Delhi, Delhi,

India, 2Center for Biochemical Technology, Delhi, India,

3Vallabhbhai Patel Chest Institute, University of Delhi, Delhi,

India

P-8-10 Skin test for house dust mite Dermatophagoides

pteronyssinus: evaluation of reactivity among both

asthmatics and non-allergic children

Daoud AAER1 , Asaad IA1 , Amin MB2 1 2 Tanta Faculty of Medicine, Tanta, Ghariah, Egypt, Pediatric

Benha Faculty of Medicine, Ghariah, Egypt

P-8-11 Evaluation of 66 consecutive pregnant asthmatics before,

during and after pregnancy: focus on pulmonary function

Cadinha S1 , Malheiro D1 , Fonseca JA1 , Coimbra A1 , Moreira-

Silva JP1 , Vaz M1 1Hospital Sao Joao, Porto, Portugal

P-8-12 IL-13 blocker (mIL-13rα2) protects against

bronchoconstriction in sensitized mice and restores the

response to β-adrenergic agonists

Hood KC1 , Townley RG1 , Qutna N1 1Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska, USA

P-8-13 Nitric oxide in asthma: inflammation or allergic

inflammation?

Garcia Robaina JC1 , Sanchez Machin I1 , Herraez Herrera L1 ,

Torre Morin F1 1Servicio de Alergia, Hospital Universitario Ntra Sra de

Candelaria, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Tenerife, Spain

P-8-14 Percentage of bronchial asthmatics among allergic rhinitis

patients in Mongolia

Munhbayarlah S1 , Battor L1 , Tseregmaa Ts1 , Narantsetseg L1 ,

Erdenebayar N1 , Enkhbayar B1 1National Medical University of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

P-8-15 Productivity of local anti-asthma program

Beltyukov EK1 1Sverdlovsk Regional Clinical Hospital N1, Ekaterinburg, Russian

Federation

P-8-16 Obesity indices are not associated with exhaled nitric oxide

levels in children

Leung TF1 , Au CSS1 , Li CY1 , Yung E1 , Wong GWK1 , Fok TF1 1Department of Pediatrics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong,

Hong Kong, Hong Kong

P-8-17 Platelet aggregation in asthma and aspirin sensitivity

Palma-Carlos AG1 , Palma-Carlos ML2 1Fac Medicina Lisboa, Unid. Imuno-Alergologia, Lisboa, Portugal,

2CHIUL - Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal

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74

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WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

P-8-18 Evolution of static and dynamic lung compliance in

asthmatic patients during immunotherapy

Palma-Carlos AG1 , Palma-Carlos ML2 1Fac Medicina Lisboa, Unid. Imuno-Alergologia, Lisboa,

Portugal, 2CHIUL - Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal

P-8-19 Outcome of childhood asthma in 105 asthmatic children

Herrag M1 , Mahraoui C2 , El-Malkitazi A2 1 2 Ibnsina Hospital, Rabat, Morocco, Ibnsina Hospital, Rabat,

Morocco

P-8-20 Immunohistochemical study of mucin protein expression

in the airways of fatal asthma

Tomichi N1 , Ono S1 , Takayama K1 , Sakuma T1 , Takeuchi K1 1Iwate Pref. Central Hospital, Morioka, Japan

P-8-21 New criteria of bronchial asthma of different degrees of

gravity according to the results of investigating the

condensate of exhaled air

Ivashkevich DL1 1Belorushian State Medical University, Minsk, Belarus

P-8-22 Expression of mast cell tryptase in bronchial mucosa of

asthmatic guinea pigs

Lin XP1 , He SH1 , Zhao HT1 1Shenyang Northern Hospital, Shenyang, Liaoning, China

P-8-23 Diverse expression of the c-c chemokine receptors ccr4 and

ccr5 in the airway of asthmatic subjects

Takizawa H1 , Chibana N1 , Eda F1 , Toda M1 , Fukushima Y1 ,

Numao T1 , Takeda A1 , Fukuda T1 1Dokkyo University School of Medicine, Mibu, Tochigi, Japan

P-8-24 Formoterol is comparable to salbutamol in bronchodilation

test in asthmatic children

Doniec Z1 , Tomalak W1 , Kurzawa R1 , Myszkal B1 , Polchlopek

A1 1Institute for TBC and Lung Dis., Rabka, Poland

P-8-25 Effect of skin tests in bronchial obstruction

Palma-Carlos AG1 , Palma-Carlos ML2 1I Medical Clinic, Lisbon University Hospital, Immuno-

Allergology, Lisbon, Portugal, 2CHIUL - Universidade de Lisboa,

Lisboa, Portugal

P-8-26 Does asthma influence secretion of GH-IGF-I axis

hormones in postmenopausal women?

Kos-Kudla K1 , Ciesielska-Kopacz CK2 , Ostrowska O3 ,

Strzelczyk S1 , Marek M1 , Kajdaniuk K1 1Dept. of Pathophysiology and Endocrinology, Zabrze, Silesia,

Poland, 2Chair and Clinical Dept. of Internal Diseases,

Allergology, Zabrze, Silesia, Poland, 3Dept. of Clinical

Biochemistry, Zabrze, Poland

P-8-27 Bronchodilator response effect measured by digital

auscultation in young children with asthma

Buczylko KB1 , Szumlanska ZS1 , Wiecek BW2 , Chwala CC1 1 2 Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland, Technical University

of Lodz, Lodz, Poland

P-8-28 Clinical classification of asthma, PFR and FEV1 Palma-Carlos AG1 , Palma-Carlos ML2 1I Medical Clinic, Lisbon University Hospital, Immuno-

Allergology, Lisbon, Portugal, 2CHIUL - Universidade de Lisboa,

Lisboa, Portugal

P-8-29 Effectiveness of elimination therapy in bronchial asthma

Akunts VB1 , Akunts ZV1 1National Institute of Public Health, Yerevan, Armenia

POSTER SESSIONS

P-8-30 Severe airway hyperresponsiveness and aeroallergen

sensitization in patients with mild asthma

Lee DKC1 , Currie GP1 , Lipworth BJ1 1Asthma and Allergy Research Group, Dundee, Scotland, UK

P-8-31 A study of asthma deaths in Seino district, Gifu, Japan

Horiba M1 , Kimura T1 , Abe T1 1Respiratory Division of Ogaki Municipal Hospital, Ogaki, Gifu,

Japan

P-8-32 Situation as to the use of allergo-diagnostic and functional

methods of asthma diagnostic and monitoring among GPs

in Ukraine

Yashyna LA1 , Gorovenko NG2 , Polyanska MA1 , Ignatieva VI1 ,

Moskalenko SM1 , Yacina MF1 1 2 Institute of Phthisiology and Pulmonology, Kiev, Ukraine, Kiev

Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, Kiev, Ukraine

P-8-33 Influence of inhalative corticosteroids on bronchial

hypersensitivity in patients with cough variant persistent

asthma

Martyn MB1 , Tumanov AN1 , Polyanska MA1 , Sidun GV1 ,

Matvienko YV1 , Lebeychuk NV1 1Institute of Phthisiology and Pulmonology, Kiev, Ukraine

P-8-34 Association of skin test reactivity to aeroallergens and asthma

severity in children aged 5 years and younger

Vicencio JV1 , Gonzalez-Andaya AM1 1University of Santo Tomas Hospital, Manila, Philippines

P-8-35 International Asthma Services: a project in demand

Vedanthan PK1 1University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO,

USA

P-8-36 Factors that influence in the severe asthmatic children

entrance in the Cuban Center of Rehabilitation

Raymond T1 , Sanchez D2 , Guerrero A3 1Center of Rehabilitation for Children with Severe Asthma, Tarara,

Habana Del Este, Ciudad Habana, Cuba, 2Tarara Pediatric

Hospital, Habana Del Este, Ciudad Habana, Cuba, 3Policlinica Luis Galvan, Habana Del Este, Ciudad Habana, Cuba

P-8-37 Local allergic reaction in nasal mucosa of bronchial asthma

children

Koryukina IP1 , Sanikidze T2 , Sidorov DV3 , Furman EG1 1Perm State Medical Academy, Perm, Russian Federation,

2 3 Georgian State Medical University, Tbilisi, Georgia, Ust-Kachka

Resort, Perm, Russian Federation

P-8-38 Development of short form for measuring quality of life

among asthmatic childhood

Poachanukoon O1 , Jirapongsananurak O1 , Visitsunthorn N1 ,

Vichyanond P1 1Division of Allergy and Immunology, Bangkok, Thailand

P-8-39 Effect of deep inhalation in asthmatic and non-asthmatic

subjects

Stevcevska GS1 , Dokic DD1 , Gligorovski LG1 , Breskovska GB1 ,

Pesic NP2 1Clinic for Pulmonology and Allergology, Skopje, FYROM,

Macedonia, 2Clinic for Skin and Veneral Diseases, Skopje,

FYROM, Macedonia

P-8-40 Risk factors of asthma in children

Kavlashvili N 1 , Kherkheulidze M 1 , Adamia N 1 , Ubiria I 2 ,

Megrelishvili G 1 , Sapanadze N 3

1 State Medical University, Tbilisi, Georgia, 2 State Medical

University, Tbilisi, Georgia, 3 M. Guramishvili Pediatric Clinic,

Tbilisi, Georgia


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

TUESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER - continued

POSTER SESSIONS

P-8-41 Alternative rehabilitation of asthmatic patients with essential

hypertension: application of measured hypercapnic-hypoxic

breathing protocols

Sydorchuk LP1 , Sydorchuk RI1 , Sydorchuk II1 1Bucovinian State Medical Academy, Chernivtsi, Ukraine

P-8-42 A case of CSF leak causing asthma exacerbation

Ku MJ1 , Atos S1 , Rao YK1 , Silverman BA1 , Schneider AT1 1Long Island College Hospital, Brooklyn, NY, USA

P-8-43 Correlation between nasal symptoms and asthma severity in

atopic and non-atopic asthmatics

Kanani AS1 , Tarlo SM1 , Broder I1 1University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

P-8-44 Characteristic features of steroid-dependent intractable

asthma in Japan

Takahashi K1 , Okada C1 , Kimura G1 , Soda R1 , Tanimoto Y2 ,

Mori A3 , Kawata N4 , Kanehiro A4 , Akiyama K4 1National Minamiokayama Hospital, Hayashima, Okayama,

Japan, 2Okayama University Medical School, Okayama,

Okayama, Japan, 3National Sagamihara Hospital, Sagamihara,

Kanagawa, Japan, 4Japan P-8-45 Bi-yearly documentation of forced expiratory time (FET) to

assess the indications of occupational asthma of employees in

the tobacco industry

Ishaq IM1 1Al-Junaid Hospital, Nowshera, NWFP, Pakistan

P-8-46 Factors of risks of death for bronchial asthma, Havana of East

1990-1999

Raymond T1 , Estruch I2 , Guerrero A3 1 2 Tarara Pediatric Hospital, Habana Del Este, Cuba, Hospital

Hermanos Ameijeiras, Centro Habana, Cuba, 3Policlinico Luis

Galvan, Centro Habana, Cuba

P-8-47 Resilience and depression in children with asthma

Kim DH1 , You IY2 , Song JH1 , Kim KE3 , Kim HS2 1The National Medical Center College of Nursing, Seoul, Republic

of Korea, 2Yonsei University College of Nursing, Seoul, Republic

of Korea, 3Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic

of Korea

P-8-48 Comparison of allergic indexes between monosensitized and

polysensitized patients in childhood asthma

Kwon BC1 , Kim EA1 , Sohn MH2 , Jang GC3 , Kim KE1 1Yongdong Severance Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea,

2 3 Severance Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea, National Health

Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea

P-8-49 Characterization of pulmonary function and utility of

methacholine challenge in diagnosis of current asthma at age

six

Joseph-Bowen JA1 , Sly PD1 , de Klerk N1 1Institute for Child Health Research, Perth, W Australia, Australia

P-8-50 Pseudoasthmatic syndrome in a woman with esophageal

achalasia

Wasilewska E1 , Mincewicz GM1 , Kurowski W1 , Aloszko A1 1Medical University of Gdansk, Dept. of Allergology, Gdansk,

Poland

P-8-51 Detection of Chlamydia pneumoniae by polymerase chain

reaction correlated with microimmunofluorescence in

children with acute infections and asthma

Avila ML1 , Hernandez-Roman MP1 , Castro G2 , GARCIA P2 ,

Del Rio Navarro BE3 , Sienra Monge JJL3 1Hospital Infantil de Mexico Federico Gomez, Mexico, D.F.,

MEXICO, Mexico, 2Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D.F.,

Mexico, 3Hospital Infantil de Mexico, Mexico, D.F., Mexico

75

P-8-52 Asthma forecast: online distribution system

Ito SI1 , Tanigawa TT1 , Ito TI2 1 2 Toukatsu Hospital, Nagareyama, Chiba, Japan, Teikyo University

School of Medicine, Itabashi, Tokyo, Japan

P-8-53 RSV G glycoprotein is a selective Th2 chemoattractant

Wellemans V1 , Bellessort F1 , Lamkhioued B1 1Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada

P-8-54 Chemokine receptors as RSV receptors: roles in viral entry

and immunopathology of the lung

Bellessort F1 , Wellemans V1 , Lamkhioued B1 1Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada

P-8-55 The Value of the Routine Chest X-ray in the Management

of Acute Childhood Asthma

Rha Y-H1 , Bae C-W1 , Chung S-J1 1Department of Pediatrics, Kyung Hee Medical Center, Seoul,

Republic of Korea

P-8-56 Misdiagnosis of vocal cord dysfunction leading to intubation

Gutin F1 , Bahrainwala A1 1Children’s Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University, Detroit,

Michigan, USA

P-8-57 The effect of FasL gene on airway inflammation and

immune effector cells

Chuang YH1 , Chiang BL2 1Graduate Institute of Immunology, National Taiwan University,

Taipei, Taiwan, 2Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine. National

Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan

P-8-58 Antioxidants and half-saturated fatty acids in patients with

asthma

Avalishvili T1 , Charkviani Z1 , Kobakhidze M1 1State Medical University, Tbilisi, Georgia

P-8-59 Adenosine in exhaled breath condensate before and after

exercise challenge

Huszár É1 , Csoma ZS1 , Vizi É1 , Horváth I1 , Böszörményi NG1 1National Korányi Institute for TB and Pulmonology, Budapest,

Hungary

P-8-60 Fibronectin concentration in children with asthma

Adamia N1 , Avalishvili T1 , Chkhaidze I1 , Kavlashvili N1 1State Medical University, Tbilisi, Georgia

Clinical Immunology: Cytokines and Chemokines

P-9-1 Blocking of DTH reaction by antibodies: experimental

tuberculosis model study and clinical observations of the

autovaccine treatment effect in acne

Halasa J1 , Kaczmarek A1 , Zaluga E1 , Halasa M2 1Microbiology and Immunology Department, Pomeranian

Academy of Medicine, Szczecin, Poland, 2General Pathology

Department, Pomeranian Academy of Medicine, Szczecin, Poland

P-9-2 Antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) and severe

cases of Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS)

Ossi E1 , De Pellegrin A1 , Mitrovic J1 , Cancian M1 , Rossanese A1 1Dept. of Med. and Surg. Sci., Clinica Medica I, Univ. of Padova,

Padova, Italy

P-9-3 Immunity status of workers exposed to isocyanates and

immunomodulation effect

Litovskaya AV 1 , Bukina KL 1 , Shipova EE 1

1 Research Institute for Hygiene and Occupational Pathology,

Nizhny Novgorod, Nizhny Novgorod Reg., Russian Federation

TUESDAY


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76

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WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

P-9-4 Lymphocytic alveolitis with CD4+ predominance in

hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to residential exposure to

parakeet

Moreira A1 , Rodrigues J1 , Morais A2 , Palmares M C3 , Souto-

Moura C4 , Vaz M1 1 2 Unidade de Imunoalergologia, H S Joao, Porto, Portugal, Serviço

de Pneumologia, H S Joao, Porto, Portugal, 3Serviço de

Imunologia, H S Joao, Porto, Portugal, 4Serviço de Anatomia

Patológica, Porto, Portugal

P-9-5 Pulmonary surfactant protein D (SP-D) down regulate

allergic inflammation by modulate NO production in

alveolar macrophages

Wang JY1 , Chen IL2 , Liu CF3 1Dept of Pediatrics, National Cheng-Kung University Hospital,

Tainan, Taiwan, 2Institute of Basic Medicine, National Cheng-

Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan, 3Institute of Biochemistry,

National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan

P-9-6 Novel gene delivery using Montmorillonite for the oral

vaccination

Tamura M1 , Kawase M2 , Shikina T1 , Hayama M1 , Kubo T1 , Yagi

K2 , Yamato E3 , Miyazaki J3 1Dept. of Otolaryngology, Osaka University Graduate School of

Medicine, Suita, Osaka, Japan, 2Osaka University Graduate

School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Suita, Osaka, Japan, 3Div. of

Stem Cell Regulation Research, Osaka University School of

Medicine, Suita, Osaka, Japan

P-9-7 The immunological interaction between activated

nasopharyngeal mucosal immune system and adjacent

tubotympanal or tracheal mucosal linings upon antigen

Yamada T1 , Kawauchi H2 , Ishimitsu R2 , Yoshikai Y3 1 2 Biomedical Laboratory, Kitasato Institute, Tokyo, Japan, Dept.

of Otolaryngology, Shimane Medical University, Izumo, Shimane,

Japan, 3Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University,

Fukuoka, Japan

P-9-8 The antihistamine oxatomide inhibits IL-8 production from

nasal epithelial cells

Takahashi A1 , Ishimitsu R1 , Murata A1 , Kataoka S1 , Yoshikai Y2 ,

Kawauchi H1 1Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Shimane Medical University,

Izumo City, Shimane, Japan, 2Medical Institute of Bioregulation,

Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan

P-9-9 An orally bioavailable, small molecule CCR3 antagonist, is a

potent inhibitor of allergic cutaneous reaction in an animal

model

Higashi H1 , Kiuchi M1 , Sato N1 , Sakata K1 , Kuwahara S1 ,

Murakami K1 , Seki M1 , Takagi S1 , Ando J1 , Sogame Y1 , Imaeda

N1 , Takeda S1 , Tanaka Y1 , Tomozane H1 , Kuroita T1 , Mishina T1 ,

Chiba K1 1Pharmaceuticals Research Division, Mitsubishi Pharma Co.,

Yokohama, Japan

P-9-10 Effect of influenza vaccinations on immune response and

serum eotaxin level in patients with asthma

Jahnz-Róyk KM1 , Plusa TE1 , Targowski T1 , Brydak L2 , Machala

M2 1Dept. Int. Med. & Allergology, Military Medical Institute,

Warsaw, Poland, 2National Influenza Center, National Institute

of Hygiene, Warsaw, Poland

P-9-11 Different forms of hypersensitivity in mucous membrane of

the upper airways, diagnosed as allergic rhinitis

Chereshnev VA1 , Tarasevich TN1 , Tuzankina IA1 1Institute of Immunology and Physiology, Ekaterinburg, Russian

Federation

POSTER SESSIONS

P-9-12 Development of protein microarray for human autoimmune

disease (AID) diagnosis

Chen YLC1 , Shen SL1 , Wu DW1 , Ke XK1 , Xiao CHX1 , Hu GXH2 1R&D, Shanghai HealthDigit Co., LtD., Shanghai, China,

2Shanghai HealthDigit Co., LtD., Shanghai, China

P-9-13 The comparison of ECP, RANTES, and eotaxin in serum

with those in nasopharyngeal secretion in RSV-bronchiolitis

Kim HH1 , Lee MH2 , Kim JT2 , Lee JS2 1Dept. of Pediatrics, Catholic University of Korea, Puchon-Shi,

Kyunggi-Do, Republic of Korea, 2Catholic University of Korea,

Seoul, Republic of Korea

P-9-14 Myeloperoxidase (MPO) and ICAM-1 levels in nasal lavages

from atopic patients after IL-8 challenge

Kupczyk M1 , Bochenska-Marciniak M1 , Górski P1 , Kuna P1 1Dept of Pneumonology and Allergy, Medical University of Lodz,

Lodz, Poland

P-9-15 Subcutaneous IVIG: pharmacokinetic study

Chaidaroon D1 , Tantimongkolsuk C1 , Visitsunthorn N1 , Arkachaisri

T2 , Wongkajornsilp A3 , Vichyanond P1 1Pediatrics Allergy & Immunology, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol

University, Bangkok, Thailand, 2Department of Pediatrics, Siriraj

Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand, 3Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand

P-9-16 Cell-mediated immune response in childhood acute leukemia

status post chemotherapy

Samanatikorn Y1 , Benjaponpitak S1 , Direkwattanachai C1 ,

Hongeng S1 1Mahidol University, Radvithi, Bangkok, Thailand

P-9-17 Assessment of the humoral immune response of children

with cystic fibrosis

Szolnoky M1 , Öjhelyi R2 , Madarasi A1 , Holics K2 , Kalmár A1 1 2 Buda Children’s Hospital, Budapest, Hungary, Heim Pál

Children’s Hospital, Budapest, Hungary

P-9-18 Assessment of the humoral immune response in children

with type 1 diabetes mellitus

Sztranyák AT1 , Szolnoky M1 , Karacs I2 , Mezey GyJ1 , Blatniczky

L1 , Kalmár A1 1 2 Buda Children’s Hospital, Budapest, Hungary, National Center

of Epidemiology, Budapest, Hungary

P-9-19 Immune complex disease in hypogammaglobulinaemia: a

paradox? A case of “cockateil fanciers lung” in a young

woman with hypogammaglobulinaemia

Nagendran V1 , Doherty M1 1Dudley Group of Hospitals NHS Trust, Brierley Hill, West

Midlands, UK

P-9-20 Th1/Th2 cytokine profile in patients with HIV/AIDS in

Delhi, India

Agarwal SK1 , Makhija A1 , Singh NP1 , Agarwal K1 , Kapoor AK2 ,

Baveja UK3 1 2 Maulana Azad Medical College, Delhi, India, Maulana Azad

Medical College, Delhi, India, 3National Institute of

Communicable Diseases, Delhi, India

P-9-21 Vitamin E exerts immunomodulatory effects on the

functions of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells

Chua WJ1 , Lin BF1 1Dept. of Agriculture Chemistry of National Taiwan University,

Taipei, Taiwan


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

TUESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER - continued

POSTER SESSIONS

P-9-22 A role for TARC/CCL17, a CC chemokine, in

rheumatological diseases

Okamoto H1 , Kamatani N1 1Inst. of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women’s Medical University,

Tokyo, Japan

P-9-23 Interleukin-13 suppresses MUC5AC gene expression and

mucin secretion in nasal epithelial cells

Kim CH1 , Kim KS1 , Yoon JH1 1Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea

P-9-24 The role of cytokines (IL-10) in endothelial damage:

pathophysiology of septic shock

Hermawan G1 1Moewardi Hospital/Med. School Sebelas Maret Univ., Surakarta,

Jawa Tengah, Indonesia

P-9-25 The relationship between atopic status and nasal IL-10 and

IL-11 levels in infants with RSV bronchiolitis

Chung HL1 , Kim WT2 , Kim JG2 , Choi EJ2 , Lee JH2 , Lee GH2 1Dept. of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Catholic University of

Taegu, Taegu, Republic of Korea, 2Dept. of Pediatrics, Taegu,

Republic of Korea

P-9-26 Matrixmetalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) inhibits eosinophil

effector functions induced by CC chemokine eotaxin

(CCL11)

Dworok T1 , Hartmann C1 , Kapp A1 , Petering H1 1Hannover Medical University, Dept. of Dermatology and

Allergology, Hannover, Germany

P-9-27 Cytokine blockade attenuates the severity of acute pancreatitis

Chooklin SN1 , Perejaslov AA1 1Medical University, Lviv, Ukraine

P-9-28 The role of cytokines and histamine in lung injury:

prognostic criteria and prophylaxis

Vatseba RE1 , Chooklin SN1 , Perejaslov AA1 1Medical University, Lviv, Ukraine

P-9-29 Correlation between proinflammatory cytokines and the

markers of allergy in BALF

Vatseba RE1 , Chooklin SN1 1Medical University, Lviv, Ukraine

P-9-30 Selected cytokines in ear fluid in children with otitis media

with effusion

Zielnik Jurkiewicz BD1 , Stankiewicz W2 1 2 ENT Department, Warsaw, Poland, Department of Immunology,

Warsaw, Poland

P-9-31 Effects of leukotriene C4 on eotaxin production by human

lung fibroblasts

Ishida A1 , Takafuji S1 , Miyakuni Y1 , Nakagawa T1 1Dpt. Int. Med. St. Marianna Univ. Sch. Med., Kawasaki,

Kanagawa, Japan

P-9-32 Macrophage migration inhibitory factor in patients with

allergic rhinitis

Nakamaru Y1 , Oridate N1 , Nishihira J2 , Takagi D1 , Furuta Y1 ,

Fukuda S1 1Department Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Hokkaido

University, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan, 2Dept. of Molecular

Biochemistry, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan

P-9-33 Structural folding optimization in human interleukin-18

expression using green fluorescent protein.

Omoya K1 , Kato Z1 , Matsukuma E1 , Hashimoto K1 , Li A1 , Kondo

N1 , Yamamoto Y1 , Ohnishi H1 1Department of Pediatrics, Gifu University School of Medicine,

Gifu, Gifu, Japan

77

P-9-34 IL-18 is associated with severity of atopic dermatitis

Ohnishi H1 , Kato Z1 , Watanabe M1 , Fukutomi O1 , Inoue R1 ,

Kondo N1 , Teramoto T1 1Department of Pediatrics, Gifu University School of Medicine,

Gifu, Japan

P-9-35 Interleukin (IL)-4 induces and cyclohexamide inhibits

intracellular expression of surfactant protein (SP)-D but not

SP-A in pulmonary epithelial cells

Cao Y1 , Tao J2 , Vass G1 , Bates SR2 , Beers MF1 , Haczku A1 1University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA

19104, USA, 2Institute for Environment Medicine, University of

Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA

P-9-36 A novel single-nucleotide substitution, Leu 467 Pro, in the

interferon-gamma receptor 1 gene associated with allergic

diseases

Aoki M1 , Matsui E1 , Kaneko H1 , Fukao T1 , Teramoto T1 , Kondo

N1 , Kasahara K1 , Watanabe M1 , Suzuki K1 1Department of Pediatrics, Gifu University School of Medicine,

Gifu, Japan

Environment: Indoor and Outdoor

P-10-1 Aerobiological study of pollen and mold from eight stations

in South Korea (July 1, 1997-June 30, 2002)

Oh JW1 , Lee HR2 , Kang IJ3 , Kook MH4 , Kim SW5 , Lee HB6 1Hanyang University Hospital, Guri-shi, Kyunggi-do, Republic

of Korea, 2Hallym University, Seoul, Republic of Korea, 3Daegu Fatima Hospital, Daegu, Republic of Korea, 4Kwangju Veterans

Hospital, Kwangju, Republic of Korea, 5Busan St. Benedict

Hospital, Busan, Republic of Korea, 6Hanyang University, Seoul,

Republic of Korea

P-10-2 Should non-woven materials be used for bed encasement

against house dust mites?

Mahakittikun V1 , Jirapongsananuruk O1 , Nochot H1 ,

Tungtrongchitr A1 , Vichyanond P1 1Mahidol University, Bangkoknoi, Bangkok, Thailand

P-10-3 Intermittent exposure to a Bacillus protease in a body lotion

led to a low rate of sensitization in a safety clinical study

Sarlo K1 , Innis JD1 , Adamson GM2 , Babcock LS1 , Hollis VL1 ,

Kirchner DB1 1 2 The Procter & Gamble Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, Avon

Products, Suffern, NY, USA

P-10-4 The fungus Metarhizium anisopliae adjuvates the allergic

response to ovalbumin and also promotes a local

inflammatory response in mice

Instanes MD1 , Ward MD2 , Groeng E-C3 , Hetland G1 1 2 Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway, NHEERL,

USEPA, Triangle Park, NC, USA, 3Norwegian Institute of Public

Health, Oslo, Norway

P-10-5 One year, double-blind, placebo- and environmental

controlled encasing study in mite allergic patients

Brehler RBS1 , Kniest F2 1 2 UKM, Muenster, Germany, Allergopharma, Joachim Ganzer KG,

Hamburg, Germany

P-10-6 Use of enzyme-containing laundry detergents does not lead

to the development of enzyme-specific IgE antibody among

consumers

Sarlo K1 , Parker RE1 , Stachlewitz R2 , Adamson G3 , Troyano M1 ,

Kirchner DB1 1The Procter and Gamble Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA,

2 3 Abbott Bioresearch, Worcester, MA, USA, Avon Products,

Suffern, New York, USA

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78

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WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

P-10-7 An evaluation of the probability of hospital admissions for

asthma attacks by using biometeorological indices: an

observational study in Florence (Italy)

Cecchi L1 , Morabito M1 , Orlandini S1 , Crisci A2 , Gensini GF1 ,

Maracchi GP2 1 2 Bioclimatology Center, Florence, Italy, IBIMET-CNR, Florence,

Italy

P-10-8 Can one sampling site accurately reflect the pollen count for a

region? Spatial variability of the pollen count in Sydney,

Australia

Katelaris CH1 , Burke TV1 , Byth K2 1Institute for Immunology and Allergy Research, Sydney, NSW,

Australia, 2Westmead Millennium Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia

P-10-9 Distribution of dog, cat and mite allergens in homes with and

without pets

Kakutani C1 , Ogino S1 , Tamaki A2 1 2 Faculty of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan, Tamaki

ENT clinic, Osaka, Osaka, Japan

P-10-10 Effects of nitrogen dioxide exposure on cells in bronchoalveolar

lavage fluids in brown Norway rats

Kumae T1 , Arakawa H2 1National Institute of Health and Nutrition, Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan,

2National Institute of Public Health, Wako, Saitama, Japan

P-10-11 Tributyltin as endocrine disrupter is the exacerbation factor of

allergy

Iwamura C1 , Nakazawa M2 , Takahashi K1 , Minami M2 , Ikezawa

Z 1

1Department of Dermatology, Yokohama City University School of

Medicine, Yokohama-shi, Japan, 2Department of Parasitology,

Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Yokohama-shi, Japan

P-10-12 Exposure characterization of fragranced air fresheners

Isola DA1 , Smith LW1 , Rogers RE2 , Black MS3 1Research Institute for Fragrance Materials, Inc., Woodcliff Lake,

New Jersey, USA, 2Toxcon Health Sciences Research Center, Inc.,

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, 3Air Quality Sciences, Inc., Marietta,

Georgia, USA

P-10-13 Aerobiology of allergy-causing plants of Islamabad

Abbas SH1 , Mirajab MI2 , Raza SM3 1 2 National Institute of Health, Islamabad, Pakistan, Quaid E Azam

University, Islamabad, Pakistan, 3Punjab Medical College,

Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan

P-10-14 Characterisation of the primary cellular response to particles

and ovalbumin in the local lymph node

Nygaard UC1 , Aase A1 , Ormstad HK2 , Lovik M1 1 2 Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway, Dermanor,

Oslo, Norway

P-10-15 Decrease in the antigenicity of cedar pollen allergens by the

treatment with positive and negative ions

Oshita MO1 , Shigeta SS1 , Hayashi TH2 , Ono KO1 , Nozima HN3 ,

Nishikawa KN3 , Akiyama TA1 1Hiroshima University ADSM, Department of Molecular

Biotechnology, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima, Japan, 2Takanobashi Medical Center, Hiroshima, Hiroshima, Japan, 3SHARP Corporation, Yao, Osaka, Japan

P-10-16 African dust clouds are associated with increased pediatric

asthma accident & emergency admissions on the Caribbean

island of Trinidad

Monteil MA1 , Gyan K1 , Henry W1 , Lacaille S1 , Laloo A1 , Lamsee-

Ebanks C1 , McKay S1 , Antoine RA1 1University of the West Indies, Champs Fleur, Trinidad and Tobago

POSTER SESSIONS

P-10-17 Febreze Allergen Reducerlowers airborne and reservoir

Der p 1 levels in laboratory tests of household bedding

O’Brien JC1 , Sarlo K1 , Alonso M1 , Sercombe JK2 , Liu-Brennan

D2 , Tovey ER2 , Battucci S1 , Reece S1 , Uchiyama H1 1The Procter & Gamble Company, Cincinnati, OH, USA,

2Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, NSW,

Australia

P-10-18 Influence of air pollution on symptoms of seasonal allergic

rhinitis and bronchial asthma

Rapiejko P1 , Zielnik-Jurkiewicz B2 , Lipiec A3 , Jurkiewicz D1 ,

Wojdas A1 1Otolaryngology Dept. Military Institute of Medicine, Warsaw,

Poland, 2Otolaryngology Dept. Children’s Hospital Nieklanska,

Warsaw, Poland, 3Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland

P-10-19 Immunoglobulin G antibodies to molds in Norwegian

blood donors

Rydjord B1 , Wiker HG1 1Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway

P-10-20 Evaluation of sensory and pulmonary responses in adults

following controlled environmental exposures to fragranced

incense sticks

Rogers R1 , Ibach R1 , Jeng C-J1 , Prasad N2 , MacDonald F1 ,

Burdick J3 1Toxcon Health Sciences Research Center Inc., Edmonton, AB,

Canada, 2Dept. of Mathematical & Statistical Sciences -

University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, 3Bath & Body

Works, Reynoldsburg, OH, USA

P-10-21 Endotoxin variability within carpeted living rooms

Siebers R1 , Loan R1 , Fitzharris P1 , Crane J1 1Wellington Asthma Research Group, Wellington, New Zealand

P-10-22 Effects of exposure to aerosolized red tide toxins

Sleasman J1 , Kirkpatrick B2 , Sanka RS1 1 2 University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL, USA, Mote

Marine Lab, Sarasota, FL, USA

Immunodeficiency and Immunomodulation

P-11-1 Opportunistic infections in HIV-infected patients in Delhi,

India

Agarwal SK1 , Makhija A1 , Singh NP1 , Agarwal K1 , Kapoor AK1 ,

Baveja UK2 1 2 Maulana Azad Medical College, Delhi, India, National Institute

of Communicable Diseases, Delhi, India

P-11-2 Primary immunodeficiencies incidence in northwest Mexico

Orozco Javier M1 , Velazquez Héctor G2 1ISSSTE Basic Hospital Pediatric Area, San Luis Río Colorado,

Sonora, Mexico, 2UABC Medicine Faculty Immunology

Department, Mexicalí, Baja California, Mexico

P-11-3 Autoimmune response induced by dendritic cells exerted

anti-tumor effect in murine model of leukemia

Tsai BY1 , Lin YL2 , Chiang BL2 1Graduate Institute of Immunology, National Taiwan University,

Taipei, Taiwan, 2Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine,

National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan

P-11-4 Modern topics in immunotherapy in chronic osteomyelitis

Slesarev VV 1 , Pyhteev DA 1 , Mashkov AE 1 , Pynegin BV 2 ,

Suchkov SV 3

1 Moscow Regional Clinical Research Institute, Moscow, Russian

Federation, 2 Institute of Immunology, Moscow, Russian

Federation, 3 Moscow Regional Clinical Research Institute,

Moscow Medical Academy, Moscow, Russian Federation


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

TUESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER - continued

POSTER SESSIONS

P-11-5 Experience with subcutaneous immunoglobulin infusions in

CVID patients with adverse reactions to intravenous

immunoglobulin: a case series

Thethi AK1 , Weiler CR1 1Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA

P-11-6 The effect of polyoxidonium, a novel immunomodulator, on

the functional activity of human peripheral blood phagocytes

Dambaeva SV1 , Mazurov DV1 , Golubeva NM1 , D’yakonova

VAyakonova VA1 , Pinegin BV1 1National Research Center Institute of Immunology, Moscow,

Russian Federation

P-11-7 Combined immunotherapy in treatment of secondary

immunodeficiency accompanied viral syndrome

Nesterova IV1 1Medical Center, Administrative Dept. of the Russian President,

Moscow, Russian Federation

P-11-8 Immunomodulatory effects of combined therapy (IFN α and

ribavirin) on the expression of adhesion molecules in patients

with chronic hepatitis C

Gazdik F 1 , Jahnova E 1 , Pijak MR 1 , Gazdikova K 1

1 Institute of Preventive and Clinical Medicine, Bratislava, Slovak

Republic, Slovakia

P-11-9 A case of primary immunodeficiency and nephrotic syndrome

Orozco Javier M1 , Velazquez Héctor G2 1ISSSTE Basic Hospital Pediatric Area, San Luis Río Colorado,

Sonora, Mexico, 2UABC Medicine Faculty Immunology

Department, Mexicalí, Baja California, Mexico

P-11-10 A study of malnutrition in Iranian children with primary

humoral immunodeficiency

Kouhkan A1 , Pourpak Z1 , Farhoudi A1 , Movahedi M1 , Gharegozlou

M1 , Jandaneh AR1 , Moin A1 , Aghamohammadi A1 1Immunology, Asthma and Allergy Research Institute, Tehran, Iran

P-11-11 Ear, nose, and throat manifestations in patients with primary

antibody deficiencies

Aghamohammadi A1 , Jalali F1 , Farhoudi A1 , Moin M1 , Pourpak

Z1 , Rezaei N1 1Dept. of Clinical Pediatric Immunology, Tehran University of

Medicine, Tehran, Iran

P-11-12 Natural killer cells in mucocutaneous candidiasis

Palma-Carlos ML1 , Palma-Carlos AG2 1CHIUL, Lisbon University Hospital, Lisboa, Portugal,

2Immunology Institute - Fac. Med. Lisbon, Lisboa, Portugal

P-11-14 Reports of 18 cases of severe combined immunodeficiency

Chirdjirapong Dr: 1 , Simasathien Dr: 1 , Jirapongsananuruk Dr: 1 ,

Luengvechakarn Dr: 1 , Visitsuntorn Prof: 1 , Vichyanond Prof: 1

1Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, Bangkok, Thailand

P-11-15 Late diagnosis and pulmonary complications of common

variable immunodeficiency syndrome

Strakova J1 1Department Clinical Immunology Faculty Hospital, Martin,

Slovakia

P-11-16 Coexistence of common variable immunodeficiency and

autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2

Yilmaz M1 , Topaloglu AK2 , Altintas DU1 , Yuksel B2 , Bingol-Karakoc

G1 , Kendirli SG1 1Cukurova University, Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology,

Adana, Turkey, 2Cukurova University, Division of Pediatric

Endocrinology, Adana, Turkey

79

P-11-17 X-linked agammaglobulinemia in Thailand

Dumrongkigchaiporn P1 , Simasathien T1 , Jirapongsananuruk O1 ,

Visitsunthorn N1 , Vichyanond P1 1Allergy and Immunology, Dept. Pediatrics, Siriraj Hospital,

Bangkok, Thailand

P-11-18 Detection of enterovirus viremia in X-linked

agammaglobulinemia using nucleic acid sequences based

amplification (NASBA)

Suntipraron P1 , Desudchit T2 , Chatchatee P1 , Ngamphaiboon J1 1Pediatric Allergy & Immunology Division, Chulalongkorn

Hospital, Pathumwan, Bangkok, Thailand, 2Pediatric Neurology,

Chulalongkorn Hospital, Pathumwan, Bangkok, Thailand

P-11-19 Leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome: report of three

cases in Iran

Nobahar V1 , Hamedi AB1 1Mashad University of Medical Sciences, Mashad, Khorasan, Iran

P-11-20 Allergic diseases at the persons undergone the influence of

the radiation

Tataurchikova N1 , Latysheva T1 , Seslavina L1 , Gudima G1 ,

Sidorovich I1 1Institute of Immunology, Moscow, Russian Federation

P-11-21 Primary immunodeficiency registry of Thailand

Simasathien T 1 , Benjaponpitak S 2 , Chatchatee P 3 , Trakultivakorn

M 4 , Sangsupavanich P 5 , Vichyanond P 6 , Pairojkul S 7 ,

Lerdluedeeporn P 8 , Thepchatri A 9 , Pattanajitvilai O 10 ,

Visitsunthorn N 11 , Luengvechakarn V 11

1 Bhumibol Adulyadej Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand, 2 Ramathibodi

Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand, 3 Chulalongkorn

University, Bangkok, Thailand, 4 Chiang Mai University, Chaing

Mai, Thailand, 5 Prince of Songkla University, Songkla, Thailand,

6 Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand, 7 Khon

Kaen University, Thailand, 8 Children Hospital, Thailand,

9 Phramongkutlao Hospital, Thailand, 10 Mahidol University,

Bangkok, Thailand, 11 Bangkok, Thailand

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WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

WEDNESDAY, 10 SEPTEMBER

Poster Sessions 15:45 - 17:00

Exhibit Hall C, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Posters are on display 9:00 – 17:00. Authors are present to discuss

their posters 15:45 – 17:00.

No CME Credit will be awarded for this activity.

Animal Models of Disease

P-12-1 Nasal cavity dimensions in rats measured by acoustic

rhinometry and a fluid-displacement method

Straszek SPV1 , Pedersen OF1 1Dept. of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University

of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark

P-12-2 Development of a murine model with peanut-induced

anaphylaxis

Sun J1 , Alvarez D1 , Goncharova S1 , Waserman S2 , Jordana M1 1Center for Gene Therapeutics, McMaster University, Hamilton,

Ontario, Canada, 2Faculty of Medicine, McMaster University,

Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

P-12-3 Lower airways hyperresponsiveness following isolated upper

airway allergen challenge in a murine model of asthma and

allergic rhinitis

Wang Y1 , McCusker CT1 1Montreal Children’s Hospital of the McGill University Health

Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

P-12-4 Budesonide abrogates airway inflammation and

hyperreactivity and improves airway remodeling in mice

continually exposed to house dust mite extract

Johnson JR1 , Pacitto SR1 , Wiley RE1 , Mackenzie DC1 , Inman

MD1 , Jordana M1 1McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

P-12-5 A mouse atopic dermatitis model for human allergic disease

and for drug screening

Chen YLC1 , Yang HLY2 , Xiao CHX3 , Ong CJO1 , Mui AM1 ,

Chung SWC4 1General Surgery Department, UBC, Vancouver, BC, Canada,

2Women’s and Children’s Hospital of Guangzhou, Guangzhou,

BC, China, 3Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei,

China, 4Surgery Department, UBC, Vancouver, BC, Canada

P-12-6 Re-direction of ragweed-induced asthma-like reaction by

adoptive transfer of dendritic cells from Chlamydia-infected

mice

Bilenki LC1 , Yang X1 1University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

P-12-7 Low productivity of MMP-9 in keratinocytes of atopic NC/

Nga mice

Fujisawa C1 , Matsuda H1 1Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo,

Japan

P-12-8 Late asthmatic response mediated by CD4 + T lymphocytes

in mice

Nabe T1 , Zindl CL2 , Atkinson TP3 , Chaplin DD2 1Department of Pharmacology, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University,

Kyoto, Japan, 2Department of Microbiology, University of Alabama

at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA, 3Department of Pediatrics,

University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA

P-12-9 Atopic dermatitis-like pruritic skin inflammation by feeding

with a special diet in hairless mice, HR-1

Fujii M1 , Nabe T1 , Mizutani N1 , Danno K2 , Kohno S1 1Department of Pharmacology, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University,

Kyoto, Japan, 2Department of Dermatology, Shiga University

Medical Science, Shiga, Japan

POSTER SESSIONS

P-12-10 DP receptor antagonists inhibit antigen and prostaglandin

D2 (PGD2)-induced nasal congestion in a primate model of

allergic rhinitis

McAuliffe MM1 , Piechuta HP1 , Bosquet J1 , Alleyn S1 , Slipetz

D1 , Jones TR1 1Merck Frosst Canada & Co, Kirkland, Quebec, Canada

P-12-11 The use of acoustic rhinometry to study antigen and

prostaglandin (PGD2) induced nasal congestion in a

primate model of allergic rhinitis

Piechuta HP1 , McAuliffe MM1 , Alleyn S1 , Bosquet J1 , Jones TR1 1Merck Frosst Canada & Co., Kirkland, Quebec, Canada

P-12-12 Anti-inflammatory effect of various fungi on airway

inflammation in animal model

Chen ML1 , Lin BF1 1Dep. of Agricultural Chemistry of National Taiwan University,

Taipei, Taiwan

P-12-13 Effect of lysed Enterococcus faecalis FK-23 (LFK) on

allergen-induced peritoneal accumulation of eosinophils in

mice

Shimada T1 , Cheng L2 , Ide M1 , Fukuda S2 , Enomoto T3 ,

Shirakawa T2 1Nichinichi Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., Oyamada, Mie, Japan,

2Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior, Kyoto

University, Kyoto, Kyoto, Japan, 3Department of Otolaryngology,

Japanese Red Cross Society Wakayama M, Wakayama,

Wakayama, Japan

P-12-14 Preparation of allergic rhinitis animal model using BN rats

Akagi MA1 , Sasahara TS1 , Fujimoto YF1 , Tanabe MT1 , Imajyo

NI1 , Fukuishi NF1 1Tokushima Bunri University, Tokushima, Tokushima, Japan

P-12-15 Immune responses induced by epicutaneous patching using

allergenic and nonallergenic proteins in mice

Huang CH1 , Tan LK1 , Yi FC1 , Kuo IC1 , Seow SV1 , Chua KY1 1Department of Pediatrics, National University of Singapore,

Singapore, Singapore

P-12-16 Inactivated Chlamydia trachomatis treatment in early life

reduced allergic reaction in adult mice following ovalbumin

exposure

Jiao L1 , Yang X1 1University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Asthma: Mechanisms

P-13-1 Changes of SOD and LPO in bronchoalveolar lavage from

asthma

Song WD1 1Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, Pulmonary Department,

Shenzhen, Guangdong, China

P-13-2 Potential pathogenic properties of so-called physiologic

bacterial flora inhabiting bronchi in asthma and COPD

Halasa M1 , Halasa J2 , Machalinski B1 1General Pathology Department, Pomeranian Academy of

Medicine, Szczecin, Poland, 2Microbiology and Immunology

Department, Pomeranian Academy of Medicine, Szczecin, Poland

P-13-3 Release of histamine from wheezy bronchitis children’s

peripheral blood basophils stimulated with bacteria

Halasa J 1 , Gonerko P 1 , Kucharska E 1 , Halasa M 2

1 Microbiology and Immunology Department, Pomeranian

Academy of Medicine, Szczecin, Poland, 2 General Pathology

Department, Pomeranian Academy of Medicine, Szczecin, Poland


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10 - continued

POSTER SESSIONS

P-13-4 Relief of disease symptoms in patients with nonatopic

asthma after autovaccine treatment correlates with IL-10

level increase

Halasa J1 , Kucharska E1 , Halasa M2 1Microbiology and Immunology Department, Pomeranian

Academy of Medicine, Szczecin, Poland, 2General Pathology

Department, Pomeranian Academy of Medicine, Szczecin, Poland

P-13-5 The state of intracellular metabolism of blood lymphocytes

in bronchial asthma patients

Smirnova SV1 , Savchenko AA1 , Kadritcheva SG1 1State Medical Research Institute for Northern Problems,

Krasnoyarsk, Russian Federation

P-13-6 Viruses in induction of bronchial asthma relapses

Issakov VA1 , Kukui DL1 , Sominina AA2 1Pasteur Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology,

Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation, 2Research Institute of

Influenza, Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation

P-13-7 Significant association of thromboxane A2 receptor

(TBXA2R) gene polymorphism was noted in ASA-intolerant

asthma (AIA)

Choi JH1 , Park HS1 , Lee JH2 , Suh YJ1 , Park CS2 , Shin HD3 1Ajou University Hospital, Suwon, Republic of Korea,

2Soonchunhyang University School of Medicine, Buchon,

Republic of Korea, 3SNP Genetics Ltd, Seoul, Republic of Korea

P-13-8 Clinical and biochemical characteristics of asthma patients

with obesity (West and North Siberia)

Korolenko TA1 , Shmachkova NV2 , Korolenko CP3 1Institute of Physiology RAMS, Novosibirsk, Russian Federation,

2Scientific Center of Clinical and Experimental Medicine,

Novosibirsk, Russian Federation, 3Medical Academy, Novosibirsk,

Russian Federation

P-13-9 Selenium status is decreased in patients with allergic asthma

and allergic rhinitis

Farid R1 , Pishnamaz R1 , Ranjbar A2 , Pizzulli A2 , Moin M3 1Mashad University of Medical Sciences, Mashad, Khorasan, Iran,

2Pediatric Practice for Clinical Immunology and Allergy, Cologne,

Georgia, 3Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

P-13-10 Dust mite allergy in Kolkata Metropolis, India: an immunopathological

purview

Saha GK1 1Dept. of Zoology, University of Calcutta, Kolkata, West Bengal,

India

P-13-11 Copper in serum and induced sputum of patients with

allergic bronchial asthma

Djuric V1 , Bogic M1 , Djarmati D2 , Djodjevic-Denic G3 1Institute of Allergology and Immunology, Belgrade, Serbia,

Yugoslavia, 2Health Protection Institute, Belgrade, Serbia,

Yugoslavia, 3Institute of Pathologic Physiology, Belgrade, Serbia,

Yugoslavia

P-13-12 Correlation between bronchial provocation tests with

allergens and histamine

Palma-Carlos AG1 , Palma-Carlos ML2 11st Medical Clinic, Faculty of Medicine, Lisbon, Portugal,

2CHIUL - Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal

P-13-13 Neuropeptide Y and leptin in mildly asthmatic children

Doniec Z1 , Widerska-Kurzawa A2 , Tomalak W1 , Kurzawa R1 1 2 Institute for TBC and Lung Dis., Rabka, Poland, Dept. of

Pediatrics, Allergology and Cardiology, Medical University,

Wroclaw, Poland

81

P-13-14 Correlation between PFR, FEV and ventilatory dysfunction

1

in asthma

Palma-Carlos AG1 , Palma-Carlos ML2 1I Medical Clinic, Lisbon University Hospital, Immuno-

Allergology, Lisbon, Portugal, 2CHIUL - Universidade de Lisboa,

Lisboa, Portugal

P-13-15 Polymorphism of leukotriene C4 synthase (LTC4S) gene and

response to leukotriene-modifiers (LTM)-montelukast

Novotna B1 , Knoll A2 , Novak J3 1 2 University Hospital, Brno, Czech Republic, Mendel University,

Brno, Czech Republic, 3Hospital Litomysl, Litomysl, Czech

Republic

P-13-16 Age-dependent effect of ozone-induced airway inflammation

in the guinea pig

Saga R1 , Mochizuki H1 , Tokuyama K1 , Morikawa A1 1Gunma University School of Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma, Japan

P-13-17 Psychological stress significantly exacerbates bronchial

asthma and may precipitate episodes of bronchial asthma in

sensitive patients

Ishaq IM1 1Al-Junaid Hospital, Nowshera, NWFP, Pakistan

P-13-18 The role of T-cell activation and cytokines in severe bronchial

asthma

Kimura G1 , Okada C1 , Takahashi K1 , Sakaguchi M1 , Tanimoto

Y2 , Mori A3 , Kawata N4 , Yishinaga Y4 , Kanehiro A4 , Soda R4 ,

Akiyama K4 1National Minamiokayama Hospital, Tsukubo-gun, Okayama,

Japan, 2Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine and

Dentist, Okayama, Okayama, Japan, 3National Sagaminara

Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan, 4Japan P-13-19 Anti-helminthic treatment interferes with asthma severity

Medeiros Jr M1 , Figueiredo JP1 , Almeida MC1 , Schriefer A1 ,

Carvalho EM1 , Araujo MI1 , Alcantara L1 1Serviço de Imunologia, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador,

Bahia, Brazil

P-13-20 The role of fungi in etiopathogenesis of asthma

Hofman T1 , Hofman AM1 , Hofman J1 1Center of Allergy, Poznan, Poland

P-13-21 Airway remodeling identification by HRCT in patients with

different forms of asthma severity and healthy control

subjects

Mincewicz GM1 , Aloszko A1 , Wasilewska E1 , Kurowski W1 ,

Mierzejewska E2 , Waszkuc-Golonko J1 1Medical University of Gdansk, Dept. of Allergology, Gdansk,

Poland, 2Medical University of Gdansk, Institute of Radiology,

Gdansk, Poland

P-13-22 Overproduction of cysteinyl-leukotriene (cys-LTs) in aspirinintolerant

asthma (AIA) necessarily occurs after systemic

aspirin challenge

Higashi N1 , Taniguchi M1 , Higashi A1 , Mita H1 , Akiyama K1 1National Sagamihara Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan

P-13-23 Helicobacter pylori infection as a possible trigger of

eosinophilic and aspirin-induced gastroenteropathy

Higashi A1 , Higashi N1 , Taniguchi M1 , Adachi K1 , Akiyama K1 1National Sagamihara Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan

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WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

P-13-24 Relationship of bronchial inhalation challenge test with

Dermatophagoides pteronissynus and serum specific IgE

antibodies

Vega-Chicote JM1 , Rondon MC1 , Ameal A1 , Carmona MJ1 ,

Garcia-Gonzalez JJ1 , Fernandez-Melendez S1 , Miranda A1 , Reina

E1 , Mayoral M1 1Carlos Haya Hospital, Malaga, Spain

P-13-25 Critical role of IL-5 in antigen-induced pulmonary

eosinophilia, but not in lymphocyte activation

Katoh S1 , Matsumoto N1 , Matsukura S1 1Third Department of Internal Medicine, Miyazaki Medical

College, Miyazaki, Japan

P-13-26 Expired nitric oxide (NO) during bronchoprovocation in

asthmatic patients

Kowal K1 , DuBuske LM2 , Bodzenta-Lukaszyk A1 1 2 Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland, Immunology

Research Institute of New England, Fitchburg, MA, USA

P-13-27 Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the

common causes of chronic cough

Bocskei CS1 , Viczian M2 , Boszormenyi NGY1 , Ajkay Z1 1Koranyi National Institute for Pulmonology, Budapest, Hungary,

2Svabhegy National Children’s Institute for Pulmonology, Budapest,

Hungary

IgE and In-vitro Testing

P-14-1 Novel optically and fluidically enhanced chamber for in vitro

allergy diagnosis in a panel format

Innerst D1 , Zatzke M1 , Romero M1 , Kawamoto S1 , Yamashita

K1 , Wilmarth B1 , Zychlinsky E1 1Hitachi Chemical Diagnostics, Mountain View, CA, USA

P-14-2 The methods of diagnosis of allergy in Ghana

Moses E1 , Moses-Fynn E2 1Center for Scientific & Industrial Research, Kumasi, ASH, Ghana,

2Kwame Nkrumah University of Science & Technology, Kumasi,

ASH, Ghana

P-14-3 Comparison of VIDAS and Pharmacia CAP for detection of

specific IgE antibodies in allergic children

Sohn MH1 , Lee KE1 , Kwon BC1 , Kim KE1 1Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea

P-14-4 An in vitro test system for rapid and simultaneous

determination of 190 crude and recombinant allergen specific

IgE in small volume of sera

Ong TC1 , Wang XS1 , Wong FL1 , Angus AC1 , Wang DY1 , Chew

FT1 1National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore

P-14-5 Reliability of different diagnostic methods for IgE mediated

allergy

Panzner P1 , Haschova M1 , Hanzlikova J1 , Malkusova I1 1Dept. of Immunology and Allergology, Medical Faculty in Plzen,

Plzen, Czech Republic

P-14-6 Aachen Allergy Array: a novel allergen chip technique for the

analysis of serum IgE antibodies to recombinant allergens in

children with atopy

Ott H1 , Schröder C2 , Heise R2 , Krischer S1 , Heimann G1 , Merk

HF2 , Baron JM2 1University Hospital Aachen, Department of Pediatrics, Aachen,

Germany, 2University Hospital Aachen, Department of

Dermatology and Allergology, Aachen, Germany

POSTER SESSIONS

P-14-7 OTC allergy testing

Brown C1 , Mara I1 , Cobb S1 , Marinkovich V2 1 2 ImmuneTech, Menlo Park, CA, USA, Stanford Medical School,

Stanford, CA, USA

P-14-8 Cross-reactivity between respiratory and food allergens:

specific IgE determination by three different methods

Wang P1 , Poulsen LK2 , Bindslev-Jensen C1 1 2 Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark, National

University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark

P-14-9 Prevalence of wheat allergy among children with food allergy

symptoms

Pourpak Z1 , Mesdaghi M1 , Mansouri M1 , Farhoudi A1 , Movahedi

M1 , Gharegozlou M1 , Moin A1 1Immunology, Asthma and Allergy Research Institute, Tehran, Iran

P-14-10 Microarrayed allergens for IgE profiling

Deinhofer K1 , Sevcik H1 , Balic N2 , Harwanegg C1 , Hiller R1 ,

Spitzauer S2 , Rumpold H2 , Mueller MW1 1VBC-Genomics Bioscience Research GmbH, Vienna, Austria,

2Clinical Institute for Med. and Chem. Laboratory Diagnostics,

Vienna, Austria

P-14-11 Evaluation of the new Hitachi allergy diagnosis system for

the detection of specific IgE to 33 allergens

Enomoto T1 , Sawazaki T2 , Mizogami Y2 , Anzai T2 , Fujiwara C2 ,

Nakagawa T3 1Japanese Red Cross Society, Wakayama Medical Center,

Wakayama, Wakayama, Japan, 2Hitachi Chemical Co., Ltd.,

Pharmaceutical Division, Hitachi, Ibaraki, Japan, 3St. Marianna

University School of Medicine, Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan

P-14-12 In vitro confirmation of specific sensitization to latex

allergens using CIA, DPC, and Immunocap systems

Potter PC1 , Millward V2 , Fenemore B1 , Zychlinski E2 1University of Cape Town, Cape Town, Western Province, South

Africa, 2Hitachi Inc., Silicone Valley, California, USA

P-14-13 Innovative method for rapid isolation of live dust mites with

high purity

Mahakittikun V1 , Pattanajitvilai S2 , Nochot H1 , Bunnag C1 1 2 Mahidol University, Bangkoknoi, Bangkok, Thailand, King

Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkuntien,

Bangkok, Thailand

P-14-14 Nasal cytology according to histamine sensitivity in perennial

allergic rhinitis

Kim K1 , Yoon JH1 , Lee JG1 1Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Yonsei University, Seoul, Republic

of Korea

P-14-15 Beneficial effect of blood specific IgE measurements to the

physician’s management of patients with respiratory/skin

symptoms in primary care

Duran E1 , Vignati G2 , Amengual Guedan MJ3 , Petersson CJ4 1REHRU, Institut Municipal d’Investigació Médica, Barcelona,

Spain, 2Centro Malattie Endocrine e Metaboliche, Ospedale G.

Fornaroli, Magenta, Italy, 3Immunology Laboratory, UDIAT-CD,

Institut Universitari Parc Tauli-UAB, Sabadell, Spain, 4Pharmacia Diagnostics AB, Uppsala, Sweden

P-14-16 Comparison of two quantitative allergen-specific IgE assays

that use liquid- and solid-phase allergens

Li TM1 , Chuang T1 , Tse S1 , Hovanec-Burns D1 , El Shami AS1 1Diagnostic Products Corporation, Los Angeles, CA, USA


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

WEDNESDAY, 10 SEPTEMBER- continued

POSTER SESSIONS

P-14-17 Flow-cytometric cellular allergen stimulation test (FAST) and

CAST for in vitro diagnosis of NSAID hypersensitive

patients

Sanz ML1 , Gamboa PM2 , Caballero MR1 , Antépara I2 , Diéguez

I3 , de Weck AL1 1 2 University Clinic of Navarra, Pamplona, Navarra, Spain, Hospital

de Basurto, Bilbao, Spain, 3University of Navarra, Pamplona,

Navarra, Spain

P-14-18 Serum levels of total IgE and IgE binding factor (soluble

CD23) in atopic disorders.

Farid R1 , Sedaghatnia R1 , Pishnamaz R1 , Moin M2 1Mashad University of Medical Sciences, Mashad, Khorasan, Iran,

2Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

P-14-19 Study of the effects of IL4 on IgE production by peripheral

blood mononuclear cells (B cells) of allergic and non-allergic

individuals

Abbas SH1 , Fitzharris PF2 1 2 National Institute of Health, Islamabad, Pakistan, Guys Hospital,

London, UK

P-14-20 IgE-dependent enhancement of Th2 cell-mediated allergic

inflammation in the airways

Maezawa Y1 , Nakajima H1 , Iwamoto I1 1Chiba University School of Medicine, Chiba City, Chiba, Japan

P-14-21 Local class switching to IgE in the nasal mucosa in seasonal

rhinitis

Takhar P1 , Coker H1 , Fear D1 , Smurthwaite L1 , Durham SR2 ,

Gould HJ1 , Banfiled G2 , Carr V2 1 2 King’s College London, London, UK, Imperial College School

of Medicine at the NHLI, London, UK

P-14-22 IL-13 gene polymorphism might be related to the control of

total IgE levels in non-atopic population

Crisci CD1 , Scollo A2 , Nardone L1 , Ardusso LRF1 , Bertoya NHI3 1National University of Rosario, Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina,

2 3 CUDAIO, Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina, Clínica del Torax,

Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina

P-14-23 Effects of allergy upon the course of bronchial asthma

Stanojev-Jovanovic D1 , Petrovic M1 , Jaric D1 1Institut za plucne bolesti, Sremska Kamenica, Vojvodina,

Yugoslavia

P-14-24 Type of alcohol consumed and IgE levels in two ethnic

groups of Slovak rural population

Pijak MR1 , Ginter E1 , Krajcovicova-Kudlackova M1 , Gazdik F1 ,

Kovacic M1 , Valachovicova M1 1Institute of Preventive and Clinical Medicine, Bratislava, Slovakia

P-14-25 Total and specific IgE to Toxocara, Anisakis and Ascaris

parasites

Gonzalez MC1 1Clinica Enf. Resp. Miguel de Servet, Santiago, Chile

P-14-26 The influence of the histamine H receptor on IgE synthesis

3

Khanferyan RA1 , Riger NA1 , Schunack W2 , DuBuske LM3 1Institute of Allergy and Asthma, Krasnodar, Russian Federation,

2Institut für Pharmazie, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany,

3Immunology Research Institute of New England, Fitchburg, MA,

USA

P-14-27 Elevated serum total IgE and psoriatic erythrodermia

LI LF1 , Liu HH1 1Department of Dermatology, Peking University Third Hospital,

Beijing, China

83

P-14-28 Epidemiological study of the allergic response of Japanese

junior high school students using the MAST CLA assay

Enomoto T1 , Igawa T2 , Sawazaki T2 , Mizogami Y2 , Wada M2 1Japanese Red Cross Society Wakayama Medical Center,

Wakayama, Wakayama, Japan, 2Hitachi Chemical Co., Ltd.,

Hitachi, Ibaraki, Japan

P-14-29 Immunosuppressive effect caused by restraint stress upon

production of PLA2-specific antibody in aged mice

Nishioka K1 , Okano M2 , Ichihara Y3 , Ichihara N3 1 2 Takinomiya General Hospital, Takamatsu, Japan, Okayama

University, Okayama, Japan, 3Kagawa Prefectural College of

Health, Takamatsu, Japan

P-14-30 A longitudinal study to assess variability and changes of IgE,

G, A, M and skin test responses in atopic subjects in and out

of a pollen season

Burke TV1 , Katelaris CH1 , Carrozzi FM1 , Tan EF2 , Ward JK2 1Institute for Immunology and Allergy Research, Sydney, NSW,

Australia, 2Pfizer Pty Ltd, Sandwich, UK

P-14-31 Azelastine hydrochloride inhibits IgE FE-3 mRNA expression

Tokeshi Y1 , Hanashiro K1 , Sunagawa M1 , Nakamura M1 , Kosugi

T1 11st Dept. of Physiol., Sch. of Med., Univ. of Ryukyus, Nishihara,

Okinawa, Japan

Immunotherapy

P-15-1 Cluster immunotherapy in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis with

lyophilisized extracts and depot allergoids: safety aspects

Hansen I1 , Schneider-Gêne S1 , Stuck BA1 , Mösges R2 , Hörmann

K1 , Klimek L3 1ENT Department, Mannheim University Hospital, Mannheim,

Germany, 2IMSIE, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany,

3Center for Rhinology, Wiesbaden, Germany

P-15-2 Immunotherapy in allergic airway diseases: our experience

Dhir R1 , Gupta A1 1General Hospital, Chandigarh, Chandigarh, U.T., India

P-15-3 Allergen-specific immunotherapy in Sorghum vulgare

(Jawar) pollen-induced allergic bronchial asthma

Pawar SS1 1Shriratna Intensive Care & Hospital, Karad, Maharashtra, India

P-15-4 Specific immunotherapy in the treatment of patients with

atopic dermatitis: results of double-blind placebo-controlled

trial

Silny W1 , Czarnecka-Operacz M1 1Department of Dermatology, Poznan, Wielkopolska, Poland

P-15-5 The forecast of complications of an immunotherapy by

allergens at a seasonal allergic rhinitis

Gumilevskaya OP1 , Gumilevskiy BY1 , Antonov YV1 1Center of an allergology and immunology, Volgograd, Russian

Federation

P-15-6 IgE-reactivity to Der p 1 or Der p 2 allergens of D.

pteronyssinus in atopic patients: implications for

immunotherapy

Taketomi EA 1 , Silva DAO 1 , Sopelete MC 1 , Sung SJ 2 , Gervásio

AM 1

1 Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia, Minas Gerais,

Brazil, 2 University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA

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WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

P-15-7 IL-10 is possibly more important than IFN-gamma in the

reduction of Th2 immune responses in the human peripheral

blood mononuclear cells by ISS-ODNs

Kang HR1 , Lee JY2 , Kim TB1 , Cho SH1 , Min KU1 , Kim YY1 1Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Seoul National University,

Seoul, Republic of Korea, 2Internal Medicine, College of Medicine,

Hallym University, Seoul, Republic of Korea

P-15-8 The influence of specific immunotherapy of bacterial antigens

in complex in licopid on some parameters of immunity in

patient with bacterial allergy

Baranova NI1 , Molotilov BA1 1The Institute of Postgraduate Medical Studies, Penza, Russian

Federation

P-15-9 Clinical efficacy and safety of omalizumab on seasonal allergic

rhinitis (SAR) induced by Japanese cedar pollen in the second

pollen season

Okubo K1 , Ogino S2 , Nagakura T3 , Ishikawa T4 1 2 Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan, Osaka University, Osaka,

Japan, 3Yoga Allergy Clinic, Tokyo, Japan, 4Kumamoto University,

Kumamoto, Japan

P-15-10 Hymenoptera venom immunotherapy does not cause

proteinuria

Nusem D1 , Panasoff J2 1Western Galilee Hospital-Nahariya and Lin Medical Center-Allergy

Dept., Nahariya-Haifa, Israel, 2Clalit Health Services-Lin Medical

Center-Allergy Dept., Haifa, Israel

P-15-11 In vitro evidence of immunosuppressive effect of Kupffer cells

Chen YLC1 , Chung SWC1 , Mui AM1 , Ong CO1 1General Surgery Department, University of British Columbia,

Vancouver, BC, Canada

P-15-12 Specific immunotherapy combined with immunomodulator

Superlymph in patients with allergy to house dust mites

Mityaseva SA1 , Polner SA1 , Kovalchuk LV1 , Chervinskaya TA1 1Institute of Immunology, Moscow, Russian Federation

P-15-13 Specific immunotherapy of allergic diseases: a three-year

prospective observational study

Barbatano Enzo BE1 1Private Surgery of Pneumology, Giarre, Catania, Italy

P-15-14 Immunotherapy suppressed histamine release rate from

basophils

Yuta A1 , Majima Y1 1Dept of Otorhinolaryngology, Mie University, Tsu, Mie, Japan

P-15-15 Safety and tolerability of allergoid sublingual immunotherapy

in patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, rhinitis and/or

asthma

Bernardis P1 1ULSS 16 - Allergologic surgery, Padova, PD, Italy

P-15-16 Clinical outcome of asthma specific immunotherapy and

spirometric patterns

Palma-Carlos AG1 , Palma-Carlos ML2 1I Medical Clinic, Lisbon University Hospital, Immuno-Allergology,

Lisboa, Portugal, 2CHIUL - Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal

P-15-17 Evaluation of immunotherapy by immunoblotting methods

Palma-Carlos ML1 , Pereira Santos MC1 , Murta R1 , Pedro E2 ,

Spinola Santos A2 , Lopes Pregal A2 , Branco-Ferreira M2 , Palma-

Carlos AG2 1 2 CHIUL, Lisbon University, Lisbon, Portugal, Inst. Immunology,

Immunoallergology Unit, Fac. Med. Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal

POSTER SESSIONS

P-15-18 Effect of specific immunotherapy on nasal reactivity to

allergen challenge

Palma-Carlos AG1 , Palma-Carlos ML2 1Faculty of Medicine, Hospital de Santa Maria, Immuno-Allergology

Unit, Lisboa, Portugal, 2CHIUL - Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa,

Portugal

P-15-19 Immunotherapy impact on asthma quality of life: two-year

follow-up

Roger A1 , Dordal MT1 , Alias C1 , Serra R1 , Vila B1 , Martí E1 1H. U. Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Catalonia, Spain

O-14-6 Improving the safety of immunotherapy by pretreatment with

fexofenadine

Ohashi Y1 , Nakai Y2 , Murata K2 1 2 Ishikiri-Seiki Hospital, Osaka, Japan, Kinki University, Osaka,

Japan

P-15-21 Ten years experience of Rybomunil application in clinics of

the Institute of Immunology, Moscow, Russia

Klevtsova MN1 1Institute of Immunology, Moscow, Russian Federation

P-15-22 Local and systemic side effects of allergen injection

immunotherapy

Yazicioglu M1 , Ulker O2 , Guler N2 1Department of Pediatrics, Trakya University, Edirne, Turkey,

2Division of Allergy, Department of Pediatrics, Istanbul University,

Istanbul, Turkey

P-15-23 Conventional immunotherapy versus sublingual

immunotherapy with standardized five-grass pollen in children

with seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

Karakoc GK1 , Altintas D1 , Yilmaz M1 , Kendirli SG1 1Cukurova University, Faculty of Medicine, Pediatric Allergy-

Immunology, Adana, Turkey

P-15-24 Evaluation of sublingual immunotherapy in asthmatic

patients

Hanna KM1 , Hanna WM2 , Gomaa BH1 1 2 Faculty of Medicine Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt, National

Research Center, Cairo, Egypt

P-15-25 Clinical comparison between two pre-seasonal schedules of

allergen specific immunotherapy: efficacy and tolerability

Giovannini M1 1Pulmonary and Allergic Diseases Dept., Lugo Ravenna, Italy

P-15-26 Efficacy and safety of DEPIGOID, a depigmented

polymerized allergen extract

Sager A1 , Renner BGR1 1LETI Pharma, Witten, Germany

P-15-27 Immunotherapy to mold is a gate to control recurrent

vulvovaginal infections

Koshak EA1 1King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Seychelles

P-15-28 Effect of immunotherapy on complement activation in

ragweed allergic patients

Dervaderics MD1 , Fust GF2 , Varga LV2 1 2 SOTE PhD Scool, Budapest, Hungary, SOTE Research Lab,

Budapest, Hungary


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

WEDNESDAY, 10 SEPTEMBER- continued

POSTER SESSIONS

P-15-29 Modulation of allergic response by chemically modified

allergen and immunomodulator Polyoxidonium

Babakhin AA1 , Andreev SM1 , Petrukhina AO1 , Puchkova NI1 ,

Khaitov RM1 , DuBuske LM2 , Petrov RV1 1National Research Center - Institute of Immunology, Moscow,

Russian Federation, 2Immunology Research Institute of New

England, Fitchburg, MA, USA

P-15-30 Modulation of the IgE response to Alternaria after DNA

vaccination with the major Alternaria allergens (rAlta1 and

rAlta2) in a brown Norway rat model

Montalbano MM1 , Sanchez H2 , Keyes EL2 , Rosenthal LA1 , Sorkness

RL3 , Bush RK1 1University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI, USA,

2William S Middleton VA Medical Center, Madison, WI, USA,

3University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Pharmacy, Madison,

WI, USA

Rhinosinusitis

P-16-1 The prospective and retrospective significance of surgical

correction of obstructive changes in the nasopharynx had

improved not only nocturnal snoring

Ishaq IM1 1Al-Junaid Hospital, Nowshera, NWFP, Pakistan

P-16-2 Diagnosis & management care in a limited resource of a

primary care setting

Jamal EJ1 1University Putra Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Selangor, Malaysia

P-16-3 Efficacy and safety of mometasone furoate nasal spray for

prophylactic treatment of intermittent moderate/severe

allergic rhinitis

Papadopoulos NG1 , Papadopoulos D2 , Kompoti E3 , Manoussakis

E1 , Tassios I1 , Pitsios K3 , Baibas N4 , Kontou-Fili K3 , Saxoni-

Papageorgiou P5 1Allergy Department, 2nd Pediatric Clinic, Univ. of Athens, Athens,

Greece, 2 "424" General Army Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece,

3 4 Laikon General Hospital, Athens, Greece, Epidemiology Dept.,

Univ. of Athens, Athens, Greece, 5Allergy Department, Univ. of

Athens, Athens, Greece

P-16-4 The content of fatty acids in erythrocyte membranes in

pollinosis children in long remission period

Terechtchenko S1 , Babushkin V2 , Terechtchenko V2 1State Medical Research Institute for Northern Problems,

Krasnoyarsk, Russian Federation, 2State Krasnoyarsk Medical

Academy, Krasnoyarsk, Russian Federation

P-16-5 A virtual model for human nasal mucosa and the influence of

individual specific allergic reactions

Strauss GS1 , Winkler DW2 , Nowatius EN3 , Mueller HM1 1Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology/University of Leipzig, Leipzig,

Germany, 2Dept. of Neurosurgery/University of Leipzig, Leipzig,

Germany, 3Zwonull Inc., Leipzig, Germany

P-16-6 Increased number of CD34+ cells in nasal mucosa of allergic

rhinitis patients: inhibition by a local glucocorticoid

Sergejeva S1 , Lotvall Jtvall J> 1 , Pullerits T1 1Lung Pharmacology Group, Göteborg University, Gothenburg,

Sweden

P-16-7 Allergic rhinitis in Delhi: a comparative profile of “sneezers

and runners” and “blockers”

Khanna P1 , Shah A1 1V P Chest Institute, University of Delhi, Delhi, India

P-16-8 Early revealings of allergic rhinitis

Chopyak V 1 , Lishchuk K 1

1 Lviv State Medical University, Lviv, Ukraine

85

P-16-9 Seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR) - circadian variation - timing of

desloratadine (DL) dosing

Haye R1 , Hoye Kye K> 2 , Berg O3 , Frones Snes S> 4 , Ädegård T4 1 2 Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway, Helsetorget Legesenter, Elverum,

Norway, 3Betania, Stockholm, Sweden, 4Schering-Plough, Eiksmarka, Norway

P-16-10 Prevalence of allergic rhinitis among asthmatics in eastern

India

Jodhani K1 , Barman NN2 1 2 Asthma Allergy Center, Guwahati, Assam, India, Guwahati Medical

College, Guwahati, Assam, India

P-16-11 Allergic rhinitis: diagnosis and misdiagnosis

Krupski MH1 , Tshifularo MI1 , Vorster W1 1Medunsa - Medical University of South Africa, Pretoria, Gauteng,

South Africa

P-16-12 Genetic variants of ADAM33 in Japanese cedar pollinosis

Cheng L1 , Enomoto T2 , Shimizu M3 , Hirota T3 , Tamari M3 ,

Shirakawa T1 1Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior, Kyoto

University, Kyoto, Japan, 2Department of ORL, Japanese Red Cross

Society Wakayama Medical Center, Wakayama, Japan, 3Laboratory for Genetics of Allergic Disease, RIKEN SNP Research Center,

Yokohama, Japan

P-16-13 Intracellular cytokines in T helper cells in intermittent allergic

rhinitis

Glück J1 , Mazur B2 , Rogala B1 1Chair & Dept. of Internal Diseases, Allergology and Cli. Immunol,

Zabrze, Poland, 2Dept. of Pathophysiology, Zabrze, Poland

P-16-14 Evaluation of the safety and efficacy of oral fexofenadine in

pediatric subjects with seasonal allergic rhinitis: pooled analysis

of three studies

Meltzer E1 , Scheinmann P2 , Rosado Pinto J3 , Bachert C4 , Hedlin

G5 , Wahn U6 , Finn A7 , Ruuth E8 1Allergy and Asthma Medical Group and Research Center, San

Diego, California, USA, 2Groupe Hospitalier Necker-Enfants

Malades, Paris, France, 3Dona Estefania Hospital, Lisbon, Portugal,

4 5 Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium, Karolinska Institutet,

Stockholm, Sweden, 6University Children’s Hospital, Berlin,

Germany, 7National Allergy, Asthma and Urticaria Centers,

Charleston, SC, USA, 8Aventis Pharma, Romainville, France

P-16-15 Fexofenadine effectively relieves seasonal allergic rhinitis in

children from the South American Cone

Baena-Cagnani C1 , Neffen H2 , Maspero J3 , Lisanti M4 , Portes R5 ,

Hardy P6 , Ruuth E6 1 2 Hospital Infantil Municipal, Cordoba, Argentina, Centro de Alergia

e Inmunologia, Sante Fe, Argentina, 3Hospital Ricardo Gutierrez,

Capital Federal, Argentina, 4Instituto de Alergia e Immunologia,

Mendoza, Argentina, 5Centro de Asma, Alergia y Immunologia

Quilmes, Provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina, 6Aventis Pharma,

Paris, France

P-16-16 Fexofenadine effectively relieves seasonal allergic rhinitis in

children sensitized to a wide range of pollen categories

Baena-Cagnani C 1 , Bernstein D 2 , Emeryck A 3 , Lisanti M 4 , Potter

P 5 , Finn A 6 , Hardy P 7 , Ruuth E 7

1 Hospital Infantil Municipal, Cordoba, Argentina, 2 Bernstein

Clinical Research Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, 3 Klinika

Pulmonogii - CSK AM, Lublin, Poland, 4 Instituto de Alergia e

Immunologia, Mendoza, Argentina, 5 University of Capetown,

Mowbray, South Africa, 6 National Allergy, Asthma and Urticaria

Centers, Charleston, South Carolina, USA, 7 Aventis Pharma, Paris,

France

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WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

P-16-17 Bronchial hyperreactivity in allergic and non-allergic rhinitis

Sevarac SK1 1Calicor Policlinic, Belgrade, Serbia, Yugoslavia

P-16-18 Characterization of a guinea pig acoustic model of nasal

congestion

Joynson VM1 , Liu WLS1 , Pedersen OF2 , Straszek SPV2 , Yeadon M1 1 2 Pfizer Central Research, Sandwich, Kent, UK, University of Aarhus,

Aarhus, Denmark

P-16-19 Diagnostic intervention by allergen-induced nasal obstruction

simultaneously evaluated by anterior rhinomanometry

(DIAGNOSE-AR study)

Roongapinun S1 , Wajajamreon S1 , Fooanant S2 1Clinical Pharmacology, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai,

Thailand, 2Otolaryngology, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai,

Thailand

P-16-20 Problems in a large-scale population survey of pollinosis

nationwide

Okuda M1 1Japan Allergy Asthma Clinic, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan

P-16-21 The co-morbidity of airway inflammation in Chinese

schoolchildren with allergic rhinitis

Leung TF1 , Wong GWK1 , Li CY1 , Yung E1 , Au CSS1 , Ko FWS2 ,

Fok T1 1Department of Pediatrics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong,

Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 2Department of Medicine and Therapeutics,

Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, Hong Kong

P-16-22 Tumor necrosis factor-α contributes to the development of

allergic rhinitis in mice

Iwasaki M1 , Saito K2 , Fujii H3 , Wada H3 , Seishima M3 , Ito Y1 ,

Takemura M3 , Sekikawa K4 1Gifu University School of Medicine, Otorhinolaryngology, Gifu,

Japan, 2National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD, USA,

3Gifu University School of Medicine, Clinical Laboratory, Gifu, Japan,

4National Institute of Animal Health, Tsukuba, Japan

P-16-23 The prevalence of allergic rhinitis in Hungary’s capital

Budapest and its agglomeration

Augusztinovicz M1 , Balogh K2 , Koppány J3 , Pintér J4 1Budapest Community Péterfy Hospital Ear-Nose-Throat-Larynx

Dept., Budapest, Hungary, 2Budapest II. District Community Health

Care, Allergology, Budapest, Hungary, 3Polyclinic of the Hospitaller

Brothers of St. John of God in Bp., Budapest, Hungary, 4Semmelweis Univ. of Med. Kútvölgyi Clinical Block ENT and Allergy, Budapest,

Hungary

P-16-24 Proctonasal reflex

Benaim-Pinto C1 1Hospital de Ninos, Allergy & Clinical Dept., Caracas, DF, Venezuela

P-16-25 Suppressive activity of fexofenadine hydrochloride on TARC

production from human peripheral blood leukocytes by

antigenic stimulation in vitro

Asano KA1 , Kanai KK2 , Hisamitsu TH1 , Suzaki HS2 1Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Showa University,

Tokyo, Japan, 2Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine,

Showa University, Tokyo, Japan

P-16-26 Suppressive activity of fexofenadine hydrochloride on

production of eosinophil chemo-attractants from human nasal

fibroblasts in vitro

Suzaki HS1 , Asano KA2 , Kyo YK1 , Watanabe SW1 , Hisamitsu TH2 1Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine, Showa

University, Tokyo, Japan, 2Department of Physiology, School of

Medicine, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan

POSTER SESSIONS

P-16-27 Suppressive effects of fexofenadine hydrochloride on nitric

oxide production from nasal polyp fibroblasts in vitro

Kanai KK1 , Asano KA2 , Kyo YK1 , Watanabe SW1 , Hisamitsu

TH2 , Suzaki HS1 1Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine, Showa

University, Tokyo, Japan, 2Department of Physiology, School of

Medicine, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan

P-16-28 Allergic rhinitis in Japanese children with bronchial asthma

Masuda S1 , Fujisawa T1 , Katsumata H1 , Atsuta J1 , Iguchi K1 ,

Kamiya H1 1National Mie Hospital, Tsu, Mie, Japan

P-16-29 Direct roles of pollen-related oligosaccharides in human IgE

and T cell responses in Japanese cedar pollinosis

Okano M1 , Kimura Y1 , Kino K2 , Michigami Y1 , Sakamoto S1 ,

Sugata Y1 , Maeda M1 , Matsuda F1 , Kimura M1 , Nishizaki K1 1 2 Okayama University, Okayama, Japan, Meiji Co., Odawara,

Japan

P-16-30 Fexofenadine: effective antiinflammatory medicine in

treatment of patients with whole-year allergic rhinitis,

combined with bronchial asthma

Feschenko YI1 , Yashyna LA1 , Ignatieva VI1 , Kurnaya LF1 , Uhno

NI1 , Budennaya MP1 1Institute of Phthisiology and Pulmonology, Kiev, Ukraine

P-16-31 Sensation of nasal patency and the geometry of nasal cavities

in allergic rhinitis patients

Kadocsa E1 , Tóth F1 , Kiss JG1 1University of Szeged, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Szeged,

Hungary

P-16-32 The different sensitivity to Japanese cedar pollen in the

quantity of histamine release from basophils

Dake Y1 , Shibano A1 , Ikeda H1 , Saito Y1 , Sogo H1 , Enomoto T1 1Japanese Red Cross Society, Wakayama Medical Center,

Wakayama, Japan

P-16-33 The effects of nasal spray of Psidium guajava for cedar

pollinosis

Suzuki IS1 , Kishida MK1 , Aoki TA1 , Kitanaka SK2 , Hamada MH3 1Department of Pediatrics, Toho University School of Medicine,

Tokyo, Japan, 2Nihon University School, Tiba, Japan, 3OS Industry

Ltd. Co., Tokyo, Japan

P-16-34 Humoral mucosal immunity in allergic rhinitis

Kramer MF1 , Pfrogner E1 , Rasp G1 1Otorhinolaryngology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich,

Germany

P-16-35 Tobacco nasal snuff initially as to relieve allergic rhinitis, later

on is followed by addiction/recurrent upper respiratory

infection

Ishaq IM1 1Al-Junaid Hospital, Nowshera, NWFP, Pakistan

P-16-36 Is Japanese cedar pollinosis a unique disease of Japan? An

epidemiological study in China

Cheng L1 , Shi HB1 , Enomoto T2 , Sahashi N3 , Shirakawa T4 ,

Miyoshi A1 1International Research Center for Nasal Allergy, Nanjing Medical

Univ., Nanjing, China, 2Department of ORL, Japanese Red Cross

Society Wakayama Medical Center, Wakayama, Japan,

3Department of Biology, Toho Univ. School of Pharmaceutical

Sciences, Funabashi, Japan, 4Department of Health Promotion

and Human Behavior, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

WEDNESDAY, 10 SEPTEMBER - continued

POSTER SESSIONS

P-16-37 Immuno-modulating oriental herbal medicine control nasal

allergy administered with cedar pollen and ovalbumin via nose

in mice

Matsuno HM1 , Yoo TJ2 , Tomoda KT3 , Yamaguchi NY4 1Dept. of Otolaryngology, Inami General Hospital, Toyama, Japan,

2Dept. of Allergy and Immunology, University of Tennessee,

Memphis, USA, 3Dept. of Otolaryngology, Kanazawa Medical

University, Isikawa, Japan, 4Dept. of Serology, Kanazawa Medical

University, Ishikawa, Japan

P-16-38 Quality of life in children with rhinoconjunctivitis before and

after specific immunotherapy

Moncayo CV1 , Rosas MA1 , Del Rio-Navarro BE1 , Sienra-Monge

JJL1 1Hospital Infantil de Mexico “Federico Gomez,” Mexico, DF, Mexico

P-16-39 Evaluation of quality of life in patients with

rhinoconjunctivitis from Mumbai City

Niphadkar PV1 , Telang PU1 , Patil MP1 1MRS, Sir H. N. Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

P-16-40 Increased prevalence of allergic rhinitis among schoolchildren

in Szeged, Southern Hungary (1987, 1997, 2002)

Bittera I1 , Kadocsa E2 1 2 Municipal Children’s Hospital, Szeged, Hungary, University of

Szeged, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Szeged, Hungary

P-16-41 Expression of IL-16 in nasal allergies

Karaki MK1 , Dobashi HD2 , Kobayashi RK1 , Tokuda MT2 , Ishida

TI2 , Mori NM1 1Dept. of Otolaryngology, Kagawa Medical University, Miki-cho,

Kagawa, Japan, 2First Dept. of Internal Medicine, Kagawa Medical

University, Miki-cho, Kagawa, Japan

P-16-42 The efficacy and tolerability of desloratadine in seasonal

allergic rhinitis

Farkas H1 , Hirschberg A1 , Krasznai M1 , Szabó I1 , Liktor B1 , Szilkai

I1 , Pánczél GY1 , Kun ZS1 , Bitay ZS1 , Naményi M1 , Vinkler I1 ,

Zibotics H1 , Harsányi E1 , Molnár GE1 , Vincze M1 , Fényi M1 ,

Rónai Z1 1Semmelweis University, Kútvölgyi Clinical Center, Budapest,

Hungary

P-16-43 Roles of FcgammaRIIB in the initiation of allergic rhinitis in

mice

Sugata Y1 , Okano M1 , Watanabe T1 , Hattori H1 , Takai T2 ,

Nishizaki K1 1 2 Okayama University, Okayama, Japan, Tohoku University, Sendai,

Japan

P-16-44 Triamcinolone acetonide aqueous nasal spray (TAA AQ)

improves nocturnal rhinitis-related quality of life in allergic

rhinitis patients in primary care

Mintz M1 , Garcia J2 , Diener P2 , Georges G2 , Dupclay L2 1 2 Eastern Vascular Associates LLC, Denville, NJ, USA, Aventis

Pharmaceuticals Inc., Bridgewater, NJ, USA

P-16-45 Documented therapeutic experience of the efficacy and safety

of desloratadine 5 ml in children older than 12 years of age and

adults with a diagnosis

Ortiz IF1 , Baeza M1 , Gonzalez S1 1Medical Tower, Irapuato, Guanajuato, Mexico

P-16-46 The most frequent ocular lesions in allergic rhinitis (AR)

Lima V1 , Aguilar D1 , Bermejo MA1 , Rojo MI1 1Hospital Juárez de México, México, Distrito Federal, México

87

P-16-47 Hypertonic saline nasal wash: effect on grass pollen rhinitis in

children

Angrisano A1 1Ospedale Caduti Bollatesi, Bollate, Milano, Italy

P-16-48 Depression and anxiety in seasonal allergic rhinitis

Brzoza Z1 , Rogala B1 , Badura-Brzoza K2 , Matysiakiewicz J2 , Hese

RT2 1Chair and Clin. Dept. of Int. Dis., Allergol. and Clin. Immunology,

Zabrze, Poland, 2Chair and Clin. Dept. of Psychiatry, Medical

University of Silesia, Tarnowskie Góry, Poland

P-16-49 Respiratory allergy associated to rheumatic fever and poststreptococa

glomerulonephrytis

Sarti W1 , Donadi EA1 , Zollner RL2 1Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirao Preto, Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil,

2Universidade de Campinas, Campinas, SP, Brazil

P-16-50 Open-label evaluation of azelastine nasal spray in patients with

an inadequate response to oral antihistamines

Overholt RM1 1The Allergy and Asthma Sinus Center, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA

P-16-51 Evaluation of second-generation antihistamine therapy in

patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis, nonallergic vasomotor

rhinitis, and mixed rhinitis

Overholt RM1 1The Allergy, Asthma and Sinus Center, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA

P-16-52 The accuracy of patients’ prediction of skin prick test results in

perennial allergic rhinitis

Saengpanich S1 , Chochaipanichnon L1 , Aeumjaturapat S1 ,

Supiyaphun P1 1Dept. of Otolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn

University, Bangkok, Thailand

P-16-53 Autoradiographic localization of cysteinyl leukotriene 1

receptor in human nasal turbinates

Shirasaki H1 , Kanaizumi E1 , Watanabe K1 , Konno N1 , Sato J1 ,

Himi T1 1Department of Otolaryngology, Sapporo Medical University,

Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan

P-16-54 A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, crossover trial

of montelukast in adults with nasal polyposis

Keith PK1 , Ferrie P1 , Conway M1 , Waserman S1 , Schmuck ML1 ,

Denburg JA1 1McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada

P-16-55 Significance of serum eosinophils as a prognostic indicator in

endoscopic sinus surgery

Dhong HJ1 , Kim HY1 , Choi JY1 , Chung SK1 1Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea

P-16-56 Sinonasal allergic fungal sinusitis: my experience

Gupta AK1 1Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research,

Chandigarh, U.T., India

P-16-57 Surgical treatment of nasal polyposis

Shamsiev DF1 1First Tashkent Medical Institute, Tashkent, Uzbekistan

P-16-58 Chronic sinusitis associated with elevated tissue and

peripheral eosinophilia and normal serum interleukin 5 (IL-

5): effect of imatinib mesylate

Sheridan T1 , Tanner SB1 , Murray J1 1Vanderbilt University, Asthma Sinus Allergy Program, Nashville,

TN, USA

WEDNESDAY


THURSDAY

88

THURSDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER

Poster Sessions 15:45 - 17:00

Exhibit Hall C, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre

Posters are on display 9:00 – 17:00. Authors are present to

discuss their posters 15:45 – 17:00.

No CME Credit will be awarded for this activity.

Allergens

P-17-1 Evaluation acarology of the Peoples Friendship University

of Russia students’ dwellings

Lolokova NV1 , Zhukov IV2 , Prokopenko VD2 , Berzhets VM3 1Peoples Friendship University of Russia, Moscow Municipal

Polyclinic, Moscow, Russian Federation, 2Peoples Friendship

University of Russia, Moscow, Russian Federation, 3I. I.

Mechnikov Moscow Research Institute of Vaccines and Sera,

Moscow, Russian Federation

P-17-2 The forming of mite sensibilization among students from

different world geographic regions in period of adaptation

in Moscow

Lolokova NV1 , Zhukov IV2 , Prokopenko VD2 1Peoples Friendship University of Russia, Moscow Municipal

Polyclinic, Moscow, Russian Federation, 2Peoples Friendship

University of Russia, Moscow, Russian Federation

P-17-3 Phl p 3: a further relevant grass pollen allergen?

Petersen A1 , Suck R2 , Wicklein D1 , Lindner B1 , Cromwell O2 ,

Becker WM1 1 2 Research Center Borstel, Borstel, Germany, Allergopharma

KG, Reinbek, Germany

P-17-4 Molecular characterization of major cat (Felis domesticus)

allergen, Fel d 1 produced in a baculovirus expression

system

Seppälä U1 , Hägglund P2 , Thorstedt P1 , Lund K1 , Roepstorff

P2 , Spangfort MD1 1 2 ALK-Abellò, Horsholm, Denmark, University of Southern

Denmark, Odense, Denmark

P-17-5 The levels of cockroach allergen in relation to cockroach

species and allergic diseases in Thai patients

Tungtrongchitr AN1 , Sookroong NI2 , Mahakittikun VA1 ,

Vichyanond PA1 , Bunnag CH1 , Chaicumpa WA2 1Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University,

Bangkok Noi, Bangkok, Thailand, 2Faculty of Allied Health

Science, Thammasart University, Bangkok, Bangkok, Thailand

P-17-6 Characterization of the group 2 allergens from dust mite,

Blomia tropicalis

Angus AC1 , Lalitha K1 , Kuay KT1 , Wang WL1 , Shang HS1 ,

Chew FT1 1National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore

P-17-7 Prosopis allergy: diagnostic impact with commercial

allergen kits

Hasnain SM1 , Al-Frayh AR2 , Al-Sediary A1 1King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh,

Saudi Arabia, 2King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

P-17-8 The clinical importance of Bt and Dp allergens in Asia

Chua KY1 , Cheong N2 , Lee BW3 1Department of Pediatrics, National University of Singapore,

Singapore, Singapore, 2Bioprocessing Technology Center,

A*STAR, Singapore, Singapore, 3Department of Pedantries,

National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

POSTER SESSIONS

P-17-9 Skin-prick reactivity (SPR) to animal danders is a predictor of

bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) in allergic rhinitis

patients.

Mete N1 , Gulbahar O1 , Sin Aytul1 , Erdinc M2 , Kokuludag A1 ,

Sebik F1 1Ege University Dept. of Internal Medicine, Clinical Immunology

& Allergy, Izmir, Turkey, 2Ege University Dept. of Chest Disease,

Izmir, Turkey

P-17-10 Clinical aspects of allergy to Cyclachaena xanthifolia pollen

Astafieva NG1 , Maron VM1 , Udovichenko EN1 1Medical University, Saratov, Russian Federation

P-17-11 Comparison of the group 7 allergens from two major dust

mites, Blomia tropicalis and Dermatophagoides farinae

Shang HS1 , Ong ST1 , Gulzar Mohd R1 , Tsai LC2 , Lim SH3 ,

Chew FT1 1 2 National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore, Veterans’

General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, 3Malaysian University of Science

and Technology, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

P-17-12 Differential IgE binding patterns in five polymorphic group

13 allergens identified from dust mites, Dermatophagoides

farinae and Blomia tropicalis

Ong ST1 , Gulzar Mohd R1 , Lim SH2 , Mari A3 , Tsai LC4 , Chew

FT1 1 2 National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore, Malaysia

University of Science and Technology, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia,

3 4 Allergy Unit, Rome, Italy, Veterans’ General Hospital, Taipei,

Taiwan

P-17-13 Airborne Ganoderma basidiospores in desert environment

Hasnain SM1 , Al-Frayh AR2 , Khatija F2 , Al-Sedairy S1 1King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh,

Saudi Arabia, 2King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

P-17-14 Detection of specific IgE to Dermatophagoides and to

Anisakis: is there any relationship?

Schiavino D1 , Flamini G2 , Venarubea S2 , Buonomo A1 , De Pasquale

T1 , Pollsatrini E1 , Roncallo C3 , Lombardo C3 , Nucera E3 , Patriarca

G3 1 2 Servizio di allergologia - Policlinico Gemelli, Rome, Italy, Istituto

di Patologia generale - Università Cattolica, Rome, Italy, 3Rome, Italy

P-17-15 Influence of disulfide bridges to the IgE reactivity of the

house dust mite allergen Der p 1

Magi M1 , Vandenbranden M1 , Haumont M1 , Garcia L1 , Jacquet

A 1

1Université Libre de Bruxelles, Gosselies, Belgium

P-17-16 Population based profile of wasp sting (WS) induced

allergenicity with non-fatal/fatal outcomes

Ishaq IM1 1Al-Junaid Hospital, Nowshera, NWFP, Pakistan

P-17-17 Rhinitis due to eucalyptus pollen sensitization

García-González JJ1 , Fernández-Meléndez S1 , Bartolomé B2 , Vega-

Chicote JM1 , Carmona-Bueno MJ1 , Mayoral M1 1Allergy Service. University Carlos Haya Regional Hospital,

Málaga, Málaga, Spain, 2Bial-Arístegui, Bilbao, Bilbao, Spain

P-17-18 Allergens responsible for allergic bronchial asthma in westcost

region of India

Pawar SS1 1Shriratna Intensive Care & Hospital, Karad, Maharashtra, India


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

POSTER SESSIONS

THURSDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER - continued

P-17-19 Phleum pratense pollen starch granules induce humoral and

cell mediated immune responses in a rat model of allergy

Motta A1 , Peltre G2 , Dormans JAM3 , Withagen CET3 , Lacroix

G4 , Bois F4 1 2 3 Ineris, Paris, France, ESPCI, Paris, France, RIVM, Bilthoven,

Netherlands, 4INERIS, Paris, France

P-17-20 Increased sensitivity of an amplified ELISA for Mus m 1

Simons E1 , Eggleston PA1 1The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

P-17-21 Screening for putative allergenic and pathogenesis related

components in Curvularia lunata: an expressed sequence tag

approach

Joshi SS1 , Wong FL1 , Tan TK1 , Chew FT1 1National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore

P-17-22 Emission of allergic fine particles from pollens and molds

Taylor P1 , Glovsky MM2 , Flagon R1 , Miguel A1 1 2 Caltech, Pasadena, CA, USA, Huntington Hospital, Caltech,

Pasadena, CA, USA

P-17-23 A survey of airborne pollen grains in Wuhan, China

Wang W ZX1 , Zhu Z RF1 1Tongji Medical College of HUST, Wuhan, Hubei, China

P-17-24 Mediator release assays based on human or murine IgE

allergen standardization

Hoeltz G1 , Kaul S1 , Foetisch K1 , Kastner B1 , Vieths S1 , Hoffmann

A1 , Danz N1 , Luettkopf D1 , Hatahet L1 1Paul-Ehrlich-Institute, Langen, Germany

P-17-25 Incidence of Blomia tropicalis sensitivity in the northwest of

Israel

Panasoff J1 , Nusem D1 1Clalit Health Services-Lin Medical Center-Allergy Dept., Haifa,

Israel

P-17-27 Prevalence of atopic sensitization (AS) among young adults

from different parts of Greece

Grigoreas GC1 , Vourdas VD1 , Petalas PK1 , Pappas PD2 ,

Kanagnostis KS2 1251General Air Force Hospital, Department of Allergology, Athens,

Greece, 2251General Air Force Hospital, Athens, Greece

P-17-28 House dust mite allergen in Turkish homes

Gulbahar O1 , Mete N1 , Kokuludag A1 , Sin A1 , Sebik F1 1Ege University Medical School, Division of Allergy & Clinical

Immunology, Izmir, Turkey

P-17-29 Characterization and enrichment of the natural complex Ara

h 3/4 in peanut extract

Boldt A1 , Petersen A1 , Lepp U1 , Becker WM1 1Research Center Borstel, Borstel, Germany

P-17-30 Sensitization to common aeroallergens is associated with in

vivo priming of airway mast cells

Lee DKC1 , Currie GP1 , Lipworth BJ1 1Asthma and Allergy Research Group, Dundee, Scotland, UK

P-17-31 Detection of latex-specific IgE using purified recombinant

latex allergens and ImmunoCAP

Elms N1 , Kurup VP2 , Sussman GL3 , Yeang HY4 , Breiteneder H5 ,

Kelly KJ1 , Bansal N6 , Fink JN1 1 2 Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA, Medical

College of Wisconsin/V A Medical Center, Milwaukee, WI, USA,

3 4 University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Rubber

Research Institute of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 5University of Vienna/General Hospital, Vienna, Austria, 6Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI, USA

89

P-17-32 Diagnosis of mosquito allergy: role of a new 67 kDa

recombinant Aedes aegypti salivary allergen rAed a 4

Li C1 , Beckett AN1 , James AA2 , Simons FER1 , Arthur G1 , Peng

Z 1

1University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada,

2University of California, Irvine, CA, USA

P-17-33 Biochemical characterization of the house dust mite

allergen, Der p 2 expressed in Pichia pastoris

Bolwig C1 , Josephsen H1 , Karlshoj Ij I> 1 , Henmar H1 , Lund K1 ,

Spangfort M1 1Alk Abelló A/S, Horsholm, Denmark

P-17-34 Immunoblot analysis of specific IgE, IgG, IgG1 and IgG4

response to Dermatophagoides farinae according to allergen

inhalation bronchial challenge test

Choi S-Y1 , Hong C-S2 , Kim C-W3 1Institute of Allergy, Brain Korea 21 Project, Yonsei University,

Seoul, Republic of Korea, 2Department of Internal Medicine,

Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea,

3Department of Internal Medicine, Inha University College of

Medicine, Incheon, Republic of Korea

P-17-35 Detection and quantification of new inhalant allergens,

pharaoh ants, in indoor environments in Seoul, Korea

Kim C-W1 , Choi S-Y2 , Hong C-S3 1Department of Internal Medicine, Inha University College of

Medicine, Incheon, Republic of Korea, 2Institute of Allergy, Brain

Korea 21 Project, Yonsei University, Seoul, Republic of Korea,

3Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of

Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea

P-17-36 Der p 1 binds to macrophages and epithelial cells but is not

internalized: possible involvement of a mannose receptor

family member in binding

Peake HL1 , Stewart GA1 , McWilliam AS1 1Microbiology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western

Australia, Australia

P-17-37 Investigations on ragweed pollens in the air in China and

study of ragweed pollenosis

Lu DW1 1Department of Allergy, Qingdao Fifth People’s Hospital, Qingdao,

Shandong, China

P-17-38 Production of monoclonal antibodies specific to house dust

mite allergens

Ekpo P1 , Plaidoung L1 , Mahakittikun V2 , Sarasombath S1 1Dept. of Immunology, Fac. of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol

U., Bangkok, Bangkok, Thailand, 2Dept. of Parasitology, Fac. of

Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol U., Bangkok, Bangkok,

Thailand

P-17-39 Interaction between HDM Der p 1 allergen and nasal

mucus

Rimmer J1 , Santos C2 , Yli-Panula E2 , Viander M2 , Tovey E2 ,

Salome C2 1Woolcock Institute of Respiratory Medicine, Sydney, NSW,

Australia, 2Woolcock Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia

P-17-40 Sensitization to different types of mites in the asthmatic

population: multicenter study in Cuba

Aguila de la Coba RO 1 , Garcia Roche RG 2 , de la Torre Morin F 3 ,

Morales M 4

1 Cerro Pediatric Hospital, Havana City, La Habana, Cuba,

2 Epidemiology and Microbiology Institute, Havana City, La

Habana, Cuba, 3 Candelaria Hospital, Tenerife, Islas Canarias, Spain,

4 Manuel Ascunce Hospital, Camaguey City, Camaguey, Cuba

THURSDAY


THURSDAY

90

THURSDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER- continued

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

P-17-41 Crossed reactivity between mites of the domestic dust which

make sensitive in asthmatic children: Havana City 2002

Aguila de la Coba RO1 , Garcia Roche RG2 , de la Torre Morin F3 ,

Martinez A4 , Hidalgo Zaldivar VC5 1Cerro Pediatric Hospital, Havana City, La Habana, Cuba,

2Epidemiology and Microbiology Institute, Havana City, La Habana,

Cuba, 3Candelaria Hospital, Tenerife, Islas Canarias, Spain, 4Bial- Aristegui Laboratory, Bilbao, PAIS VASCO, Spain, 5Aballi Pediatric

Hospital, Havana City, La Habana, Cuba

P-17-42 Fungal microflora in patients homes with allergic breathing

symptoms, Falcon state, Venezuela

Barrientos J1 , Bolivar Y1 , Ramones E1 , Reyes E1 , Yegres F1 , Prato A1 1Universidad Nacional Experimental Francisco de Miranda, Coro,

Falcón, Venezuela

P-17-43 Inhalent insect allergens in respiratory allergy in eastern India

Jodhani K1 , Singh AB2 1 2 Asthma Allergy Center, Guwahati, Assam, India, Center for

Biotechnology, Delhi, Delhi, India

P-17-44 Assessment of the slow reversibility of occupational asthma by

(PEFR) peak expiratory flow rate in workers in cotton

industries

Ishaq IM1 1Al-Junaid Hospital, Nowshera, NWFP, Pakistan

P-17-45 IgE epitope mapping of Blomia tropicalis major allergen,

Blot 5

Yi FC1 , Cheong N2 , Lee BW1 , Chua KY1 1Department of Pediatrics, National University of Singapore,

Singapore, Singapore, 2Bioprocessing Technology Center, A*STAR

Singapore, Singapore, Singapore

P-17-46 Typha angustata: an important aeroallergen in concrete jungle

of Mumbai (India) and its cross reactivity with notorious weed

Parthenium hysterophorus

Niphadkar PV1 , Mahadik UD2 , Dhar HL2 1 2 MRS, Sir H. N. Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India, MRC,

Bombay Hospital Trust, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

P-17-47 Autocatalytic processing of recombinant house dust mite

allergen Der p 1

Kuo IC1 , Chua KY1 1Department of Pediatrics, National University of Singapore,

Singapore, Singapore

P-17-48 Efficacy of various pyrethroid-impregnated fabrics against

house dust mite

Wongkamchai S1 , Mahakittikun V1 , Rongsriyam K1 , Nochote H1 ,

Sermsart B2 1Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok,

Thailand, 2Faculty of Medical Technology, Mahidol University,

Bangkok, Thailand

P-17-49 Allergy to cypress

Zauli D1 , Zucchini S1 , Vukatana G1 , Grassi A1 , Bianchi FB1 1Dept Int Med, Cardioangiol, Hepatol, University of Bologna,

Bologna, Italy

P-17-50 Airborne allergy in atopic dermatitis

Silny P1 , Czarnecka-Operacz M1 , Silny W1 1Department of Dermatology and Allergic Diseases Diagnostic

Center, Poznan, Wielkopolska, Poland

POSTER SESSIONS

P-17-51 Identification and characterization of shrimp allergens: actin,

arginine kinase and tropomyosin

Fraser OP1 , Jones M2 , Sumar S1 , Bansal A3 , Reid H4 , Sumar N3 1 2 University of Westminster, London, UK, Imperial College of

Science, Technology & Medicine, London, UK, 3St Helier Hospital,

London, UK, 4University of Guyana, Georgetown, Guyana

P-17-52 Allergens and risk factors associated to allergic conjunctivitis in

Mexican children

Penagos-Paniagua MJ1 , Campuzano-Arguello M1 , Juarez-Echenique

JC1 , Lopez-Perez G1 , Zaragoza-Benitez JM1 1Instituto Nacional de Pediatria, Mexico City, DF, Mexico

P-17-53 Early sensitization to aeroallergens in a pediatric Mexican

population

Zaragoza-Benitez JM1 , Espinoza-Padilla SE1 , Orozco-Martinez S1 1Instituto Nacional de Pediatria, Mexico City, DF, Mexico

P-17-54 Sensitization to environmental fungal allergens in Japanese

patients with adult asthma

Takeuchi Y1 , Yasueda H1 , Saito A1 , Kutsuwada K1 , Taniguchi M1 ,

Akiyama K1 1National Sagamihara Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan

P-17-55 Aspergillus restrictus, but not Aspergillus fumigatus-induced

asthma

Takeuchi Y1 , Taniguchi M1 , Saito A1 , Yasueda H1 , Takatori K2 ,

Akiyama K1 1National Sagamihara Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan,

2National Institute of Health Sciences, Setagaya, Tokyo, Japan

P-17-56 Indoor Allergens in Japan: Results from the first national

survey

Akiyama K1 , Yasueda H1 1National Hospital Asthma Research Group, Sagamihara, Japan

P-17-57 Skin test reactivity to Cheyletus eruditus (Ce) in atopic

patients.

Chong Neto HJ1 , Rosario NA1 , Z’darková Edarková E> 2 , Hubert

J2 , Oliveira CH1 1 2 Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, Parana, Brazil, Research

Institute of Crop Production, Prague, Czech Republic

Drug Allergy

P-18-1 Influence of antibiotics on peripheral blood lymphocytes’

survival and proliferation in culture

Halasa M1 , Machalinski B1 1General Pathology Department, Pomeranian Academy of Medicine,

Szczecin, Poland

P-18-2 Prevalence of radiocontrast allergy in HIV patients

Yusuff JJ1 , Wong ML1 1Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY, USA

P-18-3 Effect of pyridostigmine on methacholine responsiveness in

myasthenia gravis

Davis LJ1 , Hagan JB1 1Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA

P-18-4 Pharmacokinetic analysis of the species difference in the

toxicity induced by novel inhaled corticosteroid, ST126

Togashi T 1 , Oikawa T 2 , Naitou H 2 , Uchiyama T 1

1 Toho University, Ota-ku, Tokyo, Japan, 2 SSP CO., LTD., Narita,

Chiba, Japan


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

THURSDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER - continued

POSTER SESSIONS

P-18-5 Testing for penicillin allergy: a practical approach

Panasoff J1 , Nusem D1 1Clalit Health Services-Lin Medical Center-Allergy Dept., Haifa,

Israel

P-18-6 Treatment of a drug-induced cutaneous reaction due to

imatinib by desensitization

Park MA1 , Guarderas JC1 , Volcheck GW1 1Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA

P-18-7 Acute allergic reactions and emergency medical care

Fassakhov RS1 , Reshetnicova ID1 1Postgraduate Medical Academy, Kazan, Russian Federation

P-18-8 Rofecoxib as a safe alternative for acetylsalicylic/nonsteroidal

anti-inflammatory drug-intolerant patients

Bavbek S1 , Celik G1 , Pasaoglu G1 , Harmanci E1 , Abadoglu O1 ,

Misirligil Z1 1Ankara University, School of Medicine, Department of Allergy,

Ankara, Turkey

P-18-9 Side effect of castor oil

Di Berardino L1 , Della Torre F2 1 2 INRCA, Lecco Casatenovo, Italy, INRCA Care and Research

Institute, Lecco Casatenovo, Italy

P-18-10 Respiratory system function in patients with

bronchoobstructive syndrome and moderate essential

hypertension treated with atenolol and nebivolol

Sydorchuk LP1 , Sydorchuk RI1 , Sydorchuk II1 1Bucovinian State Medical Academy, Chernivtsi, Ukraine

P-18-11 Some aspects of drug allergy during genitourinary tract

diseases treatment

Javaid M1 , Yakolcevich M1 , Korshak T1 , Vdovichenko V1 1Grodno State Medical University Grodno Belorus, Grodno,

Belarus

P-18-12 Allergic reaction induced by inhaled budesonide

Blaziene A1 , Chomiciene A1 1Vilnius University, Clinic of Pulmonology, Vilnius, Lithuania

P-18-13 Systemic manifestations of aspirin-intolerant asthma:

similarity to Churg-Strauss syndrome

Taniguchi M1 , Turikisawa N1 , Higashi N1 , Takeuchi Y1 , Higashi

A1 , Akiyama K1 1National Sagamihara Hospital, Sagamihara, Japan

P-18-14 Assessment of drug allergy in Crimea, Ukraine

Beloglazov VA1 , Konjaeva EI1 , Rosovenko AV1 , DuBuske LM2 1Crimea State Medical University, Simferopol, Crimea, Ukraine,

2Immunology Research Institute of New England, Fitchburg, MA,

USA

P-18-15 The hepatotoxicity of the antibacillar drug therapy

Herrag M1 , Mouline S1 , Krami A1 1Hospital, Rabat, Morocco

P-18-16 Successful treatment of acute toxic epidermal necrolysis and

its sequelae with cyclosporine, IVIG, ocular amniotic

membrane suturing and mycophenylate

McPolin CM1 1Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, New Jersey,

USA

Food Hypersensitivity

P-19-1 Nutritional evaluation of a new semi-elemental diet

Plaskie K1 , Haschke F2 , Hauser B1 , Vandenplas Y1 1Academisch Ziekenhuis Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels,

Belgium, 2NESTEC, Vevey, Switzerland

91

P-19-2 Utility of wheat-specific IgE concentration in wheat allergy

diagnosis and predicting probability of anaphylaxis

Pourpak Z1 , Mesdaghi M1 , Kazemnejad A2 1Immunology, Asthma and Allergy Research Institute, Tehran, Iran,

2Department of Biostatistics, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran,

Iran

P-19-3 Plant food allergies in children from Spain

Fernandez-Rivas M1 , Gonzalez-Mancebo E1 , Alonso-Diaz de

Durana MD1 , Rosado A1 , Tejedor MA1 , Vila C1 , Benito CH1 1Fundacion Hospital Alcorcon, Alcorcon, Madrid, Spain

P-19-4 Purification and partial characterization of allergen from

sapodilla (Achras zapota)

Hegde VL1 , Venkatesh YP1 1Central Food Technological Research Institute (CFTRI), Mysore,

Karnataka, India

P-19-5 A new extensively hydrolyzed whey protein formula: safe for

the use in children with IgE-mediated cow’s milk allergy

Marcucci G1 , Biasucci G2 , Giovannini M3 , Castro M4 , Alarcon

P5 , Comer GM5 , Vandenplas Y6 1 2 Monteluce Clinic, Perugia, Italy, Civile di Piacenza Hospital,

Piacenza, Italy, 3San Paolo Hospital, Milano, Italy, 4Bambino Gesú

Hospital, Roma, Italy, 5Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL,

USA, 6Academical Hospital V.U.B., Brussels, Belgium

O-19-1 One man’s meat is another man’s poison: urticaria with

multiple meats

Bourne HC1 , Moutzouris M2 , Katelaris C3 1Department of Immunology, Westmead Hospital, Wentworthville,

NSW, Australia, 2Department of Dietetics, Westmead Hospital,

Wentworthville, NSW, Australia, 3Department of Clinical

Immunology and Allergy, Westmead Hospital, Wentworthville,

NSW, Australia

P-19-8 Relationship between probable IgE-mediated food allergy and

other atopic disorders

Ferraz de Oliveira J1 , Rosmaninho I1 , Cunha L1 , Lopes C2 , Castel-

Branco MG1 1 2 H. S. Joao, Porto, Portugal, F. Medicina Universidade Porto,

Porto, Portugal

P-19-9 Allergy to fish in Spanish children: clinical aspects

Ibañez MD1 , Jimenez A1 , Fernandez E1 , Muñoz MC1 , Laso MT1 1Hospital Niño Jesus, Madrid, Spain

P-19-10 Rice as a common cause of food protein-induced enterocolitis

syndrome in early childhood: a ten-year experience 1992-

2002

Kakakios A1 , Codarini M1 , Kemp A2 1 2 The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, Australia, The

Children’s Hospital at Westmead, University of Sydney, Sydney,

Australia

P-19-11 Electrogastography (EGG) in food allergy

Micskey É1 , Badacsonyi Sz1 , Kalmar A1 1Buda Children’s Hospital, Budapest, Hungary

P-19-12 IL-10 inhibits allergen-specific Th2 cytokine production in

human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in peanut allergic

subjects

Wong B1 , Sun J1 , Conway M1 , Dalrymple A1 , Waserman S1 , Jordana

M1 1McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

THURSDAY


THURSDAY

92

THURSDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER - continued

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

P-19-13 Pattern of IgE reactivity to food allergens in the Singapore

population

Wang XS1 , Ong TC1 , Wang DY2 , Chew FT3 1Department of Biological Sciences; Department of Pediatrics,

Singapore, Singapore, 2Department of Otolaryngology, Singapore,

Singapore, 3Department of Biological Sciences, Singapore,

Singapore

P-19-15 IgE-Ab and IgG4-Ab to cow’s milk antigens in patients with

food allergy

Chikina EY1 , Zhirova SN1 , Shabalina SV1 1Mechnikov Research Institute for Vaccines and Sera, Moscow,

Russian Federation

P-19-16 Fixed eruption caused by quinine in tonic water

Kubota Y1 1Fukuoka University, Fukuoka, Japan

P-19-17 Otorhinolaryngological and skin prick test findings in

patients with rhinitis and asthma

Kaulsay R2 , Sani A2 , Murad S3 1 2 Harnam ENT Hospital, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, National

University Hospital Malaysia (HUKM), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia,

3Institute for Medical Research, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

P-19-18 Occurrence of food allergens as immune complexes with

their specific sIgAs in human breast milk

Narita H1 , Hirose J1 , Kimura A2 , Honjoh T3 1 2 Kyoto Women’s University, Kyoto, Kyoto, Japan, Itayado Clinic,

Kobe, Hyogo, Japan, 3Morinaga Institute of Biological Science,

Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan

P-19-19 Cellular response of gastrointestinal mucosa in children with

food allergy

Maciorkowska EM1 , Kaczmarski MK1 , Kowalczuk JK1 , Kasacka

IK2 , Kondej-Muszynska KM1 13rd Department of Children’s Diseases, Medical University,

Bialystok, Poland, 2Medical University, Bialystok, Poland

P-19-20 An apparent life-threatening event and food hypersensitivity

in infancy

Wasilewska J1 , Kaczmarski M1 1Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland

P-19-21 Milk-induced pulmonary disease (Heiner syndrome)

Moissidis IJ1 , Bahna SL1 , Chaidaroon D2 , Vichyanond P2 1Louisiana State Univ Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA,

USA, 2Siriraj Hospital Mahidol University, Bahgkok, Thailand

P-19-22 Effects of introducing oats in a strict gluten-free diet

Lovik A1 , Gjoen A2 , Nilsen E1 , Scott H G1 , Loberg E M1 , Skar V3 ,

Kett K1 , Lundin KEA1 1 2 Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway, Ulleval Hospital, Oslo, Norway,

3Lovisenberg Hospital, Oslo, Norway

P-19-23 Anaphylaxis due to ingestion of raw leek

Borja JM1 , Galindo PA1 , Gomez E1 , Feo JF1 , Alonso A1 , Pineda F2 1 2 Allergy Section, Hospital Complex, Ciudad Real, Spain, Diater

Laboratory, Madrid, Spain

P-19-24 Severe anaphylaxis after ingestion of millet noodle

contaminated wheat: evaluation of hidden antigens by ELISA

Shibata R1 , Nishima S2 , Miyazawa I3 , Takahata Y3 , Morimatsu F3 1National Minami-Fukuoka Hospital, Fukuoka, Fukuoka, Japan,

2National Minami-Fukuoka Hospital, Fukuoka, Fukuoka, Japan,

3Research and Development Center, Nippon Meat Packers, Inc.,

Tukuba, Ibaragi, Japan

POSTER SESSIONS

P-19-25 Food hypersensitivity: significant improvement of lag-time,

oxidative pattern and cholesterol level in adults following a

DRIA test defined diet

Perrone G1 , Cestaro B2 , Cazzola R2 , Ostan B1 , Speciani AF3 1 2 Private Medical Center, Milano, Italy, Department of Preclinical

Sciences, Medical University, Milano, Italy, 3SMA (Associated

Medical Services), Milano, Italy

P-19-26 Peabutter - a peanut butter substitute

Tkachyk SJ1 1University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

P-19-27 Betula occidentalis, Quercus vellutina and other allergens

related to the oral allergy syndrome

Rojo MI1 , Aguilar D1 , Bermejo MA1 1Hospital Juárez de México, México, Distrito Federal, Mexico

P-19-28 Production of cytokines in allergic rhinitis patients with or

without sensitization to food allergens

Nakonechna AA1 , Muratova I1 , Drannik GN1 , DuBuske LM2 1 2 National Medical University, Kiev, Ukraine, Immunology

Research Institute of New England, Fitchburg, MA, USA

P-19-29 The impact of a negative peanut challenge on peanut allergy

management

Yu J1 , Vaughan R1 , Ferguson AC1 , Dean J1 1British Columbia Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, B.C, Canada

P-19-30 Comparison of IgE binding to water-soluble proteins in

genetically modified and traditionally bred varieties of hard

red spring wheat

Goodman RE1 , Bardina L2 , Nemeth MA1 , Astwood JD1 , Sampson

HA3 , Beyer K3 , Leach JN1 , Kurunanandaa K1 1 2 Monsanto Company, St. Louis, MO, USA, Mount Sinai Medical

Center, New York, NY, USA, 3Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA

P-19-31 Hypoallergenic parvalbumin variants for immunotherapy of

fish allergy

Swoboda I1 , Verdino P2 , Keller W2 , Valent P3 , Valenta R4 ,

Spitzauer S1 , Bugajska-Schretter A1 , Sperr WR3 1Institute for Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics, AKH

Vienna, Vienna, Austria, 2Division of Structural Biology, University

of Graz, Graz, Austria, 3Department of Internal Medicine I, AKH

Vienna, Vienna, Austria, 4Department of Pathophysiology, AKH

Vienna, Vienna, Austria

P-19-32 Comparison of relationship based on the IgE-binding

activities and taxonomical classification of fishes

Urisu A1 , Kakami M1 , Koyama H2 , Yamada K3 , Yasuda T4 ,

Kawamura M1 , Kawaguchi H1 , Tokuda R1 , Kondo Y1 , Tsuge I1 1Department of Pediatrics Fujita-Health University, Nagoya, Aichi,

Japan, 2Department of Pediatrics, Gunma University, Maebashi,

Gunma, Japan, 3Yamada Clinics, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan, 4Toyosuisan KK, Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

P-19-33 Immunological properties of lipid transfer proteins, a protein

family of potentially severe food panallergens

Scheurer S 1 , Cistero-Bahima A 2 , San Miguel-Moncin MM 2 ,

Enrique E 2 , Retzek M 1 , Haase T 1 , Schocker F 3 , Becker WM 3 ,

Conti A 4 , Lauer I 1 , Vieths S 1

1 Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, Langen, Germany, 2 Institut Universitari

Dexeus, Barcelona, Spain, 3 Research Center Borstel, Borstel,

Germany, 4 ICNR-ISPA Bioindustry Park, Colleretto Giacosa, Italy


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

POSTER SESSIONS

THURSDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER - continued

P-19-34 Impact of gastric digestion on allergenic molecules, epitopes

and mimotopes: a pivotal role of antacids in the etiology of

food allergy

Untersmayr E1 , Schoell I1 , Walter F1 , Förster-Waldl E2 , Swoboda

I3 , Jensen-Jarolim E1 , Riemer A1 , Scheiner O1 , Boltz-Nitulescu

G1 , Spitzauer S3 1Dept. of Pathophysiology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria,

2Clinics of Juvenile Medicine, University of Vienna, Vienna,

Austria, 3Clin. Inst. for Medical and Chemical Laboratory

Diagnostics, Vienna, Austria

P-19-35 Production of an antibody fragment for studying a crossreactive

IgE epitope on the major cherry allergen Pru av 1

Wiche R1 , Schicktanz S1 , Scheurer S1 , Foetisch K1 , Hoffmann A1 ,

Vieths S1 1Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, Langen, Germany

Occupational Asthma and Allergy

P-20-1 Occupational asthma in Polish workers exposed to organic

dust

Milanowski JM1 , Szmygin-Milanowska KSM1 1Pulmonary Department, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin,

Poland

P-20-2 Occupational rhinitis in patients with occupational asthma

Rosmaninho I1 , Torres da Costa J1 , Vaz M1 1H. S. Joao, Porto, Portugal

P-20-3 Lysozyme-induced eosinophilic bronchitis without asthma in

a baker

Fernandez-Nieto MFN1 , Quirce SQ1 , Escudero CE1 , Sastre JS1 1Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, Madrid, Madrid, Spain

P-20-4 Prevalence of latex allergy in a group of Venezuelan

healthcare workers and cross-reactivity between latex and

foods or inhalant allergens

Asbati M1 , Puccio F1 , Capriles A2 , Di Prisco MC1 , Arteta M3 1 2 Instituto de Biomedicina/UCV, Caracas, Venezuela, Hospital

San Juan de Dios/Centro Medico de Caracas, Caracas, Venezuela,

3Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas, Venezuela

P-20-5 Prevalence of respiratory symptoms in workers of a sealed

office building in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Rios JL1 , Boechat JL1 , Gioda A1 , França AT1 , Lapa e Silva JR1 ,

Aquino Neto FR1 1Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil

P-20-6 Occupational asthma: dolichol as a predictor of susceptibility

Kuznecovs S1 , Joksta I2 , Kuznecova G1 1Allergy Unit, Public Health Research Laboratory, Riga, Latvia,

2Latvian Medical Academy, Riga, Latvia

Pharmacotherapy

P-21-1 Mechanism of action and clinical application of

polyoxidonium, an immunomodulator

Pinegin BV1 , Khaitov RM1 , Nekrasov AV1 1Institute of Immunology, Moscow, Russian Federation

P-21-2 Improved protection of a single dose of levocetirizine over

desloratadine on the early allergic reaction in a nasal

provocation test with allergen

Spertini F1 , Deruaz C1 , Leimgruber A1 1Immunology and Allergy, Center Hospitalier Universitaire

Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland

93

P-21-3 Efficacy of mizolastine in the treatment of chronic idiopathic

urticaria

Liu L1 , Dou D1 , Li M2 , Peng ZH3 , Guo ZP4 , Li FQ5 , Zhu XJ1 1Department of Dermatology, Peking University First Hospital,

Beijing, China, 2Department of Dermatology, Zhong Shan Hospital,

Fu Dan University, Shanghai, China, 3Department of Dermatology,

The 2nd Hospital, Xian Jiaotong University, Xian, Shaanxi, China,

4Department of Dermatology, Huaxi Hospital of Sichuan

University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China, 5Department of

Dermatology, The 2nd Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun,

Jilin, China

P-21-4 Effects of anti-allergic drugs on the activities of protein kinase

C and protein phosphatase (IIA) using Pleckstrin as an

endogenous substrate

Imaoka T1 1Misuzugaoka-Higashi Hosp, Hiroshima, Hiroshima-Ken, Japan

P-21-5 Vitamin A reduces lung inflammation with eosinophilia and

neutrophilia in Sephadex-treated rats

Torii A1 , Torii S2 , Miyake M1 , Morishita M3 , Ito K3 , Sakamoto T1 1Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan,

2The Faculty of Domestic Science of Aichi-Gakusen University,

Okazaki, Japan, 3Aichi Children’s Health and Medical Center,

Obu, Japan

P-21-6 Influence of levocetirizine (LC) on lymphocytes

Werfel T1 , Wittmann M1 , Kapp A1 1Dept Dermatology and Allergology, Hannover Medical University,

Hannover, Germany

P-21-7 Influences of mizolastine on rat paw edema induced by

arachidonic acid

Fu M1 , Zhang YG1 , Zhao XD1 , Liao WJ1 , Liu YF1 , Wang ZP1 1Xijing Hospital, Xi’an, Shaanxi, China

P-21-8 Antihistaminic drugs and antileukotrienes: a way to decide about

QOL in children with grass-pollen induced rhinitis

Stencel-Gabriel K1 , Sadza K2 , Mertas T2 , Lukas A1 , Obuchowicz A1 1 2 3rd Clinic of Pediatrics, Bytom, Slaskie, Poland, Silesian Medical

Academy, Zabrze, Slaskie, Poland

P-21-9 Comparison of effectiveness between nebulized budesonide

plus albuterol versus albuterol alone in children with

moderate acute asthma

Blandon MV1 , Rosas MA1 , Del Rio BE1 , Sienra JJ1 1Hospital Infantil de Mexico Federico Gomez, Mexico City,

Mexico

P-21-10 Role of leocetirizine, cetirizine and desloratidine in allergic

bronchial asthma associated with rhinitis

Pawar SS1 1Shriratna Intensive Care & Hospital, Karad, Maharashtra, India

P-21-11 Comparing the safety consequences of newer antihistamines

Hindmarch I1 1HPRU Medical Research Center, University of Surrey, Guildford,

Surrey, UK

P-21-12 Sustained efficacy of montelukast in seasonal allergic rhinitis

(SAR) over 4 weeks of treatment

van Adelsberg J1 , Menten J1 , Philip G1 , Reiss TF1 1Merck & Co., Inc., Rahway, NJ, USA

P-21-13 Guideline-compliant treatment of allergic rhinitis in practice:

an evaluation on the basis of 48,000 cases

Mösges R 1 , Plenker A 2 , Goetze K 1 , Hilgenfeld A 3

1 IMSIE-University at Cologne, Cologne, Germany, 2 Essex Pharma

GmbH, Munich, Germany, 3 University of Aachen, Aachen,

Germany

THURSDAY


THURSDAY

94

THURSDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER- continued

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

P-21-14 Fexofenadine does not impair reaction time, decision making

and driver behavior

Potter PC1 , Van Niekerk CH2 , Scheepers JM3 1University of Cape Town, Cape Town, Western Province, South

Africa, 2Aventis Pharma., Johannesburg, South Africa, 3Rand Afrikaans University, Pretoria, South Africa

P-21-15 The problem of corticosteroid phobia in atopic dermatitis

patients

Jenerowicz D1 , Czarnecka-Operacz M1 , Silny W1 , Silny P1 1University of Medical Sciences in Poznan, Department of

Dermatology, Poznan, Wielkopolska, Poland

P-21-16 Roxithromycin promotes lymphocyte apoptosis in

Dermatophagoides-sensitive asthma patients

Ogawa N1 , Sugawara Y1 , Saeki T1 , Ishikawa Y1 , Kawano Y2 , Noma

T1 1Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa,

Japan, 2Yokohama Red Cross Hospital, Yokohama, Kanagawa,

Japan

P-21-17 Inhaled corticosteroids in some pulmonary complications and

respiratory function changes after bone marrow

transplantation in children

Willak-Janc E1 , Wójcik I1 , Chybicka A2 , Gorczynska E2 , Szczyra

Z2 , Dyla A2 1Wroclaw University of Medicine, Depart. of Pediatric Allergology,

Wroclaw, Poland, 2Wroclaw University of Medicine, Depart. of

Pediatric Hematology, Wroclaw, Poland

Urticaria, Angioedema and Anaphylaxis

P-22-1 Subclass analysis of autoantibody to FcεRI α in chronic

urticaria patients

Kikuchi Y 1 , Joseph K 1 , Kaplan AP 1

1 Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina,

USA

P-22-2 Hyperresponsiveness of chronic urticaria basophils

Luquin E1 , Kaplan AP2 , Ferrer M1 1Department of Allergy, Clinica Universitaria, Universidad de

Navarra, Pamplona, Spain, 2The Konishi-MUSC Institute for

Inflammation Research, Div of Allergy, Charleston, South Carolina,

USA

P-22-3 Anisakis and food allergy in Portuguese population

Nunes C1 , Ladeira S1 1Center of Allergy and Immunology of Algarve, Portimao, Portugal

P-22-4 Monoclonal gammopathy (MG) in allergy patients with

angioedema, urticaria, and other disorders

Silverman BA1 , Kapur P2 1Long Island College Hospital, Brooklyn, New York, USA,

2Ochsner Clinic Foundation, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

P-22-5 Prevalence of thyroid autoantibodies (TAA) and response to

thyroid hormone therapy in patients with chronic idiopathic

urticaria (CIU)

Said YS1 , Harfi HA2 1National Center of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Riyadh,

Saudi Arabia, 2King Faisal Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh,

Saudi Arabia

P-22-6 Delayed pressure urticaria successfully controlled with

sulfasalazine

O’Connell MA1 , Silvers WS1 , Engler RJ2 1University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO,

USA, 2Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA

POSTER SESSIONS

P-22-7 Helicobacter pylori: association with chronic urticaria

Farid Reza1 , Pishnamaz R1 , Moin M2 1Mashad University of Medical Sciences, Mashad, Khorasan, Iran,

2Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

P-22-8 Mast cell and eosinophil activation in exercise- induced

urticaria-angioedema syndrome

Bruno G1 , Angelino A1 , Santangelo G1 , Bruno A1 , Graf U1 ,

Andreozzi P1 1Allergologia e Immunologia Clinica, Università, Rome, RM, Italy

P-22-9 Helicobacter pylori infection in chronic urticaria patients

Danek K1 , Zbraniborski T1 1Chair and Cl. Dpt. of Int. Dis. Allergology and Cl. Imm. MU of

Silesia, Zabrze, Poland

P-22-10 Clinical and laboratory features of patients with cold-induced

urticaria

Chomiciene A1 , Blaziene A1 1Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania

P-22-11 Anaphylaxis to intravenous cyclosporine but not to

tacrolimus

Siripassorn K1 , Chantaphakul H1 1Chulalongkorn University Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand

P-22-12 Lack of diagnosis in patients with severe systemic reactions to

hymenoptera stings

Miranda-Páez A1 , Fernández-Meléndez S1 , Vega-Chicote JM1 ,

Carmona-Bueno MJ1 , Reina-Ariza E1 , García-González J1 1Allergy Service. Universitary Carlos Haya Regional Hospital,

Málaga, Málaga, Spain

P-22-13 Late onset anaphylaxis to Bacillus natto-fermented soybeans

(natto)

Inomata NI1 , Matsukura MS1 , Osuna OH1 , Ikezawa IZ1 1Department of Dermatology, Yokohama City University School

of Medicine, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan

P-22-14 Anaphylaxis caused by hydrocortisone sodium succinate

Kim BE1 , Kim CK1 , Kim SW1 1Inje University-Sanggyepaik Hospital, Nowon, Seoul, Republic

of Korea

P-22-15 Wheat-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis in Thailand

and omega-5 gliadin

Pongpreuksa S1 , Pattanajitvilai O1 , Visitsunthon N1 , Reunula T2 ,

Palosuo K2 , Vichyanond P1 1Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital,

Bangkok, Thailand, 2Department of Dermatology, University of

Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland

P-22-16 Anaphylaxis to tetanus toxoid: diagnosis by specific IgE

immunoblot

Duronpisitkul W1 , Jirapongsananuruk O1 , Malainual N1 ,

Boonchoo S1 , Visitsuntorn N1 , Vichyanond P1 1Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand

P-22-17 A case of suspected angioedema

Lee CS1 , Sussman GL1 1University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada


96

PLAN TO ATTEND!

SOYEZ DES NÔTRES!

The Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

Société canadienne d’allergie et d’immunologie clinique

October 20-24, 2004

du 20 au 24 octobre 2004

Annual Scientific Meeting

Réunion scientifique annuelle

Tel: (613) 730-6272 * csaci@rcpsc.edu * http://csaci.medical.org


Adkinson, N. Franklin

United States

D1, WK9

Arruda, L. Karla

Brazil

LU25, PR3

Asher, Innes

New Zealand

LU81, PR16

Atkins, Dan

United States

BR81, WK4

Austen, K. Frank

United States

MP2, PR1

Bachert, Claus

Belgium

D4, LU10, PR7

Baena-Cagnani, Carlos

Argentina

BR43, LU65, PL5

Baker, James

United States

BR12

Ballas, Zuhair

United States

FC2

Ballow, Mark

United States

BR21, WK3

Baraniuk, James

United States

BR50, LU49

Baratawidjaja, Karnen

Indonesia

PR21

Bardana, Emil

United States

LU42, PR23, WK6

Bavbek, Sevim

Turkey

LU28

Becker, Allan

Canada

BR32, WK2

Becker, Wolf-Meinhard

Germany

BR26, PR3

Befus, A. Dean

Canada

BR70, FC8, PR2

Behrendt, Heidrun

Germany

LU9, WK7

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

Beltrani, Vincent

United States

BR49, PR6, PR20

Berger, Melvin

United States

BR69

Berger, William

United States

GS1, LU66

Bernstein, Jonathan

United States

LU42

Bieber, Thomas

Germany

BR87, PL4, WK11

Bielory, Leonard

United States

LU47

Bischoff, Stephan

Germany

LU29, PR13

Bjorksten, Bengt

Sweden

BR44, WK6

Blaiss, Michael

United States

BR68, PR4, PR10,

Blaser, Kurt

Switzerland

FC14, LU43, LU68, PL5

Blumenthal, Malcolm

United States

BR25

Bochner, Bruce

United States

PR5

Boguniewicz, Mark

United States

WK11

Bonini, Sergio

Italy

GS2, LU66, PR17

Boulet, Louis-Philippe

Canada

BR83, PR19

Brockow, Knut

Germany

BR87

Broide, David

United States

PR23

Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla

The Netherlands

LU80, PR20

FACULTY

Buckley, Rebecca

United States

BR67, PR12, WK3

Burks, Wesley

United States

BR2, WK4

Bush, Robert

United States

LU13

Busse, Paula

United States

BR69

Busse, William

United States

LU24, LU44, MP4, PR1

Calderon, Moises

United Kingdom

LU50

Canonica, G. Walter

Italy

BR66, LU46, PL2, PL5

Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda

Brazil

PR12

Carrasco, Edgardo

Chile

BR45, WK6

Cartier, Andre

Canada

LU11, PR11

Casale, Thomas

United States

LU63, PR23

Chan-Yeung, Moira

Canada

PR11

Chapman, Martin

United States

BR24, FC1, LU9

Chen, Yu Zhi

China

LU65

Chipps, Bradley

United States

LU7

Church, Martin

United Kingdom

GLS2

Cockcroft, Donald

Canada

BR8

Condemi, John

United States

BR6, LU67

Cox, Linda

United States

FC14

Craig, Timothy

United States

BR30

Creticos, Peter

United States

DS1, LU61, WK8

Cua-Lim, Felicidad

Philippines

LU44, WK1, WK12

Custovic, Adnan

United Kingdom

D2, LU4, PR17

Dahl, Ronald

Denmark

PL3, WK8

Dahlen, Sven-Erik

Sweden

PR15

D’Arienzo, Peter

United States

GS2

Darsow, Ulf

Germany

BR82, PR20

Dean, John

Canada

FC19

Denburg, Judah

Canada

D3, LU1, LU62

Diette, Gregory

United States

DS2

Didier, Alain

France

LU49

Dluhy, Robert

United States

DS2

97

Session Codes

BR – Breakfast Seminar

D – Debate of the Day

FC – Free Communication Session

GLS – Grand Luncheon Seminar

GS – Gold Symposium

LU – Luncheon Seminar

MP – Meet the Professor Session

PL – Plenary Session

PR – Platinum/Parallel Session

WK – Interactive Workshop


98

Dolovich, Myrna

Canada

BR86

Dubois, Anthony

The Netherlands

LU8, WK10

Durham, Stephen

United Kingdom

D2, GLS2, LU61, MP1, PR23

Dykewicz, Mark

United States

PR7

Ebisawa, Motohiro

Japan

BR1

Eggleston, Peyton

United States

FC9, LU25

Eigenmann, Philippe

Switzerland

LU41

El Hefni, A.

Egypt

LU20

Engler, Renata

United States

BR12, LU30, LU47

Ewan, Pamela

United Kingdom

WK10

Ferguson, Alexander

Canada

BR3

Fink, Jordan

United States

BR45, BR62

Fokkens, Wytske

The Netherlands

LU26, PR1

Frank, Michael

United States

BR29

Frew, Anthony

United Kingdom

D1, PR17

Fukuda, Takeshi

Japan

MP5

Garsia, Roger

Australia

WK5

Gelfand, Erwin

United States

BR10, BR20, LU51, PR4, WK3

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

Gold, Michael

Australia

LU87

Golden, David

United States

LU8, LU23, WK10

Grattan, Clive

United Kingdom

PR6, WK1

Greaves, Malcolm

Singapore

BR49, WK1

Gross, Robert

United States

GS2

Gutierrez-Ramos, Jose-Carlos

United States

PR5

Haahtela, Tari

Finland

BR46, BR85, PR16

Hagel, Isabel

Venezuela

LU12

Hamid, Qutayba

Canada

BR60, LU26, PR18

Hamilos, Daniel

United States

BR9, WK5

Hanna, Kamal

Egypt

FC16

Hargreave, Frederick

Canada

BR83, MP8, PR14

HayGlass, Kent

Canada

FC7, LU22, PL1

Hill, David

Australia

WK4

Hindmarch, Ian

United Kingdom

BR30, LU45, PR4

Ho, Vincent

Canada

GLS1

Hofstra, Claudia

The Netherlands

LU3

Hogg, James

Canada

BR48

FACULTY

Holgate, Stephen

United Kingdom

BR25, LU6, MP2, PL3

Holt, Patrick

Australia

FC12, MP4, PR16

Hong, Chein-Soo

Korea

LU23, LU64

Honsinger, Richard

United States

FC10

Host, Arne

Denmark

PR16

Hourihane, Jonathan

United Kingdom

PR17, WK4

Howarth, Peter

United Kingdom

BR22, PR4

Huerta-Lopez, Jose

Mexico

FC6

Ing, Alvin

Australia

LU83, PR22

Ishikawa, Takeru

Japan

LU10, LU24, PR18

Isolauri, Erika

Finland

LU5

Ivancevich, Juan

Argentina

FC18

Johansson, S.G.O.

Sweden

PL1, PR19

Jutel, Marek

Poland

BR66

Kaliner, Michael

United States

D4, DS2, GS1, PL4

Kaplan, Allen

United States

BR51, PL1, PL4, PR16

Kapp, Alexander

Germany

LU80, WK7

Karlsson, Lars

United States

LU3

Katelaris, Connie

Australia

BR71, BR85, PL4

Katz, Yitzhak

Israel

PR3

Kaulsay, Ranbir

Malaysia

PR21

Kay, A. Barry

United Kingdom

MP5, PL2

Kemp, Stephen

United States

BR5

Khaitov, Rakhim

Russia

PR7

Khaltaev, Nikolai

Switzerland

PR16

Kim, You-Young

Korea

LU64, PR24

Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

Japan

PR18

Knop, Jurgen

Germany

BR88

Kohno, Yoichi

Japan

FC12

Kowalski, Marek

Poland

BR4, FC3

Kraft, Dietrich

Austria

BR24, BR80, PR3

Kuna, Piotr

Poland

LU48

Kurosawa, Motohiro

Japan

FC17, PR6

Lanier, Bob

United States

PR6, PR10

Lee, Chul Hee

Korea

BR23

Lehrer, Samuel

United States

BR2


Lemanske, Robert

United States

BR84, PR22

LeSouef, Peter

Australia

PR8

Leung, Donald

United States

PR20

Li, Xiu-Min

United States

BR41

Lieberman, Philip

United States

LU40, LU60, PR2

Lockey, Richard

United States

D1, LU46, PL5, PR1

Luger, Thomas

Germany

GLS1

Luskin, Allan

United States

PR15

Luster, Andrew

United States

PL1

Malling, Hans-Jorgen

Denmark

LU50, PL5, WK8

Marone, Gianni

Italy

LU51, PR4, PR8

Martin, Richard

United States

BR60, PL3

Matsushima, Koji

Japan

PR18

Matsushita, Sho

Japan

PR8

McFadden, E. Regis

United States

LU7, WK12

Mekori, Yoseph

Israel

LU2

Mello, Joao de

Brazil

LU86, PR22

Meltzer, Eli

United States

BR68, D4, MP3, PR15, PR19

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

Metcalfe, Dean

United States

LU2, PL2, PR2

Minoguchi, Kenji

Japan

WK8

Miyamoto, Terumasa

Japan

DS1, MP3, PR18

Mochizuki, Hiroyuki

Japan

DS1

Moin, Mostafa

Iran

FC6

Moon, Hee-Bom

Korea

LU69

Moqbel, Redwan

Canada

D3, LU62

Mosges, Ralph

Germany

GLS2

Motala, Cassiem

South Africa

LU41, PR12, PR24

Naspitz, Charles

Brazil

LU12, PR9, WK11

Neffen, Hugo

Argentina

PR12, PR24

Nelson, Harold

United States

FC11, PR14, WK12

Nicklas, Richard

United States

BR7, FC17

Nishioka, Kiyoshi

Japan

WK1

O’Byrne, Paul

Canada

DS1, LU6, PL3, PR19

Ochs, Hans

United States

BR67, PR12, WK3

Oehling, Albert

Spain

MP6

O’Hehir, Robyn

Australia

BR40, FC13

FACULTY

Ohta, Ken

Japan

FC4

Park, Hae-Sim

Korea

BR28

Paul, William

United States

PL1

Pauli, Gabrielle

France

PR13

Pawankar, Ruby

Japan

BR43, LU86, PR7

Peden, David

United States

BR11

Platts-Mills, Thomas

United States

D2, PR19

Portnoy, Jay

United States

PR10

Potter, Paul

South Africa

BR46

Poulsen, Lars

Denmark

FC10

Prasad, Rajendra

India

MP8

Prescott, Susan

Australia

PR21

Quirce, Santiago

Spain

LU11

Rachelefsky, Gary

United States

PR20, WK5

Rak, Sabina

Sweden

LU63, WK8

Reese, Gerald

Germany

BR26

Renz, Harald

Germany

PR17

Ring, Johannes

Germany

GLS1, MP6, PL4, PR13

Romagnani, Sergio

Italy

BR64, LU22, PR5

Rosario, Nelson

Brazil

BR32

Rosenwasser, Lanny

United States

PR5, PR8, PR23

Rothenberg, Marc

United States

FC4, PL2

Ruhno, John

Australia

FC2

Rylander, Ragnar

Sweden

WK6

Sampson, Hugh

United States

BR81, MP7, PR2, PR13

Sanchez Borges, Mario

Venezuela

LU28

Santa Marta, Christina

United States

LU85

Sastre, Joaquin

Spain

BR22, PL2

Scadding, Glenis

United Kingdom

PR15

Schatz, Michael

United States

BR71, PR22

Schellenberg, Robert

Canada

BR28, FC18, LU60, PR11

Schleimer, Robert

United States

D3, PR5, PR14

99

Session Codes

BR – Breakfast Seminar

D – Debate of the Day

FC – Free Communication Session

GLS – Grand Luncheon Seminar

GS – Gold Symposium

LU – Luncheon Seminar

MP – Meet the Professor Session

PL – Plenary Session

PR – Platinum/Parallel Session


100

Schnuch, Axel

Germany

BR88

Schoepf, Erwin

Germany

WK7

Schroeder, John

United States

BR70

Schuhl, Juan

Uruguay

FC3

Schultze-Werninghaus, Gerhard

Germany

WK7

Sears, Malcolm

Canada

PR15

Sepiashvili, Revaz

Russia

PR24

Settipane, Russell

United States

GS1

Shah, Ashok

India

FC20

Shearer, William

United States

LU27, LU84

Sienra Monge, Juan Jose

Mexico

BR61

Simon, Ronald

United States

LU13

Simons, F. Estelle R.

Canada

PL3, PR2, PR9

Singh, Anand

India

PR8

Singh, Raj

India

PR24

Skoner, David

United States

BR63

Slavin, Raymond

United States

BR5, PR7

Sorensen, Ricardo

United States

BR21

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

Spergel, Jonathan

United States

GLS1

Stark, Donald

Canada

FC20, PR11

Stein, Mark

United States

LU83

Stempel, David

United States

FC6, PR14

Stevenson, Jim

United Kingdom

PR9

Stick, Stephen

Australia

PR21

Sussman, Gordon

Canada

BR40

Szczeklik, Andrzej

Poland

PR7

Szefler, Stanley

United States

BR3, PR10

Tarlo, Susan

Canada

BR62, PR11

Thomas, Wayne

Australia

PR21

Todo-Bom, Ana

Portugal

BR31

Togias, Alkis

United States

BR23, GS1

Townley, Robert

United States

BR8

Umetsu, Dale

United States

PL5

Valenta, Rudolf

Austria

BR47, FC16, LU68, PR3

Valovirta, Erkka

Finland

FC9

Van Cauwenberge, Paul

Belgium

BR7, BR63, GS2, PR9

FACULTY

Van Hage-Hamsten, Marianne

Sweden

PR3

Vercelli, Donata

United States

BR47, PR8

Vervloet, Daniel

France

BR31, PR14, WK9

Vichyanond, Pakit

Thailand

BR61, MP7, PR22, WK2

Virant, Frank

United States

BR9, WK2

Wah, Lee Bee

Singapore

WK10

Wahn, Ulrich

Germany

BR42, LU5, PR9, WK7

Walls, Ronald

Australia

PR1

Warner, John

United Kingdom

BR42, PR9, WK11

Warrington, Richard

Canada

BR27, WK9

Waserman, Susan

Canada

FC15

Watson, Wade

Canada

FC19

Weck, Alain de

Switzerland

BR82, LU82, MP1, PR24, WK9

Weiler, John

United States

LU45

Weinberg, Eugene

South Africa

BR86, LU20, WK2

Weller, Peter

United States

LU1

Werfel, Thomas

Germany

BR65, PR13

Wilson, Andrew

United Kingdom

GLS2

Wong, H.C. George

Canada

BR41

Wu, Y.Y. Adrian

China

LU82

Yanez, Anahi

Argentina

FC11

Zambrano-Haboud, John

Ecuador

FC1

Zitt, Myron

United States

PR10

Zuraw, Bruce

United States

BR51, PR6

Zweiman, Burton

United States

BR6, LU30

Session Codes

BR – Breakfast Seminar

D – Debate of the Day

FC – Free Communication Session

GLS – Grand Luncheon Seminar

GS – Gold Symposium

LU – Luncheon Seminar

MP – Meet the Professor Session

PL – Plenary Session

PR – Platinum/Parallel Session

WK – Interactive Workshop


Allergy &

Clinical

Immunology

International

Journal of the

World Allergy Organization

ISSN 0838-1925

www.acii.net

Offi cial organ of

&

INTERASMA

Editor-in-Chief:

A. P. Kaplan

Founding Editor:

A. L. de Weck

Associate

Editors-in-Chief:

G. W. Canonica

M. A. Kaliner

C. K. Naspitz

J. Ring

Allergy &

Clinical

Immunology

International

Intern

■ Conjugated Polymer-Subunit

Immunogens and Vaccines

Page 7

■ An Investigation of Cross-

Reactive Allergens and

Antigens of Imperata

cylindrica Using Western

Blotting and ELISA Inhibition

Page 12

■ Immunologic Investigations in

Neurological and Psychiatric

ACII – Journal of the World Allergy Organization

is available to subscribers of the printed version in full-text online:

• Full-text of all published papers

• E-mail addresses of authors and members

of the editorial board

www.acii.net

Worldwide meeting calendar

• The guide to authors, aims and goals of the journal

• Details about the WAO-IAACI and Interasma, their activities, scope

and purposes

• Media information (also available from the publisher)

• Links to important sites in the field of allergy/immunology

Get your free sample copy

at the ACII booth!

March/April 2003

Vol.15, No. 2

Journal of the

World Allergy Organization

Diseases – Review of the

Literature 1994–2000 Page 15

■ Allergenic Pollen and

Urban Air Pollution in the

A Great Diversity

Mediterranean Area Page 16

of Research

■ New Insights Into the

Pathogenesis of Allergic

Hyperimmunoglobulinaemia E (hyper IgE)

Bronchopulmonary

syndrome is a rare disease, consisting of recurrent Aspergillosis Page 20

bacterial infections, high serum IgE levels and ■ Hyper IgE Syndrome in an

recurrent skin abscesses usually early in life. We Adult Page 22

are reporting the case of a 28-year-old woman

with a history of episodes of serious infections

■ Acase of anaphylactic

reactions with generalized

of the chest and skin abscesses. On the chest urticaria due to Pyongyang

radiograph, bilateral multiple pneumatoceles cold noodles Page 23

and bilateral bronchiectasis were observed.

Serum IgE level was 1650 IU/ml. Hyper IgE

World Allergy Organization

ICACI Indoor Allergen Survey

syndrome was diagnosed in adult life. Page 12 and Monitoring Working

Group Page 23

■ WAO-IAACI Horizons Page 24

■ WebWatch Page 24

Ranked among the world’s top ten allergy

journals by MDLinx.com, awarded a four-star rating from the clinical

reference Medical Matrix, listed in the Doctors’ Guide to the Internet

Global Edition, indexed/abstracted in: EMBASE/Excerpta Medica, the

Cinahl Database, the Cumulative Index to Nursing

and Allied Health Literature ®

ISSN 0838-1925

6 issues per annual volume

US $ / € 99.00 for Libraries and Institutions

US $ / € 78.00 for Individuals

US $ / € 49.00 for WAO-IAACI members

+ US $ / € 10.00 p+h per subscription

101

www.acii.net

The well-established journal Allergy & Clinical

Immunology International is the official

publication of the WAO/IAACI. To

Awarded

✰ ✰ ✰ ✰ ✰ ✰ ✰ ✰ ✰ ✰ ✰ ✰ ✰ ✰ ✰ ✰✰

✰✰


Four stars by

Medical Matrix –

The online clinical resource

directory of

www.medmatrix.org

emphasize this fact it is now

appearing under its new name:

Allergy & Clinical Immunology

International – Journal of the

World Allergy Organization.

Please collect your free sample

copy of this “new” journal at the

ACII booth.

• All papers fully peer-reviewed

• Received by practically all allergists throughout

the world

• Encourages full-color illustrations

• In no other allergy journal will your paper

receive the same exposure, with a

worldwide distribution of around 10,000

If you are interested in submitting a paper, please contact the Managing Editor at one of the addresses below.

Hogrefe & Huber Publishers

44 Brattle Street, 4th Floor • Cambridge, MA 02138, USA • Fax: +1 (617) 354-6875 • E-mail: acii.net@hogrefe.com

Rohnsweg 25 • D-37085 Göttingen, Germany • Fax: +49 551 49609-88 • E-mail: acii.net@hogrefe.com

www.acii.net


102

201 ACII - Journal of the World Allergy Organization

202 Pam Lab L.L.C

203 Karger Publishers

204 VIASYS Healthcare

205 American Latex Allergy Association

207 Hycor Biomedical, Inc.

212 Canadian Food Inspection Agency

214 ALPCO Diagnostics

218 Schering Laboratories

219 Micro Direct, Inc.

221 American Academy of Allergy,

Asthma & Immunology

223 Canadian Society of Allergy

and Clinical Immunology

225 NeilMed Products, Inc.

300 Mission: Allergy

304 Hitachi Chemical Diagnostics

310 Alcon Laboratories, Inc.

318 SHS North America

320 Blackwell Publishing

322 US BioTek Laboratories

324 Trudell Medical International

502 UCB Pharma

510 GlaxoSmithKline

518 AstraZeneca Canada, Inc.

601 Ferraris/PDSI, Inc.

602 Aventis Pharmaceuticals

605 Priva, Inc.

610 Novartis Pharma AG

618 Merck Sharp & Dohme

619 Stallergenes

621 3M

623 EUROIMMUN North America

625 European Academy of Allergology

and Clinical Immunology

700 Allergy & Asthma Information Association

702 International Asthma Services

704 Medic Savoure Ltd.

706 Quorum Pharmaceuticals

710 MedPointe Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

711 Methapharm, Inc.

713 Dey, L.P.

715 Indoor Biotechnologies, Inc.

718 Pharmacia Diagnostics AB

720 Canadian Immunodeficiencies Patient Organization

722 Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Society

724 Current Views in Allergy and Immunology

907 World Allergy Congress Munich 2005

905 World Allergy Organization - IAACI (WAO)

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

FLOOR PLAN VCEC Exhibition Hall

ENTRANCE

200

201 300

601 700

202

203

502

602

702

Poster

Sessions

204

205 304

605 704

207

706

STORAGE

210 310 510

610

710 711

212 713

214 715

219 318

518

618

619 718

221 320

621 720

INTERNET

CAFE

223 322

623 722

FOOD &

BEVERAGE

225 324

218

625 724

227 326

WAO 907 908

627 726


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

EXHIBIT DIRECTORY

General Information

Location: Exhibit Hall B, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition

Centre

Exhibitors will display the latest information on products and

services in the field of allergy, asthma and immunology. This directory

offers only a brief outline of the information available in the exhibit

hall. Make time in your daily schedule to visit the exhibits.

Name badges required for entrance to the Exhibit Hall.

Exhibit Hall Hours

Monday, 8 September 9:00-17:00

Tuesday, 9 September 9:00-17:00

Wednesday, 10 September 9:00-17:00

Thursday, 11 September 9:00-17:00

Exhibitor Registration Desk

Location: Lobby, Vancouver Exhibition & Convention Centre

Badges for exhibitors may be obtained at the Exhibitor registration

desk. All exhibiting personnel will be required to show a business

card or other proof of company affiliation in order to receive an

exhibitor badge.

Exhibitor Registration Hours

Saturday, 6 September 8:00-19:00

Sunday, 7 September 8:00-18:00

Monday, 8 September 8:00-18:00

Tuesday, 9 September 8:00-18:00

Wednesday, 10 September 8:00-18:00

Thursday, 11 September 8:00-18:00

Friday, 12 September 8:00-16:00

Endorsement Disclaimer

Products and services displayed in the exhibit hall or advertised in

this program occur by contractual business agreements between

WAO and participating companies and organizations. These

arrangements do not imply an endorsement by WAO of these

products and services.

103

3M

300 Tartan Drive

London, Ontario N5V 4M9

Canada

Tel: +1 519 452 6111

Fax: +1 519 452 4626

Booth #: 621

QVAR(beclomethasone dipropionate) Inhalation Aerosol. QVAR

is a unique aerosol metered-dose inhaler (MDI) which contains

beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) in a solution. It is the first inhaler

designed to deliver smaller particle-sized medication to the large,

intermediate and small airways. This allows QVAR to control asthma

at a lower dose than conventional CFC-containing BDP inhalers. QVAR

is available only by prescription. QVAR is a trademark of 3M. Used

under license in Canada.

ACII - Journal of the World Allergy Organization

c/o Hogrefe & Huber Publishers

Rohnsweg 25

Gottingen D37085

Germany

Tel: +495514960936

Fax: +495514960988

Booth #: 201

The new look ACI International – Journal of the World Allergy

Organization will be presented. As ACI International this wellestablished

journal has been the official publication of the WAO/

IAACI and INTERASMA for years. The latest issue containing reviews

and news from the world of allergy, back issues, and related publications

will be displayed.

Alcon Laboratories, Inc.

6201 South Freeway

Fort Worth, TX 76134-2099

United States

Tel: +1 800 862 5266

Fax: +1 800 777 2799

Booth #: 310

Alcon Laboratories, Inc. is the world’s leading eye care company. Alcon,

which has been dedicated to the ophthalmic industry for more than

50 years, develops, manufactures and markets pharmaceuticals, surgical

equipment and devices, contact lens solutions and other vision care

products that treat diseases, disorders and other conditions of the eye.

Allergy & Asthma Information Association

P.O. Box 2371

St. Mary’s, Ontario N4X 1A2

Canada

Tel: +1 519 284 4222

Fax: +1 519 284 0384

Booth #: 700

Serving Canadians from coast to coast in allergy, asthma and

anaphylaxis. To develop societal awareness of the seriousness of allergic

disease, including asthma, and to enable allergic individuals, their

families and caregivers, to increase control over allergy symptoms by

providing leadership in information, education, and advocacy, in

partnership with health care professionals, business, industry and

government.


104

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

ALPCO Diagnostics

P.O. Box 451

Windham, NH 03087

United States

Tel: +1 800 592 5726

Fax: +1 603 898 6854

Booth #: 214

ALPCO Diagnostics offers a comprehensive menu of immunoassay tests

for the Allergy Research and Clinical Allergy communities. Featured in

vitro products include CAST-ELISA (Cysteinyl Leukotriene

Determination) and Flow-CAST (Basophil Activation Test measuring

CD63 by flow cytometry) which are utilized for the determination of

food, venom, drug, inhalation, and pseudoallergies.

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

611 East Wells Street

Milwaukee, WI 53202

United States

Tel: +1 414 272 6071

Fax: +1 414 272 6070

Booth #: 221

The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology is the premier

professional medical specialty organization representing allergists, clinical

immunologists, allied health professionals and other physicians. The

Academy supports the Allergy/Immunology specialty by reaching out

to primary care physicians, MCOs, consumers and legislators. The broad

outreach creates an influential voice for the allergist/immunologist.

American Latex Allergy Association

3791 Sherman Road

Slinger, WI 53086

United States

Tel: +1 262 677 9707

Fax: +1 262 677 2808

Booth #: 205

The American Latex Allergy Association (A.L.E.R.T., Inc) founded in

1993, is a national, non-profit (501 3c) educational support association.

Its mission is to create awareness of latex allergy through education, and

to provide support to allergists and their patients who have developed

latex allergy. The American Latex Allergy Association seeks to reinforce

the doctor-patient relationship by publishing a newsletter and developing

educational materials and services.

AstraZeneca Canada, Inc.

1004 Middlegate Rd.

Mississauga, ON L4Y 1M4

Canada

Tel: +1 905 804 4962

Fax: +1 905 275 2695

Booth #: 518

AstraZeneca is one of the world’s leading pharmaceutical companies.

Products such as Symbicort® and Oxeze® are just two examples of our

commitment to providing innovative, effective medicines that make a

real difference in the treatment of Respiratory Disease.

EXHIBIT DIRECTORY

Aventis Pharmaceuticals

200 Crossing Blvd

P.O. Box 6890

Bridgewater, NJ 08807

United States

Tel: +1 908 231 4511

Fax: +1 908 304 7705

Booth #: 602

Aventis Pharma is dedicated to treating and preventing human disease

through the discovery, development, manufacture and sale of innovative

pharmaceutical products designed to meet unmet medical needs. Please

visit the Aventis exhibit to learn about Allegra®/Telfast® (fexofenadine

hydrochloride), a widely used non-sedating antihistamine for fast,

effective relief of SAR and CIU.

Blackwell Publishing

350 Main Street

Malden, MA 02148

United States

Tel: +1 781 388 8250

Fax: +1 781 388 8255

Booth #: 320

Blackwell Publishing is a leading international publisher in the areas of

science and medicine. Please stop by our booth for complimentary

copies of our journals and visit our Web site,

www.blackwellpublishing.com for information on all of our publications.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

59 Camelot Drive

Ottawa, ON K1A 0Y9

Canada

Tel: +1 613 225 2342

Fax: +1 613 228 6601

Booth #: 212

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is Canada’s sciencebased,

federal regulator of food, animals and plants, and is committed

to enhancing food safety, animal health, and protecting the plant resource

base. At the World Allergy Organization Congress 2003, the CFIA will

highlight its Food Recall and Allergy Alert outreach campaign.

Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Society

Box 2072

Claresholm, Alberta T0L 0T0

Canada

Tel: +1 403 625 4100

Fax: +1 403 625 4195

Booth #: 722

The Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Society (CHAES) / Société

d’angioédème héréditaire du Canada (SAHC) enhances the quality of

life for persons with Hereditary Angioedema or Acquired Angioedema

due to C1 inhibitor deficiency. They assist patients, their families,

friends, physicians and other health care professionals to understand

and effectively manage this disease.


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

EXHIBIT DIRECTORY

Canadian Immunodeficiencies Patient Organization

362 Concession 12 East,

RR #2

Hastings, Ontario K0L 1Y0

Canada

Tel: +1 877 262 2476

Fax: +1 705 696 1386

Booth #: 720

CIPO is a national organization of patients with primary immune

deficiency disorders, and their families. Its purpose is to unite the

experience, resources and expertise of its members as well as its medical

scientific advisory committee; to achieve nationwide improvement in

the diagnosis and treatment of patients with primary immune deficiency

in Canada.

Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

774 Echo Drive

Ottawa, ON K1S 5N8

Canada

Tel: +1 613 730 6272

Fax: +1 613 730 1116

Booth #: 223

The Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology is one of the

oldest specialty societies in Canada. It was founded in 1945. The goals

of the society are to: improve the standards of teaching and practice of

allergy and clinical immunology; foster co-operation between those

engaged in the study and practice of allergy and clinical immunology;

encourage research in the field of allergy and clinical immunology; and

much more. The Society has over 355 Canadian and international

members.

Current Views in Allergy and Immunology

Medical College of Georgia

919 15th Street, Floor 1062

Augusta, GA 30912

United States

Tel: +1 706 721 3967

Fax: +1 706 721 4642

Booth #: 724

Current Views in Allergy and Immunology, now in its 26th year, is an

annual correspondence course offering six in-depth presentations by

nationally known speakers. Presentations are steered by a national advisory

board and represent topics most frequently requested by participants.

The program awards 18 CME credits.

Dey, L.P.

2751 Napa Valley Corporate Drive

Napa, CA 94558

United States

Tel: +1 707 224 3200

Fax: +1 707 224 0495

Booth #: 713

DEY is a specialty pharmaceutical company focusing on respiratory care.

As a leader in the manufacture and marketing of sterile, unit-dose

inhalation solution products, DEY offers an extensive line of cost-effective

pharmaceuticals for asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

(COPD), respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), cystic fibrosis, and other

respiratory conditions.

105

EUROIMMUN North America

404-999 Canada Place

Vancouver, BC V6C 3E2

Canada

Tel: +1 604 688 8113

Fax: +1 604 688 8328

Booth #: 623

EUROIMMUN produces an extensive range of indirect

immunoflorescence, ELISA, immunoblot and radioimmunassay test

systems for laboratory diagnostics in the areas of autoimmunity, infectious

serology and allergy diagnostics. 2000 laboratories worldwide use

EUROIMMUN’s products and services. EUROIMMUN North America

is the subsidiary of EUROIMMUN AG and proudly serves North America.

European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology

P.O. Box 24140, Linnegatan 89A

Stockholm 10451

Sweden

Tel: +4684596623

Fax: +4686633815

Booth #: 625

EAACI is a non-profit organization, dedicated to the advancement of

education in allergy and clinical immunology. The EAACI at present has

more than 3,500 members and 30 National Societies.

Ferraris/PDSI, Inc.

908 Main Street

Louisville, CO 80027

United States

Tel: +1 800 574 7374

Fax: +1 303 574 7373

Booth #: 601

Ferraris Medical manufactures and distributes aerosol delivery devices,

pocket chambers, aerosol masks, Wright respirometers, inspiratory meters,

in-check dials for inspiratory training and six peak flow meters. Pulmonary

Data Services, Inc. produces the Koko product line including the Koko

Spirometer, Koko Digidoser and the Keystone3 PF Analizer.

GlaxoSmithKline

GlaxoSmithKline Research and Development

Greenford Road, Greenford

Middlesex UB6 0HE

United Kingdom

Tel: +442084223434

Fax: +442084234401

Booth #: 510

GlaxoSmithKline is a leading research based pharmaceutical company.

Visit our stand in the exhibition hall and learn more about AdvairTM and

FlonaseTM . Test your knowledge with our asthma and allergy quiz. Come

to the GSK sponsored Platinum Symposium - Asthma: From Research to

Real World Data held on Wednesday, September 10 from 10:30 - 12:00.

Hitachi Chemical Diagnostics

630 Clyde Court

Mountain View, CA 94043

United States

Tel: +1 650 961 5501

Fax: +1 650 969 2745

Booth #: 304

Hitachi Chemical Diagnostics, Inc. is dedicated to providing unique in

vitro allergy diagnostic products, services and expertise to the global

medical community. The company also operates a fully licensed clinical

reference laboratory and provides ready-to-use allergenic extracts for

immunotherapy and clinical expertise from its Medical Director.


106

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

Hycor Biomedical, Inc.

7272 Chapman Avenue

Garden Grove, CA 92841

United States

Tel: +1 714 933 3000

Fax: +1 714 933 3222

Booth #: 207

Hycor Biomedical Inc. manufactures and markets diagnostic products

including the fully automated EIA HY TEC® 288 Plus system for

allergy and autoimmune testing with broad menus of over 1,000 allergens

and 30 510(k)-cleared ELISA-based AUTOSTAT® II autoimmune

essays. Hycor also offers the KOVA® brand system for standardized

microscopic urinalysis.

Indoor Biotechnologies, Inc.

1216 Harris Street

Charlottesville, VA 22903

United States

Tel: +1 434 984 2304

Fax: +1 434 984 2709

Booth #: 715

Indoor Biotechnologies specializes in innovative products for

environmental studies of asthma and allergic diseases. The company

markets ELISA kits for allergen detection and offers a laboratory

INDOOR Allergen Analysis Service. Our latest product includes a home

base rapid test for dust mite and a range of purified natural and

recombinant allergens.

International Asthma Services

3405 Shore Road

Fort Collins, CO 80524

United States

Tel: +1 970 493 5290

Fax: +1 303 238 0471

Booth #: 702

A registered 501(c) (3) charitable organization dedicated to improving

care of the asthmatics around the globe. Over the past 15 years, we have

evaluated 20,000 patients free of charge in India, Kenya, USA,

Philippines, and Mauritius. Asthma Awareness camps are held on a

regular basis through permanent centers.

Karger Publishers

26 West Avon Road

P.O. Box 529

Farmington, CT 06085

United States

Tel: +1 860 675 7834

Fax: +1 860 675 7302

Booth #: 203

Publisher of medical/scientific books and journals, including the book

series Chemical Immunology and Allergy, Current Directions in

Autoimmunity, Monographs in Allergy, and Progress in Respiratory

Research. Journals include, International Archives of Allergy and

Immunology, Neuroimmunomodulation, Neurosignals, ORL,

Pathobiology, and Respiration.

EXHIBIT DIRECTORY

Medic Savoure Ltd.

Box 70

Dutton, Ontario N0L 1J0

Canada

Tel: +1 519 762 3045

Fax: +1 519 762 2738

Booth #: 704

Medic Savoure offers a full-line of allergenic extracts for the diagnosis

and treatment of allergies. Proud to be the largest distributor of Greer

products in Canada. We also supply home environmental control products

for asthma and allergy sufferers.

MedPointe Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

P.O. Box 68

265 Davidson Avenue, Suite 100

Somerset, NJ 08875

United States

Tel: +1 732 564 2200

Fax: +1 732 564 2313

Booth #: 710

MedPointe Pharmaceuticals will present information on: ASTELIN®

(azelastine hydrochloride) Nasal Spray, 137 mcg, the only secondgeneration

antihistamine that relieves the full spectrum of rhinitis

symptoms, including nasal congestion; and OPTIVAR® (azelastine

hydrochloride ophthalmic solution, 0.05%) indicated for itching of the

eyes associated with allergic conjunctivitis in adults and children 3 years

of age and older.

Merck Sharp & Dohme

Tel: +1 908 423 1000

Fax: +1 908 735 1134

Booth #: 618

Merck Sharp & Dohme is a research-driven global pharmaceutical

company committed to respiratory medicine and improving the lives of

patients. Singulair(montelukast) is the only once-daily leukotriene

receptor antagonist for the treatment of asthma in patients 2 years of age

and older.

Methapharm, Inc.

2825 University Drive, Suite 240

Coral Springs, FL 33065

United States

Tel: +1 800 287 7686

Fax: +1 519 751 9149

Booth #: 711

Methapharm specializes in the manufacture and marketing of brand

name pharmaceuticals and medical devices for the asthma and allergy

professional. Including; Provocholine®, (FDA approved Methacholine

Chloride USP), Self-Study Training Module (Second printing by

demand!) AARC approved for 2 hours continuing education credits;

Provocholine® Nebulizer Kit, Dosimeter, SuperSpiro spirometer and

customized research kits. Come by the booth and see what’s new!


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

EXHIBIT DIRECTORY

Micro Direct, Inc.

803 Webster Street

Lewiston, ME 04240

United States

Tel: +1 207 786 7808

Fax: +1 207 786 7280

Booth #: 219

Micro Direct is pleased to offer Total Spirometry Solutions with nine

models all designed to meet your needs; and each with your choice of

inexpensive cardboard mouthpieces, one-way mouthpieces or full

protection pulmonary filters. Stop by our booth to see which unit best

fits your needs.

Mission: Allergy

28 Hawleyville Rd.

Hawleyville, CT 06440

United States

Tel: +1 203 364 1570

Fax: +1 203 426 5607

Booth #: 300

MISSION: ALLERGY manufactures and distributes high quality

products for allergen avoidance. Our allergy self-help guide provides

patients with scientifically accurate advice on allergy avoidance.

NeilMed Products, Inc.

1221 Farmers Lane

Ste 500

Santa Rosa, CA 95404

United States

Tel: +1 707 525 3784

Fax: +1 707 525 3785

Booth #: 225

NeilMed’s Sinus Rinse Kit for soothing nasal irrigation comes with 50

packets of preservative free, pH balanced, sodium chloride/sodium

bicarbonate mixture, an irrigation bottle, and an educational brochure

on rhinosinusitis and nasal irrigation. Proven to be highly effective for

rhinosinusitis and post FESS patients.

www.neilmed.com

Novartis Pharma AG

Lichstr. 35/WSJ 310.126

Basel CH-4002

Switzerland

Tel: +41 61 324 90 26

Fax: +41 61 324 25 22

Booth #: 610

Novartis AG (NYSE:NVS) is a world leader in pharmaceuticals and

consumer health. Headquartered in Basel, Switzerland, Novartis Group

companies employ 77,200 people and operate in over 140 countries

around the world. For further information please consult http://

www.novartis.com.

107

Pam Lab L.L.C.

4099 Hwy 190

Covington, LA 70433

United States

Tel: +1 985 893 4097

Fax: +1 985 893 6195

Booth #: 202

PALGIC® from Pamlab, L.L.C. indicated for the effective relief of seasonal

allergic rhinitis, perennial allergic rhinitis, vasomotor rhinitis, urticaria,

angioedema, dermatographism and allergic conjunctivitis. PALGIC® is a

single-entity antihistamine with excellent anticholinergic and antihistamine

action. Well tolerated by patients, Carbinoxamine Maleate has been

prescribed for 50+ years. See www.palgic.com for prescribing details.

Pharmacia Diagnostics AB

Rapsgatan 7

82 Uppsala SE-751

Sweden

Tel: +4618165060

Fax: +4618140358

Booth #: 718

Pharmacia Diagnostics develops, manufactures and markets complete

blood test systems for allergy and autoimmunity. More than 3,000

laboratories in 60 countries use the company’s products. Supplying

seven out of ten allergy laboratory tests worldwide, Pharmacia Diagnostics

has remained the world leader in its field for more than 25 years.

Priva, Inc.

9100 Ray Lawson Blvd.

Anjou, Quebec H1J 1K8

Canada

Tel: +1 514 356 8881

Fax: +1 514 356 0055

Booth #: 605

Priva, Inc. manufactures and distributes anti-allergen bedding systems.

Dust mite impermeable encasings for pillows, mattresses, box springs

and duvets. Currently manufacturing four product lines of encasings

and a synthetic-fill pillow.

Quorum Pharmaceuticals

550 Yates Street

Victoria, British Columbia V8W1K8

Canada

Tel: +1 250 383 2330

Fax: +1 250 383 2210

Booth #: 706

Quorum Pharmaceuticals/Western Allergy Services is a truly Canadian

Company, looking to expand and introduce exciting international

products to the Canadian market. Internationally known as a reputable,

reliable company, we strive to provide exceptional customer service in

these changing times to Allergy Professionals and their patients while

providing a gateway for Canada and International markets.

Schering Laboratories

2000 Galloping Hill Road

Kenilworth, NJ 07033

United States

Tel: +1 908 298 4000

Booth #: 218

Schering Laboratories, a leader in allergy and respiratory care, invites

you to visit their booth to inquire about their full-line of products,

including CLARINEX, NASONEX and FORADIL.


108

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

SHS North America

P.O. Box 117

Gaithersburg, MD 20884

United States

Tel: +1 301 795 2300

Fax: +1 301 795 2301

Booth #: 318

SHS North America, International Leader in clinical nutrition, invites

you to visit our booth to learn more about the nutritional management

of severe pediatric food allergy and gastrointestinal disorders. Our

representatives will be happy to provide you with the information about

our specialized products including our trusted range of Neocate products.

Stallergenes

6, rue Alexis de Tocqueville

Antony 92160

France

Tel: +33155592174

Fax: +33155592159

Booth #: 619

Stallergenes is a pharmaceutical company specializing in allergen

immunotherapy: Ranges of diagnostic and therapeutic products

(sublingual and subcutaneous administration).

Trudell Medical International

725 Third Street

London, Ontario N5V 5G4

Canada

Tel: +1 519 455 7060

Fax: +1 519 455 6478

Booth #: 324

Trudell Medical International is a leader in the development and

manufacture of aerosol delivery devices and asthma management

products. We offer a wide selection of aerosol delivery devices, from our

flagship AEROCHAMBER PLUS* valved holding chamber line of

products to custom designed devices.

UCB Pharma

Allée de la Recherche, 60

Brussels B-1070

Belgium

Tel: +3225599999

Fax: +3225599900

Booth #: 502

UCB with headquarters in Brussels (Belgium), is a pharmaceutical and

specialty chemical company which operates on a global scale. It is

committed to pharmaceuticals, as well as to technically innovative

products for surface applications. It employs 12,000 people around the

world. The pharmaceutical research of UCB includes the following

fields: respiratory, including allergy and asthma, and neurology.

EXHIBIT DIRECTORY

US BioTek Laboratories

13500 Linden Ave N

Seattle, WA 98133

United States

Tel: +1 206 365 1256

Fax: +1 206 363 8790

Booth #: 322

US BioTek Laboratories provides accurate and reliable allergy testing

by ELISA (IgG and IgE) for clinicians worldwide. We offer test panels

for food (96), inhalant (47), spice (24) & herbal (24), etc., Other

services include comprehensive metabolic testing, Urinary steroid/

hormone panel. For more information, please visit our website:

www.usbiotek.com, or email us at cservice@usbiotek.com

VIASYS Healthcare

22705 Savi Ranch Pkwy

Yorba Linda, CA 92887

United States

Tel: +1 800 231 2466

Fax: +1 714 283 8439

Booth #: 204

VIASYS Healthcare Inc. is a global, research-based medical technology

company focused in respiratory technology, neuro-care and medical/

surgical products. VIASYS’ products are marketed under well recognized

brand names such as SensorMedics, Bird, Beat Nicolet, and Jaeger.

VIASYS is headquartered in Conshohocken, PA.

World Allergy Congress Munich 2005

C/O Congrex Sweden AB

POB 5619

Stockholm SE 114 86

Sweden

Tel: +4684596618

Fax: +4686619125

Booth #: 907

Promoting the World Allergy Congress-WAC 2005, that will be held

in Munich, 26 June - 1 July 2005.

World Allergy Organization - IAACI

611 East Wells Street

Milwaukee, WI 53202

United States

Tel: +1 414 276 1791

Fax: +1 414 276 3349

Booth #: 905

The World Allergy Organization - IAACI (WAO) is an international

umbrella organization whose members consist of 60 national allergology

and clinical immunology societies, three regional and two affiliate

organizations from around the world. By collaborating with Member

Societies, WAO provides direct educational outreach programs, symposia

and lectureships to approximately 38,000 individual members in 92

countries.


Delayed food reactions mediated by IgG (IgG1 and IgG4) is

well documented in research worldwide

Common chronic symptoms include:

Abdominal Pains

Aches and Pains

Acne

ADHD

Anxiety

Arthritis

Asthma

Autism

Bloating

Hyperactivity

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Itching

Lethargy

Loss of Appetite

Migraine

Nausea

PMS

Psoriasis

Recurrent Ear Infection

Recurrent Sinus Infections

Celiac Disease

Chronic Infections

Constipation

Depression

Dizziness

EczemaEnuresis (Bed Wetting)

Fatigue, Chronic

Fibromyalgia

Fluid Retention

GI Problems

Rhinitis

Sinusitis

Skin Rashes

Stomach Cramps

Tension

Urticaria

Weight Gain

Weight Loss

Wheezing

US BioTek Laboratories, a fully licensed clinical laboratory with advanced ELISA

technologies, now provide accurate, reliable and affordable IgG/IgE food panels* for

clinicians worldwide.

Each report comes complete with easy to understand bar graphs of both IgG/IgE results

against tested foods. A customized rotation diet along with FoodStat food guide is

included to facilitate patient compliance.

*Panels available include:96 General food, 96 Vegetarian, 96 Asian food panel, 24 Herb and 24 Spice Panel, 48 Inhalant,

and coming soon: Chemical panel

Relief of symptoms is as fast as -2 1 weeks from date of avoidance of reactive foods.

Make us part of your team in caring for your patients!

13500 Linden Avenue North

Seattle, WA 98133

Tel: (206) 365-1256

Fax: (206) 363-8790

www.usbiotek.com

www.usbioteklabs.com

Serving worldwide in Allergy Testing!

Shipment of Blood Samples

Minimum specimen requirement

: 2 ml of serum in polyproplylene transport tube.

Freeze serum before shipment.

Shipping instructions: Frozen serum can be batched shipped once per week in a

styprofoam container. No dry ice or any refrigeration is required in the container.

Serum tubes must be labeled legibly and caps are screwed tightly to prevent

leakage. Pack specimens with proper packing materials, making sure the container is

not over packed. Seal box tightly.

Shipping: Specimens can be shipped via any overnight courier: DHL, FedEx, UPS,

Airline courier, etc. In order to ensure proper processing of the specimens, a test

order form must be included with each shipment.

Remember to mark on the outside of the container the following sentences: “Blood

for diagnostic testing only. Content is non-infectious and non-contagious”.

Turnaround time: 3-5 working days. Results will be emailed in pdf format.

109


110

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

FLOOR PLAN Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre (VCEC)

Level 2

Level 1


WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

201 ACII - Journal of the World Allergy Organization

202 Pam Lab L.L.C

203 Karger Publishers

204 VIASYS Healthcare

205 American Latex Allergy Association

207 Hycor Biomedical, Inc.

212 Canadian Food Inspection Agency

214 ALPCO Diagnostics

218 Schering Laboratories

219 Micro Direct, Inc.

221 American Academy of Allergy,

Asthma & Immunology

223 Canadian Society of Allergy

and Clinical Immunology

225 NeilMed Products, Inc.

300 Mission: Allergy

304 Hitachi Chemical Diagnostics

310 Alcon Laboratories, Inc.

318 SHS North America

320 Blackwell Publishing

322 US BioTek Laboratories

324 Trudell Medical International

502 UCB Pharma

510 GlaxoSmithKline

518 AstraZeneca Canada, Inc.

601 Ferraris/PDSI, Inc.

602 Aventis Pharmaceuticals

605 Priva, Inc.

610 Novartis Pharma AG

618 Merck Sharp & Dohme

619 Stallergenes

621 3M

623 EUROIMMUN North America

625 European Academy of Allergology

and Clinical Immunology

700 Allergy & Asthma Information Association

702 International Asthma Services

704 Medic Savoure Ltd.

706 Quorum Pharmaceuticals

710 MedPointe Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

711 Methapharm, Inc.

713 Dey, L.P.

715 Indoor Biotechnologies, Inc.

718 Pharmacia Diagnostics AB

720 Canadian Immunodeficiencies Patient Organization

722 Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Society

724 Current Views in Allergy and Immunology

907 World Allergy Congress Munich 2005

905 World Allergy Organization - IAACI (WAO)

FLOOR PLAN VCEC Exhibition Hall

ENTRANCE

200

201 300

601 700

202

203

502

602

702

Poster

Sessions

204

205 304

605 704

207

706

STORAGE

210 310 510

610

710 711

212 713

214 715

219 318

518

618

619 718

221 320

621 720

INTERNET

CAFE

223 322

623 722

FOOD &

BEVERAGE

225 324

218

625 724

227 326

WAO 907 908

627 726

111


112

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

FLOOR PLAN Fairmont Waterfront Hotel – Headquarters Hotel


Level 1

Level 2

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

FLOOR PLAN Pan Pacific Hotel – Headquarters Hotel

113


114

Crowne Plaza Hotel Georgia

801 West Georgia Street

Vancouver, BC V6C 1P7

Tel: +1 604 682 5566

Fax: +1 604 642 5579

2 Days Inn Downtown

Days Inn Downtown

921 West Pender Street

Vancouver, BC V6C 1M2

Tel: +1 604 681 4335

Fax: +1 604 681 7808

3 Fairmont Hotel Vancouver

Fairmont Hotel Vancouver

900 West Georgia Street

Vancouver, BC V6C 2W6

Tel: +1 604 684 3131

Fax: +1 604 662 1924

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

HOTEL MAP AND CONTACT INFORMATION

12

10

11

6

3

9

1 Crowne Plaza - Hotel Georgia 4 Fairmont Waterfront Hotel – Headquarters Hotel

2

7

1

5

4

13

8

Fairmont Waterfront - Headquarters Hotel

900 Canada Place

Vancouver, BC V6C 3L5

Tel: +1 604 691 1991

Fax: +1 604 691 1999

5 Four Seasons Hotel Vancouver

Four Seasons Hotel Vancouver

791 West Georgia Street

Vancouver, BC V6C 2T4

Tel: +1 604 689 9333

Fax: +1 604 689 3466

6 Hyatt Regency Vancouver

Hyatt Regency Vancouver

655 Burrard Street

Vancouver, BC V6C 2R7

Tel: +1 604 683 1234

Fax: +1 604 689 3707


7 Metropolitan Hotel

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

Metropolitan Hotel

645 Howe Street

Vancouver, BC V6C 2Y9

Tel: +1 604 687 1122

Fax: +1 604 689 7044

HOTEL MAP AND CONTACT INFORMATION

8 Pan Pacific Hotel – Headquarters Hotel

Pan Pacific Hotel - Headquarters Hotel

300 – 999 Canada Place Way

Vancouver, BC V6C 3B5

Tel: +1 604 662 8111

Fax: +1 604 685 8690

9 Renaissance Vancouver Hotel

Renaissance Vancouver Hotel

1133 West Hastings Street

Vancouver, BC V6E 3T3

Tel: +1 604 689 9211

Fax: +1 604 689 4358

10 Sheraton Vancouver Wall Centre

Sheraton Vancouver Wall Centre

1088 Burrard Street

Vancouver, BC V6Z 2R9

Tel: +1 604 331 1000

Fax: +1 604 331 1001

11 Sutton Place Hotel

Sutton Place Hotel

845 Burrard Street

Vancouver, BC V6Z 2K6

Tel: +1 604 682 5511

Fax: +1 604 682 5513

12 Westin Bayshore Resort & Marina

Westin Bayshore Resort & Marina

1601 Bayshore Drive

Vancouver, BC V6G 2V4

Tel: +1 604 682 3377

Fax: +1 604 687 3102

13 YWCA

YWCA

733 Beatty Street

Vancouver, BC V6B 2M4

Tel: +1 604 895 5830

Fax: +1 604 681 2550

115


116

WAO Congress–XVIII ICACI Final Program

VANCOUVER MAP


117


118

(salmeterol xinafoate/fluticasone propionate, dry powder for inhalation)

(salmeterol xinafoate/fluticasone propionate inhalation aerosol)

Bronchodilator and corticosteroid for oral inhalation

ACTION AND CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

ADVAIR ®

(salmeterol xinafoate/fluticasone propionate) contains salmeterol

xinafoate and fluticasone propionate which have differing modes of action for

the treatment of COPD and reversible obstructive airways disease, including

asthma. Salmeterol is a long-acting bronchodilator that prevents breakthrough

symptoms of wheezing and chest tightness; fluticasone propionate is an

inhaled anti-inflammatory agent that reduces airways irritability. ADVAIR ®

can

offer a more convenient regime for patients requiring concurrent long-acting

ß2-agonist and inhaled corticosteroid therapy. The respective mechanisms of

action of both drugs are discussed below:

Salmeterol is a selective, long-acting (12 hours), slow onset (10-20 minutes)

ß2-adrenoceptor agonist with a long side-chain which binds to the exo-site of

the receptor.

Salmeterol offers more effective protection against histamine-induced

bronchoconstriction and produces a longer duration of bronchodilation, lasting for

at least 12 hours, than recommended doses of conventional short-acting ß2-agonists. In vitro tests on human lung, have shown salmeterol is a potent and longlasting

inhibitor of the release of mast cell mediators, such as histamine,

leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2. In man, salmeterol inhibits the early and late phase response to inhaled

allergen. The late phase response is inhibited for over 30 hours after a single

dose, when the bronchodilator effect is no longer evident. The full clinical

significance of these findings is not yet clear. The mechanism is different from

the anti-inflammatory effect of corticosteroids.

Fluticasone propionate is a highly potent glucocorticoid anti-inflammatory

steroid. When administered by inhalation at therapeutic dosages, it has a direct

potent anti-inflammatory action within the lungs, resulting in reduced

symptoms and exacerbations of asthma, and less adverse effects than

systemically administered corticosteroids.

In comparisons with beclomethasone dipropionate, fluticasone propionate has

demonstrated greater topical potency.

Pharmacokinetics: There is no evidence in animal or human subjects that the

administration of salmeterol xinafoate and fluticasone propionate together by the

inhaled route affects the pharmacokinetics of either component. For

pharmacokinetic purposes therefore each component can be considered separately.

Salmeterol acts locally in the lung therefore plasma levels are not an indication

of therapeutic effect. Because of the low therapeutic dose, systemic levels of

salmeterol are low or undetectable after inhalation of recommended doses

(50 mcg twice daily).

Salmeterol is predominantly cleared by hepatic metabolism; liver function

impairment may lead to accumulation of salmeterol in plasma. Therefore,

patients with hepatic disease should be closely monitored.

Following intravenous administration, the pharmacokinetics of fluticasone

propionate are proportional to the dose. Fluticasone propionate is extensively

distributed within the body. The volume of distribution at steady state is

approximately 300 litres and has a very high clearance which is estimated to

be 1.1 litre/minute indicating extensive hepatic extraction. Peak plasma

fluticasone propionate concentrations are reduced by approximately 98%

within 3-4 hours and only low plasma concentrations are associated with the

terminal half-life, which is approximately 8 hours.

Following oral administration of fluticasone propionate, 87-100% of the dose

is excreted in the faeces. Following doses of either 1 or 16 mg, up to 20% and

75% respectively, is excreted in the faeces as the parent compound. Absolute

oral bioavailability is negligible (


Eosinophilic Conditions: In rare cases, patients on inhaled fluticasone

propionate may present with systemic eosinophilic conditions, with some

patients presenting with clinical features of vasculitis consistent with Churg-

Strauss syndrome, a condition that is often treated with systemic corticosteroid

therapy. These events usually, but not always, have been associated with the

reduction and/or withdrawal of oral corticosteroid therapy following the

introduction of fluticasone propionate. Cases of serious eosinophilic conditions

have also been reported with other inhaled corticosteroids in this clinical setting.

Physicians should be alert to eosinophilia, vasculitic rash, worsening pulmonary

symptoms, cardiac complications, and/or neuropathy presenting in their

patients. A causal relationship between fluticasone propionate and these

underlying conditions has not been established.

Effect on Infection: Corticosteroids may mask some signs of infection and new

infections may appear. A decreased resistance to localised infection has been

observed during corticosteroid therapy. This may require treatment with

appropriate therapy or stopping the administration of fluticasone propionate

until the infection is eradicated (see WARNINGS, Effect on Infection).

Hypothyroidism and Cirrhosis: There is an enhanced effect of corticosteroids

on patients with hypothyroidism and in those with cirrhosis.

Proper Use of the DISKUS ®

and Inhalation Aerosol: To ensure the proper

dosage and administration of the drug, the patient must be instructed by a

physician or other health professional in the use of the device (DISKUS ®

or

inhalation aerosol) (see INFORMATION FOR THE PATIENT).

DRUG INTERACTIONS

Short-Actingß-Agonists: Aerosol bronchodilators of the short-acting

adrenergic stimulant type may be used for relief of breakthrough symptoms

while using salmeterol for asthma. Increasing use of such preparations to

control symptoms indicates deterioration of disease control and the patient’s

therapy plan should be reassessed.

The regular, concomitant use of salmeterol and other sympathomimetic agents

is not recommended, since such combined use may lead to deleterious

cardiovascular effects.

Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors and Tricyclic Antidepressants: Salmeterol

should be administered with extreme caution to patients being treated with

monoamine oxidase inhibitors or tricyclic antidepressants, or within 2 weeks

of discontinuation of such agents, because the action of salmeterol on the

vascular system may be potentiated by these agents.

Methylxanthines: The concurrent use of intravenously or orally administered

methylxanthines (e.g., aminophylline, theophylline) by patients receiving

salmeterol has not been completely evaluated.

ß-Blocking Drugs: Non-selective ß-blocking drugs, should never be prescribed

in asthma or COPD since they may antagonise the bronchodilating action of

salmeterol. Cardioselective ß-blocking drugs should be used with caution in

patients with asthma or COPD.

Acetylsalicylic Acid: Use with caution in conjunction with corticosteroids in

hypoprothrombinemia.

Other Drugs: Use ADVAIR ®

with caution in patients receiving other medications

causing hypokalemia and/or increased QTc interval (diuretics, high dose

steroids, anti-arrhythmics, astemizole, terfenadine) since cardiac and vascular

effects may be potentiated.

Clinically significant drug interactions with fluticasone propionate are unlikely

due to the very low plasma concentration achieved after inhaled dosing.

However, care should be taken when co-administering strong hepatic inhibitors

of the CYP3A4 enzyme system (e.g., ketoconazole and ritonavir) since there is

potential for increased systemic exposure to fl