SENIOR HANDBOOK for 2012

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PRINCIPAL'S MESSAGE - St Margaret Mary's College

SENIOR HANDBOOK

for

2012

Saint Margaret Mary’s College

1-9 Crowle Street

HYDE PARK QLD 4812

PO BOX 1806

AITKENVALE QLD 4814

PHONE: (07) 4726 4900

FAX: (07) 4726 4989

www.smmc.catholic.edu.au

email: smmc@smmc.catholic.edu.au

ABN: 18 717 189 058


CONTENTS

Principal’s Message .......................................................................................................................................................... 1

Obtaining Assistance …………… .......................................................................................................................................... 2

Statement of Policy........................................................................................................................................................... 2

Mission Statement ............................................................................................................................................................ 3

Enrolment Policy ............................................................................................................................................................... 3

Contract of Enrolment ...................................................................................................................................................... 4

Student Welfare ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. ................................................... 5

College Procedures ………………………………………………………………………………………………... .................................................. 6-8

Network, Internet and Email Contract........................................................................................................................ 9 -10

Writing a Bibliography ………………………………………………………………………………………….. ............................................... 11-13

Assessment Procedure ………………………………………………………………………………………………. ............................................... 14

Australian Qualifications Framework ............................................................................................................................. 15

Learning Pathways .......................................................................................................................................................... 16

Queensland Certificate of Education ......................................................................................................................... 17-19

Senior Education and Training Plan ........................................................................................................................... 20-21

Terms and Conditions for SET Plan ................................................................................................................................. 22

Senior School Curriculum ............................................................................................................................................... 23

Requirements of Tertiary Institutions............................................................................................................................. 24

TAFE Advanced Standing Information…………………… ........................... ……………………………………………………………………….24

Vocational Education and Training …………………… .......................................... …………………………………………………………….25

Vocational Education and Training Student Induction …… ................................. ………………………………………………………...26

Choosing Senior Subjects ................................................................................................................................................ 27

Steps to Guide You in Subject Selection ......................................................................................................................... 28

Year 10 Career Program…………………………………………………… ............................................... ……………………………………….. 29

Subject Selection Process .......................................................................................................................................... 29-30

Subject Descriptions

i) Authority Subjects .................................................................................................................................. 31

Accounting ......................................................................................................................................... 32-33

Ancient History ................................................................................................................................... 34-35

Biological Science ………………………………………… .................................. ………………………………………………… 36

Business Communication & Technologies .............................................................................................. 37

Chemistry ................................................................................................................................................ 38

Dance ...................................................................................................................................................... 39

Drama ................................................................................................................................................. 40-41

English ..................................................................................................................................................... 42

English Extension ............................................................................................................................... 43-44

Geography .......................................................................................................................................... 45-46

Graphics .................................................................................................................................................. 47

Home Economics ................................................................................................................................ 48-49

Hospitality Studies ……………………………………… ................................ ………………………………………………...50-51

Information Processing & Technology ............................................................................................... 52-53

Italian ...................................................................................................................................................... 54

Japanese .................................................................................................................................................. 55

Legal Studies ...................................................................................................................................... 56-57

Mathematics A, Mathematics B and Mathematics C ......................................................................... 58-59

Modern History .................................................................................................................................. 60-61

Music .................................................................................................................................................. 62-63

Music Extension ...................................................................................................................................... 64

Physical Education.............................................................................................................................. 65-66

Physics ..................................................................................................................................................... 67

Study of Religion …………………………………………………… .................................. ……………………………………….. 68

Visual Art……………………………………………………………… ..................................... ……………………………………... 69

ii) Authority-Registered Subjects ............................................................................................................... 70

Business (Certificate II in Business) ………………………… ......................... ……………………………………………71-72

Early Childhood .................................................................................................................................. 73-74

English Communication........................................................................................................................... 75

Hospitality ............................................................................................................................................... 76

Information & Communications Technology ..................................................................................... 77-78

Pre-Vocational Mathematics................................................................................................................... 79

Recreation Studies ……………………………………………… ................................. ………………………………………….. 80

Religion & Ethics ..................................................................................................................................... 81

Science in Practice…………………………………………………… ................................. ………………………………………. 82

Visual Art Studies…………………………………………………… .................................. ……………………………………….. 83

Explanation of Terms……………………………………………… ....................................................... …………………………………………. 84


Dear Students,

PRINCIPAL’S MESSAGE

Welcome to this next phase of your learning. This is an exciting time for you and one which we hope will

contribute to setting you on a positive course for not only the next couple of years, but also in your life beyond

your secondary schooling.

As a Senior student, you will need to assess your strengths, work on your weaknesses and continue to respect

and value the fellow members of our College community. We expect a lot of our Seniors and we look forward to

working with you. You are the College role models and it is your leadership, good example and connection with

the College that those behind you will follow.

The choice for Years 11 and 12 is not an inflexible one. While we want you to choose wisely, you cannot always

know what you will enjoy and be motivated by. While there are some Queensland Studies Authority

requirements for OP (Overall Position) eligibility, your Senior education should also be a time where you respond

to your own learning needs and circumstances and these may change during the course of the two years.

Remember that your abilities and interests are a good guide to your choices.

This booklet contains information which we feel will help you in the decision-making process. This is but one of a

number of useful resources available to you.

You are asked to make a choice of up to seven subjects. There are a variety of options:

students who wish to be eligible for tertiary entrance and do six Authority subjects plus Religion & Ethics

(Authority–Registered)

students who wish to be eligible for tertiary entrance and do six Authority subjects including Study of

Religion plus one Authority–Registered subject

students who wish to be eligible for tertiary entrance and do five Authority subjects and do Religion & Ethics

plus another Authority–Registered subject

students who do not require tertiary entrance and who wish to do a combination of multiple Authority and

Authority-Registered subjects including Religion & Ethics

An exception is made for students undertaking TAFE or School-based Apprenticeships/Traineeships. Further

information regarding these options can be found in this booklet. Students may do a TAFE subject and remain

OP eligible.

As Year 10 students, you have already begun to explore career options. In Term 3, this will culminate in the

selection of senior subjects. All students and their parents will have the opportunity to meet with an advisor to

examine possibilities.

A Parent Information Evening will be held on Tuesday, 26 th July. It is very important that all parents attend. An

important reason for this is that it keeps parents informed and aware of the process that their daughter is going

through. It also allows us as a College to work in partnership with parents during the subject selection process.

Please stay in contact with us, and discuss your options with your parents and teachers and ask for any help you

feel we can offer you with your subject choices.

Yours sincerely,

Kathy Park

PRINCIPAL

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 1


OBTAINING ASSISTANCE

If there are any queries regarding matters raised in this booklet, please feel free to contact the College.

You may need more information about the subjects themselves, the difference between Authority and

Authority-registered subjects or prerequisites. Such help can be provided by Mr John Rea (Deputy Principal,

Administration), Mrs Mardi Christ (Deputy Principal, Pastoral Care), Mrs Norena Mendiolea (Assistant to the

Principal, Administration), Academic Co-ordinators, subject teachers, Mrs Debbie Glenwright (Careers Coordinator)

and Mrs Merilyn Stanley (VET Co-ordinator).

We look forward to being of assistance as you make these important decisions.

STATEMENT OF POLICY

Parents are the first and most important educators in faith for their children and the role of teachers in a

Catholic College is complementary to that of the parent. Saint Margaret Mary's College is seen as a community

of students, parents and teachers, whose members are closely interdependent and whose major aims must

coincide. It is believed that parents who enrol their children at a Catholic College wish them to continue their

education in faith and that they, thus, implicitly accept the values of the College.

It is affirmed:

that Catholic schools (and therefore this Catholic school) must be seen

as meeting places for those who wish to express Christian values in

education;

that the Catholic school, far more than any other, must be a

community whose aim is the transmission of values for living;

that faith is principally assimilated through contact with people whose

daily life bears witness to it and, in fact, that Christian faith is born and

grows inside a community (see ‘The Catholic School – Rome 1977).

Insofar as Saint Margaret Mary's pursues this aim of educating its students in faith, it is different from other

schools which are not specifically Christian and, while secular aspects of learning are held to be very important,

they must be permeated by truly Christian values.

The task of parents and teachers is a profound one: “to promote a faith relationship with Christ”. It is a serious

challenge to their commitment and dedication and requires, above all, a common commitment to the ideal of a

Catholic College as a means of helping students to this faith relationship with Christ and a desire to provide

them, to the fullest extent possible, an education in faith. This will be possible only if parents and teachers

mutually support and assist each other. On the part of teachers, this means that they will be open to the desires

of parents with regard to their daughters. On the part of parents, it is hoped that they will positively encourage

their daughters to take the fullest possible part in all College activities, especially those related and conducive to

their education in faith.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 2


MISSION STATEMENT

Saint Margaret Mary's College is a community of faith striving to live the message of Christ.

Faith Education will be seen as our primary goal. This will be nurtured not only in the curriculum but also in the

caring atmosphere of staff, parents and fellow students.

The College will aim to meet the needs of the whole person. It will provide a high standard of education that will

challenge students to achieve their inborn potential:

spiritually;

academically;

physically;

socially.

It is recognised that each student’s contribution will be unique.

To achieve these goals there will need to be a close working harmony between Church, home, the community

and the College.

ENROLMENT POLICY

Saint Margaret Mary's College, as part of the Ministry of the Catholic Church, has a specific and distinctive

purpose to create a community of faith and learning. As a Catholic College, the Christian spirit and values will

permeate all areas of learning and College life, determining the whole atmosphere of the College.

Saint Margaret Mary's, by reflecting its Catholic identity, assists in the full personal and academic development

of those in its care. This College, as a community of faith, supports the family by nurturing children in the

Catholic faith.

Enrolment priority will be given to children of parents who are actively involved in the life of the Christian

Church.

Saint Margaret Mary's is a faith community. It is expected that children who are enrolled should have a

background of religious beliefs and practices which, with their family, will enable them to contribute actively,

participate in and benefit from involvement in the College.

Cases of special need (spiritual, material, emotional, physical, pastoral) may arise which may necessitate

individual attention.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 3


SAINT MARGARET MARY’S COLLEGE

Contract of Enrolment

Years 11 & 12

2012 - 2013

On enrolling at Saint Margaret Mary’s College,

I, (student’s name) ____________________________________________________, undertake:

Values Related Expectations

TO:






Participate in the school’s Religious Education programmes

Contribute my personal gifts and talents to the school community in curricular and extra-curricular

activities.

Accept the school’s guidelines and discipline as being necessary to its good function and

organisation, and to my own growth in self-discipline.

Respect myself and others and to demonstrate due care with my own property, the property of

others and that of the school, including textbook and computer resources.

Act politely and in a co-operative way while at school and while travelling to and from school,

knowing that proper relationships with other people constitute a most important part of my growth

and development.

College Policy Expectations

TO:

Be neatly dressed on school days in the complete school uniform and on sports days, in the complete

sports uniform. Full school uniform must be worn to and from the College.

Abide by the College sun safety policy requiring a hat to be worn. I will have both an Academic and

Sports hat available to wear.

Assume responsibility, with the help of my teachers, for my own work and study and for the

submission of class work and assignment items by due dates.

Abide by the College regulations in respect to hair, make-up, jewellery and personal grooming.

Take part in all excursions, retreat days, camps and other outings, as determined by the College

curriculum.

Attend school, and all classes, regularly and punctually.

Abide by the College Electronic Communication Devices Policy and Internet Usage Policy regarding all

electronic technology, including the use of mobile phones, iPods, cameras and computers.

Abide by the College policy relating to use and possession of drugs, alcohol or other prohibited

substances at school or school-related activities.

It is St Margaret Mary’s College policy that all students should attend school for at least 80% of the school year.

If a student does not attend school for that stated period of time, consideration may be given to the following

options:

a) Contact with the Queensland Studies Authority will be made to check if a Queensland Certificate of

Education should be given; and / or

b) Entitlement to participate in or attend certain end of year ceremonies could be withdrawn; and / or

c) Enrolment at St Margaret Mary’s College may be terminated.

Student Name: _______________________________

Student’s Signature: ___________________________

Parent’s Name: ________________________________

Parent’s Signature: _____________________________

Date: _____/_____/_____

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 4


STUDENT WELFARE

Student welfare embraces all areas of College life. It refers to the pastoral care of our students, the importance

of self-discipline, and the adherence to expectations that allow our students the opportunity to reach their

potential.

The College has a number of policies and procedures that help guide the implementation of our pastoral care

philosophy.

Pastoral Care

The motto of Saint Margaret Mary's College is Christus Veritas, Christ is Truth. In looking towards Christ for truth,

we see what it means to be a Christian: to be honest, to act with integrity and to act justly. It is in Christ and

through our actions that our College community offers support to our students. Students are encouraged to

respect and accept the gifts we all bring to the community. Through our pastoral care for one another, the

College hopes to lead each member to a better understanding of maturity, responsibility and accountability.

Support Structures

Relationships are a key source for our students to develop and grow. Within the College, there are various

people available to assist the students on a day to day basis.





The Homeroom Teacher meets with the students twice a day and this student-teacher relationship is viewed as a

central point of contact.

A Pastoral Co-ordinator is assigned to each year level. This person is there to support the students with a range

of organizational and personal issues.

Administration members, Academic Co-ordinators and all teaching staff. (It is certainly preferable that discipline

issues are dealt with as informally as possible as early as possible.)

College Counsellors are available to students throughout the school day.

Self-discipline and responsibility

The College places a big emphasis on student responsibility and accountability for their actions. Actions have

consequences and an acceptance of these consequences is a sign of the individual’s increasing maturity.

Discipline is an essential part of growing into mature Christian adulthood.

Saint Margaret Mary’s College recognises that sound discipline is based on positive guidelines and reflects

compassion and respect for the dignity of each student. This allows us, the College community, to nurture each

individual so that we encourage an atmosphere of close working harmony between the family and the College.

Our aim is to enable the student to achieve self-discipline centred on Gospel values.

College-Family Relationships

‘This is what Yahweh asks of you; only this; to act justly,

to love tenderly and to walk humbly with your God.’

(Micah 6:8)

Saint Margaret Mary's College views contact with parents as an essential part of our pastoral care. Keeping

parents informed of all matters concerned with their daughter (including the difficult issues as well as the good

things) keeps lines of communication open. We appreciate the support we receive from parents who, in turn,

keep us informed of necessary information that impacts on the way we can best cater for their daughter.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 5


COLLEGE PROCEDURES

Daily Routine

The College commences at 8:40 a.m. with a fifteen minute class period. The day concludes at 3:05 p.m.

On special occasions, the College day finishes at an earlier time and parents are given ample warning of this

early finishing time through the College Newsletter.

The newsletter is available electronically every Tuesday and contains important details related to College events,

as well as items of general interest to the College community.

College Rules

Although Saint Margaret Mary's College endeavours to promote the development of self-discipline and

individual responsibility in students, there are still College rules set down for regulating student conduct on a

day-to-day basis.

PERSONAL INFORMATION CHANGES

The College should be notified immediately of changes to personal details such as:

Home Address

Work phone number of either father or mother

Remarriage / alteration to Marital Status Home phone number

Change of family name

PAYMENTS

Payment of money to the College, whether it be by cheque or cash, and when sent via the student, must be

contained in a sealed envelope. The following details must be written on the envelope:

student’s name and class

the amount of money enclosed

the purpose for which it is intended

The relevant excursion form or permission slip should be enclosed.

For example: Jane Smith Year 8.2

Geography Excursion

(Bus Fare) $3.00 enclosed

TUCKSHOP

Tuckshop orders must be placed at the Tuckshop by 8:40 a.m. daily.

LARGER AMOUNTS OF MONEY

Large amounts of money should not be held personally by the student during the day but should be handed in to

the Office to be held in safe keeping until the student is due to depart that day.

FULL COLLEGE UNIFORM

Full College uniform (which includes black lace up, polished shoes and hat) must be worn. This also includes full

Sports uniform on the day during which the students have a Physical Education lesson. Students are to wear the

College hat at all times when in uniform. Lunch time uniform detentions are held each week for students who do

not abide by the College Uniform Policy.

JEWELLERY

Jewellery is not permitted except for: a watch, a signet ring ONLY, a plain chain with or without a cross or

religious medal, two pairs of small sleepers / stud earrings of plain gold or silver, worn on the ear lobe. Please

note that studs / earrings are to be worn in ears only, i.e. not eyebrows, tongues etc. or any other visible part of

the anatomy.

HAIR

Hair is to be tied back with a white or royal blue ribbon. Hair colour is expected to be in natural tones only.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 6


Colourful clips, ribbons or flowers in the hair are not permitted. Headbands must be thin and either the colour of

the hair or College colours (blue or white).

MAKE-UP

Students are not permitted to wear eye make-up or lipstick.

COLOURLESS NAIL POLISH

Only colourless nail polish may be worn, if desired.

CHEWING GUM

This is TOTALLY PROHIBITED on College property and at school related activities. No student should chew gum

while in College uniform.

MOBILE PHONES, IPODS, MP3 PLAYERS

These items are not to be used in class. Items used inappropriately will be confiscated.

AFTER HOURS

Students are discouraged from attending shops in uniform. If this is unavoidable, then full College uniform must

be worn, including a hat. On any day when students have an early finish, students are not permitted to visit

shops in uniform unless accompanied by a parent. No student should be at shops in uniform during normal

school hours (i.e. 8:30 a.m. – 3:05 p.m.), unless accompanied by a parent.

COLLEGE DIARY

The College diary is to be kept intact and free of graffiti, photographs, stickers and pictures. Students are not to

use textas or liquid paper or paint or draw on the cover of the diary. Students who lose their diaries and those

whose diaries contain inappropriate material will be required to purchase a new one at their own expense.

INAPPROPRIATE BEHAVIOUR

It is College policy that all students conduct themselves with dignity and regard for the safety and well-being of

themselves and others. Expectations can be determined from the Contract of Enrolment.

Where an infringement of discipline policy occurs, the following procedures may be followed.









In the first instance, the matter will normally be dealt with by the teacher concerned. This applies to minor

infringements such as:

failure to submit homework

incorrect or incomplete uniform

failure to complete work set in class

offensive language (written or oral)

disorder or inattention in class

lack of punctuality

failure to complete yard / class duties

disobedience

If the problem persists, or a teacher is still not satisfied, the matter will be reported to the Pastoral Co-ordinator

who will then liaise with Administration and / or parents where appropriate.

In the case of serious infringement of College rules, the matter may be referred directly to a member of

Administration.






Some examples may be:

leaving school grounds without permission

smoking / consuming alcohol or other drugs

direct insolence or refusal to obey a request

fighting (including water fights)

vandalism of any kind (including chairs, desks or other students’ property)

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 7


any kind of bullying or harassment (verbal or physical)

serious discourtesy

missing classes

Any behaviour by one student which impedes the learning of other students WILL be dealt with promptly.

The College cannot tolerate disruption of learning. Students who offend in this manner by e.g. continually calling

out in class, distracting other students from their education, will be sent directly to the Office. Where a member

of Administration is unavailable, students will be kept isolated until the matter is dealt with. Should the need

arise to remove a student from class, parents will be notified.

DETENTION SYSTEM

A student who is considered to be behaving inappropriately may be placed on an afternoon detention, of which

parents are notified. This decision will be made by Administration.




Some examples:

rudeness to teachers

failure to attend uniform or lunchtime detention

skipping classes

SUSPENSION / EXPULSION

Suspension of a student may occur in the case of serious misdemeanours, e.g. smoking, fighting, serious

discourtesy to staff or other students, bullying / harassment. The decision to suspend a student will be made by

Administration. Expulsion will occur only in extreme cases where it is felt all other avenues have been exhausted

and the College can do no more to keep a student, or the student is considered a danger to others.

The College does not take such decisions lightly and regret is always felt at the failure to overcome problems for

students who are struggling to meet the demands of our behavioural guidelines.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 8


ST. MARGARET MARY’S COLLEGE

January 2011

Dear Parent / Guardian,

Saint Margaret Mary’s College has advanced information technology facilities. Students have access to more than 200

computers, a variety of CD ROMS, the Internet (World Wide Web) and email.

These wonderful resources give students access to a great amount and variety of information. The purpose for

enabling this access is to effectively teach students information skills through the use of the most modern tools

available.

Information skills include the ability to locate and select relevant information, to translate gathered information into a

meaningful form, and to communicate information effectively.

The Internet not only provides us with a tool for research; it provides students with avenues of communication and

purpose for their work via the use of email and authoring of web pages.

Please read the School Network and Internet Contract (on the reverse of this letter) very carefully with your

daughters. It explains the responsibilities they have when using the College’s Information Technology resources, both

at school and from home, and asks for a commitment to use these resources responsibly and ethically. All students

are issued with login names and passwords that provide access to the school network, the SMMC Extranet and a

school-based webmail account. It is essential that students understand and agree to abide by the guidelines for use of

these resources as stated in the contract.

We are happy to discuss any questions or concerns you may have.

Regards,

Mrs Norena Mendiolea

Assistant to the Principal (Administration)

Mr Peter Griffin

Principal

NETWORK, INTERNET & EMAIL CONTRACT ACCEPTANCE

I have read and I understand the rules and regulations regarding the use of the College network and its

Internet and email facilities and I agree to abide by these rules.

_____________________________________

Student Signature

Date: ___ / ___ / ____

I hereby give my permission for my daughter ____________________________ to use the College

network, Internet and email facilities in accordance with College guidelines.

______________________________________

Parent / Guardian Signature

Date: ___ / ___ / ____

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 9


CONTRACT FOR STUDENT USE OF THE SMMC COMPUTER NETWORK,

THE INTERNET AND EMAIL

I undertake to take good care of the school computers and the programs that are loaded on them because I am

aware that:

Computers are an important tool that will help me to be successful with the education tasks I need to carry

out.

The settings on the computer are there to make the computer easy for everybody to use.

It is very expensive to repair damage to computers and the software programs on them.

Any damage caused to computers and software affects all students including myself.

I understand that:

Saint Margaret Mary's College reserves the right to have use of its Internet connection monitored by the

College’s staff or agents.

The Internet sites visited and the language used by me in email messages are open to scrutiny by the College

for the purpose of the protection of students, the public and the College’s reputation.

My use of the College’s network and Internet and email facilities is a privilege.

I understand and agree that:

I will behave responsibly and ethically and, at all times, respect the rights of others.

I must use my own login name, password and data directory and logout properly after each session.

I must not disclose my password to any other student or to others outside the school.

I must store only data files in my user directory. (i.e. No .com, .exe, or .bat files are to be stored.)

I must not breach copyright regulations by downloading to and/or storing, in my user drive or on my USB

memory stick, files such as illegal copies of songs, videos, photographs etc.

I must only use the Internet to search for information related to my school work when I am using the College

computers or Remote Desktop from home.

I will follow the instructions of College staff with regard to my use of the Internet at school.

I will not attempt to retrieve, view or disseminate any obscene, offensive or illegal material.

If, by accident, I find information that is offensive or inappropriate, I will exit the site immediately and

inform the teacher of the event.

I will not write/send electronic communications (via email, blogs or social networking sites) that use

offensive language or are abusive, threatening or that constitute harassment.

I will not use email to forward chain letters and I will not send multiple copies of a particular email to any

person.

The College does not permit me to access internet chat or blogs unless under direct teacher supervision or

on College-designed sites.

I will not use College equipment such as digital cameras to take photographs or videos of other students or

College staff without their permission.

My privileges to use the College’s information technology facilities may be withdrawn if I offend or engage in

inappropriate conduct.

My enrolment at the College may come under consideration if I am involved in serious misuse of

information technology resources.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 10


WRITING A BIBLIOGRAPHY

The following format has been adopted as standard for all students in all subjects. Teachers are asked to ensure

that students are familiar with this format and that it is used in all assignment work where a bibliography is

required.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: HOW TO SET IT OUT

References – Harvard System

A bibliography is an alphabetical list at the end of your essay. It is necessary to acknowledge other people’s work

quoted or paraphrased in your essay and to show the extent you researched the essay topic. The information

provided in the list assists the reader in locating these sources if they so wish.

One of the most common systems used to compile a bibliography is the author-date or Harvard system. The

author’s name, date, and page number is placed in the text directly following the reference with a detailed

description of the author’s work contained in a List at the end of the essay.

You will need to write down the details of each information source (e.g. book, journal, newspaper article,

encyclopaedia, CD Rom, Internet source, TV broadcast, video) as you access them, so your bibliography will be

complete. It is important to include all information sources even if you do not directly cite them in your text, but

have used them for background research.

Examples of citing references within the text:

one author .......................................................................................... (Dunn, 1996, p. 46)

two or more authors ............................................................ (Williams et al., 1963. p. 21)

article in book, magazine, newspaper ...............................................(Oakes, 1992, p. 26)

no author, use title ............................................................. (School in Society, 1986, p.4)

secondary sources ...................................... Buhler’s (1933) study (cited in Piaget, 1951)

The structure used for the main categories in the List of References / Bibliography is as follows:

1. BOOKS

Structure

- Author’s surname and initials or given name

- year of publication

- title of publication

- title of series (if applicable)

- volume number (if applicable)

- edition (if applicable – only second and subsequent reprints have the edition mentioned)

- publisher

- place of publication

- page number or numbers (if applicable)

One author

e.g. Adams-Smith, Patsy 1978, The ANZACS, Thomas Nelson, Melbourne.

Russell, B. 1967, The Autobiography of Bertrand Russell, vol. 1, 1872-1914, George Allen & Unwin,

London.

Two or three authors

e.g. Boone, L.E. & Kurtz, D.L. 1992, Contemporary Marketing, 7 th edn, Dryden Press, Hinsdale, Illinois.

More than three authors

e.g. Hickman, G., et al. 1973, A New Professionalism for a Changing Geography, Wayland, London.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 11


Editor(s)

e.g. Butler, J.D. & Walbert, D.F. (eds) 1986, Abortion, Medicine and the Law, Facts on File Publications,

New York.

No author

e.g. World Book Encyclopaedia, 1992, World Book Inc., Chicago, vol. 3, p. 125

2. ARTICLE IN A JOURNAL, MAGAZINE OR NEWSPAPER

Structure

- name of author/s of article (if listed)

- year of publication

- title of article in inverted commas

- title of publication

- volume and number (if applicable)

- pages

e.g. Dewhirst, C. 1986, ‘Hot air over the Himalayas’, World Geographic, vol. 1, no. 4, pp. 44-55.

Jeanloz. R. 1983, ‘The earth’s care’, Scientific American, vol. 249.

3. FILMS, TV, VIDEO, AUDIO

Structure

- title

- format

- date of recording

- place of recording

- publisher

- any special credits

e.g.

The Comedic Fall (motion picture) 1981, Englewood, New Jersey, Pratfall Releases.

Learning to Live (motion picture) 1964, London, Fine Films Inc., Producer Martin Freeth.

4. COMPUTER RESOURCES

i) Computer Programs

Structure

- author’s name (if known)

- format

- program name

- date

- publisher

e.g.

PC Globe Maps ‘n’ Facts (Computer program) 1995, Broderbund Software.

ii) Full Text CD-ROMs

Structure

- author’s name (if known)

- title in quotation marks

- name of CD-ROM

- format

- date

- publisher

e.g. Kohn, Hans ‘Nationalism’, Microsoft Encarta (CD-ROM) 1993, Microsoft Corporation.

iii) World Wide Web Sites

Structure

- author’s name

- title of the Web page in quotation marks

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 12


- title of complete work in italics

- date of Web page publication

- full http address

- date of access

5. INTERVIEW

Structure

- name

- date

- format

- place

e.g. Grounds, P. ‘A Hypertext of Multi-User Dimensions’, The MUDdex, 1993.

http://www.apocalypse.org/pub/u/lpb/muddex/essay/ (5 Dec. 1997)

e.g.

Ryan, Lorna 1988, (Personal communication), Rowville, Vic.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 13


ASSESSMENT PROCEDURE

Rationale

The basic principle behind assessment is that it gives the student an opportunity to demonstrate either in writing

and/or orally information and/or skills that they have developed or improved upon. The College endorses the

fact that a student’s Level of Achievement must be a valid and fair representation of the student’s ability and

performance at the time of assessment. For this reason, the College will not deduct marks for late assessment.

However, the College reserves the right, in fairness to all students, to abstain from assessing work that is not

submitted according to the assessment time frames as outlined below.








One week prior to the due date, the teacher must check the progress of all students. For any student at risk

of completing the task, the teacher will notify parents via a phone call or email. The form “Unsatisfactory

Progress on an Assessment Task” will also be posted to parents.

Students submit their work to the teacher in the lesson on the due date for the assessment task

If the student does not submit the task, a letter will be issued to parents identifying the non-submission.

Non-submission in Year 11 or 12 can have very serious consequences for the student:

- not passing the course

- not receiving credit for the semester studied

- failing to satisfy the perquisite subject required for further study

- not receiving an OP and/or a QCE (i.e. If less than 20 semesters of credit)

If a student demonstrates a pattern of non-submission, the student and her parent/s will be required to

attend an interview with the Pastoral Co-ordinator and a member of the Administration Team.

Normal extension procedures apply for special circumstances. Special circumstances include illness and

compassionate leave. Family holidays and avoidable absences are generally NOT regarded as sufficient

grounds for an extension.

If a Year 11 or Year 12 student is absent from school on the day of an examination or the due date for a

major piece of assessment, the student must collect a ‘Request for Special Consideration’ form from the

Deputy Principal on her return to school. The completed form, and any other supporting documentation

such as a doctor’s certificate, needs to be presented to the Deputy Principal. In addition, the school should

be informed of the student’s absence, by phone, on the day that the assessment falls due.

General

In the case of an individual or group oral presentation or performance for assessment, students must be

ready to perform on the day. If students do not have the oral ready, they will receive a non-submission.

Non-submission may affect the overall result for a subject at the end of the semester.

It is the responsibility of the student to consult the teacher regarding any alternative assessment

procedures.

It must be appreciated that student absence on the day of a test or oral presentation may require students

to take the test or present the oral on return to school.

GROUP PRESENTATIONS: A student who is considered to be not contributing to a group presentation will be

withdrawn from the group and asked to do an individual presentation.

Students are required to save up-to-date versions of all electronic work to their College network drives.

Students are also advised to keep progressive drafts in hard copy form or backups saved electronically using

devices such as USB memory sticks. An extension request due to computer technical problems would

require the student to provide some evidence of their progress on the task.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 14


AUSTRALIAN QUALIFICATIONS FRAMEWORK (AQF)

Many people still think of post educational options in terms of gaining an appropriate OP to allow them to go to

a university. To these people the ‘natural’ order of things is – Queensland Certificate of Education OP

university degree world of work. They therefore choose their senior subjects on the basis of this and

sometimes attempt subjects for which they have little aptitude on the pretext of ‘keeping their options open’.

Since January 1995, a framework encompassing all qualifications in post-compulsory education and training

across Australia has been implemented under the auspices of all State, Territory and Commonwealth Ministers

for Education and Training to bring some national consistency into qualifications and to make it easier for people

to have qualifications awarded in one State recognised in all the others. An offshoot of this is to make alternative

pathways of post compulsory education much clearer for us.

The AQF comprises national qualifications issued in:

the secondary schools sector;

the vocational education and training sector (TAFE and registered private providers); and

the higher education sector (mainly universities)

These qualifications are shown below, grouped according to the educational sector which they are most

commonly issued.

AQF QUALIFICATIONS BY EDUCATIONAL SECTOR

Schools Sector Accreditation

Queensland Certificate of Education

Vocational Education and Training

Sector Accreditation

Vocational Graduate Diploma

Vocational Graduate Certificate

Advanced Diploma

Diploma

Certificate IV

Certificate III

Certificate II

Certificate I

Higher Education Sector

Accreditation

Doctoral Degree

Master’s Degree

Graduate Diploma

Graduate Certificate

Bachelor Degree

Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma

Diploma

Notice that the sectors overlap. Schools are able to offer courses leading to qualifications at Certificate I, II and III

standard, while the VET sector overlaps at Diploma and Advanced Diploma levels.

The AQF also supports more efficient continuous learning and elimination of wasteful repetition of learning by:

Articulation of education and training programs by interconnecting programs across schools, TAFE, adult

education centres, universities and private providers, across fields of study and across qualification levels.

Credit transfer arrangements

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) – credit for skills and knowledge acquired through training, work or life

experience.

While entry into degree courses from school is usually via an OP, entry into other courses may be via this route

or via a selection rank.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 15


LEARNING PATHWAYS

Flexible Education and Training Pathways

AQF qualifications link with each other in a range of learning pathways between schools, vocational education

and training providers and universities your learning and career ambitions require.

The AQF makes a specific commitment to flexible transparent and systematic learning pathways and the removal

of boundaries between educational sectors. It therefore encourages cross sectoral linking programmes such as:




VET in Schools, which allows schools across the country to offer industry-based units of learning that can

contribute to both the Queensland Certificate of Education and Certificate I-IV qualifications.

Articulation and Credit Transfer Arrangements between registered vocational education and training

providers and universities involving efficient articulation programs and maximum credit transfer; and

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) by which credits are granted towards qualifications through assessment

of an individual’s knowledge and skills through education, training, work and life experience.

AQF Pathways Diagram

RPL

Doctorate

Masters

RPL

Graduate

Diploma

Graduate

Certificate

Bachelor

Degree

Advanced Diploma

Diploma

RPL

Queensland

Certificate of

Education

Certificates I-IV

The Pathway from university to vocational education and training qualifications is becoming increasingly popular

as a way of gaining industry experience needed to increase opportunities.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 16


QUEENSLAND CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION

New law and registering young people

The Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE) is Queensland’s new senior schooling qualification.

The new law

The Youth Participation in Education and Training Act 2003 was introduced on 1 January 2006. The law means it

is compulsory for all young people to be either ‘learning or earning’ until they turn 17.

What does the law mean?




Young people need to stay at school until they finish Year 10 or turn 16, whichever comes first.

After that, if they aren’t working at least 25 hours per week, young people will need to:

o Stay in education or training for a further 2 years, or

o Get a QCE, or

o Get a Certificate III vocational qualification or higher, or

o Turn 17…

whichever comes first.

Every young Queenslander must be registered with the Queensland Studies Authority (QSA) in Year 10 or in

the year before they turn 16.

Overview

What is the QCE?

The QCE is Queensland’s senior schooling qualification. The Queensland Studies Authority (QSA) will award

young people a QCE when they complete the senior phase of learning – usually the end of Year 12.

To be awarded a QCE young people will need to achieve a significant amount of learning, including literacy and

numeracy, at set standards.

How does the QCE work?

The QCE recognises broad learning options and offers flexibility in what, where and when students learn.

A wide range of learning, including academic subjects, vocational education, workplace learning and university

subjects, can contribute towards the QCE.

Different types of learning attract different numbers of credits. Students must have at least 20 credits to be

awarded a QCE.

Planning for a QCE

All students in Year 10 will develop a Senior Education and Training (SET) plan. The SET plan helps students

structure their learning around their abilities, interests and ambitions.

It will map out what, where and how a student will study during their senior phase of learning – usually Years 10,

11 and 12. The SET plan needs to be agreed by the student, their parents or carers, and the school. It can be

started at any time, but should be finalized by the end of Year 10.

Schools and students regularly review the SET plan to monitor progress. The plan can be updated at any time.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 17


Registering young people

All schools must register every student in Year 10, or in the 12 months before they turn 16, whichever comes

first.

When a student is registered, the QSA opens an individual, web-based learning account for them. The account is

password protected and can be accessed by the student only.

Monitoring progress

The learning account records what, where and when a student learns and the results they achieve.

Schools and other learning providers report students’ enrolments and results to the QSA and this information is

recorded in the individual learning accounts.

Students use their learning accounts to track their progress towards a QCE, vocational certificates or Certificates

of Post-Compulsory School Education.

Students can access their learning account through the Career Information Service at www.cis.qsa.qld.edu.au

Awarding a QCE

If a student completes Year 12 without achieving a QCE, their learning account will remain open for 9 years

regardless of their age. After Year 12, any QCE-related learning and activities can still be reported to the QSA and

recorded in the learning account. When the student achieves 20 credits, the QSA will award the QCE in the

following June or December.

Every student will receive a Senior Statement at the end of Year 12. This statement will be a transcript of their

learning account, recording all the learning undertaken and results achieved.

Find out more

Visit: www.qsa.qld.edu.au

Phone: 3864 0299

Email: qce@qsa.qld.edu.au

Learning Accounts

Where does a learning account lead?

Each learning account stores information about the different learning undertaken. The account may contribute

towards:

a Senior Statement

This reports all learning undertaken and the results achieved during the senior phase of learning.

a QCE

This confirms a significant amount of learning at a set standard, which meets literacy and numeracy

requirements.

an OP

This indicates a student’s rank order position based on overall achievement in QSA subjects.

A QCIA

This certifies achievements by students with special needs on individualised learning programs.

a VET certificate

This certifies competence in a course or qualification level.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 18


Credit table

The Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE) is Queensland’s new senior schooling qualification.

To be eligible for a QCE, a young person must:

complete 20 credits

achieve the required standard

meet literacy and numeracy requirements

This credit table lists the types of learning that can contribute towards a QCE, their values and the standards

required.

Types of learning and their values

The required amount of learning:

includes a minimum of 12 credits from completed Core Courses of study. At least 1 credit must come from

Core Studies undertaken at school

may also include up to 8 credits from a combination of core, preparatory, enrichment or advanced courses

Core credit Preparatory credit Enrichment credit Advanced credit

Authority or Authority 4 VET Certificate I 2 a recognised

1 a 1-semester

2

– registered subject

an employment skills

certificate or award

university subject

a Senior External

Examination

4

development

program (only 1 can 2

in areas such as:

music, dance,

achieved while at

school

VET Certificate II 4

count)

drama, sport and

a 2-semester

4

VET Certificate III-IV 8 a re-engagement

community

university subject

school-based

4

program (only 1 can 2

development

1

achieved while at

apprenticeships and

count)

a negotiated

school

traineeships*

recognised

community or selfdirected

competencies in a 2

tailored training

program

4

certificates and

awards as recognised

learning

project

1

diploma or advanced

diploma over at least

recognised

4

by QSA

160 hours (20 days)

1 semester (or its

international learning

program

short courses in

literacy and

numeracy developed

by QSA

structured

workplace learning

project

equivalent)

Minimum of 12 Credits Maximum of 4 Credits Maximum of 8 Credits Maximum of 8 Credits

Course of study

Set Standard

Authority subjects and Authority-registered subjects Authorityregistered

at least a Sound Level of Achievement t

subjects

Vocational education and training competence

University subjects achieved while at school at least a pass as defined by the course

International learning course of study at least a pass as defined by the course

Recognised awards and certificates awarded

Workplace, community and self-directed learning projects at least a pass as defined by the project

V Some VET Certificates III and IV attract less than 8 credits

* A young person completes 30% as part of a school-based apprenticeship

t A young person studying only Authority and / or Authority-Registered subject must achieve at least a Sound

Achievement to be awarded.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 19


St. Margaret Mary’s College

Senior Education and Training Plan

2012-2013

Name: ___________________________________________________________

Form class: ___________

1. Year 10 Results (See attached Semester 1 Report)

2. At this stage of your life your long term career goals are:

a) ____________________________________________________

b) ____________________________________________________

c) ____________________________________________________

d) ____________________________________________________

3. Please number from 1 to 4 your preferred learning pathway. (1 is the most preferred pathway.)

POST SCHOOL OPTION

EMPLOYMENT

TRAINEESHIP / APPRENTICESHIP

TAFE

UNIVERSITY

PREFERENCE

4. If you are choosing a higher education pathway, list your options and any prerequisite subjects that you

need to study in Year 11 and 12.

COURSE OF STUDY

PREREQUISITES

5. If you are interested in a school based traineeship / apprenticeship / TAFE, indicate which areas:

____________________________________________________________________________________

6. Field Position Eligibility:

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Subjects

Field Totals

Tick if eligible (i.e. 15)

Subject weights for Field Positions

A B C D E

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 20


7. Students will be given subject lines to select subjects.

OP Eligible Yes No

Student Intended Learning Option (SILO)

By the end of Year 12, I wish to have:

(Students may select one or more of the options below)

* A Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE)

* An overall position rank (OP)

* A vocational qualification (Certificate I or II)

* A school-based traineeship completed

* A school-based apprenticeship commenced

* A university subject

* A tailored training program

* A Queensland Certificate of Individual Achievement (QCIA)

Subject Changes:

FROM TO DATE SCHOOL OFFICER

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 21


Terms and conditions for the SET Plan

By signing this document you agree to the Terms and Conditions, including the roles and responsibilities of each

party, for the SET Plan. If the parties do not agree to one or more of the items listed in the agreement, then it

must be re-negotiated and the changes noted. Each of the parties may initial the change as agreement to the

amendment.

The young person and parents / carers will:

Number Item

1 Keep the original SET plan and any update of the SET Plan

2 Show the current SET plan to a new school or learning provider

The school or learning provider:

3 Will keep a copy of the original plan or any updated plans

4 If major changes are made to the copy of the plan, will provide the copy of the plan with the

original changes to the young person

5 Will keep a record of changes made including the change and the date

6 May take reasonable steps to provide secure storage

7 Will decide which personnel can view the plan

8 Will keep a copy of the latest plan for a minimum period of 12 months and no longer than 5

years, from the date the young person is no longer enrolled.

9 May forward a copy of the plan to a new school or learning provider within 12 weeks.

10 May forward statistical information to education and training sectors and authorities

11 May contact the youth support co-ordinator or other government agencies if the young person

needs additional support or is at risk of disengaging from learning.

12 May contact other learning providers to support the young person.

13 Request a copy of the student’s SET Plan from another school or learning provider for newly

enrolled students.

Signature of young person: ________________________________ _________

Date: ____/____/____

Name of parent/ carer: ____________________________________________________________________

Signature of a parent / carer: _______________________________________

Date: ____/____/____

Name of learning provider: _________________________________________________________________

Position of delegate person: _________________________________________________________________

Name of delegated person: __________________________________________________________________

Signature: _______________________________________________________

Date: ____/____/____

Notes:

SET Plan Doc 20/06/09

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 22


THE SENIOR SCHOOL CURRICULUM

There are two broad groups of subjects in the Senior curriculum: Authority Subjects and Authority-Registered

Subjects. Saint Margaret Mary’s College offers a range of each of these types of subjects.

AUTHORITY-REGISTERED SUBJECTS

Business (Certificate II in Business) •

Early Childhood

English Communication

Hospitality

Information & Communications Technology

Pre-Vocational Mathematics

Recreational Studies

Religion & Ethics

Science in Practice

Visual Art Studies

Accounting

Ancient History

Biological Science

Business Communication &

Technologies •

Chemistry

Dance

Drama

English

English Extension (Year 12 only)

AUTHORITY SUBJECTS (Contribute to an OP Score)

Geography

Graphics

Home Economics

Hospitality Studies •

Information Processing &

Technology

Italian

Japanese

Legal Studies

Mathematics A

Mathematics B

Mathematics C

Modern History

Music

Music Extension (Year 12 only)

Physical Education

Physics

Study of Religion

Visual Art

• These subjects have nationally accredited Vocational Education and Training competencies contained in

them, so that a student choosing to study these subjects will exit Year 12 with credit for VET modules that

will give her advanced standing credits into courses at other providers.

Students would usually study seven subjects in Years 11 and 12. An English subject, a Mathematics subject and a

Religion subject are compulsory.

Those students wishing to be eligible for an Overall Position (OP) for tertiary entrance must study a minimum

of five (5) Authority Subjects. Please note, however, that this is not necessary for students wishing to go on to

TAFE Colleges. Students should check entrance requirements in the TAFE Handbooks or QTAC booklets

published each year.

Authority subjects at Year 11 and 12 level are reasonably difficult – certainly more difficult than Authority

subjects at Year 10 level. If you cannot achieve at least a ‘C’ result in a Year 10 subject, then you would be

unlikely to achieve well in the equivalent Authority subject at Year 11. Authority subjects also require more

study time at home than Authority-Registered subjects. Three hours per week for each Authority subject is

recommended.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 23


REQUIREMENTS OF TERTIARY INSTITUTIONS

For entry to any course, you must satisfy the minimal educational and / or other requirements specified for it.

Most tertiary courses require English over four semesters in Years 11 and 12. Some TAFE courses accept English

Communication studied over four semesters and many courses require a minimum Exit Level of a Sound

Achievement in English / English Communication. QUEENSLAND TERTIARY COURSES, published each year by

QTAC, outlines prerequisite studies and achievement levels for all tertiary courses in Queensland.

Students leaving Year 12 to go directly to university generally require an OP for entry. Students intending to go

to TAFE or private providers from Year 12 can enter via an OP or a Selection Ranking based on all their studies

done across Year 11 and 12.

Students’ Overall Positions are expressed in bands from 1 to 25, with 1 being the top band and 25 the bottom

band. The Overall Position is calculated from the student’s results in her best five Authority subjects, scaled for

state-wide comparability according to results in the Queensland Core Skills Test (QCS) that is administered to all

students in the state seeking tertiary entrance.

Where students’ Overall Positions are inadequate to differentiate between students seeking to enter a tertiary

course (i.e. a number of students have the same OP but there are inadequate places in a course for all of them)

their Field Positions will be considered in selection. Subjects are weighted in various fields according to the skills

emphasised in the subject. Field Positions are calculated according to the scaled results for the best three

subjects in that field and are expressed on a scale of 1 (top position) to 10 (bottom position).

Tertiary Selection Rankings which can be used for entry to TAFE are based on all results listed on the Queensland

Certificate of Education. QCS Test mark is used if the student chooses to sit for this exam. Selection ranks are on

a scale from 99-1 with 99 being the highest.

IMPORTANT POINTS FOR STUDENTS SEEKING ENTRANCE TO TERTIARY COURSES




Make sure that you cover the prerequisite subjects and fields for that course.

To be eligible for an OP you must study at least five Authority subjects. Three of these

subjects must be studied for the full four semesters.

You must sit for the Queensland Core Skills Test.

QUEENSLAND STUDIES AUTHORITY - TAFE ADVANCED STANDING INFORMATION

The Queensland Studies Authority and TAFE Queensland have worked together to provide students with

Advanced Standing from selected Authority Subjects and Authority-Registered Subjects (Study Area

Specifications) to TAFE Queensland courses.

‘Advanced Standing’ refers to the amount of credit granted to a student towards an accredited course or training

program on the basis of previous study, experiences or competencies held.

It is increasingly being recognised, in Queensland and nationally, that students moving between different

education and training sectors should receive appropriate recognition and credit for existing relevant

educational achievements. As well as avoiding duplication of study and saving time, the provision of credit can

provide greater incentive for students to continue improving their educational and training qualifications.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 24


VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Students are increasingly choosing to begin vocational education and training (VET) while still at school.

A number of major initiatives now make this a very viable and attractive option for many students.

Saint Margaret Mary's College offers three subjects which include nationally recognised VET Certificates or Units

of Competency. These subjects are Business (Certificate II in Business), Business Communications & Technologies

(Certificate II in Business) and Hospitality Studies (Certificate I in Hospitality).

On completion of these, students will obtain either a full Certificate or Statement of Attainment.

A framework of mutual recognition exists, whereby other Registered Training Organisations are obliged to

recognise such qualifications.

The result is that students completing such courses at school will be given Advanced Standing or credit for a

range of courses offered at TAFE or other training providers.

The TAFE VET in Schools Programme allows student’s access to TAFE courses conducted in specified areas in the

Townsville region. This normally requires attendance for one day each week (usually Wednesday) or possibly 3

hours on another afternoon.

As of June 2009, these are possible TAFE options:

Art

Automotive

Business Studies

Child Care

Community Recreation

Computer Aided Drafting

Cookery

Engineering

Food and Beverage

Furnishing

Hairdressing

Horticulture

Information Technology

Justice Administration

Retail Operations

Spray painting and Panel beating

Tourism

The School-based Apprenticeship and Traineeship scheme allows students to begin working towards vocational

qualifications while still completing a Queensland Certificate of Education.

Students may be awarded a Level II or Level III traineeship / apprenticeship, depending on their experience and

industry requirements. At Saint Margaret Mary's College, students normally undertake one less subject at

school, and undertake some on-the-job training during school time e.g. one day per week.

There are also other off-the-job training requirements, usually provided by TAFE or another Registered Training

Organisation.

Trainees are paid a normal wage while undergoing training.

While the scheme does not guarantee employment on leaving school, students have the advantage of being

already placed with an employer, as well as having completed a significant component of their training.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 25


VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING STUDENT INDUCTION

All students who participate in subjects containing VET Certificates (BCT, Hospitality Studies and Business) at

Saint Margaret Mary's College must attend a compulsory VET student induction that will be held early in 2012.

At this induction students will be issued with a Saint Margaret Mary's College VET Student Information

Handbook and introduced to information pertinent to being a VET student. Such information includes: relevant

terminology; the Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) process; VET assessment; work placement procedures and

Workplace, Health and Safety Issues. Further to Workplace Health and Safety (WH&S), all VET students will be

required to view a WH&S video and complete an on-line Safety Sense certificate issued through the Department

of Industrial Relations.

It is important to note that once students have attended the VET student induction that they will be asked to

sign a document stating they have participated in the induction. VET must comply with the standards set out in

the Australian Quality Training Framework (AQTF) and providing students with information relevant to their

participation in a VET programme is one of these standards. Saint Margaret Mary's College is a Registered

Training Organisation (RTO) and, as such, it is important that we comply with nationally prescribed standards in

all areas to do with VET. This ensures that students obtain the highest possible standards of VET delivery.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 26


CHOOSING SENIOR SUBJECTS

It is important to choose Senior subjects carefully as decisions affect not only the type of career you can follow

after leaving school but your happiness and success while at school.

There are a number of rules to go by when choosing subjects for Years 11 and 12. Choose subjects:

you enjoy

in which you can do well

which will help you get into your chosen career(s)

which give you skills, knowledge and attitudes useful to you in life

This may sound easy but it should involve a lot of thought, discussion, and research. You need to find out about

the different types of subjects and, in many cases, think further about career choice. Never assume you know all

about a subject at a higher level because you have done that subject before. To find out about any subject:

ask the teachers of that subject

look at the books and materials in the subject

read about the subject in any booklets that your school provides

listen carefully when teachers tell you about the subject in class or at parent nights

You can also talk to students who are doing or have done the subjects. However, don’t assume that because one

other student does or doesn’t like a particular subject you will feel the same. All subjects are both liked and

disliked by some students.

When investigating a subject to see if it is suitable for you, try to find out not only about the content (i.e. what

topics are covered in the subject) but also how the subject is taught and assessed.

For example:

Does the subject mainly involve learning from a textbook?

Are there any field trips, practical work, or experiments?

How much assessment is based on exams compared to assignments?

How much theory is there compared to practical work, written work compared to oral work?

Many students choose subjects for the wrong reasons and, as a result, are not happy at school or cannot follow

their career choice later. Do not take or avoid subjects simply because:

one other person says they are good or bad

your friends are or are not taking it

you think it is easy or difficult

you like or dislike the teacher

your elder brother / sister took it

you think you will get a better OP

Remember: The Queensland Certificate of Education requires that students must exit from their subjects with

“Sound Achievement” in order to receive credit points.

Saint Margaret Mary's College offers the subject choice guidelines on the following pages as a guide for parents

and students.

For a student to have the best chance of success in the subjects listed, we recommend that certain subjects have

been undertaken, or certain results achieved, in Year 10.

Year 10 Semester I results should give a reasonably accurate view of a student’s abilities and likelihood of

success in particular subjects.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 27


STEPS TO GUIDE YOU IN SUBJECT SELECTION

1. Use the Job Guide and the numerous online careers information sites available to investigate a number of

possible career options.

2. Find out what qualifications and / or training are required for each job. (Job Guide)

3. Find out where you can get the qualifications and / or training. (Job Guide / Tertiary Prerequisites

handbook)

4. Look up the prerequisites for entry into courses in which you are interested. (Tertiary Prerequisites 2014)

5. Consider the likelihood of achieving the prerequisites. Be realistic. Consider advice given by your teachers. If

you are not likely to achieve the prerequisites, reconsider. Look at other options. Go back to Step 1 and look

for related or similar jobs or jobs in the same field but with lower entry requirements.

6. Keep as many options open as possible. You may change your mind between now and the end of Year 12.

7. Once you have prerequisites covered, select subjects which you enjoy and in which you are more likely do

well. Be sure to keep a balance of subjects e.g. Maths and Science / Humanities; practical / theoretical etc.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 28


YEAR 10 CAREER PROGRAM 2011

Terms 1 and 2

Job Application unit in English

Distribution of Job Guide

Career Interest Quiz and Personality Preference Analysis

Career Portfolios

Career Mapping

QTAC (Queensland Tertiary Admissions Centre) Guide distributed with University prerequisites

“Try a Trade” Expo at Reid Park (26 th May)

Mock interviews (2 nd June)

Senior Handbook distributed to students (31 st May)

Teacher subject information presented to students between 20 th June and 24 th June

SUBJECT SELECTION PROCESS

Term 3

STAGE 1: Information Distributed / Draft SET Plan

Week 1 (11 th July to 15 th July)

Information to students about the Student Education and Training (SET) Plan, Queensland Certificate of

Education (QCE) and study options (15 th July)

Week 2 (18 th July to 22 nd July)

SET Plan (draft) completed by students and handed into the Office by Friday 22 nd July. This draft plan gives

the teachers who are involved in the interview process an idea of the student’s possible career pathways. It

is a start in the process of choosing subjects for Year 11.

STAGE 2: Student/Parent Interviews and Subject Selection

Week 3 (25 th July to 29 th July)

Tuesday 26 th July Parent Information Evening (Theatre 7.30pm)

Subject selection, Student Education and Training (SET) Plans, Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE)

Student/Parent Interviews for subject selection (Wednesday 27 th July to Thursday 4 th August)

Week 4 (1 st August to 5 th August)

Student/Parent Interviews for subject selection continue

Week 5 (8 th August to 12 th August)

Monday 9 th August

Career Expo at RSL Stadium, Murray Sports Complex

Depart SMMC 9.45am

Return SMMC 11.15am

Students will be transported to and from the venue by Campbell’s Buses

Dress: Academic Uniform with hat

Students should review their subject selection with parents and teachers, based on their interview, the

Careers Expo visit and other relevant information

STAGE 3: Subject Selection Deadline

Week 6 (15 th August to 19 th August)

Students need to make their final subject selection by Friday 19 th August

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 29


STAGE 4: Subject Lines Established

Week 7 (22 nd August to 26 th August)

Note: Be aware that, when subject lines are established, it’s possible that up to 30% of students may not get

all of the four non-core subjects that they chose

STAGE 5: Subject Choices Finalised

Week 8 (29 th August to 2 nd September)

Re-selection of subjects for students whose choices are not compatible with subject lines

Careers Co-ordinator re-interviews students and changes are made to subject choices

STAGE 6: SET Plans including Subject Selection finalised

Week 9 (5 th September to 9 th September)

By the end of this week, subject selection is finalised and SET plans are completed

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 30


QUEENSLAND STUDIES AUTHORITY (QSA)

AUTHORITY SUBJECTS

Accounting

Ancient History

Biological Science

Business Communication & Technologies

Chemistry

Dance

Drama

English

English Extension (Year 12 only)

Geography

Graphics

Home Economics

Hospitality Studies

Information Processing & Technology

Italian

Japanese

Legal Studies

Mathematics A

Mathematics B

Mathematics C

Modern History

Music

Music Extension (Year 12 only)

Physical Education

Physics

Study of Religion

Visual Art

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 31


ACCOUNTING

Why study Accounting?

Accounting is an information system that provides financial and other information for making and evaluating

decisions about the allocation of resources. It is a system of recording, reporting, analysing and interpreting the

financial information of a business enterprise to interested parties.

The study of Accounting enables students to understand the processes involved in generating accounting

information as a basis for planning, control and effective decision making. This course is designed not only to

provide a foundation in the discipline of accounting but also to prepare students for further education, training

and employment.

Students are provided with opportunities to develop skills in managing financial resources which can be applied

at a personal level and in the business environment. They are encouraged to think logically, to apply accounting

principles in a consistent and effective manner and to become independent learners.

Students will use information technology to enable them to apply the accounting process in business. On

completion of this course, students should be able to participate more effectively and responsibly in a changing

business environment.

Prerequisites

While Year 10 Business Education is not essential, it is an advantage. Students who have not studied Business

Education would need to be prepared to make an extra effort to achieve well in this subject.

Course Content

Year 11

Semester I

Core Studies 1 and 2

In this semester the basic rules of accounting are taught, along with source documents, journals, ledgers and

Trial Balances. Students prepare basic Income Statements and Balance Sheets.

Semester 2

Recording of cash, accounts receivable and inventories

Internal Controls over cash, accounts receivable, inventories and non-current assets

* Semesters 1 and 2 are formative and do not contribute to the exit result.

Year 12

Semester 3

Budgeting

Accrual accounting

Analysis of Financial Reports

* Both the Budgeting and Analysis of Financial Reports will be prepared on spreadsheets.

Semester 4

Accounting for Non-current Assets

Integrated Accounting Package (MYOB)

Personal Financing and Investing

Assessment

The course is divided into three dimensions - knowledge and procedural practices, interpretation and evaluation,

and applied practical processes, and these are linked to the exit standards.

Knowledge and procedural practices requires students to explain and apply fundamental accounting concepts

and procedures to a broad range of accounting information in routine situations.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 32


Interpretation and evaluation requires students to analyse a variety of accounting situations, develop logical

arguments and communicate a justified position.

Applied practical processes requires students to synthesise challenging practical accounting situations by

recording, process and reporting accounting information.

A variety of assessment techniques will be used:

Objective/short response items

Extended response items

Practical application items

Responses to stimulus material

Assignments and projects

Research assignments

Non-written presentations.

Career Paths

Auditing, Budgeting, Financial Accounting, Forensic Accounting, Managerial Accounting, Taxation, Public

Accounting Firms, Government (Federal, State, Local), Corporations, Solo

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 33


ANCIENT HISTORY

Why study Ancient History?

As well as it being important for all informed citizens to have knowledge about how our contemporary

civilizations and cultures have developed, the study of Ancient History in the contemporary classroom focuses

on the development of thought processes and skills essential in learning throughout life – researching, critically

analysing and evaluating opinion, and developing written and oral argument.

These attributes are valuable to anyone wishing to study towards professions that are people-centred, that

require effective and confident written and spoken communication, and in which the ability to critically think

through issues is required – law, arts, education, economics, government and the public services, personnel

management, behavioural sciences, tourism, public relations, journalism, librarianship and research.

Prerequisites

As success in Senior Ancient History depends on the ability to read and research widely and to develop a wellbalanced

historical argument based upon critically analysed evidence, a “C” result in Year 10 English would be

advisable.

Course Content

YEAR 11

1. What is Ancient History? What is Archaeology?

During this unit, students will visit the Pandora Museum to view features of archaeological excavation.

2. Conflict in Ancient History

Environmental (The Stone Ages, with particular reference to Australian Aborigines)

Religious (Traditional Egyptian Religion and the Impact of the Amarna Revolution)

Military (The Spartans)

Political (Rome during the First Century BCE)

Social (The Coming of the Invaders – The Aztecs versus the Spanish)

YEAR 12

1. The Individual in Ancient History

Augustus and the Julio-Claudian Emperors (Ancient Rome)

Boadicea (Ancient Britain)

2. The Group In Ancient History

Role of Women in the Ancient World

Everyday Life in the Ancient World

3. Ideology in the Ancient World

Impact of Confucianism on the Eastern World

Impact of Christianity on the Western World with a study of the Church’s role during the Middle Ages

Assessment

YEAR 11

Semester 1

1. Written Research Assignment(800 – 1000 words)

2. Response to Stimulus Test (2 hours)

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 34


Semester 2

3. Extended Written Response (500 word essay based on provided historical sources; 2 hours)

4. Multi-modal Presentation (5 – 7 minute oral presentation using multimedia)

YEAR 12

Semester 3

1. Response to Stimulus Test (2 hours)

2. Written Research Assignment(1000 – 1500 words)

3. Extended Written Response (600 – 800 words; 2 hours)

Semester 4

4. Multi-modal Presentation (8 – 10 minute oral presentation using multimedia)

5. Response to Stimulus Test (2 hours)

Additional Information

Year 11 students will attend an excursion to the Museum of Tropical Queensland in Semester 1 to introduce

them to the techniques of Archaeology particularly through reference to the “Pandora” display.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 35


BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Why study Biological Science?

Biology is the study of life in its manifestations. It encompasses studies of the origin, development, diversity,

functioning and evolution of living systems and the consequences of intervention in those systems.

Biology is characterised by a view of life as a unique phenomenon with fundamental unity. The study of biology

provides students with opportunities to:

Gain insight into the scientific manner of investigating problems pertaining to the living world

Experience the processes of science that leads to the discovery of new knowledge

Develop a deeper understanding and aesthetic appreciation of the living world

Prerequisites

Students should have achieved a “B” result or higher in the Biology unit of Year 10 Extension Science and a “B”

result or better in English.

Course Content

Over two years, students will study areas of Biological Science including:

Animal and Plant Physiology

Reproduction

Ecology

Disease

Cell Structure

Evolution

Genetics

Gene Technology

Marine Biology

The field studies unit is a compulsory element. This involves two days at Paluma and one day at Magnetic Island.

Assessment

There are four different types of assessment tasks:

1. Written Task

Tasks may be conducted under exam conditions. Tasks can include short response, multiple choice, longer

response, interpreting graphs, tables, diagrams and data.

2. Extended Response

Written assignments / responses to stimulus material (800-1000 word length)

Oral presentation / multimedia presentation (time 10 minutes)

3. Field Data Analysis – 2 days with one nights at Paluma. 1 day at Magnetic Island.

A Collection of Organisms

Scientific Report

Field Report and Analysis of Data

4. Extended Experimental Investigation

This involves an open-ended experimental design. Task length may vary from a few weeks to several

months. Journal style record keeping validates the investigation.

Additional Information

Regular reading or written homework is set. There is a compulsory Field Studies component in the course which

involves a camp and additional field work. Students who do not complete the field studies may not be awarded

a result in that component of the course. Cost for 2011 was approximately $120. Students will also be required

to purchase a workbook each year at an approximate cost of $35.

Career Paths

Those choosing to study Biology will find it helpful in medicine, nursing, occupational therapy and other health

areas, food and nutrition studies, biotechnology, microbiology, land care, ecotourism, zoology and numerous

other fields.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 36


BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES

Why study Business Communication and Technologies?

This subject is designed for students who wish to pursue a career in the business world. Students are given the

opportunity to develop both business and vocational skills, as this subject combines general and vocational

educational components. Firstly, this is a Queensland Studies Authority subject and may contribute to the

calculation of an OP and, secondly, students wishing to enrol in related vocational educational and training on

leaving school will be eligible for appropriate credit towards Certificate II in Business (Office Administration).

This subject takes into account the changing contexts within which business and government agencies operate.

Students develop knowledge, reasoning processes, skills and attitudes associated with this course through a

contextual learning approach as well as being exposed to a variety of experiences in keeping with the needs of

different private sector businesses and public administrative situations.

Prerequisites

A sound knowledge of Business Education and/or ICTE would be an advantage. Good written communication

skills are essential.

Course Content

This two-year course is based on 11 topics of study and embedded within these topics are the 12 competencies

from Certificate II in Business (Office Administration). Details of this Certificate II are provided in the subject

description for Business (Certificate II in Business) later in this booklet.

Topics covered in this course are:

Workplace Safety

Computer Operations

Business Communication

Industrial Relations

International Business Communication

Work team Communication

Assessment

Assessment instruments include:






Business Environments

Managing Workplace Information

Financial Records

Organisational Skills

Business Meetings

Skills and Procedures: Simple Word Processing assignments, Spreadsheeting assignments, Oral Presentations,

Electronic Presentations and basic Financial Recording (Deposit Slips, Invoice writing, Reconciling Creditors’

Invoices, Petty Cash)

Knowledge and Understanding: Short Responses based on knowledge of a topic including examples of applying

knowledge, Research Assignments, and Oral Presentations.

Reasoning Process: Oral Presentations, Report Writing and Extended writing which include the analysis,

evaluation and justified recommendations of stimuli provided (newspaper articles, cartoons, case studies,

statements about a topic)

Additional Information

Regular homework is required. It will involve summarising, studying, planning and research. There is a

considerable amount of reading and writing involved in this subject.

This subject will be beneficial in all careers as it provides the student with a multitude of skills which are used in

all career areas

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 37


CHEMISTRY

Why study Chemistry?

Chemistry engages students in an exciting and dynamic investigation of the material universe. Matter and its

interactions – from alloys to plastics, an understanding of body processes to food chemistry, life-saving

medicines to cosmetics are the essence of Chemistry. A course of study in Chemistry focuses on the intrinsic

“hands-on” nature of the subject with multiple opportunities to engage in practical experiences. The course

develops student’s understanding and appreciation of Chemistry in real-world contexts. The study of Chemistry

is a requirement for many science-based University courses.

Prerequisites

Students should have achieved at least a “B” result in their study of Mathematics and Extension Science in Year

10.

Course Content

Students study a variety of topics including:

Atoms, elements, compounds and the periodic table

The properties, bonding and structure of different materials

The chemistry concepts needed to explain reactions in the body

The chemistry of balancing equations and calculating reaction quantities

Acids and bases and their importance

Organic chemistry including pharmaceuticals, fuels and fabrics

Industrial chemistry

Oxidation and reduction processes and their importance

Assessment

Students are required to complete a major assessment task each term. This assessment task may take the form

of either an extended experimental investigation, an extended response task or a written test. Each of these

tasks requires a considerable amount of time and effort outside of regular class time for students to achieve

well. Students who cannot commit time to complete research and study will not achieve their best. However,

those who do will find the course rewarding and of great benefit to further studies at University.

Additional Information

Students are expected to revisit the topics presented in class at home to ensure understanding. Each term, they

are given a unit outline with revision questions that are the student’s responsibility to complete in order to

consolidate their understanding of the class work. A high level of independence is required for students to be

successful in the subject.

Career Paths

Study of Chemistry can lead to careers in medicine, dentistry, vet science, pharmacy, nursing, other health fields,

plastics, ceramics and paper industries, metallurgy, engineering, biotechnology, environmental science,

environmental law, forensics, marine biology, aquaculture, occupational health and safety and numerous other

science careers.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 38


DANCE

Why study Dance?

Dance provides a basis for post-secondary involvement in dance and related arts for employment and leisure.

Students’ self-confidence and the necessary social skills to work effectively, individually and in teams, are

developed within dance education. Dance heightens awareness of, and develops respect for, the body and

increases the equality of a person’s physical well-being. The study of Dance in its wider context promotes within

students an understanding of their own culture, other cultures and the world at large.

Prerequisites

It is advised that students possess some background in formal dance training or exhibit a natural movement

ability as this has proven to hold an advantage in coping with the physical demands of the subject. However, this

is not essential. Students must also display an interest in all aspects of the performing arts which includes

performing, creating and responding to dance works in a variety of genres. It is also recommended that students

have achieved a “C” result or better in Year 10 English.

Course Content

Over the course of study, students are exposed to a variety of dance genres and develop an awareness of dance

in various contexts. The subject is divided equally between practical experiences and theory. Students will have

the opportunity to partake in a number of dance workshops and attend live dance performances during their

course of study. In recent years, the Year 12 class has also been involved in a Dance camp, usually held in Cairns.

However, this is subject to availability and conditions may vary each year.

Assessment

Exit levels of achievement are awarded on the basis of student performance in the three organisers –

performance (presenting a learnt dance), choreography (creating a dance based on stimulus) and appreciation

(writing about dance works). Each organiser will be assessed at least once per semester.

Year 11 Tasks

1. Performance Task: Small Group Performance (1 – 3 minutes)

2. Appreciation Task: Individual Written Analytical Essay (600 – 1000 words)

3. Choreography Task: Individual/Pair/Small Group (1 – 2 minutes)

4. Performance Task: Individual/Pair/Small Group (1 – 3 minutes)

5. Appreciation Task: Individual Written Analytical Essay (600 – 1000 words)

6. Choreography Task: Pair/Individual (1 – 2 minutes)

Year 12

1. Performance Task: Small Group Performance (2 – 4 minutes)

2. Appreciation Task: Individual Written Analytical Essay (800 – 1000 words)

3. Choreography Task: Pair (2 – 4 minutes)

4. Performance Task: Individual Performance (2 – 4 minutes)

5. Choreography Task: Individual Computer Edited Dance Film (2 – 4 minutes)

6. Appreciation Task: Individual Written Analytical Essay (Exam 1.5 – 2 hours)

7. Choreography Task: Individual (3 – 4 minutes) or

Performance Task: Individual (3 – 4 minutes) or

Appreciation Task: Individual Written (800 – 1200 words)

Homework

Homework includes reading, research, written responses to in-class experiences, rehearsing dance works and

devising dance sequences for assignments.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 39


DRAMA

Why study Drama?

Senior Drama is a subject that enables students to communicate effectively, not only in the written form, but

also physically and orally. The program provides students with the confidence and ability to become articulate

and productive citizens. This is especially important in an era where the community more and more frequently

communicates electronically and the skills of communicating orally with people are in fear of being lost. Such

skills are essential in a changing society, to give students a critically active orientation to play a full part in their

own culture, the culture of others and the world of work.

Prerequisites

It is desirable to have studied Junior Drama or to have a “C” result or better in Year 10 English.

Course Content

During the four semester course, students will study five different units of work. These include:

Realism/Australian Drama

Greek/Elizabethan Drama

Australian Indigenous/Political Drama

Cyber Drama

Audition

During these units, students develop skills in acting, directing and individual and group devised drama. There is a

balance between practical activities, extended writing activities and the creative process.

Assessment

Exit levels of achievement are awarded on the basis of student performance in the three organisers – Forming

(creating own work), Presenting (performing scripted text or student-devised text) and Responding (writing

about performances or plays).

Students are required to attend two performances by a professional company outside school hours in Year 11

and one performance in Year 12.

Year 11 Tasks

1. Presenting Task: Small Group Performance of Scripted Text (2 – 3 minutes per person)

2. Responding Task: Written Analytical Essay (800 – 1000 words)

3. Forming Task: Individual Practical Directing Task (4 – 6 minutes directing input)

4. Responding Task: Written Analytical Essay (800 – 1000 words)

5. Presenting Task: Small Group Performance of Scripted Text (2 – 3 minutes per person)

6. Responding Task: Individual Written Script (600 – 800 words)

Year 12 Tasks

1. Forming Task: Individual Practical Directing Task (6 – 8 minutes directing input) or Individual Written Script

(800 – 1000 words)

2. Presenting Task: Group Performance of Scripted Text (3 – 5 minutes per person)

3. Responding Task: Written Analytical Essay (1000 – 1200 words)

4. Presenting Task: Group Performance of Scripted Text (3 – 5 minutes per person)

5. Forming Task: Individual Written Monologue (800 – 1000 words) or

Presenting Task: Individual Performance of Scripted Text (4 – 6 minutes per person) or

Responding Task: Written Analytical Essay (1000 – 1200 words)

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 40


Homework

Homework includes reading plays, devising scenes, learning dialogue, rehearsing and preparing assignments.

Career Information

This subject will prepare students who are interested in pursuing careers that include working and

communicating with others including law, education, social work, television or dramatic studies, etc.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 41


ENGLISH

Why study English?

Studies in Senior English develop students’ knowledge of how language works in particular texts and how

language works in our culture. To study English at senior level is to build understanding of the relationships

between language, text studies and literacy. We look at how these relationships help to make meaning in

particular social and cultural contexts.

A course of study in Senior English aims to develop students’:









Knowledge of the relationship between language and culture

Awareness of the flexibility, diversity and dynamism of language

Understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of language and its uses in texts

Creative and critical engagement with texts, to explore the students’ world and worlds beyond their own

Ability to reflect on the ways language is used in a wide range of cultural contexts and socials situations to

shape meanings

Ability to use language appropriately, effectively, purposefully, aesthetically and critically to participate in

communities and cultures, as well as to think, write and speak about texts

Participation in the diversity of Australian cultures and contribution to their enrichment

Participation in life-long learning as active citizens shaping the future.

Prerequisites

Year 10 English students working at C‾ or less for English are likely to experience some difficulty with the

concepts and standard of communication required in Year 11 English. Such students are advised to study English

Communication. Students who do not read a variety of texts will find Senior English very difficult.

Course Content

Students will be required to communicate to a wide variety of audiences. Features of the course include

continuity, increasing complexity of challenge, range, increasing independence and accommodation of cultural,

social and individual differences. Novels, plays, poems, short stories, film, documentaries, newspapers and non

fiction will be studied.

Assessment

Assessment is continuously undertaken at varying times and under varying conditions. At the end of each

semester students are awarded an overall achievement level based on the following criteria:




Knowledge and control of texts in their contexts

Knowledge and control of textual features

Knowledge and application of the constructedness of texts

The student’s folio of work contains a representative range of both written and oral tasks to provide the fullest

and latest information on the language achievement of the student. Students must obtain at least a minimum

Sound Level of Achievement in both written and oral components of the course in order to receive a minimum

Sound Level of Achievement at Exit.

Homework

Homework is on-going and is usually directly linked to assignments.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 42


(Year 12 only)

ENGLISH EXTENSION

Why study English Extension?

English Extension is a one-year subject that aims to extend those with demonstrated ability and interest in

English through a much more challenging program of work. It is extremely important that students understand

that the content and expectations of this subject are markedly different to those of Senior English. This subject

is studied in addition to Senior English and challenges students to reconsider traditional notions of literature,

through the study and application of contemporary literary theories. English Extension develops valuable skills

such as refined research skills, critical analysis, evaluation and development of complex argument. The increased

demands of this subject are valuable for anyone wishing to undertake tertiary study and the skills developed in

English Extension are highly beneficial for people wishing to enter professions such as journalism, law, the arts,

education, behavioural sciences, public relations and librarianship.

Prerequisites

Success in English Extension depends upon the ability to research, comprehend, and apply complex literary

theories, and articulate this understanding in a very sophisticated manner. Consequently, students must be

achieving at least a “B+” Achievement in Year 11 Senior English to enrol in English Extension. Admission to the

subject is through invitation only and the subject is limited in numbers. Most importantly, it is imperative that

students must be prepared to and capable of, working very independently, undertaking comprehensive

research, and managing their time effectively.

Course Content

This course introduces students to multiple literary theories, that are, in most cases, unlike anything they have

dealt with before. The concepts, level of vocabulary and expected standard of work is substantially higher than

that expected at Senior English level.

Assessment

Assessment is based on three comprehensive and complex assignments; one oral and two written,

approximately one per term. Students MUST submit assignment drafts and must be independently proactive in

their research and reading.

Course Overview

Term 1: I can’t get no satisfaction…

This unit focuses on building students’ knowledge and understanding of different theoretical approaches and the

application of these approaches to literary texts to produce individual readings. Students also learn to produce a

defence to support their readings. In a defence, students analyse the reading they have produced, explaining

how the theoretical approach used has allowed them to make meaning of the text in particular ways.

Assessment

Students apply either a reader-centred or author-centred theoretical approach to a self-selected Margaret

Atwood text to produce a written reading and accompanying written defence:

Reading and Defence: 1,000 – 1,500 words (combined)

6 weeks notice of task

Open access to material and human resources

Written feedback on two drafts

Term 2: Ch-ch-ch-changes…Turn and face the strain…

This unit builds on students' learning in Unit 1 by exploring the relationship between writing practices and

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 43


eading positions. This involves investigating the invited readings of texts that students might want to challenge

and constructing alternative meanings by intervening in those texts. These investigations must involve a

consideration of particular textual features that could be manipulated to produce alternative meanings. These

meanings are to be constructed and defended in terms of text-centred and world-context theoretical

approaches.

Assessment

Students are to produce a theory-based complex transformation of a selected text (of any genre) and a defence

of the transformation which explains how they applied theories to reposition readers regarding the base text.

Students will also evaluate how the rewritten text offers readers an alternative perspective

Complex Transformation: Written: 100 – 800 words

Multimodal: 3 – 5 minutes

Defence:

Spoken/signed: 8 – 10 minutes

6 weeks notice of task

Open access to material and human resources

Written feedback on two drafts

Term 3: Well, it’s all right now! I’ve learned my lesson well…

From their learning in Unit 1 and Unit 2, students can now challenge a variety of texts and ideas in theoretically

defensible ways. For this reason, a key focus for Unit 3 is increasing student independence, both in terms of

selecting texts and theoretical approaches.

Unit 3 builds towards students evaluating their learning throughout the course, offering them opportunities for

in-depth exploration of texts they find particularly interesting and evaluation of how texts and theoretical

approaches can work together to produce close readings. Students explore how theoretical approaches can

complement one another and/or clash in producing close readings of literary texts.

Through a range of learning experiences students will develop achievable focus questions to define and scope

their exploration and evaluation. Students will develop an understanding of the nature, purpose and iterative

process of designing a suitable focus question which allows them to pursue their exploration and evaluation

within time and length guidelines.

Assessment

Students produce a theory-based extended analytical response that evaluates the ways selected theoretical

approaches may be applied in investigating text/s in depth.

Written: 2,000 – 2,500 words

6 weeks notice of task

Open access to material and human resources

Written feedback on one draft

Additional Information

In September of Year 11 selected Year 11 students (and parents who wish to attend) will be invited to an

information session about English Extension. This initial meeting will be held in October and will provide

substantial information about English Extension. Students wishing to undertake English Extension in Year 12 will

attend their first lesson in November of Year 11. During this lesson students will be issued with two Margaret

Atwood texts and a critical theory textbook that they must read over the Christmas holidays – this is nonnegotiable

and English Extension in Year 12 begins with the understanding that students have completed these

readings.

English Extension is held on a Tuesday and Wednesday afternoon until 4.30pm. Because of the workload and

intensive learning curve associated with English Extension, it is not advisable to undertake any other extension

courses in addition to English Extension. Likewise it is advisable that students do not participate in any extracurricular

activities that interfere with their attendance at these lessons.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 44


GEOGRAPHY

Why study Geography?

Geography is an important part of the school curriculum in that it involves the education of young people about,

in and for the society and environment in which they live. The content, cognitive processes, skills and values that

Geography promotes can help students better explore, understand and evaluate the social and environmental

dimensions of the world.

Geography also evokes feelings for environments and people in environments.

Prerequisites

As with any Social Science subject, Senior Geography requires the ability to read and research widely and

develop arguments and make decisions based upon critical analysis of sources.

Course Content

The four themes and core units offered in Senior Geography are:

Theme 1: Managing the Natural Environment

Focus unit 1: Responding to natural hazards

Focus unit 2: Managing catchments

Theme 2: Resources and the Environment

Focus unit 3: Living with Climate Change

Focus unit 4: Sustaining Biodiversity

Theme 3: Social Environments

Focus unit 5: Sustaining Communities

Focus unit 6: Connecting People and Places

Theme 4: People and Development

Focus unit 7: Feeding the World’s People

Focus unit 8: Exploring the Geography of Disease

The themes cover a range of studies in Geography including physical, social, economic and environmental issues.

GIS technology is used throughout units. GIS (Geographical Information Systems) aims to broaden students’

geographic awareness and knowledge of the world around them by engaging them in computerised activities.

Geography covers most of the Common Curriculum Elements (CCEs).

Assessment

The Exit Criteria for Geography are Knowledge, Analytical Processes, Decision-making Processes and Research

and Communication Skills.

Assessment is based on two Knowledge tests and two other assessment items per semester. These include

practical exercises, stimulus-response essays, reports and non-written responses.

Short Response Tests require precise answers on the key ideas of the unit being studied.

Practical Exercises include:

the interpretation of information from statistics, maps, photographs, images, graphs,

the manipulation of information allowing for the production of graphic and cartographic presentations like

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 45


maps and scatter graphs

analytical and decision-making processes

Stimulus response essays are responses to a question which require students to analyse stimulus materials and

use decision–making processes.

Reports are investigations based on primary sources like information gathered on field trips. They require the

gathering of data and the demonstration of analytical and decision making processes.

Non-written responses are analytical, persuasive and/or argumentative expositions. These responses are

individually negotiated topics within the theme of study. Each presentation concludes with a question-andanswer

session in which the presenter is required to defend positions taken about an issue or requires audience

participation and reaction.

Careers in Geography

Geography is useful and relevant in a number of occupations. Some of these include Tourism, Marketing,

Education, Politics, Urban Planning, Meteorology, GIS, Ecotourism, Environmental Management and Surveying.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 46


GRAPHICS

Why study Graphics?

All students are exposed in some form of experience to graphical communication, both in liberal art forms and

structured discipline forms.

Graphics is an elective course that develops an understanding of the significance of graphical communication as

a universal language and the techniques and technologies used to convey technical and non-technical ideas and

information. Graphics Technology develops in students the ability to read, interpret and produce graphical

presentations that communicate information using a variety of techniques and media.

In the Senior Graphics course, students experience a variety of intellectual challenges involving discrete

problem-solving strategies, as they develop a range of associated practical skills. As a result of these studies, the

course will contribute substantially to students’ general education.

Prerequisites

Senior Graphics is a natural extension of Year 9 and 10 Design and Technology, but at an increasingly difficult

level over four semesters. However, this does not exclude students who have not studied Design and Technology

in Years 9 and 10. It must be realised that such students will find the course more difficult than continuing

students, but it is not impossible to catch up with tutorials and extra work.

Course Content

The course of study consists of an introductory unit, Foundation Studies, and three contextual units- Production

Design, Business Graphics and Built Environment.

Foundation Studies introduces students to subject matter in each area of study. It is an intensive unit in

learning the fundamentals of graphical communication of a depth and level of difficulty appropriate to the

study of Senior Graphics.

Production Design will focus on the preparation of drawing for the manufacturing, construction and craft

industries e.g. jewellery design

Business Graphics will focus on the paper based media which dominate the business world’s communication

platform e.g. business stationery and marketing

Built Environment will focus on the changes planned by humans to the indoor and outdoor environments,

from the ground up looking at landscaping through to house design.

Assessment

Senior Graphics assessment comprises of three folios of student work and two exams based around the areas of

study in Year 11 and four folios of student work and one exam in Year 12. The folios are a compilation of class

work and homework in an assignment format. These tasks are designed to provide a wide cross-section of

learning experiences in the major areas of graphical communication including both 2D and 3D viewing systems.

All formal tests and research projects will be assessed in the following criteria:

Criterion 1 - Knowledge and Understanding

Criterion 2 - Reasoning

Criterion 3 - Presentation

All student folios will be assessed in the Criteria 1 (Knowledge and Understanding) and 3 (Presentation).

Career Paths

Graphics offers an insight into a wide range of career options some of which are: Graphic Designer, Landscape

Architect, Landscape Designer, Architect, Engineering Degrees, Jewellery Designer and Manual Arts Teacher.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 47


HOME ECONOMICS

Why study Home Economics?

Home Economics offers students opportunities to discover and further develop critical and creative capabilities

that enhance individual and family wellbeing. The focus is on the impacts that individuals, families, government

and non-government organisations and local and global communities have on each other’s’ wellbeing. Home

Economics combines theory with practical activities.

Home Economics covers three main areas of study which include:

Individuals, families and communities

Nutrition and food

Textiles and fashion.

Careers

Study of Senior Home Economics can lead to careers in Teaching, Public Relations and Social Services (e.g.

Nursing, Psychology, Health Promotion and Social Work), Food Styling, Food Editing, Hospitality, Childcare,

Consumerism, Dietetics, Fashion Design and Marketing and Interior and Housing Design.

Prerequisites

There are no prerequisites for Home Economics. Achievement at a “C” level or better in Year 10 English is

advisable. You need to be motivated and able to learn independently.

Course Content

Semester 1

Year 11 Year 12

Semester 3

Unit 1: Textiles and Contemporary

Influences

Unit 4: Textiles and new/recycled

sustainability

Semester 2

Unit 2: Building a sustainable

Community

Unit 3: Influences on Family Food

Choices

Semester 4

Unit 5: Contemporary Issues in food

and nutrition for adolescents in

transition

Each of the units of study are developed to provide you with a significant body of knowledge and to use an

investigative approach relating to current trends and issues. Practical performance classes encourage you to

design, implement and evaluate courses of action to provide food and textile products that will enhance

individual and family well-being.

Assessment

Criteria assessed include Knowledge and understanding, Reasoning processes and Practical performance.

Over the two-year course, assessment methods will include:

objective/short answer tests

short response tests

research tasks

practical tasks (food and textiles) with process journals

The student profile that is compiled over the two-year course will describe individual ability to:

explain knowledge and demonstrate understanding

use critical thinking skills to research issues

collect, synthesise and evaluate data to communicate solutions

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 48


demonstrate refined practical skills to produce quality products

record processes and decisions

Homework

This is consistent with the outline given to all Year 11 students. The amount will vary throughout each semester,

depending on the requirements of the unit. Tutorials will be available for you if you require additional teacher

assistance in practical tasks and structured exam revision. Students will be required to attend tutorials during

the textile units in order to successfully complete the projects.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 49


HOSPITALITY STUDIES

Why study Hospitality Studies?

Consider a career in the hospitality industry, providing accommodation, food and beverage, front office and

gaming services, which include but are not limited to hotels, motels, clubs, restaurants, recreation facilities,

cruise lines, event management and theme parks. Wow, what a variety of options! Studying Hospitality Studies

may be the way forward for you. It also contributes towards your OP.

Hospitality Studies provides both a theoretical and practical hands-on approach. You are given valuable insight

not only into the world of work but also the range of skills necessary for life-long learning.

The subject emphasises the development of authentic practical competencies and skills that relate directly to

the hospitality industry. You will undertake SIT10207 Certificate I in Hospitality. Hospitality Studies offers

learning activities that require analysing, synthesising and evaluating issues impacting on the industry.

Prerequisites

There are no academic prerequisites for this subject. Achievement at a “C” level or better in Year 10 English is

advisable.

Course Content

Semester 1

Semester 2

Year 11 Year 12

Semester 3

Introduction to Kitchen production

(sandwiches, savoury foods, sweets)

Introduction to Beverage production

and services (coffee, tea)

Function e.g. High Tea

Kitchen production (canapés)

Beverage production and services

(mocktails)

Function e.g. Cocktail evening

Semester 4

Kitchen production (café cookery)

Beverage production and services

(frappes, cold espressos)

Function e.g. Coffee Lounge

Food and beverage service (casual and

fine dining)

Function e.g. Dining event

How will you learn?

Hospitality Studies combines investigative and practical approaches to your learning. You will undertake

research tasks into hospitality-related issues.

Practical performance involves Hospitality functions or events that may be on a small or large scale, vary in

complexity and involve various levels of problem solving. The practical skills include those required for the units

of competency (certificate) and the skills required as part of the topic areas.

Assessment

Criteria assessed include Knowledge and understanding, Reasoning and Practical performance.

Assessment techniques may include:

Short written response – response to questions or problems

Extended written responses – reports, essays or response to stimulus materials (drafts are required)

Oral/multimodal presentations – seminar, webpage, podcast, video, computer simulation.

Practical tasks may demonstrate some or all of the following:

o planning and decision making e.g. coffee service

o procedures and techniques e.g. knife skills, using industrial ovens

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 50


o

o

o

o

estimating and costing e.g. costing salads, desserts

product development and presentation e.g. canapés

food and beverage production and service e.g. coffee shop

evaluations (a written folio is required)

Competency-based assessment for the certificate is an ongoing process of collecting evidence and making

decisions on whether you can consistently demonstrate knowledge and skill, and apply that knowledge and skill

to the standard of performance required in the workplace.

SIT10207 Certificate I in Hospitality

Five core modules

SITHIND001A Develop and update hospitality

industry knowledge

SITXCOM001A Work with colleagues and customers

SITXCOM002A Work in a socially diverse

environment

SITXOHS001A Follow health, safety and security

procedures

SITXOHS002A Follow workplace hygiene procedures

Two electives

SITHFAB001A Clean and tidy bar areas

TDTE597B Carry out basic workplace calculations

Homework

Homework will vary with each topic and include detailed research. This is consistent with the outline given to all

Year 11 students. Tutorials will be available for you if you require additional teacher assistance in practical tasks

and structured exam revision. This subject also incorporates compulsory participation in functions held outside

of normal school hours (with negotiation and appropriate notice).

Additional Information

The school provides food items required for practical classes. As part of your Hospitality uniform, you will

require a pair of black trousers or skirt.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 51


INFORMATION PROCESSING & TECHNOLOGY

Why study Information Processing & Technology?

Information Processing & Technology (IPT) is a contemporary subject which looks at the way in which

information technology can meet and influence the needs of people in a world which is rapidly becoming

saturated with information. IPT aims to develop in students an awareness and understanding of the concepts

and practices associated with the use of information technology. Because information technology touches many

aspects of our lives, the study of IPT contributes in a significant way to the general education of students,

whether or not they intend to undertake a career or further study in the Information Technology field.

Prerequisites

There are no prerequisites for the study of IPT. However, the study of Information & Communication Technology

Education in Year 10 is an advantage. A minimum requirement is that the student has obtained a “C” result or

better in Year 10 Mathematics and in English. Success in IPT requires an interest in solving problems and a desire

to see problems through to their end, good communication skills and an ability to work both independently and

as a member of a project team.

Course Content

The subject matter is organised under six core topics:

Social and Ethical Issues (SEI), Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), Relational Information Systems (RIS),

Structured Query Language (SQL), Algorithms (Alg), Software Programming (SP)

and two additional topics:

Intelligent Systems (IS), Computer systems (CS).

Topics are integrated where possible and often studied within the context of the Design-Develop-Evaluate cycle.

The aim of the Social and Ethical Issues topic is to help students develop an appreciation and understanding of

the impact that developments in information technology have on themselves and on communities worldwide. It

is intended that discussion of issues such as privacy and security of information, legal issues including copyright

and intellectual property, and issues related to equity of access will promote responsible and discriminating use

of information technology by students both now and in the future.

The Human-Computer Interaction topic centres on the importance of good interface design in enabling people

to effectively communicate with and use computer systems. It requires understanding of human perspectives as

well as understanding of hardware and software.

The Relational Information Systems topic introduces a formal model for describing the architecture of

information systems, presents methods for developing these systems, and allows students to implement these

to produce working information systems.

The Structured Query Language topic introduces a formal query language, Structured Query Language (SQL), for

the manipulation of data within a database.

In the Algorithms topic, a number of procedural or algorithmic design systems are available. No particular

system is specified in this syllabus, but students should acquire skills in at least one formal representational

system (e.g. flowcharts, structure design charts, pseudocode, Nassi-Schneidermann diagrams, etc.).

The Software programming topic involves the study of the development of software. Students will gain some

experience and skills in the design, development and evaluation of computer programs that solve practical

problems or meet particular needs.

The Intelligent Systems additional material introduces a formal model to describe the architecture of intelligent

systems, presents methods for the development of these systems, and allows students to implement these to

produce working intelligent systems.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 52


The Computer Systems topic explores how computers and computer systems are organised, designed, and

implemented. An introductory study of how processors and memory may be configured to form different

computer architectures is also examined.

Assessment

Students will be assessed on the basis of their responses to extended writing tasks, objective and short response

tests, practical exercises and minor and major projects.

Homework

Students will be expected to complete 2 to 3 hours of homework a week. A home computer is not necessary. If

students require extra time on a computer, arrangements will be made for lunchtime or after-hours access of

school computer facilities. IPT tutorials are held two afternoons each week.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 53


ITALIAN

Why study Italian?

Italian is a valuable language for Australians to learn. It is a language of our community, second only to English

so learners of Italian do not have to go overseas to hear or speak the language. Italy is one of the leading

industrial powers in the world. Australia’s trade links with Italy mean that ability with the language is a practical

business tool. Many of Australia’s elite sports people compete and travel in Italy.

Benefits can be:

Learning to speak a language is increasingly important for effective participation in a globalised world. In

recognition of this, many Australian universities have introduced incentive schemes and bonus points

systems for students who have completed a language through to Year 12. Both UQ and Griffith University

offer bonus points to LOTE learners.

Students interested in becoming teachers would be well placed to include Italian as one of their skills as

Italian Language teachers are in short supply.

A good knowledge of Italian is advantageous in the public service, social welfare organisations, education,

business, industry, tourism, foreign affairs and journalism.

Learning Italian can enrich one’s educational, intellectual, personal, social and cultural development.

Prerequisites

Students should have a “C” result or better in Year 10 Italian.

Course Content

Working with a variety of resources and the Internet and using a communicative approach, students will be

introduced to new language functions through the themes of Family and Community, Leisure, Recreation and

Human Creativity, School and Post-School Options and Social Issues.

Assessment

The skills of Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking will be assessed through oral and written exams each term.

Homework

It is vital for students to be learning and revising vocabulary and language structures consistently. It is important

that students allow time for this purpose every day in addition to other set homework tasks.

Additional Information

Every three to four years students will have the opportunity to participate in a three week trip to Italy. There is

also the possibility available for our students to go to Italy as exchange students and to meet and mix with Italian

students who are hosted by our school.

The annual Italian Speech Competition provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate their language

skills. Students can also participate in the Australian Language Certificate each year.

Year 12 students of Italian are eligible to apply for the annual StuditaliA prize, a scholarship to Italy sponsored by

the Department of Education and the Arts and the Italian Consulate in Brisbane. This prize includes a return

airfare from Australia to Italy and a one month home stay and study program in Italy at the completion of Year

12.

There is also an exchange opportunity open to Year 11 students. This exchange involves a ten week visit to an

Italian speaking region of Switzerland.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 54


JAPANESE

Why study Japanese?

Because of the links in tourism and commerce between Australia and Japan, there are many opportunities to

meet Japanese speaking people.

Japanese lifestyle and culture are becoming more familiar to Australians through media and personal contact.

Through studying Japanese, students are able to develop a sensitivity towards the values and perspectives of the

Japanese people.

A knowledge of Japanese is an advantage in enriching travel in Japan and in opening opportunities for working

there. Developing language skills could enhance career prospects.

Prerequisites

An attainment of a “C” standard in Year 10 Japanese is advisable. This is important as the Senior Japanese course

is a continuation of what has been learnt in Years 8, 9 and 10. Students need to have a strong commitment to

spend time studying the different aspects of the language. These include kanji, grammar and vocabulary.

Course Content






Skills developed are Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing

Topics and settings relate primarily to students’ own life situation and to real-life situations likely to be

encountered in Japanese – speaking countries for example – Growing up, Leisure Pursuits, Social Life,

Health, Future Plans, Vacations and Travel.

Language functions and grammar points covered are those necessary for communication in the above

situations.

Learning experiences include a variety of activities based on audio-visual and printed resource materials as

well as resources and cultural artefacts from Japan.

Cultural insights, appreciation and tolerance should flow naturally from all of the above.

Assessment

Assessment is related specifically to communicative objectives in the four skill areas of Listening, Speaking,

Reading and Writing. The student’s Exit Level of Achievement is decided at the end of the course, using the

fullest and latest information on her overall performance, as judged by these criteria:

Comprehension of spoken material (listening comprehension)

Ability to communicate orally

Comprehension of written material (reading comprehension)

Ability to communicate in writing.

In addition to formal exams each term which are used for summative (exit) purposes, there are also formative

assessment tasks throughout the course to provide diagnostic feedback to students and their parents.

Homework

Although there are no lengthy assignments required for assessment in this subject, regular completion of

homework is vital.

Additional Information

Every two or three years a small group of students can spend two weeks in Japan in holiday time. Students can

participate in the Australian Language Certificate and the Townsville and District Japanese Speaking

Competition. There may also be an opportunity to host a Japanese student for two weeks in July / August.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 55


LEGAL STUDIES

Why Study Legal Studies?

Legal Studies is principally intended to help students develop knowledge, skills and attitudes to enhance their

ability to participate as informed, proactive and critical members of society. This subject allows students to

investigate and understand the Australian legal system and how it affects their basic rights, obligations and

responsibilities. The immediate relevance of the course to students’ lives should promote and motivate students

to make constructive assessments and informed commentaries on the law. The course content is current and

relevant court decisions are studied to enhance student learning.

The methodology for teaching and learning Legal Studies integrates many skills and processes required for the

students’ senior studies. Some examples of the more critical skills include summarising, comparing and

contrasting, analysing, evaluating, justifying and researching information. Throughout each unit of work students

will be asked to comment on the effectiveness, adequacy and appropriateness of legal outcomes, and will be

involved in the communication of ideas, information, opinions, arguments and conclusions, in a variety of

formats and for a variety of audiences.

It is not the principal intention of Legal Studies to prepare students for a career in law. However, this subject will

provide grounding in the basics of law directly related to a career in the legal field such as solicitor, barrister or

magistrate. In addition, as all careers are impacted by the law, Legal Studies can also be relevant to such careers

as policing, journalism, medicine and business.

During the Year 11 course of study, students will participate in an excursion to the courts to enable them to see

the legal system in practice. Guest speakers are also utilised where possible to encourage community

interactions and supplement classroom learning.

Prerequisites

An “A” or “B” result in Year 10 English will be beneficial.

Course Content

Year 11

Term 1: The Legal System

Term 2: Civil Obligations – Negligence and Defamation

Term 3: Crime and Society

Term 4: Civil Obligations – Agreements combined with Sport and the Law

Year 12

Term 1: Renting and Buying

Term 2: Independent Study (own choice research unit)

Term 3: Family Law

Term 4: Law in our Society – a Review

Assessment

Criteria for Assessment

Knowledge and Understanding – assesses a student’s ability to describe and explain key legal concepts based on

recall and/or research.

Investigation – assesses a student’s ability to examine legal situations and issues. This is done through analysing

situations and information to identify legal issues and problems, applying relevant legal principles and

procedures, and identifying the competing interests of stakeholders to legal issues.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 56


Evaluation – assesses a student’s ability to critically review the law’s attempts to achieve just, fair and equitable

outcomes to issues, and to make justified conclusions on the suitability of legal outcomes and their social

implications.

Communication and Research Skills – assesses a student’s ability to select, organise and present information

effectively in a variety of genres, using legal terminology proficiently.

Assessment Techniques

Students are assessed in a variety of ways, with the main forms being short response, extended response,

inquiry/research, response to stimulus and non-written presentations.

Year 11:

1. Short Response Test

2. In Class Essay (600 - 800 words; research preparation necessary)

3. Non-written presentation (15 – 20 minute group re-enactment of a court case)

4. Inquiry task (1000 word analytical essay)

5. Short Response and Extended Response Exam (includes a 300 word essay)

6. Unseen Essay (500 – 600 word analytical essay written under exam conditions)

Year 12:

1. Inquiry task (1500 word analytical essay)

2. Short Response Test

3. Independent Study

4. Unseen Essay (600 – 800 word analytical essay written under exam conditions)

5. Non-written presentation (8 -10 minute; individual)

6. In Class Essay (800 - 1000 words; research preparation necessary)

Additional Information

During the Year 11 course, students will participate in an excursion to the courts to enable them to see the legal

system in practice. Guest speakers are also utilised during the two-year course to encourage community

interactions and supplement classroom learning.

Legal Studies is a subject that is relevant to everyday life ad which allows students to investigate, discuss and be

informed of current legal issues. However, there is a considerable amount of reading and writing involved in this

subject. Students will achieve highly in this subject if they are hard-working, enthusiastic, inquisitive and enjoy

reading and learning.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 57


MATHEMATICS

Why study Mathematics?

Mathematics is an integral part of general education. In recent years, the range of career opportunities

requiring mathematical competence has expanded significantly. Mathematics is not only a significant

component of science and technology, but it is also used for developments in industry and commerce, in the

provision of social and community services and in government policy and planning. Studying Mathematics will

help students to develop their analytical, problem solving and decision making skills.

Prerequisites

In Senior there are four mathematics subjects: Mathematics A, Mathematics B, Mathematics C and Pre-

Vocational Mathematics. Mathematics A, B and C are all Authority subjects, whereas Pre-Vocational

Mathematics is one of the Authority-Registered subjects and is outlined in a later section. Hence, there are four

possible Mathematics pathways.

1

2

3

4

PATHWAY COURSE(S) OF STUDY PREREQUISITES

Pre-Vocational Mathematics

Mathematics A

Mathematics B

Mathematics C

Course Content

Applied Geometry

Financial Mathematics

Statistics & Probability

Networks & Queuing

Data Collection and Presentation

Land Measurement

Nil

C Standard or above in Preparatory Maths A in Year 10

C Standard or above in Preparatory Maths B in Year 10

B Standard or above in Preparatory Maths B in Year 10

MATHEMATICS A MATHEMATICS B MATHEMATICS C

Functions

Rates of Change

Optimisation

Integration

Applied Statistical Analysis

Periodic Functions

Exponential and Logarithmic

Functions

Assessment in Mathematics A, B and C

Groups

Complex Numbers

Matrices

Vectors

Calculus

Structures and Patterns

Dynamics

Advanced Periodic and Exponential

Functions

Exit levels of achievement are awarded on the basis of students performance in three criteria.

Criterion I Communication and Justification

Criterion II Mathematical Knowledge and Procedures

Criterion III Mathematical Modelling and Problem Solving

Student assessment in Year 11 will be of a formative nature with Year 12 assessment being summative.

Students would normally have a mid and end of semester test as well as some alternative assessment, for

example an assignment, problem solving task or oral presentation. There is one piece of alternative assessment

each semester in Year 11 and 12.

Homework

To ensure success in any of the Mathematics courses it is important that students have regular practice in the

routines, rules and formulae for their chosen course. It is therefore important that students spend at least 45

minutes per night, five times a week on homework for Mathematics B and C. For Mathematics A, 30 minutes per

night is recommended. Success in Mathematics can be significantly improved by regular practice and review of

learned mathematical techniques.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 58


Additional Information

Students must study Mathematics B with Mathematics C. Students who take Mathematics B and C together

usually have a keen interest in Mathematics and enjoy it. Students who study Physics will find that some of the

Mathematics C topics complement some Physics topics. Certain mathematics subjects are prerequisites for some

University courses.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 59


MODERN HISTORY

Why study Modern History?

As well as it being important for all informed citizens to have knowledge about how our society and its traditions

have developed, the study of Modern History in the contemporary classroom focuses on the development of

thought processes and skills essential in learning throughout life – researching; critically analysing and evaluating

opinion, and developing written and oral argument.

These attributes are valuable to anyone wishing to study towards professions that are people-centred, that

require effective and confident written and spoken communication, and in which the ability to critically think

through issues is required – law, arts, education, economics, government and the public services, personnel

management, behavioural sciences, tourism, public relations, journalism, librarianship and research.

Prerequisites

As success in Senior Modern History depends on the ability to read and research widely, and to develop a wellbalanced

historical argument based upon critically analysed evidence, a ‘C’ result in Year 10 English would be

advisable.

Course Content

YEAR 11

1. Co-operation from Conflict – Major 20 th and 21 st Century conflicts and major attempts at

Internationalism and Peaceful Co-operation.

2. Destruction and Triumph of the Individual – a study of the role of dictatorship with particular focus on

Hitler’s Germany and of various historical personalities during the 20 th and 21 st Centuries who have

enriched the rights of the Individual.

YEAR 12

3. Independent Women within the World of Patriarchy (A Study in National and International Leadership) –

a study of women in Chinese History over the past 150 years and of other female leaders throughout

the world in the 20 th and 21 st Centuries.

4. Spiritual Heart within a Cauldron of Conflict – introductory study to the role of Israel in the religious

evolution of History and the subsequent History of The Middle East over the past 2000 years,

particularly since 1948.

5. Beauty amongst Ugliness – a study of Australian race History through to the successful achievement of

Multiculturalism and Reconciliation within contemporary Australian society.

6. Prosperity and Poverty – a study of the far-reaching History of the impact of the Industrial Revolution on

the contemporary world.

Assessment

YEAR 11

Semester 1

1. Response to Stimulus Test (2 hours)

2. Written Research Assignment(800 words)

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 60


Semester 2

3. Extended Written Response (500 word essay based on provided historical sources; 2 hours)

4. Multi-modal Presentation (5 – 7 minute oral presentation using multimedia)

YEAR 12

Semester 3

1. Response to Stimulus Test (2 hours)

2. Written Research Assignment(1000 – 1500 words)

3. Extended Written Response (600 – 800 words; 2 hours)

Semester 4

4. Multi-modal Presentation (8 – 10 minute oral presentation using multimedia)

5. Extended Written Response (600 – 800 words; 2 hours; without sources)

Homework

Student study time at home should be used for the completion of work from class and revision of major

concepts studied. Typically students have 4-6 weeks to complete assignments, so time for reading, research and

writing should be wisely spread throughout this period.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 61


MUSIC

Why study Music?

We study music because it is enjoyable, challenging and constructive. It helps you learn both practical and

theoretical skills that will enrich the whole of your life and help to enrich the lives of many others. It can also

lead to career opportunities in music as a performer, technician, teacher, director, composer, musicologist,

conductor, or a music therapist. It can assist in careers such as primary and pre-school education where a

teacher with music ability and knowledge are highly valued. Music has something to offer all students with an

interest in music and a willingness to learn skills. The study of music develops the gifts and talents of the

students and has been shown to assist in the development of cognitive processes and study skills.

Prerequisites

It is recommended that students who undertake Senior Music will have achieved a “C” in Year 10 Music. There

are, however, some exceptions to this. Some students who have studied music privately may be well placed to

take the senior course without having taken Year 10 Music at school. Any student who has not done junior

classroom music, but who wishes to take senior music should speak to a classroom music teacher.

Course Content

Students learn to listen to, explore and deconstruct a variety of music, including rock, folk, classical, jazz, vocal

and instrumental music. They learn composition skills and apply these to tasks that allow them to develop their

own style. Performing involves playing an instrument, singing or conducting. Performing may include solo or

ensemble experiences and can be chosen according to the individual student’s interests and strengths.

Year 11:

TERM UNIT LENGTH ASSESSMENT

1 Folk Music 10 weeks Composing Task 1

Performing Task 1

2 & 3 Small Groups 20 weeks Analysing Repertoire 1

Composing Task 2

Performing Task 2

4 Keyboard Capers 10 weeks Analysing Repertoire 2

Year 12:

TERM UNIT LENGTH ASSESSMENT

1 &2 Vocal Voyages 15 weeks Composition of Vocal Piece

Performance of Vocal repertoire

Exam

2 & 3 Symphonic

Sojourns

15 weeks Instrumental solo, single part in small ensemble or

conductor of an instrumental ensemble

Composition of Incidental Music

Extended Writing Task

4 Australian Music 6 weeks One further negotiated task in Analysing Repertoire,

Composing or Performing

Assessment

Over the two years, students will be required to complete assessment in three areas:

Composition: Two composition assignments each year (some students prefer to record an original

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 62


composition rather than write one. All students have access to computer software that allows them to

compose and hear what they have written simultaneously).

Analysis: There are two of these aural and visual analysis tasks each year. They take the form of either an

exam or an analytical essay.

Performance: There are two performing tasks per year. These can be vocal or instrumental, solo, ensemble

or conducting. Students are given choices in performance tasks and are able to perform using their personal

strengths.

Music allows students the chance to extend themselves and express their feeling, moods and creativity in a

positive way. Senior Music will give skills that will enrich your whole life. It is a great choice to make!

Homework

Students are regularly expected to revise and research topics and complete exercises from class.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 63


MUSIC EXTENSION

(Year 12 Only)

Why study Music Extension?

The Year 12 Music Extension syllabus is designed to cater for students with specific abilities in music. It is an

extension of the Senior Music syllabus and can only be undertaken in conjunction with the parent syllabus. The

course is studied for two semesters in Year 12.

In the course, a student with identified ability in performance (instrumental, vocal or conducting), composition

or musicology (an extension of the analysing dimension of the senior syllabus), has the opportunity to develop

personal potential beyond the scope of the parent syllabus.

The syllabus offers specialisation in any one of three areas:

performance

composition

musicology

Music Extension challenges students to extend their abilities in music. They need to be motivated and selfdisciplined.

Music extension allows students a great deal of freedom to work in a style or genre or field of

interest best suited to them and may act as a catalyst for further involvement with music beyond the school

environment.

Assessment

All specialisations (composing, performance and musicology) must complete an investigating task that relates to

some aspect of that specialisation. If written, the essay should be 1200-1500 words. If presented as an oral or

multi-media presentation, it should be a minimum of 5 minutes.

As well as the investigating task, each student presents a folder of work at monitoring (June) and verification

(October).

Performance students must have 3 minutes of performance at monitoring and 15 minutes at verification.

Composition students must have a recording of their composition at least 1 minute long at monitoring and 3

minutes (minimum) of a different composition at verification.

Musicology – an evidence based critical task at least 10 minutes in length and at least 2500 words at

verification in addition to 5-8 minutes or 1000 words at monitoring.

Homework

All students are expected to practise and prepare for their presentation. Each week all students are required to

present a segment of their work for the class.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 64


PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Why study Physical Education?

Physical Education is an Authority subject that deals with the areas of learning physical skills, understanding the

relationship between training and physical performance, and examining physical activity in society. It will be an

interesting area of study for students who are physically active, enjoy a wide range of sports, participate in sport

as a coach, or who would like to further their knowledge of the physical culture of Australia.

Prerequisites



A minimum of a “C” standard in Year 10 English, Extension Science and Physical Education.

An interest in physical fitness and a willingness to improve on existing skills in all practical areas of study.

Course Content

Theory

Focus Area A: Learning Physical Skills

Motor skill learning

Biomechanics

Psychology of learning physical skills

Focus Area B: Process and effects of training and exercise

Energy systems

Exercise physiology principles

Training program design

Practical

Volleyball

Netball

Touch

Competitive Aerobics

Focus Area C: Equity and access to exercise, sportand physical

activity in Australian society

Figueroa’s framework for examining equity and access in sport and

physical activity in Australian society

Assessment

The student’s Exit Level of Achievement will be based on her ability to:

understand the theoretical concepts of the course

develop skills in the practical components of the course

The theoretical and practical aspects of the course each contribute 50% to the Exit Level of Achievement.

A comprehensive assessment overview is presented on the next page.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 65


St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 66


PHYSICS

Why study Physics?

Physics is an OP eligible subject. Physics is defined by the Queensland Studies Authority as a culture that values

methods of precise measurements, reproducible experiments and powerful mathematical relationships.

Physics is the study of all forms of force, matter and energy which are known to exist as part of nature.

Therefore, in Physics we look at the natural laws of the universe from the subatomic level to the far reaches of

space. Knowledge of physics has led to developments in technology, such as telecommunications, and electrical

appliances which have had a profound impact on social structures.

After two years of Physics, students will be able to: apply scientific method, enact scientific enquiry and

experimentation while gaining familiarity with the instruments and practical aspects of this discipline.

Prerequisites

To study Physics in Year 11 and 12, the student should achieve a “B” or better in Year 10 Extension Science. They

need to be studying Year 10 Preparatory Mathematics B and achieve at least a “B” in Semester 2.

Course Content

Year 11:

Measurement, Motion

Forces, Momentum, Energy

Physics of Fun

Waves, Sight and Seeing

Physics of Music

Year 12:

Electronics

Magnetism, Electromagnetism

Nuclear Physics

Medical Physics

Relativity, Modern Physics

Physics in Space

Assessment

Assessment covers a range of techniques that includes supervised exams, extended experimental investigations

and assignments.

Additional Information

The Physics classes at St. Margaret Mary's College receive whole group instruction as well as individualised

tuition. They experience a wide range of practicals and experience using technology for simulation and to collect

data.

Homework is an essential component as success in the course depends on reinforcement of concepts covered in

each lesson. Homework is given regularly and students are encouraged to attend tutorial sessions and/or

develop study groups. It is essential that students are organised and motivated. There is also an expectation that

students develop their ability to work independently for long periods of time during extended experimental

investigations.

Career Paths

Studying Physics is recommended for a career as an engineer, medical radiation technologist, cardiologist,

audiologist, optometrist, meteorologist, astronomy, air traffic controller, surveyor, architect, pilot and a host of

science related fields from exercise science to aviation technology. It is also a worthy subject for electrical and

aeronautical apprenticeships.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 67


STUDY OF RELIGION

Why choose Study of Religion?

This course can contribute to the development of students’

intellectual skills

communication skills

critical thinking skills

cultural awareness

capacity to make judgements in relation to moral, ethical and religious issues

emotional, mental and spiritual health

Students’ achievement is based on the ability to demonstrate skills. These skills are associated with the criteria:

‘Knowledge and understanding’, ‘Evaluative processes’ and ‘Research and communication’.

Prerequisites

An ability to write coherently and analyse and think logically is required for Study of Religion. Students should

have an “A” or “B” result in Religious Education in Year 10. A “C” result or better in Year 10 English would be

advantageous.

Course content and Assessment

The core components of Study of Religion are:

Australian religious perspectives

World religions

The nature and significance of religion

Year 11

UNIT

The Nature of Religion

Ritual

Ritual

Religion/State Relations

Year 12

UNIT

Religion-State Relationships

Religion, Values and Ethics

Medical Ethics

Religion, Values and Ethics:

Business & Environmental Ethics

Ultimate Questions

ASSESSMENT

Short response - Supervised exam – 2hrs

Multimodal presentation: focus on a ritual from another religion other

than Christianity, 5-7 minutes presentation

Research assignment: an ethnographic investigation of a Christian ritual,

1000-1200 words

Extended written response: exploration of historical case studies in the

ways religion and state have interrelated

Supervised essay, 600-800 words, unseen question

ASSESSMENT

Response to Stimulus – Students explore and investigate how religion

coexists in a political world.

Unseen, in-class supervised essay

Case Study

Research task Multi modal presentation: the connection between the

world of business/ environmental issues and ethics

Unseen supervised Short answer/Response to stimulus: focus on

ultimate questions concerning the meaning and purpose of life, the value

of the human being, identity and destiny

Homework

Homework includes completing work from class, revision of major concepts and preparation of assignments. It is

always recommended that students work continuously throughout each semester on all of the above.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 68


VISUAL ART

Why study Visual Art?

Visual Art has been the medium to record our dreams, build our cities, and create and respond to the beauty in

our environment. Art enables us to communicate through a wide variety of mediums.

When coming to secondary school, all students are encouraged to work with a wide variety of media enabling

them to express themselves through visual communication and literacy.

When the student reaches Year 11, she chooses to study the subject at a more sophisticated level, thus enabling

her to respond to her environment with a more challenging and focussed approach. Year 11 Art students attend

an Art camp at Gumburu, Paluma, where they have the opportunity to work through a series of engaging and

creative workshops to create a folio of new ideas and techniques which will be developed and resolved at a later

date at school.

Prerequisites

Students must have studied Art in Year 10 and received at least a “C” result. Students who do not meet this

prerequisite may choose to study the Authority-Registered subject, Visual Art Studies.

Course Content

Art is a two year course of study based on units that comprise concepts, focuses and media areas. Students’

understanding of Making and Appraising work is developed through these diverse units of work. This is

supported by the learning processes of researching, developing and resolving works, whilst continuing to

enhance their skills with media and visual literacy.

Assessment

Year 11:

4 Making Folios

2Appraising Instruments

Year 12:

2 Bodies of work

2 Appraising Instruments

Homework

Ongoing research, journaling and practical work

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 69


QUEENSLAND STUDIES AUTHORITY (QSA)

AUTHORITY REGISTERED SUBJECTS

(Study Area Specifications)

Business (Certificate II in Business)

Early Childhood*

English Communication*

Hospitality*

Information & Communication Technology (ICT)*

Pre-Vocational Mathematics*

Recreation Studies*

Religion and Ethics*

Science in Practice*

Visual Art Studies*

____________________________________________________

* THESE SUBJECTS ARE GENERAL APPROACH B SAS SUBJECTS AND CONTAIN NO

NATIONALLY-RECOGNISED VET CERTIFICATES

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 70


BUSINESS (CERTIFICATE II IN BUSINESS)

Why study Business?

This subject is designed for students who wish to pursue a career in the business world. Students are given the

opportunity to develop both business and vocational skills as this subject combines general and vocational

educational components. This is an Authority-registered subject and students wishing to enrol in related

vocational education and training on leaving school will be eligible for appropriate credit in a Certificate II in

Business (BSB20107). The results of competencies achieved will be recorded on the Year 12 QCE Certificate, and

the school will also issue Certificates or Statements of Attainment depending on the number of competencies

demonstrated.

This two-year course is based on the study of 12 competencies which are made up of competencies drawn from

Certificate I, II and III of the Business Services training package (BSB07).

Structure of the Certificate

To achieve the qualification, students must achieve competence in the core unit of competency (Participate in

OHS Processes), and in 11 elective units of competency.

Code

BSBOHS201A

Description

Participate in OHS Processes (Core competency)

Elective competencies

Code Description Code Description

BSBITU101A Operate a personal computer BSBITU203A Communicate electronically

BSBITU102A Develop keyboard skills BSBWOR202A

Organise and complete daily work

activities

BSBCUS201A Deliver a service to customers BSBWOR203A Work effectively with others

BSBINM201A

Process and maintain workplace

information

BSBSUS201A

Participate in environmentally

sustainable work practices

BSBCMM201A Communicate in the workplace FNSICGEN305A

Maintain daily financial/business

records

BSBITU201A

Produce simple word processed

documents

BSBITU302A

Create electronic presentations

BSBITU202A Create and use spreadsheets BSBITU303A Design and produce text documents

Assessment

Assessment for the units of competency-based means that once the students can demonstrate they can do all of

the tasks required in a unit of competency, they will be given credit for that unit of competency.

Career Opportunities

Business provides vocational outcomes and skills appropriate for all career paths. On successful completion of

the vocational education units of competency in Certificate II in Business (BSB20107) the student will:

be able to carry out a limited range of entry-level employment tasks within a position such as clerical

assistant, receptionist, cashier etc.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 71


possess a range of skills, attitudes and knowledge that will assist the student in roles not specifically related

to employment, for example as a student and as a citizen in general.

be eligible for appropriate credit into related courses, offered by other training providers, for example, TAFE

Queensland.

Additional Information

Homework is done on an as needs basis. Normally this would mean the completion of work not completed in

class.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 72


EARLY CHILDHOOD

Why study Early Childhood?

The primary focus of the early childhood field of study and industry is to promote the well-being of young

children and a greater awareness of the importance of quality practices in the community. Throughout this

course, you will develop:

respect for young children and an understanding of their social, emotional, physical, intellectual and

language development

a knowledge and understanding of child development from birth to eight years

the ability to communicate in a variety of modes

practical skills in a care-giving role including teamwork and co-operative planning

an awareness of cultural values and influences in child-rearing practices, especially those which are seen

within Australian society

the ability to operate as an independent, reflective and self-directed learner

a knowledge and understanding of early childhood environments and programs that facilitate all aspects of

the development of young children

a knowledge and understanding of the role of parents, caregivers and early childhood professionals in

providing suitable environments and programs

an awareness of ethical and legislative issues related to the care of children

knowledge and skills essential to participation in the workforce, particularly the early childhood sector.

Prerequisites

There are no academic prerequisites for this subject. A “C” level of literacy is desirable if you want to achieve

employment in the early childhood setting.

Course Content

Core Topics

The value of play

Quality early childhood practices

Observing children

Elective Units

Introducing early childhood (compulsory)

Understanding growth and development (compulsory)

Social and emotional development of children

Physical development

Intellectual and language development

The physical care of children

Play in early childhood

Creativity, self-expression and problem solving in early

childhood

Parenting

Behaviour in early childhood

Children with special needs

Accident prevention and safety

Career pathways working with young children

Assessment

Assessment is mostly practical. The emphasis is on communication. Criteria for assessment are:

Practical skills

Knowledge and understanding

Reasoning

Assessment techniques will include:

Practical skills – toy making, demonstrations, orals, excursions, designing learning activities, interaction with

young children

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 73


Teacher observation of student skills

Objective and short-response tests

Response to stimulus tasks e.g. guest speaker, case studies, film, role play

Reports on excursions, observations of children, childcare environments

Non-written tasks e.g. posters, collage, photo essay, story reading

Where possible, students will be assessed in real and/or simulated early childhood situations.

Homework

This is consistent with the outline given to all Year 11 students. The amount will vary throughout each semester,

depending on the requirements of each topic or elective.

Career Pathways

This subject is linked to employment in the early childhood field but you will require further tertiary

certifications to qualify e.g.

Home based childcare provider

Assistant in a childcare centre

Nanny

Assistant in early childhood setting (kindergarten and Pre-school to Year 3)

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 74


ENGLISH COMMUNICATION

Why study English Communication?

In Australia, English is the principal spoken language and the predominant written language of personal and

public life. Proficiency in and understanding of English allows people to share in and contribute to current and

future local, national and global communities and cultures.

Effective communication is integral to our society. New technologies, the influences of globalisation and the

restructured workplace require students to be able to interpret, construct and make judgements about

meanings in texts, in preparation for lifelong learning.

This study area specification offers students opportunities, within the contexts of work, community and leisure,

to use language to perform tasks, use technology, express identity, and interact in groups, organisations and the

community.

The concept of language and literacy as social practice is fundamental to this study area specification in English

Communication. It is through texts that people express and share the vitality of cultures and communities; tell

the stories of cultures; contribute to the shaping of personal, group and national identities; explore ideas and

feelings that invite reflection on knowledge, values and practices; promote shared cultural understandings; and

actively participate in communities. Because of this, a contextualised approach to teaching and learning is

adopted in English Communication.

This study area specification has been developed as a two-year Authority-registered subject to take into account

the needs of students from a variety of cultural, social, linguistic and economic backgrounds. English

Communication can establish a basis for students’ further learning as well as developing essential

communication skills to enhance employment opportunities.

Course Content

Workplace relationships Heroes and role models Sport/Arts/Music

The right training & Carer for me Film/Literature Reading for pleasure

Rights and responsibilities Holidays and travel Self / identity

Small business

Undertaking Charity work

Families and friends

Objectives





Knowledge of contextual factors

Knowledge of textual features

Knowledge and understanding of texts

Affective objectives

Assessment

Assessment takes place in a variety of forms including written which is 50% of assessment. The emphasis is on

practical and oral presentations including PowerPoint multimedia. Creativity, self-direction and independently

extending personal skills is encouraged.

Homework

The majority of work done in this subject takes place during class time. Unfurnished work is completed for

homework.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 75


HOSPITALITY

Why study Hospitality?

Hospitality is designed to provide an understanding of the hospitality industry, workplace culture and practices,

and develop practical skills and attitudes for making decisions.

Prerequisites

There are no academic prerequisites for this subject. To be successful in this subject, you must be interested in

food and beverage preparation and service. You must be able to work hygienically and safely as part of a team.

Course Content

The course is based on food production, beverage production and food and beverage service. Wherever

possible, learning experiences are conducted within hospitality events and include:

using hygienic, safe and efficient work methods to practice food production techniques

designing and evaluating a range of foods for different situations and customers

planning menus

completing cost analyses to meet profit requirements for functions

completing requisitions and order forms and purchasing commodities

liaising with industry representatives

planning and evaluating hospitality ventures and events

Assessment

Practical tasks may demonstrate some or all of the following:

planning and decision making e.g. coffee service

procedures and techniques e.g. knife skills, using industrial ovens

estimating and costing e.g. costing salads, soups

product development and presentation e.g. gourmet sandwiches, cheese platters

food and beverage production and service e.g. soup kitchen, coffee shop

Presentations – e.g. orals that may be supported by visual aids (PowerPoint)

Response to stimulus tasks – these could include short-answers, paragraphs, posters and charts, letters to

specific organisations / clients.

Short reports – may be written following a case study, industry visit, interview, survey or a hospitality event.

Objective and short-response tests

Homework

Homework will vary with each topic and you will participate in some functions held outside of normal school

hours (with negotiation and appropriate notice) e.g. Year 12 Mocktail evening.

Career Pathways

This could be as a full-time career choice in Food Preparation, Food Service, Bar Operations or Housekeeping and

Front Office Operations.

Additional Information

The school provides food items required for practical classes. As part of your Hospitality uniform, you will

require a pair of black trousers or skirt.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 76


INFORMATION & COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

Why study Information & Communications Technology?

Computers are an integral part of today’s work, study and leisure. Even if not directly using computers, all

individuals in society are affected in some way by their use. Most social environments involve the use of

information and communications technologies (ICTs) in some form for entertainment, educational and

recreational purposes.

The study of the subject Information and Communications Technology is designed to help students use this

technology effectively, efficiently and ethically. Students learn to use ICTs to develop practical solutions to real

life and simulated real life problems and to become confident, competent and self-motivated users of ICTs.

Prerequisites

There are no prerequisites for the study of Information & Communications Technology. Study of ICTE in Year 10

is an advantage but not a requirement. Students with limited keyboard and software skills will have an

opportunity to develop these skills during the Information & Communications Technology course.

Course Content

Approach B (Vocational Learning) of the Information & Communications Technology Study Area Specification is

offered at Saint Margaret Mary's College. This subject is based upon a number of core principles which provide a

basis for the acquisition of skills and understanding of concepts:

Using ICTs competently

Managing time and resources effectively and efficiently

Communicating and working with others

Engaging in self-directed learning

Making informed decisions

Employing safe and healthy procedures in the use of ICTs

Using ICTs ethically

Striving for excellence and aiming for quality

The course of study is based upon eight elective units, each of which is studied for a term:

Digital Still Imaging

Animation

Managing Data

Online Communication

Website Development

Multimedia Authoring

Digital Video

During the course, the students will become proficient in using such resources as the Internet and email,

multimedia, printers, scanners, microphones, video cameras and digital cameras. They will have access to a

variety of software and will practise choosing the most appropriate software and resources for a given task. The

skills and understandings developed in the course will provide a firm basis for further learning whether the

student’s future use of ICTs is vocational, educational, personal or recreational.

Assessment

Assessment is an integral part of the learning process in Information & Communications Technology. The

approach taken in the course is task-centred with the emphasis on using ICTs to solve problems or complete

tasks. Many of these tasks involve developing products for real clients. The projects which students undertake

are assessed both through the products developed (their functionality and presentation) and process of

development (how the student worked during the task and managed time, resources and constraints and the

ability to reflect on and learn from the task).

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 77


Homework

Students will be expected to complete homework at various times during the course. There is no necessity for

students to own a computer as most practical work is completed in class time. Where extra time on a computer

is required, arrangements will be made for lunchtime or after school access of school computer facilities. ICT

tutorials are held one afternoon each week.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 78


PRE-VOCATIONAL MATHEMATICS

Why study Pre-Vocational Mathematics?

Pre-Vocational Mathematics is designed to help students improve their numeracy by building their confidence

and success in making meaning of mathematics. It aims to assist students to overcome any past difficulties with,

or negative attitudes towards, mathematics, so that they can use mathematics efficiently and critically to make

informed decisions in their daily lives.

Numeracy is more than being able to operate with numbers. It requires mathematical knowledge and

understanding, mathematical problem-solving skills, literacy skills and positive beliefs and attitudes.

Course Content

A course of study is based on five topics that are grouped into three categories according to the purposes and

functions of using mathematics in various contexts. These categories are:

Interpreting society: this relates to interpreting and reflecting on numerical and graphical information of

relevance to self, work or the community.

Personal organisation: this relates to the numeracy requirements for personal matters involving money,

time and travel.

Practical purposes: this relates to the physical world in terms of designing, making and measuring.

The five topics are:

1. Mathematics for interpreting society: Number (study area core)

2. Mathematics for interpreting society: Data

3. Mathematics for personal organisation: Location and Time

4. Mathematics for practical purposes: Measurement

5. Mathematics for personal organisation: Finance

These five topics are integrated into teaching and learning contexts which have relevance to them. Because

these contexts foster co-operation, and are supportive, enjoyable and non-competitive, students develop

positive attitudes towards the use of mathematics.

Assessment

Students are assessed on the three criteria of: Knowing, Applying and Explaining:

In Knowing, students demonstrate knowledge of content and use given rules, operations and procedures to

carry out simple, familiar tasks.

In Applying, students interpret and analyse different contexts, identify familiar mathematics, develop

strategies, then select and apply rules and procedures to carry out tasks.

In Explaining, students use basic mathematical and everyday language to present and explain their

responses to tasks in both familiar and different contexts.

Over the two years there are a variety of tasks including tests, assignments, field trips, oral presentations and

practical projects.

Homework

Students are expected to keep up with classwork. This could mean revising or completing some tasks at home,

especially assignments.

Additional Information

From excursions to shopping centres, to costing your dream car, it’s all about you!

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 79


RECREATION STUDIES

Why study Recreational Studies?

Recreation Studies is an Authority-Registered subject that examines the effects of recreation on individuals and

communities, investigates the role of physical activity in maintaining a healthy lifestyle, evaluates strategies to

promote health and safety, and develops interpersonal and group dynamics.

Prerequisites



A “C” Level of Achievement in Year 10 Sport and Recreation.

An interest in physical fitness and recreation pursuits.

Aims

Recreation aims to develop an awareness and understanding of various recreational and health and safety

pursuits through:

Participating in and promoting a positive attitude to recreational and sporting fitness

Acquiring and applying knowledge about sport and recreation in the community

Promoting risk awareness

Evaluating personal and group cohesiveness

Course content

Theory

1. Recreation, you and the community – examining

the effects of recreation on individuals and

communities

2. Physical activity and healthy lifestyle –

investigating the role of physical activity in

maintaining good health

3. Safety, risk awareness and health concerns –

evaluating strategies to promote health and safety

Practical

Bronze Medallion

Survival / Camping techniques

Games organisation / Coaching

Futsal / Indoor soccer

Fitness / Gym

Tennis

Target sports: Bowling / Lawn Bowls /

Bocce / Mini golf / Aquatics

4. Interpersonal and group dynamics – investigating

personal and interpersonal skills to achieve goals

Assessment

The student’s Exit level of achievement will be based on her ability to:

Understand the theoretical concepts of the course and apply them to practical components

Develop and evaluate skills in the practical components of the course – games and sport

Participation and involvement in all activities including the Athletics Carnival and Year 8 games

Half of the allocated time will be given to practical activities. Theoretical and practical components are

intertwined and depend on each other for a successful outcome.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 80


RELIGION & ETHICS

Why study Religion and Ethics?

Religion & Ethics encourages students to explore their personal values and life choices and the way in which

these are related to their beliefs. A search for meaning assists students from various cultural, social, linguistic

and economic backgrounds to learn about and reflect on the richness of religious and ethical worldviews.

‘Religion’ is understood as a faith tradition based on a common understanding of beliefs and practice and ‘ethics’

refers to systematic approaches to making good decisions for oneself and for society as a whole.

Within this subject, the focus is on students gaining knowledge and developing ability to reflect on, critique and

communicate this knowledge in relation to their lives and the world in which they live.

Prerequisites

Nil.

Course Content

The course is structured as four units in each year.

YEAR 11 YEAR 12

Peace Studies

Medical Ethics

Environmental Ethics

Social Justice

Heroes and Role Models

Spirituality and Ritual

Religions of the World

Life Choices

Assessment

Assessment is concerned with the extent to which students meet the objectives in the following criteria:

Knowledge, Process and Communication.

UNIT

Peace Studies

Medical Ethics

Environmental Ethics

Social Justice

Heroes and Role Models

Spirituality & Ritual

Religions of the World

Life Choices

ASSESSMENT

Assignment - compiling a promotional package for the official opening of a local

‘Peace Park’.

Response to Stimulus based on topics such as Organ Donation, Euthanasia,

Reproductive Technology – in-class supervised.

Group Oral Presentation - multi-modal - identifying a current environmental issue

which provides evidence of humanity’s contribution to De-creation

Assignment – based on the examination of a current social justice issue.

Part A – assignment – a hero today

Part B - in-class supervised – Gospel study

Oral: Each group plans and prepares a liturgy which the class celebrates.

In-class supervised - discussion based on one world religion e.g. Buddhism,

Judaism, Islam, Catholicism.

No Assessment

Homework

No formal homework is set. However, some time will need to be spent completing assessment tasks.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 81


SCIENCE IN PRACTICE

Why study Science in Practice?

A course of study devised from Science in Practice aims to assist students to develop knowledge, skills, attitudes

and values that are transferable to a range of work options and life plans. Students will develop:

scientific literacy and numeracy skills

a curiosity and interest for the world they live in, and consequently a sense of responsibility for the

stewardship of their local and global environments

an appreciation of the issues and impacts of science

knowledge, practical skills and work-related practices which are essential for effective participation in the

workforce

the ability to communicate effectively

the skills to use and apply a range of technologies

the knowledge, abilities and ethical commitment to participate as active citizens in a rapidly changing world.

Prerequisites

Nil.

Course Content

There are five major topics that are covered. They are:

Science for the Workplace

Resources, Energy and Sustainability

Health and Lifestyles

Environments

Discovery and Change.

Practical and field work form an integral part of this study area. At least 10 hours per year is set aside for student

field work. This may range from local, short duration activities to an extended excursion, for example visiting

local industries, places of work, laboratories, museums, accessing mobile laboratories, displays, resources as well

as local natural environments (bushland, creek and dam).

Science in Practice courses are rich in learning experiences involving the use of scientific instrumentation and

technology. The use of computers and data-logging equipment will significantly enhance the learning outcomes

of this Authority-registered subject. Use of the following technologies is included:







computers (e.g. spreadsheets, accessing the internet, creation of websites or blogs)

data-loggers

interactive whiteboards

presentation software such as PowerPoint

electronic databases

telecommunication technologies

Assessment

The following types of assessment techniques will be used:

practical project

assignment

portfolio

supervised assessment.

Homework

Students are expected to keep up with classwork. This could mean revising or completing some tasks at home,

especially assignments.

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 82


VISUAL ART STUDIES

Why study Visual Art Studies?

Visual Art Studies enables the student who enjoys the practical side of Art but does not wish to do the theory

component of QSA Art.

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop the necessary practical skills in a range of Visual

Art disciplines such as painting, drawing, printmaking, ceramic sculpture or mixed media over a four semester

course.

The students will have the opportunity to create wearable art and to create printed consumer articles decorated

with original designs and art works, such as T-shirts, shoulder bags and gift card sets. They will be required to

keep a visual journal and record of their progress. The students will become aware of Hazards in the Art Room

and Workplace Health & Safety.

Prerequisites

A love of Art and Crafts

Assessment



Practical folios

Visual diary

Homework

Organising and completion of Art projects

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 83


EXPLANATION OF TERMS























Advanced standing refers to the credit granted to a student towards an accredited course or training

program on the basis of previous study, experience or competencies held.

Articulation is the process used to progress from one level of qualification to another.

The Australian Qualifications Training Framework (AQTF) shows all the qualifications issued in post

compulsory education in Australia and how these qualifications relate to each other.

Competencies are the knowledge and skills a person must have to do a specific job or to gain a specific AQF

qualification.

Credit transfer recognises previous formal study or training based on documented evidence of achievement.

For instance, modules assessed as competent in an Authority Subject or SAS may attract credit for a subject

in a TAFE diploma. (See also Advance Standing above).

Field Positions (FPs) rank students on their achievements in up to five fields. These are dimensions of study

that emphasise particular knowledge and skills. FP scores are used for tertiary entrance only when there is a

need to select students from within the same OP band.

ILO: Individual Learning Outcome

LUI: Learner’s Unique Identifier

Overall Position (OP): Score which indicates a student’s rank order position in the State reported in bands

from 1 (highest) to 25

Prerequisite: A subject or qualification required for eligibility for entry to a particular course of study or

employment

QCE: Queensland Certificate of Education

Queensland Core Skills (QCS) Test is conducted over 2 days in 3 rd term for Year 12 students. To be eligible

for an OP and FP’s you must sit the QCS Test. If you are not eligible for an OP or FP’s the test is voluntary.

For students not eligible for an OP, sitting the test may improve their Selection Rank.

Queensland Studies Authority (QSA): The statutory body that has taken over the functions and powers of

the former Board of Senior Secondary School Studies, the Tertiary Entrance Procedures Authority, and the

Queensland School Curriculum Council. This body approves subject syllabi for Years 11/12, accredits school

work programs and issues Senior Certificates that records students’ achievements. The QSA also administers

the Queensland Core Skills Test (QCST), which is used to scale students’ results when calculating OP’s

(Overall Positions) and FP’s (Field Positions) for tertiary entrance.

Queensland Tertiary Admissions Centre Ltd (QTAC) acts on behalf of universities and TAFE institutes to

publish course information and requirements, to provide application materials and to receive and process

applications.

Rank: A QTAC selection score allocated to students not eligible for an OP, based on their results recorded

on the Senior Certificate. Used mainly for those students to be considered for entry to TAFE and university

diploma courses.

Recognition of prior learning (RPL) is the process used to assess the competencies a person has gained from

past experience and training. RPL is a form of assessment and each person is treated individually. (See also

Advanced Standing and Credit Transfer, above).

Recommended (or desirable) subjects are not essential, but are likely to make future courses easier to

follow.

Recorded Subjects are those subjects, other than Authority Subjects or Authority Registered subjects

offered by an educational institution approved by the QSA e.g. AMEB music and speech results.

Selection Ranks are calculated for tertiary applicants who are not school leavers or are senior students not

eligible for an OP. For senior students who are not eligible for an OP, the Selection Rank is determined by

achievements recorded on the Senior Certificate, the Queensland Core Skills Test and other criteria.

SET Plan: Student Education and Training Plan

VET: Vocational Education and Training

Voc Ed: Vocational Education

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 84


NOTES

St Margaret Mary’s College Senior Handbook for 2012 Page 85

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