Schedule of Classes - Butler University

butler.edu

Schedule of Classes - Butler University

B U T L E R U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G S E M E S T E R 2 0 1 1 S C H E D U L E O F C L A S S E S


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Schedule of Classes

Spring 2011

Contents

General information Page

University Core Curriculum 10

First-Year Seminar Dr. Lysacker JH184B ext. 8061 10

Global and Historical Studies Dr. Hanson JH380 ext. 9679 18

Area 1 (PCA, SW, TI) Dr. Mix FB008 ext. 6457 20

Area 2 (AR, NW, PWB) Dr. Ryan GH047 ext. 9977 20

Honors Program Dr. Morrel JH153 ext. 9273 24

Center for High Achievement and Scholarly Engagement

Irwin Library IL109A ext. 9714 4

Learning Resource Center Ms. Griggs JH136 ext. 9308 25

Washington DC Semester Dr. Morrel JH153 ext. 9273 25

Liberal Arts and Sciences Dr. Howard JH237 ext. 9224 26

African Studies Dr. Jett JH347B ext. 8451

Anthropology Dr. Swanson JH349C ext. 9680 26

Biological Sciences Dr. Salsbury GH255 ext. 9879 27

Chemistry Dr. O’Reilly GH300 ext. 9806 28

Classical Studies Dr. Bauman JH202C ext. 8705 29

Computer Science Dr. Sorenson FB158 ext. 9765 30

Economics Dr. Rieber HB262 ext. 9006 40

Engineering Dr. Kirsch GH347 ext. 9400 30

English Dr. Flanzbaum JH308C ext. 9860 30

Gender, Women and Dr. Deno JH349D ext. 9681 41

Sexuality Studies

History Dr. Swanson JH349C ext. 9680 33

International Studies Dr. Menendez JH371B ext. 9284 40

Mathematics/Actuarial Science Dr. Carpenter JH270A ext. 9436 35

Modern Languages, Dr. Carney JH392 ext. 8438 36

Literature and Cultures

Peace Studies Dr. McEvoy-Levy JH347D ext. 9465 42

Philosophy and Religion Dr. Bauman JH202C ext. 8705 37

Physics and Astronomy Dr. Han GH239 ext. 9873 38

Political Science Dr. Jett JH347B ext. 8451 39

Psychology Dr. Morris JH290 ext. 8707 39

Science, Technology and Society Dr. Reeves JH325B ext. 9858 43

Sociology Dr. Novak JH371A ext. 6176 40

College of Education Dr. Shelley JH171E ext. 9752 45

College of Business Dr.Updyke HB162 ext. 9531 48

College of Pharmacy Dr. Andritz PB107 ext. 9322 52

and Health Sciences

Jordan College of Fine Arts Michelle Jarvis LH138E ext. 9231 85

Arts Administration Susan Zurbuchen LH131 ext. 9567 58

Dance Larry Attaway LH52 ext. 9346 59

Music Daniel Bolin LH214 ext. 9246 61

Theatre William Fisher LH152 ext. 9659 65

Art Program Gautam Rao FC116 ext. 5985 58

College of Communication Dr. Neher FB218 ext. 9815 67

Creative Media and Entertainment Christine Taylor FB102 ext. 5967 68

Critical Media and Rhetoric Dr. Harthcock FB112 ext. 5966 70

Journalism and Electronic Media Dr. Whitmore FB118 ext. 8080 70

Organizational Communication Dr.Waite FB218D ext. 9626 69

and Leadership

Strategic Communication: Dr. Rademacher FB238 ext. 9823 67

PR and Advertising

Communication Sciences Dr. Reading JH274A ext. 9492 67

and Disorders

Air Force ROTC Jackie Harding (800) IUB-ROTC 44

Army ROTC Captain Douglas Rapp (317) 274-2644 43

Butler University is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission and is a

member of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools


Academic Calendar for 2010–2011

Spring 2011

Oct. 18–29 Advising for Spring 2011 registration

Nov. 1–12 Self Service Registration for continuing

students

Jan. 10 M Last day to apply for admission

Jan. 13-14 R–F New student orientation

Jan. 17 M Martin Luther King holiday (no classes)

Jan. 18 T First day of instruction

Jan. 24 M Last day to add a course (5 p.m.)

Jan. 31 M Last day to drop a course (5 p.m.)

Feb. 14 T Last day to change P/F to credit or

credit to P/F

Feb. 28 T Early term grades due in Registration

and Records by 10 a.m.

March 14–18 M–F Spring break (no classes)

March 28–April 8 Advising for Fall and Summer 2011

registration

April 1 F Last day to withdraw or change to

non-credit (5 p.m.)

April 11–22 M–F Self Service Registration for continuing

students

May 2 M Last meeting of classes

May 3 T Reading day

May 4–10 W–T Final examinations

May 12 R Grades due by 10 a.m. in Registration

and Records

May 14 S Commencement

Summer 2011 Planning Dates

Summer I: May 16–June 24

March 28–April 8 Advising begins for Summer I 2011

(concurrent with advising for Fall 2011)

April 11–May 13 Self Service Registration for continuing

students

May 9 M Last day to apply for non-degree admission

May 16 M First Day of Class

May 30 M Memorial Day holiday (no classes)

June 24 F Last day of class

June 27 T Grades Due in Registration and Records

by 10 a.m.

Summer II: June 27–August 5

March 28–April 8 Advising begins for Summer II 2011

(concurrent with advising for Fall 2011)

April 11–May 13 Self Service Registration for continuing

students

June 20 M Last day to apply for non-degree admission

June 27 M First day of class

July 4 M Independence Day holiday (no classes)

Aug. 5 F Last day of class

Aug. 9 T Grades Due in Registration and Records

by 10 a.m.

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Admission

Students may seek admission to Butler University in one of the following ways:

Freshman. Students who have completed or will complete high

school prior to the beginning of the term or high school graduates

with fewer than 12 hours of college coursework after high school

graduation may be considered for freshman admission. All

applicants must submit the following to the Office of Admission:

• Application for Freshman Admission and Scholarships

• The application fee (waived for online applicants)

• An official high school transcript and the Secondary School

Report sent from the high school guidance office

• Official results of the SAT and/or ACT (the writing portion

is required) or for international students, official results of the

TOEFL or other proof of English proficiency

• A writing sample as indicated on the application

• A list of activities/activities resume as indicated on the

application

• Other documents as indicated on the application

Transfer. Students who have completed 12 hours or more of

college coursework after high school graduation from any regionally

accredited post-secondary institution may be considered for

admission as transfer students. All transfer applicants must submit

the following items to the Office of Admission:

• Complete Application for Transfer Admission and Scholarships

• The application fee (waived for online applicants)

• An official high school transcript or GED certificate if they

have not received

a four-year college degree

• Official results of the SAT and/or ACT (waived for students

who have been out of high school for longer than four years

or have earned a bachelor’s degree) or for international

students, official results of the TOEFL or other proof of

English proficiency

• Official transcripts from all previous colleges and/or

universities sent directly from the issuing institution

• A writing sample as indicated on the application

Graduate. Students who have completed a bachelor’s degree from

Butler University or another regionally accredited university or

college may be considered for a graduate program. All students must

submit the following items to the Office of Admission:

• Complete Application for Graduate Admission

• Application fee (waived online applicants and/or Butler

graduates)

• Official transcript from each college or university previously

attended mailed directly from the issuing institution

• Official results of the GRE, GMAT or MAT if required for the

program of interest

• Official results of the TOEFL or other proof of English

proficiency for international students

• Additional requirements for specific program as indicated on

the application

International students. For information regarding additional

documents that may be required, international students are

encouraged to contact the Office of Admission by email at

intadmission@butler.edu.


Non-degree/visiting. Students who do not wish to pursue a

degree, or visiting (transient) students who currently are enrolled

at another college or university, but would like to enroll in courses

at Butler University to transfer back to their home institutions,

may apply as non-degree students. Non-degree applications and

supporting documents must be submitted no later than one

week prior to the first day of classes.

• Undergraduate students must submit the non-degree

application and provide official documents from the last

school attended indicating satisfactory academic standing.

A maximum of 18 credit hours may be taken on the

undergraduate non-degree status.

• Graduate students must submit the non-degree application

and official college transcripts indicating the date a bachelor’s

degree was awarded. Although graduate students may take an

unlimited number of courses on a non-degree basis, a maximum

of 9–12 non-degree hours (depending on the program) may

be applied toward the student’s selected master’s degree

program. Some graduate programs and classes are open

only to degree-seeking students. Please contact the Office

of Admission with questions.

• The College of Education offers workshops throughout the

year to encourage and support continuing professional\

development. A list of workshops and a workshop application

form may be obtained from the College of Education or on

our website at www.butler.edu/coe. Workshop applications

and supporting documents can be submitted up to one

week prior to the end of the class.

Note: Non-degree students who wish to continue their studies at

Butler University as degree-seeking students must contact the Office

of Admission to complete the appropriate (undergraduate or graduate)

application for admission.

Renewed enrollment. Previously enrolled students who wish to

return to Butler University after an absence:

• Undergraduate students who have not attended Butler

University for one or more semesters, or graduate students

who have not attended Butler University for two or more

semesters, must file an Application for Renewed Enrollment

with the Office of Registration and Records. An official transcript

of any coursework taken since last attending Butler University

must be submitted to the Office of Registration and Records

from the college attended. An application for renewed

enrollment is available online at www.butler.edu/

registrar/?pg=1143.

• Students seeking to renew enrollment into a program different

than their previous degree may be required to submit the

appropriate application to the Office of Admission. Applications

for admission are available in both electronic and PDF formats

on the Office of Admission website: http://go.butler.edu.

Office of Admission Contact Information:

• Undergraduate admission: Robertson Hall, (317) 940-8100

• Graduate admission: Robertson Hall, (317) 940-8140

• Toll free: (888) 940-8100

• Fax: (317) 940-8150

• Email: admission@butler.edu

• Web: http://go.butler.edu

Student Disability Services

Student Disability Services facilitates accommodation and support

services for students with properly documented disabilities. Any

student with a document¬ed physical or mental impairment that

substantially limits one or more of life’s major activities may qualify.

Written documentation from the appropriate professional is

required. Additional information, including documentation guidelines,

is available at www.butler.edu/disability. Please contact

Michele Atterson, director of student disability services, Jordan

Hall, Room 136 or (317) 940-9308.

Advisors

All students enrolled in credit courses have academic advisors. If

you expect to take courses for credit toward licenses or degrees, you

should consult with the proper advisor. A personal interview may be

necessary and at that time you will be registered by your advisor, or

allowed to register through the Butler University portal My.Butler.edu.

Drop/add and withdrawal. Self-Service Registration is available

through the first week of class. After the first week of class, all changes

must have the signature of the instructor as well as the advisor.

The change is effective on the date it is processed by the Office of

Registration and Records, usually the same day received.

Audit for enrichment

The Audit for Enrichment (AFE) program is designed for adults who

have achieved at least a high school diploma to participate in some

courses. All persons must make application to this program at least

30 days prior to the first day of class. With your first application,

you will be asked to provide transcripts of your highest level

academic work. You will be notified of your acceptance into the

program by the registrar. If you have been part of the AFE program

in the prior two years, it is not necessary to provide transcripts again.

Departmental approval is required for all AFE enrollment. Courses

taken in this program are not listed on an official transcript nor

may you change your enrollment to “credit” later in the semester.

You may register as early as the first day of class and all registrations

are on a space-available basis. Auditors will not have access to any

electronic resources associated with the course. The audit for

enrichment fee of $100 per credit hour is payable at the time of

registration and is not refundable. For an application, visit the

registrar’s office in Jordan Hall, Room 133.

Residence requirement

All first year students not living at home with a parent are required

to live in one of the residence halls. All sophomore and junior

students (including those affiliated with a Greek organization) not

living at home with a parent or legal guardian will be required to live

in University housing or an approved Greek housing unit of which

he or she is a member.

Advising Spring 2011

An early period of advising and registration is available and

recommended for students currently enrolled at Butler. Advising

for Spring 2011 will be from October 18–October 29, 2010. You

should contact your advisor and schedule an advising appointment

in these two weeks. For degree seeking students, your advisor will

OK your registration.

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Registration for Spring 2011

For continuing students: your registration appointment time will

be posted as early as November 1 on My.Butler.edu. Please check

this day and time. You will have access to look at your current transcript

and advising audit through My.Butler.edu. At your advising

appointment you will discuss your schedule for the next semester.

You will be able to register for classes using My.Butler.edu when

your registration appointment opens. Appointments begin after

advising for the semester is complete. Appointment times will be:

7 a.m., 7:30 a.m., noon, 12:30 p.m., 3 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 4:30

p.m., 5 p.m., 5:30 p.m., 6 p.m., 6:30 p.m., 7 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.

Registration appointment times for all students will be scheduled

Monday through Friday, November 2–13, 2010. Hours of the help

desk will be posted on My.Butler.edu.

All registrations in Applied Music must have the approval of the

dean of the Jordan College of Fine Arts. If your schedule includes

an arranged course, you may secure a Permission Number from the

department head or dean. You will use this Permission Number to

register for Applied Music Courses.

Graduate students may register during any published registration

period. Non-degree students may register following the last group

of freshmen. Spring 2010 semester registration and course changes.

Registration and course changes will be held according to the

schedule listed below prior to the first day of class.

Thursday, Jan. 7 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Registration and drop/add

Friday, Jan. 8 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Registration and drop/add

Spring late registration and course changes

Tuesday, Jan. 18 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Registration and drop/add

Wednesday, Jan. 19 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Registration and drop/add

Thursday, Jan. 20 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Registration and drop/add

Friday, Jan. 21 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Registration and drop/add

Monday, Jan. 24. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Registration and drop/add

The last day to add for credit is Jan. 24, 2010, 5 p.m.

The last day to drop a course is Jan. 31, 2010, 5 p.m.

Insufficient enrollment

Whenever the enrollment in a course is deemed insufficient, the

University reserves the right to withdraw that course. When small

classes are continued, full payment of fees is required at the time of

registration. In such cases no refund will be permitted.

Student identification numbers

Butler University uses a computer assigned number for the student

identifier. New or returning students automatically will receive this

number when they are admitted. Student numbers for all other

students will remain the same.

The social security number will be a secondary identifier for all

students. In accordance with federal and state law, you have the

right to refuse disclosure of this number.

All students may obtain their student identification cards from the

Vehicle Registration and I.D. office, located at 525 W. Hampton

Drive. Initial ID cards are free; replacement cards are $20. Replacement

fees will be charged directly to the student’s account.

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Consortium Registration

Fall and spring semester only

Butler University is a member of a consortium of institutions

comprised of Franklin College, Indiana University Purdue University

at Indianapolis (IUPUI), Ivy Tech State College, Marian College,

Martin University and University of Indianapolis. The purpose

of the consortium is to offer a wider range of courses to students.

You may participate in the consortium registration during fall and

spring semesters if you are enrolled for at least three credit hours as

a fully admitted degree-seeking student. To participate, you should

obtain the necessary form from the Office of Registration and

Records, Jordan Hall, Room 133, before consulting your advisor. The

completed, signed form needs to be returned to the same office.

Consortium registration occurs on a space-available basis two or

three weeks prior to the beginning of the semester. Consortium

registered students pay tuition only at their home institutions except

for special course fees that may be required in some courses. Grades are

accepted as if the course was taken at the home institution;

however, these courses are not eligible for the repeat policy. Students

bypass the standard admission procedure at the host institution.

One course per semester is allowed with a maximum of four courses

per student. For more information go to www.butler.edu/registrar

or stop in Jordan Hall, Room 133.

Privacy Rights

A student directory of names and addresses is published soon

after the beginning of the fall semester. Names and local

telephone numbers of all students are available on the Butler

University student portal, My.Butler.edu. If you wish to prevent the

release of such directory information, you can do so by completing

a form that is available in the Office of Registration and Records

within 10 days of the first class day. The full text on the privacy

rights of students is contained in the student handbook available

in the student affairs office and on the Butler University webpage.

Library

The Butler University libraries contain approximately 270,000 book

volumes, scores and multi-media items; approximately 35,000 print

and electronic full text periodicals, over 75,000 bound periodicals,

and 45,000 microform volumes. Enhancing these collections is a

strong array of services, such as professional reference and research

assistance, library instructional services, faculty reserve readings

(print and electronic), interlibrary loan (including electronic

transmission of many articles) and circulation. Normal operating

hours for Butler libraries are:

Irwin Library

Monday–Thursday 7:30 a.m.–1 a.m.

Friday 7:30 a.m.–6 p.m.

Saturday 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

Sunday 10 a.m.–1 a.m.

Science Library

Monday–Thursday 8 a.m.–midnight

Friday 8 a.m.–8 p.m.

Saturday 10 a.m.–8 p.m.

Sunday noon–midnight

A validated student identification card is required to borrow library

materials.


Parking

All full- and part-time students must register vehicles with the Butler

University Police Department. The initial decal costs $60; each

additional decal costs $50. Replacement decals cost $5. Decals

may be obtained at the identification/vehicle registration office,

located at 525 W. Hampton Drive. The parking policy requires that

students and staff be aware of University parking and traffic regulations.

Parking fines should be paid at the Office of Student

Accounts, Jordan Hall, Room 102. Parking and traffic citations

may be appealed, in writing, to the Butler University Police

Department. The fine for non-registration of a vehicle is $30.

A parking map is available at BUPD, 525 W. Hampton Drive.

Bookstore

You may purchase textbooks, supplies and other materials for class

work at the Butler University Bookstore or at www.butler.bkstr.

com. Textbooks are located on the lower level north; and paperbacks,

school supplies, clothing, greeting cards and gifts are located

on the upper level north. Textbooks should be purchased by the

second class meeting.

Regular bookstore hours

Monday–Friday 8:30 a.m.–7:30 p.m.

Saturday 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

Sunday noon–5 p.m.

To make your return process more smoothly, please read the following

helpful tips:

• Receipts are required for ALL refunds.

• Textbooks may be returned for a full refund within seven

working days from the first day of the new semester, or within

two days of purchase thereafter.

• Drop slips may be required.

• Textbooks must be returned in the same condition they were

purchased. If the text was sealed it must be returned sealed.

• Textbooks purchased after mid-term are not eligible for returns.

Convenience store

Butler University convenience store is located in the lower level

of the Dawghouse at the Apartment Village. The store features

a variety of groceries, health and beauty aids, bottled beverages

and snacks. For your convenience, use Flex Money, Dawg Bucks,

MasterCard or Visa.

University Dining Services

The University Dining Services office is located on the main level

of Atherton Union, Room 110. Butler University students, faculty

and staff may purchase Dawg Bucks and use it to purchase meals

and snacks in the Dining Rooms, C-Club Food Court, Starbucks,

Zia Juice Bar and the Convenience Store. An additional five percent

is added to your account with each deposit of $50 or more. Visa

and MasterCard are accepted. Orders can also be made online at

www.butler.edu/dining.

Residential Dining Rooms. The residential dining rooms are

located on the second level of Atherton Union and the main

floor in the Residential College. In these “all you care to eat” settings

is a wide variety of options from which to choose, including

hot entrees, salad bar, soups, sauté station, deli, grill, vegetarian

selections and desserts. You have the option to purchase an Unlimited,

290 Block, 240 Block and 180 Block Meal Plan. For more information,

contact the Residential Life office at (317) 940-.9458. Meals for

guests may be purchased at the entrance to the dining rooms.

C-Club Food Court. Located in the lower level of Atherton

Union, you may enjoy the following: Papa John’s Pizza, Grill Works

and Montague’s Deli. Salads, sushi, deli sandwiches and subs,

snacks and beverages also are available for quick grab n’ go. For your

convenience, use your Flex Money, Dawg Bucks, MasterCard or Visa.

Starbucks. Starbucks is located on the north end of the Atherton

Union just past the bookstore. The Butler University Starbucks

was the first store to open in the Indianapolis area. It has a cozy,

contemporary atmosphere that offers a quiet setting in which to

enjoy friends, food and service. For your convenience, use your Flex

Money, Dawg Bucks, MasterCard or Visa.

Zia Juice Bar. This juice bar is located in the Health and Fitness

Complex. The juice bar features an array of freshly squeezed

juices and smoothies. In addition, grab-n-go sandwiches, salads,

baked goods, bottled water and coffee are also available. For your

convenience, use your Flex Money, Dawg Bucks, MasterCard or Visa.

Off-Campus Student Bulletin Board

An off-campus student bulletin board is located in the lower level

of Atherton Union. Watch this board for details regarding the

Off-Campus Student Association, campus-wide events and services.

6


Atherton Union

The Programs for Leadership and Service Education (PuLSE)

office is responsible for the operation of Atherton Union, which

includes the Volunteer Center, Efroymson Diversity Center,

student lounge, student study space, bookstore, food service

operations, Starbucks, email stations, several meeting rooms and

a 24-hour computer lab. The offices of Student Affairs, PuLSE,

International Student Services, Greek Life, Diversity Programs,

Residence Life, Bands and Spirit, Aramark and Internships and

Career Services are located in the union. Student organizations

such as Student Government Association, Off-Campus Student

Organization, the yearbook and various student organizations also

make their home in the union.

If you have questions about hours of operation, suggestions for

specific services or are seeking information about events on campus

or off, contact the PuLSE office at 940-9262.

Tuition

Spring 2011

Tuition charges are based on the number of credit hours and the college

of enrollment. The rates are as follows:

Undergraduate tuition

CBA, CCOM, COE, JCFA, LAS

Full time (12–20 hours) $14,870/semester

1–11 hours $1,250/hr

Each hour above 20 hours $1,250/hr

College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Full-time (12–20 hrs)

Health Sciences year 1 (pre-Health) $14,870/semester

Health Sciences year 2 (pre-Health) $14,870/semester

Health Sciences year 3 curriculum $16,085/semester

Health Sciences year 4 curriculum $16,085/semester

Pharmacy year 1 (pre-Pharmacy) $14,870/semester

Pharmacy year 2 (pre-Pharmacy) $14,870/semester

Pharmacy year 3 (P1) $16,085/semester

Pharmacy year 4 (P2) $16,085/semester

Pharmacy year 5 (P3) $16,085/semester

Pharm.D. P4 (6th year only) $35,670/year

• billed 5% Summer I ($1,785), 5% Summer II ($1,785),

45% Fall* ($16,050), 45% Spring* ($16,050)

*Each hour above 20 hours is$1,330/hour

1-11hours $1,330/hr

Each hour above 20 hours $1,330/hr

Graduate tuition

Tuition rate — graduate by college of enrollment:

Liberal Arts and Sciences $430/hr

MFA Creative Writing

• Continuing student as of Fall 2009 $575/hr

• New student as of Fall 2009 $625/hr

College of Education $430/hr

Jordan College of Fine Arts $430/hr

Pharmacy and Health Sciences $575/hr

PA Masters – Clinical Phase $460/hr

MBA $625/hr

MPAcc $625/hr

7

Miscellaneous fees

Full-time activity fee $144/semester

Health and Recreation Complex fee $265/semester

Applied music course fee $220/credit hour

First year student Welcome Week fee $125(one time fee)

Transfer student Welcome Week fee $85 (one time fee)

New student early registration fee $100 (one time fee)

Residence hall program fee $35/year

COPHS mobile computing fee $475/semester

COPHS mobile computing fee (P4 only) $150/semester

Room and board rates

Ross Hall/Schwitzer Hall

Triple Room $1,965/semester

Double Room $2,225/semester

Single Room $3,310/semester

Residential College (Resco)

Double Room $2,480/semester

Single Room $3,570/semester

University Terrace

Shared Room $2,885/semester

Single Room $3,410/semester

Studio Apartment $3,940/semester

Apartment Village

Single Room $3,930/semester

Board Rates

Unlimited Meal Plan plus $75 $2,585/semester

290 Block Meal Plan plus $100 $2,585/semester

240 Block Meal Plan plus $150 $2,585/semester

180 Block Meal Plan plus $200 $2,585/semester

Commuter Meal Plans

75 Block Meal Plan plus $300 $790/semester

50 Block Meal Plan plus $400 $790/semester

Payment of Tuition and Fees, Spring 2011

Students who register through the early registration process for

Spring 2011 will be billed in December 2010 for tuition, fees, room

and board charges. Spring 2011 early registered students must pay

in full by January 6, 2011 or be enrolled in the monthly payment

plan no later than January 10, 2011. Failure to do so may result in

the cancellation of classes. Students who register after their regular

registration time frame will be required to pay all charges in full in

order to receive grade or transcript information. Students whose

enrollment in a course(s) is added after the term or semester has

ended must pay for the course(s) BEFORE grade and/or transcript

information will be released from the University. Students

who have not paid their charges in full by the due date indicated on

the billing statement will be assessed a monthly finance charge of

1.5% (18%APR).

The Office of Student Accounts implemented an electronic billing

format in summer 2009. Please refer to the Office of Student

Account website at www.butler.edu/student-accounts for additional

information regarding electronic billing.


Payment is accepted in the form of personal check, ACH/electronic

check and on-line Credit Card. ACH/electronic check payments

are not subject to a convenience fee. Payments made via Master

Card, Discover and American Express will be charged a 2.75%

conve¬nience fee.

Butler University offers a payment plan that allows students

and families to divide the semester tuition, fees, room, board, and

miscellaneous charges into manageable monthly payments. The

fee to participate in the plan varies based on your choice of plan.

Information regarding the 2010–2011 payment plans is available

on the Office of Student Accounts website at www.butler.edu/

student-accounts. Establishing the payment plan will prevent the

standard finance charges (1.5% per month) on current semester

charges. Any scheduled payment plan payment that is not received

by the plan due date will be assessed a late fee of $40. Payment

plans will be cancelled when two payment plan payments are not

received or are received after the due date. Once the payment plan

is cancelled due to late payment, the standard finance charge will

accrue against the total outstanding balance. Persons with a past due

balance or poor payment history with the University may be denied

participation in the payment plan. Students with past due balances

may have classes cancelled. Students who fail to attend class and/or

pay their tuition are not considered withdrawn from the course(s).

Withdrawals must be made through the adviser or dean of the college

in which the student is enrolled. All past due balances must be paid

before a student will be permitted to enroll for a new semester.

The University provides a tuition prepayment plan that guarantees

a fixed tuition rate for all prepaid semesters. This program applies

only to students enrolled on a full-time basis in an undergraduate

degree program or the Pharm.D. program. The prepayment plan

does not apply to graduate programs. Contact the Office of Student

Accounts for more information.

Accept Financial Responsibility

Butler University policy requires all students to complete the

Acceptance of Financial Responsibility process now included in

the Finance section of the Student Center each semester prior to

enrollment. The Acceptance of Financial Responsibility statement

outlines the student’s responsibility for paying all expenses in

addition to the penalties that may be incurred by the student if the

expenses are not paid in a timely manner.

Institutional Tuition Refund Schedule

The official schedule will be posted at the Office of Student

Accounts website: www.butler.edu/student-accounts. Any student

needing to change their class schedule after the first day of the term

should refer to the tuition refund schedule prior to making any

schedule change. It is critical that any student receiving financial

assistance, particularly the Higher Education Award, Freedom of

Choice Grant or 21st Century Scholar Award, contact the Office of

Financial Aid before changing your enrollment.

Credit balance accounts. The Office of Student Accounts

requires students to complete a refund request form in order to

receive a refund check; however, if the credit on the account is due

to a Federal Stafford loan or other Federal Title IV financial aid, the

Office of Student Accounts will issue a check to the student without

the written request. If the credit balance on the account is due to a

Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS loan), the refund

check will be issued in the name of the parent borrower and mailed

to the address on file. If the student is anticipating a credit balance

on his or her account, it is recommended that a refund request form

be completed, even if you believe the source of the refund is from

Title IV financial aid. With the exception of the PLUS loan refunds,

checks can be issued to the student only. Refund checks are issued

once a week. Refund checks are not issued when classes are not in

session.

Butler University Return of Funds Procedures

(2010–2011 Academic Year)

Federal regulations require that, as a part of an institution’s Return

of Funds Policy, an office or offices must be designated as the contact

point for students to begin the withdrawal process. The designated

office(s) must document the date the student withdraws or otherwise

provides official notification to the institution of the intent to

withdraw. The Office of Registration and Records is the designated

office at which a student must withdraw. Official notification from

the student must be in writing. The date of withdrawal will be

utilized by the Office of Financial Aid in determining the amount

of financial assistance which may be retained by the student, based

upon the percentage of the enrollment period (semester) which the

student completed to that point in time. In the case of a student

who does not withdraw or otherwise notify Butler University of

the intent to withdraw, the date used will be the mid-point of the

payment period for which assistance was disbursed, unless the

attendance records document a later date.

8


Unpaid items

A student who is past due in any debt to the University is not

permitted to register in any school or college of the University and

is not entitled to an official transcript, grade report or diploma from

the Office of Registration and Records until the indebtedness has

been paid in full. Any check presented to the University that fails to

clear the bank shall be subject to a $25 handling charge. If the check

is for payment of a debt, it also will be considered as non-payment.

Any E-check (ACH) transaction that is rejected by either banking

institution will be charged a returned E-check (ACH) fee of $25.

Students also may be held responsible for reasonable collections

fees, attorney fees and court costs without relief of evaluation and

appraisement law to collect outstanding balances. When a student is

in possession of University property or owes a particular department

for charges not applied to the student account, the department may

request for a department requested hold be placed on a student’s

record. The hold prevents the release of University records and

future enrollment. This hold is removed upon confirmation from

the requesting department.

Outside billing

The University will bill a third party for tuition, room and board

and miscellaneous fees provided 1) a voucher and/or written

authorization is received by the student accounts office prior to the

beginning of each semester; and 2) payment will be made on or

before the first day of the semester. The University will not bill any

employer or third party who pays upon completion of the course(s).

Any balance remaining unpaid on the first day of the semester will

be assessed a monthly finance charge of 1.5 percent (18 percent

APR). If the third party will not pay the finance charge, the student

will be responsible for payment. Students will continue to receive a

billing statement directly from Butler University until the account

balance is paid in full. It is the responsibility of the student to contact

the third party payer to determine why a delay in payment has

occurred.

Room assignments

Room assignments will be available online by November 1, 2010.

Please check your schedule prior to the first day of classes. Student

schedules may be accessed on My.Butler.edu. Login, click Self

Service, then Student Center. In the Academics section of Student

Center, locate the “Enrollment” heading, then click on My Class

Schedule. Select the term (semester) you want from the dropdown

that appears at the top of the page, and then click the “change”

button. Your schedule appears. You may choose to display your

schedule in “List View” or “Weekly Calendar View” by depressing

the radio button next to the desired display option, and can print

your schedule by selecting “Print” from the File menu.

Building Codes:

FB Fairbanks Center

FHEC Fieldhouse east classroom

FHFC Fieldhouse football classroom

FHWC Fieldhouse west classroom

FHWG Fieldhouse–west gym

FHBUB Fieldhouse, tennis bubble

GA Holcomb Garden House

GH Gallahue Hall

9

HB Holcomb Building

HO Holcomb Observatory

HR Health and Recreation Center

IL Irwin Library

JCAD Jordan Academy of Dance

JH Jordan Hall

LH Lilly Hall

METH Methodist Hospital

PB Pharmacy Building


Changes to the Schedule of Classes

The most up to date class schedules are located online. Current

schedules can be viewed on the web in two ways. www.butler.edu/

CourseSearch allows you to browse all the courses in a subject, or

search for a particular course by searching for the course title, the

instructor name or the subject and catalog number. You can link to

special topic titles and course catalog descriptions. The enrollment

limit and available seat count is shown, but may be up to an hour

behind actual figures.

If you are a student, faculty member or staff member at Butler, you

may also use the secure inquiry on My.Butler.edu. Log in, then go

to My Student Data Home, then Academics Home. Select View

Schedule of Classes and provide the desired semester code. With

this search facility you can also look for classes that are scheduled at

a certain time during the week and the enrollment status is always

current.

Final examinations

Spring 2011. Final examinations in 4-, 5- and 6-hour courses are

three hours in length; other courses have two-hour examinations.

Examinations in one or two-hour courses are arranged by the

instructor. Examinations are normally held in the room regularly

occupied by the class. All day class examinations, with the exception

of GHS201–209, BI122 and MA106–107 will begin and end

according to the schedule below.

8 a.m.

9 a.m.

10 a.m.

11 a.m.

12 p.m.

1 p.m.

2 p.m.

3 p.m.

4 p.m.

5 p.m.

6 p.m.

7 p.m.

8 p.m.

Wednesday

May 4, 2011

M–F 9 a.m.

4–6 cr hr

classes

Final

8–11 a.m.

TR 9 a.m.

4–6 cr hr

classes

Final

1–4 p.m.

MA 106/107

Final 6–9 p.m.

MWF 9 a.m.

3 cr hr classes M–F 1 p.m.

Final

4–6 cr hr

8–10 a.m.

classes

Final

8–11 a.m.

TR 9 a.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final

1–3 p.m.

Thursday

May 5, 2011

TR 1 p.m.

4–6 cr hr

classes

Final

1–4 p.m.

MWF 1 p.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final

8–10 a.m.

TR 1 p.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final

1–3 p.m.

GHS 201–209

Final 4:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

BI 122

Final 7–9 p.m.

Friday

May 6, 2011

TR 11 a.m.

4–6 cr hr

classes

Final

8–11 a.m.

M–F 10 a.m.

4–6 cr hr

classes

Final

1–4 p.m.

TR 11 a.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final

8–10 a.m.

MWF 10 a.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final

1–3 p.m.

Classes that do not start on the hour are placed in an examination

period by the hour of the start of the class and by the first day of

the class. For example, classes that meet on Tuesday and Thursday

at 9:35–10:50 a.m. are scheduled into the 9 a.m. Tuesday/Thursday

examination period.

Special Examinations:

• GHS 201-209 examinations will be held Thursday, May 5,

from 4:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

• All MA106 and MA107 examinations will be held

Wednesday evening, May 4, from 6–9 p.m.

• All BI122 examinations will be held Thursday evening,

May 5, from 7–9 p.m.

• Saturday classes will have their final examination on Saturday,

May 7.

Evening-class examinations. Classes that start at 4 p.m. or later

follow the evening examination schedule. For classes meeting once

a week, the examination should be given on one evening. For classes

meeting twice a week, the examination should be given in one

evening if possible or two if necessary. Evening class examinations

begin on Wednesday, May 4, and end on Tuesday, May 10. Evening

class examinations are normally held in the room regularly occupied

by the class. All evening examinations will begin at the same time

as the usual class starting time and will end according to the lengths

of examinations listed. Because of the wide variety of starting and

ending times of evening classes, conflicts of examination times are

possible; therefore, instructors and students should consult on times

of examinations and adjust their schedules accordingly.

Saturday

May 7, 2011

TR 2 p.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final 8–10 a.m.

M–F 11 p.m.

4–6 cr hr

classes

Final

1–4 p.m.

MWF 3 p.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final 8–10 a.m.

TR 3 p.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final 10:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

MWF 11 p.m.

3 cr hr classes M–F 12 p.m.

Final

4-6 cr hr

1–3 p.m.

classes

Final

1–4 p.m.

Monday

May 9, 2011

MWF

3 cr hr classes

Final

1–3 p.m.

Tuesday

May 10, 2011

M–F 8 a.m.

4–6 cr hr

classes

Final

8–11 a.m.

MWF 8 a.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final

8–10 a.m.

TR 8 a.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final 10:15-12:15 p.m.

MWF 2 p.m.

3 cr hr classes

Final

1–3 p.m.

10


11 University Core Curriculum

University

Core Curriculum

First Year Seminar

First-Year Seminars: The First-Year seminars are for entering

first-year students new to Butler. Completing FYS 101 in the fall,

and FYS 102 in the spring, fulfills first year core requirements.

2223 FYS 102 01 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Ries, Rebecca S

Heroic Temper: Roman Style

Building upon Homer as a framework for an examination

of the epic heroes in the first semester, the second semester of

this course will look at further reworking of the Homeric

model by Roman authors. Working with Virgil’s Aeneid and

Ovid’s Metamorphoses, as well as others, we will push our

understanding of what it means to be an epic hero. We will

ask ourselves why subsequent generations keep turning to

the models of antiquity for inspiration. This course is the

second semester offering of the year-long Literary Studies

First-Year Seminar. Note: Semester one in this topic is

prerequisite to semester two.

2224 FYS 102 02 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Valliere, Paul R

Faith, Doubt and Reason II

Faith Doubt and Reason. Reading and discussion of classic

philosophical religious and literary texts exploring the ways

in which human beings have reflected on their relationship

to God; the world and their fellow human beings. In the first

semester (‘The Search for God’), we will focus on how human

beings have sought to know and understand God and the

world and on how that search has shaped the way humans

define themselves. In the second semester (‘The Search for

Community’), we will focus on how human beings have

sought to define themselves in terms of the various

communities to which they belong, including families and

clans, ethnic communities, nations and faith communities.

The interaction and interconnections of faith, doubt and

reason will receive attention in both semesters. Note: This is

a two-semester course. Students who enroll in this topic

in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the spring.

FYS101 and FYS102 will satisfy the core requirements

of FYS101, FYS102 and COM102.

2227 FYS 102 03 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Dunn, Mindy

Fantasy and Reality II

This semester we jump from the fantasy of fairy tales to the

reality of non-fiction and memoir. We’ll discuss the truthful-

ness of story, just how far creativity can go in non-fiction,

and when just telling the facts is important. Using texts such

as Mark Salzman’s Lost in Place, Bich Nguyen’s Stealing

Buddha’s Dinner, Maxine Hong Kingston’s Woman Warrior

and Michael Pollan’s Omnivore’s Dilemma we’ll explore the

themes of self, truth, and even food. This course is the

second-semester offering of the year-long Literary Studies

First-Year Seminar. Note: Semester one of Fantasy and

Reality is prerequisite to semester two.

2228 FYS 102 04 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 DeLuycker, Anneke

Human Species: Past and Present

What does it mean to be human? This course concerns the

study of human biological evolution and variation, and

focuses on the relationship between human biology and

culture. We will explore all aspects of the human condition.

What is our place in nature? How are we related to other

living beings? How are we unique? What are our origins?

How were our earlier ancestors similar to or different from

us? What causes the patterns of human variation that we see?

Is race meaningful? Are we still evolving? Rather than

provide a dogmatic approach stating various truths, this

course is intended to explore the evidence and allow for

critical evaluation and synthesis. This is the first-semester

offering of the two-semester first-year seminar. Note: Semester

one is pre-requisite to semester two. Students who enroll

in this topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic

in the spring.

2229 FYS 102 05 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Levy, Andrew G

Contemporary Writers

A year-long course focusing on the works of contemporary

writers. Texts for the course will be chosen primarily from

the works of writers who will be coming to campus during

the year as part of the Visiting Writers Series, the James

J. Woods Science Writers Series, and other events and series

that bring writers to campus. In the course of reading and

discussing the works of contemporary writers, students will

cultivate the skills necessary for critical thinking, oral

communication, and effective writing. The course will also

serve as an introduction to the vitality of the liberal arts.

Class will involve discussion, student presentations, and

writing strategies. Semester one is not prerequisite to semester

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


two, but students who enroll in this topic in the fall are

expected to enroll in this topic in the spring. Note: there

will be a change in professors from fall to spring. Professor

Neville will teach the fall semester and Professor Levy

will teach the spring semester.

2230 FYS 102 06 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Ries, Rebecca S

Heroic Temper: Roman Style

Building upon Homer as a framework for an examination

of the epic heroes in the first semester, the second semester of

this course will look at further reworking of the Homeric

model by Roman authors. Working with Virgil’s Aeneid and

Ovid’s Metamorphoses, as well as others, we will push our

understanding of what it means to be an epic hero. We will

ask ourselves why subsequent generations keep turning to

the models of antiquity for inspiration. This course is the

second semester offering of the year-long Literary Studies

First-Year Seminar. Note: Semester one in this topic is

prerequisite to semester two.

2225 FYS 102 07 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Lantzer, Jason

Revisiting the Cabin

A minister’s wife is not the sort of person usually associated

with launching a war, but Harriet Beecher Stowe was no

ordinary woman. This course will look at the impact Uncle

Tom’s Cabin had on the United States in the 1850s. In

addition to the book itself, we will consider the story behind

the story, how things like the institution and politics of

slavery in America, Stowe’s family, reform movements,

regionalism, and other factors helped make her, in the words

of Abraham Lincoln, the little woman who wrote the book

that started this great war. This is the first semester of the

year-long First-Year Seminar. Semester two will look at slave

narratives (Frederick Douglas, for example) and /or Lincoln

and the Emancipation. Semester one is not pre-requisite to

semester two, but students who enroll in this section in the

fall are expected to enroll in this section in the spring.

2231 FYS 102 08 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Kelly, Casey Ryan

George Orwell and Social Critic

From dystopian visions of a totalitarian surveillance society

to complex accounts of working class exploitation, the

writings of George Orwell (1903–1950) provide valuable

social critiques of oppression and social injustice at work in

free societies. With keen wit and intelligence, Orwell’s

polemical career as a writer and journalist provided a revolu-

tionary challenge to totalitarianism in all forms. Well after

his death, his writings have been cited to critique a number

of significant contemporary social and political issues:

crime and punishment, technology, imperialism, war,

patriotism, class, and so on. Orwell inspired critical social

theorists, filmmakers, and political activists to apply his

insights to their own social and political contexts. Through

the writings of Orwell, this course will explore the social

criticisms that lie within and are inspired by his work.

Through reading and writing, students in this First-Year

Seminar will have the opportunity to apply insights from

novels such as 1984, Animal Farm, and Down and Out in

Paris and London to present-day social issues. They will also

explore the utility of modern criticism inspired by Orwell,

from the dystopian novels of Margaret Atwood to films

such as A Clockwork Orange and Brazil. This is a two-semester

sequenced course. Students who enroll in the fall are

expected to enroll in this section in the spring. Semester one

is pre-requisite to semester two.

2232 FYS 102 09 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 McGrath, James

Faith, Doubt and Reason II

Faith Doubt and Reason. Reading and discussion of classic

philosophical religious and literary texts exploring the ways

in which human beings have reflected on their relationship

to God; the world and their fellow human beings. In the first

semester (‘The Search for God’), we will focus on how

human beings have sought to know and understand God

and the world and on how that search has shaped the way

humans define themselves. In the second semester (‘The

Search for Community’), we will focus on how human

beings have sought to define themselves in terms of the

various communities to which they belong, including families

and clans, ethnic communities, nations and faith communities.

The interaction and interconnections of faith, doubt and

reason will receive attention in both semesters. Note: This is

a two-semester course. Students who enroll in this topic

in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the spring.

FYS101 and FYS102 will satisfy the core requirements

of FYS101, FYS102 and COM102.

2233 FYS 102 10 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Hege, Brent

Faith, Doubt and Reason II

Faith Doubt and Reason. Reading and discussion of classic

philosophical religious and literary texts exploring the ways

in which human beings have reflected on their relationship

to God; the world and their fellow human beings. In the first

semester (‘The Search for God’), we will focus on how

human beings have sought to know and understand God and

the world and on how that search has shaped the way

humans define themselves. In the second semester (‘The

Search for Community’), we will focus on how human

beings have sought to define themselves in terms of the

various communities to which they belong, including families

and clans, ethnic communities, nations and faith communities.

The interaction and interconnections of faith, doubt and

reason will receive attention in both semesters. Note: This is

a two-semester course. Students who enroll in this topic

in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the

spring. FYS101 and FYS102 will satisfy the core

requirements of FYS101, FYS102 and COM102.

2234 FYS 102 11 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Stapleton, Robert L

Rock and Roll High School

Like rock and roll itself, this class will be a hybrid, an extended

jam of threads and themes as we map the ideological geography

of youth culture through literature, music, film, and art. This

is not a history of rock and roll class, but rather an ongoing

inquiry into the collective expressions of rebellion, coming-

of-age, and generational battles. Semester one will examine

the first half of the 20th century, including considerations

of the Harlem Renaissance, jazz music, and Okie culture.

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. University Core Curriculum 11


Semester two will consider the second half of the 20th

century. This course is the second semester offering of the

year-long Literary Studies First-Year Seminar. Semester one

is not prerequisite to semester two, but students who enroll

in this topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in

the spring.

2235 FYS 102 12 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Smith, Christine M

The American Experience in the Civil War

This seminar continues the theme of rebellion from the fall

semester but will adjust its focus to an examination of the

myth and reality surrounding the American Civil War, with

special emphasis on the lives of the average citizens involved,

as we see their lives and the lives of differeing groups of

people transformed in history and literature. Readings may

include Uncle Tom’s Cabin, March, Gone with the Wind,

among others. A genealogical component is required for this

semester.

2236 FYS 102 13 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Vecera, Grant

The Art of Literature Now II

We will study recently published essays and short stories

from the Best American Series in order to better understand

ourselves and the human condition at large. Such texts will

function to some extent as models for the types of writing

students will perform, but the texts will also function as

artifacts with which we can hopefully make deep and complex

philosophical, psychological, social, religious, historical,

political, and aesthetic inquiries intrinsic to the liberal arts

tradition. Because the texts will be almost exclusively American,

cultural criticism will pervade our intellectual investigations,

and students will obtain many opportunities to reflect upon

their roles and identities as members of various communities

and as earthlings. This course is the second semester

offering of the year-long Literary Studies First-Year Seminar.

Semester one is not prerequisite to semester two, but students

who enroll in this topic in the fall are expected to enroll in

this topic in the spring.

2226 FYS 102 14 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Bungard, Christopher

Heroic Temper: Homer

Homer lays the groundwork for an examination of the epic

heroes, with his very personal attention to the lives and

characters of his chosen heroes in the Iliad and the Odyssey.

Central to our concern in this seminar will be our own

examination of these poems especially with an eye towards

understanding what keeps generation after generation not

only reading these classic epics but reworking the heroic form

as well as the heroic themes. Besides our reading the

Homeric epics, we will study the modern applications of

them in film—such as Troy, Ulysses, and O Brother Where

Art Thou? Semester two will look at further reworking of

the Homeric model, with Roman works such as Virgil’s

Aeneid and Ovid’s Metamorphoses, among others. This

course is the second semester offering of the year-long

Literary Studies First-Year Seminar. Students who enroll in

this topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the

spring.

13 University Core Curriculum

2237 FYS 102 15 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Turner, Robin

Travelers and Tourists II

Why do people travel? How does tourism alter our self-

understanding and shape our perceptions of other people and

communities? What consequences does tourism have for

host communities, societies, and economies? This course will

look at tourism from the perspective of travelers, guests,

advocates, and critics, drawing from travel narratives, popular

films, and academic texts to examine the complex relation-

ships between tourists and toured, travel and development.

This is the second semester offering of the year-long First-

Year Seminar. Note: Semester one is prerequisite to semester

two. Students who enroll in this topic in the fall are

expected to enroll in this topic in the spring.

2238 FYS 102 16 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Stapleton, Robert L

Rock and Roll High School

Like rock and roll itself, this class will be a hybrid, an extended

jam of threads and themes as we map the ideological geography

of youth culture through literature, music, film, and art. This

is not a history of rock and roll class, but rather an ongoing

inquiry into the collective expressions of rebellion, coming-

of-age, and generational battles. Semester one will examine

the first half of the 20th century, including considerations

of the Harlem Renaissance, jazz music, and Okie culture.

Semester two will consider the second half of the 20th

century. This course is the second semester offering of the

year-long Literary Studies First-Year Seminar. Semester one

is not prerequisite to semester two, but students who enroll

in this topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in

the spring.

2239 FYS 102 17 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Hege, Brent

Faith, Doubt and Reason II

Faith Doubt and Reason. Reading and discussion of

classic philosophical religious and literary texts exploring the

ways in which human beings have reflected on their relationship

to God; the world and their fellow human beings. In the first

semester (‘The Search for God’), we will focus on how

human beings have sought to know and understand God and

the world and on how that search has shaped the way

humans define themselves. In the second semester (‘The

Search for Community’), we will focus on how human

beings have sought to define themselves in terms of the

various communities to which they belong, including families

and clans, ethnic communities, nations and faith communities.

The interaction and interconnections of faith, doubt and

reason will receive attention in both semesters. Note: This is

a two-semester course. Students who enroll in this topic

in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the

spring. FYS101 and FYS102 will satisfy the core require-

ments of FYS101, FYS102 and COM102.

2240 FYS 102 18 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Vecera, Grant

The Art of Literature Now and Then

We will study recently published essays and short stories

from the Best American Series in order to better understand

ourselves and the human condition at large. Such texts will

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


function to some extent as models for the types of writing

students will perform, but the texts will also function as

artifacts with which we can hopefully make deep and complex

philosophical, psychological, social, religious, historical,

political, and aesthetic inquiries intrinsic to the liberal arts

tradition. Because the texts will be almost exclusively American,

cultural criticism will pervade our intellectual investigations,

and students will obtain many opportunities to reflect upon

their roles and identities as members of various communities

and as earthlings. This course is the second semester offering

of the year-long Literary Studies First-Year Seminar. Semester

one is not prerequisite to semester two, but students who

enroll in this topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this

topic in the spring.

2241 FYS 102 19 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Dunn, Mindy

Fantasy and Reality II

Once upon a time, in lands all over the world, fairy tales

were passed on through generations, carried over continents

by the voices of storytellers. This semester we will be

re-learning how to read fairy tales, working to uncover the

layers of meaning hidden to us by our modern eyes too readily

satisfied by the obvious morals of Disney movies; will ask

why fairy tales are important, why their shelf lives are so long;

will investigate how the tales themselves have shape-shifted

from the oral into text and media and how this affects their

worth; all while asking ourselves what is a fairy tale? Our

second semester will take a giant leap from the fantasy of

fairy tale into the genres of “reality”: creative non-fiction and

memoir. This course is the second semester offering of the

year-long Literary Studies First-Year Seminar. Semester one

is not prerequisite to semester two, but students who enroll

in this topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in

the spring.

2242 FYS 102 21 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Corpus, Deborah A

Identity and Culture II

What tells us who we are? How does one develop an

image of self? Students will use the lenses of literature,

psychological theory, art, and history to examine depictions

of coming of age across cultures and time periods. Aristotle

wrote that the aim of art is to represent not the outward

appearance of things, but their inward significance; through

this seminar students will use “art” in its broadest sense to

explore the inward significance of “coming of age.” Semester

I: Coming of Age in America. Semester II: Coming of Age in

Other Cultures and Other Times. Semester one is not

prerequisite to semester two. Students who enroll in this

section in the fall are expected to enroll in this section in the

spring semester.

2243 FYS 102 22 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Sutherlin, Susan J

Ireland and the Irish

What contribution does history or literature make in the

construction of self and nationhood? Is there such a thing

as a national character? How do history, literature, and the

arts contribute to or contradict these features? We will

examine an early Irish epic Tain Bo Cuailnge (The Cattle

Raid of Cooley), Woodham-Smith’s The Great Famine, as

well as works by Yeats, Joyce, O’Casey, and Synge. This

course is a second semester offering of the year-long Literary

Studies First-Year Seminar. Semester one is not prerequisite

to semester two.

2244 FYS 102 23 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Hofstetter, Angela D

Blood Will Tell

What do Count Dracula, Vito Corleone, 50 Cent, Jane

Austen, and Seabiscuit have in common? They are all, in

their unique ways, obsessed with blood! This year-long

course will explore the various manners in which metaphors

of blood-xenophobia, violence, kinship, rank, sex, science,

murder—circulate through the cross-currents of Anglo-

American culture in a provocatively indiscriminate fashion.

Semester one begins with an exploration of how Austen’s

focus on rank and birth migrates into 20th-century America

and continues with a detailed study of the evolution of

the vampire from Bram Stoker’s Dracula to True Blood’s Erik

the Northman—with a horrifying detour through Nazi

Germany and its compelling use of the Nosferatu by Hitler’s

propaganda machine. Semester two considers the rise of the

equine superstar, examining the often conflicted constellation

of meanings imposed upon his powerful body in the Great

Depression and contemporary America and then shifts to an

examination of the role of the gangster in cinema from

Scarface and The Godfather to Get Rich or Die Tryin.’

Readings in eugenics, evolutionary biology, sociology,

capitalism, feminism, immigration, and reproduction will

flesh out our understanding the uses of blood! Semester one

is not prerequisite to semester two. Students who enroll in

this section in the fall are expected to enroll in this section in

the spring semester.

2245 FYS 102 24 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Colavito, Joseph J

Scary Stories II

Why are we drawn to stories that leave us with a feeling of

unease, to tales that make us shudder? What is it about scary

stories that have, across different cultures and throughout

centuries, fascinated us? In this class, we will explore this

fascination and, in the course of our investigation, gain

an understanding of how these texts speak to our human

nature. Readings will include works by Stephen King and

Shirley Jackson, among others. This course is the second

semester offering of the year-long Literary Studies First-Year

Seminar. Semester one is not prerequisite to semester two.

2246 FYS 102 25 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Laurent-Faesi, Stephan

Spellbound: The Quest for Magic II

Spellbound: The Quest for Magic in Speculative Fiction and

the Arts. Throughout the ages, the fascination with the

otherworldly, the supernatural, the magical element has been

a great source of inspiration for writers, choreographers,

musicians, and other artists. From the tales of 1001 Nights

to A Mid-summer Night’s Dream, from The Lord of the

Rings to contemporary fantasy literature, magic is ever-

present, sometimes for the good, now and again in the

purpose of evil. Similarly, the art of dance abounds with tales

of the fantastic; musicians have given a voice to many a fairy

tale; and artists have painted or sculpted countless

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. University Core Curriculum 13


mythological figures. This course will explore the many faces

of this quest for magic in an inter-disciplinary way, with

selected readings from the genre of fantasy literature,

viewings of masterworks of ballet and modern dance, and

musical examples from great symphonic and operatic works.

Note: Semester one is prerequisite to semester two.

Students who enroll in this section in the fall are expected

to enroll in this section in the spring.

2247 FYS 102 26 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Stapleton, Robert L

Rock and Roll High School

Like rock and roll itself, this class will be a hybrid, an extended

jam of threads and themes as we map the ideological geography

of youth culture through literature, music, film, and art. This

is not a history of rock and roll class, but rather an ongoing

inquiry into the collective expressions of rebellion, coming-

of-age, and generational battles. Semester one will examine

the first half of the 20th century, including considerations

of the Harlem Renaissance, jazz music, and Okie culture.

Semester two will consider the second half of the 20th

century. This course is the second semester offering of the

year-long Literary Studies First-Year Seminar. Semester one

is not prerequisite to semester two, but students who enroll

in this topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in

the spring.

2248 FYS 102 27 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Smith, Christine M

War of Rebellion

This First Year Seminar will analyze challenges to authority,

with attention to the way those challenges are reflected in

fiction and non-fiction. Larger questions such as—what

constitutes a rebellion? why and how do we rebel? what role

does the rebel serve in society?—these will become topics for

discussion and writing integrated with the texts used. In the

course of reading and discussing these works of literature,

students will cultivate the skills necessary for critical thinking,

oral communication, and effective writing. The course will

also serve as an introduction to the vitality of the liberal arts.

As a seminar the class will be structured around student

discussion as well as student presentations, in class

writing and writing workshops. The second semester will

consider the American Civil War, called at its outset the War

of the Rebellion, will emphasize the common soldier and his

family, and will require a genealogy project. This course is

the second semester offering of the year-long Literary Studies

First-Year Seminar. Semester one is not prerequisite to

semester two, but students who enroll in this topic in the

fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the spring.

2249 FYS 102 28 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Lantzer, Jason

Revisiting the Cabin

A minister’s wife is not the sort of person usually associated

with launching a war, but Harriet Beecher Stowe was no

ordinary woman. This course will look at the impact Uncle

Tom’s Cabin had on the United States in the 1850s. In addition

to the book itself, we will consider the story behind the story,

how things like the institution and politics of slavery in

America, Stowe’s family, reform movements, regionalism,

and other factors helped make her, in the words of Abraham

15 University Core Curriculum

Lincoln, the little woman who wrote the book that started

this great war. This is the first semester of the year-long First-

Year Seminar. Semester two will look at slave narratives

(Frederick Douglas, for example) and /or Lincoln and the

Emancipation. Semester one is not pre-requisite to semester

two, but students who enroll in this section in the fall are

expected to enroll in this section in the spring.

2251 FYS 102 29 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Watts, William H

Imagining the Middle Ages

The Middle Ages have given us a treasure of imaginative

literature, including unbelievably brave knights, incredibly

resourceful and beautiful ladies, and the possibility of magic

everywhere. In this course, we will read original works of

medieval literature by such authors as the Beowulf-poet,

Chretien de Troyes, Geoffrey Chaucer and Thomas

Mallory, together with historical accounts of the period. We

will then go on to read more recent works by writers such as

Walters Scott, T.H. White, J.R.R. Tolkien and J.K. Rawlings.

We will also watch movies, such Monty Python and the Holy

Grail and The Return of Martin Guerre. Throughout the

course, we will seek to understand both the complexity of

Middle Ages and the reasons why the period continues to

engage the imagination of writers, artists and readers. This is

the second semester offering of the year-long Literary Studies

First-Year Seminar. Semester one is not prerequisite to the first.

2250 FYS 102 30 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Waite, David H

Mickey Mouse, Media and Culture II

Mickey Mouse, Media, and Culture. From 1930 to the

present, mass media, media technology, and American and

world popular culture has evolved at an accelerating pace.

Mickey Mouse is one universally recognized figure whose

development symbolizes these dramatic changes. This course

focuses on three interrelated themes through the study of

Mickey Mouse’s evolution from playful scamp to corporate

symbol: 1) the interaction of technology and American

culture; 2) the evolution of the American identity or what it

means to be an American; and 3) the spread of American

cultural values abroad. Semester one is a prerequisite for the

semester two.”

2252 FYS 102 31 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Hofstetter, Angela D

Blood Will Tell

What do Count Dracula, Vito Corleone, 50 Cent, Jane

Austen, and Seabiscuit have in common? They are all, in

their unique ways, obsessed with blood! This year-long

course will explore the various manners in which metaphors

of blood, xenophobia, violence, kinship, rank, sex, science,

murder—circulate through the cross-currents of Anglo-

American culture in a provocatively indiscriminate fashion.

Semester one begins with an exploration of how Austen’s

focus on rank and birth migrates into 20th-century America

and continues with a detailed study of the evolution of

the vampire from Bram Stoker’s Dracula to True Blood’s Erik

the Northman—with a horrifying detour through Nazi

Germany and its compelling use of the Nosferatu by Hitler’s

propaganda machine. Semester two considers the rise of the

equine superstar, examining the often conflicted constellation

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


of meanings imposed upon his powerful body in the Great

Depression and contemporary America and then shifts to an

examination of the role of the gangster in cinema from

Scarface and The Godfather to Get Rich or Die Tryin.’

Readings in eugenics, evolutionary biology, sociology,

capitalism, feminism, immigration, and reproduction will

flesh out our understanding the uses of blood! Semester one

is not prerequisite to semester two. Students who enroll in

this section in the fall are expected to enroll in this section in

the spring semester.

2253 FYS 102 32 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Kelly, Casey Ryan

George Orwell and Social Critic

From dystopian visions of a totalitarian surveillance society

to complex accounts of working class exploitation, the writings

of George Orwell (1903–1950) provide valuable social

critiques of oppression and social injustice at work in free

societies. With keen wit and intelligence, Orwell’s polemical

career as a writer and journalist provided a revolutionary

challenge to totalitarianism in all forms. Well after his death,

his writings have been cited to critique a number of

significant contemporary social and political issues: crime

and punishment, technology, imperialism, war, patriotism,

class, and so on. Orwell inspired critical social theorists,

filmmakers, and political activists to apply his insights to

their own social and political contexts. Through the writings

of Orwell, this course will explore the social criticisms that

lie within and are inspired by his work. Through reading

and writing, students in this First-Year Seminar will have the

opportunity to apply insights from novels such as 1984,

Animal Farm, and Down and Out in Paris and London to

present-day social issues. They will also explore the utility of

modern criticism inspired by Orwell, from the dystopian

novels of Margaret Atwood to films such as A Clockwork

Orange and Brazil. This is a two-semester sequenced course.

Students who enroll in the fall are expected to enroll in this

section in the spring. Semester one is pre-requisite to semester

two.

2254 FYS 102 33 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MWF 2-2:50 Stapleton, Robert L

Rock and Roll High School

Like rock and roll itself, this class will be a hybrid, an extended

jam of threads and themes as we map the ideological geography

of youth culture through literature, music, film, and art. This

is not a history of rock and roll class, but rather an ongoing

inquiry into the collective expressions of rebellion, coming-

of-age, and generational battles. Semester one will examine

the first half of the 20th century, including considerations

of the Harlem Renaissance, jazz music, and Okie culture.

Semester two will consider the second half of the 20th

century. This course is the second semester offering of the

year-long Literary Studies First-Year Seminar. Semester one

is not prerequisite to semester two, but students who enroll

in this topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in

the spring.

2255 FYS 102 35 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Reeves, Carol A

Political Fiction II

In the second semester of Political Fiction, we will explore

the utopian and anti-utopian visions regarding such modern

issues as genetic engineering, gender and racial identities,

political ideologies, and environmental protection by reading

works of literature as well as by exploring actual intentional

and planned communities in the United States.

2256 FYS 102 36 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Furuness, Shelly Renae

Identity and Culture II

What tells us who we are? How does one develop an

image of self? Students will use the lenses of literature,

psychological theory, art, and history to examine depictions

of coming of age across cultures and time periods. Aristotle

wrote that “the aim of art is to represent not the outward

appearance of things, but their inward significance;” through

this seminar students will use “art” in its broadest sense to

explore the inward significance of “coming of age.” Semester

I: Coming of Age in America. Semester II: Coming of Age in

Other Cultures and Other Times. Semester one is not

prerequisite to semester two. Students who enroll in this

section in the fall are expected to enroll in this section in the

spring semester.

2257 FYS 102 37 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Jett, Terri R

Assessing the American Dream

This course will create a journey by which students address

the relevance of the “American Dream” as this ideal is situated

from the perspective of the experiences of black women.

Through exploration of various forms of writings, from

political essays to short stories, poems, and novels, all by

black women, students will develop an understanding of

how the voice of black women offers a unique opportunity

from which to study this “land of opportunity,” as the

concept of the “American Dream” suggests. This is a two-

semester course, part of the Collaborative for Critical Inquiry

into Issues of Gender, Race, and Sexuality/Gender Studies.

Note: Semester one is prerequisite to semester two.

Students who enroll in this section in the fall are expected

to enroll in this section in the spring.

2258 FYS 102 39 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Ries, Rebecca S

The Shakespearean Temper

For this seminar, we will examine how one particular artist,

William Shakespeare, makes meaning of the life that

surrounded him. Within the artificial world of his dramas

he will supply the very real values and morals of his time-

complete with the conflicts that result. Shakespeare’s

characters must weigh their allegiances-to whom? And at

what cost? A young woman finds she must choose between

her father and her love. How far can the father’s claim hold?

What drives a good man to undermine his own good friend?

Even to murder him? What could propel a man to destroy

the very person whom he loves? FYS102 will pick up with

Much Ado About Nothing, Hamlet and Macbeth.

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. University Core Curriculum 15


2259 FYS 102 40 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Hofstetter, Angela D

Blood Will Tell

What do Count Dracula, Vito Corleone, 50 Cent, Jane

Austen, and Seabiscuit have in common? They are all, in

their unique ways, obsessed with blood! This year-long

course will explore the various manners in which metaphors

of blood, xenophobia, violence, kinship, rank, sex, science,

murder—circulate through the cross-currents of Anglo-

American culture in a provocatively indiscriminate fashion.

Semester one begins with an exploration of how Austen’s

focus on rank and birth migrates into 20th-century America

and continues with a detailed study of the evolution of

the vampire from Bram Stoker’s Dracula to True Blood’s Erik

the Northman—with a horrifying detour through Nazi

Germany and its compelling use of the Nosferatu by Hitler’s

propaganda machine. Semester two considers the rise of the

equine superstar, examining the often conflicted constellation

of meanings imposed upon his powerful body in the Great

Depression and contemporary America and then shifts to an

examination of the role of the gangster in cinema from

Scarface and The Godfather to Get Rich or Die Tryin.’ Readings

in eugenics, evolutionary biology, sociology, capitalism,

feminism, immigration, and reproduction will flesh out our

understanding the uses of blood! Semester one is not prereq-

uisite to semester two. Students who enroll in this section in

the fall are expected to enroll in this section in the spring

semester.

2260 FYS 102 42 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Keating, Jim

Looking for Shangri-La

This year-long seminar will explore the works of several

important writers in their search for their Shangri-La—the

perfect personal expression in the fictions they create.

Shangri-La is, of course, elusive for all of them, and our work

will be to examine where their searches have taken them and

the legacies they have left behind, found in their novels,

plays, prose, and poetry. The writers for our study will likely

include William Shakespeare, Mary Shelley, Joseph Conrad,

and Graham Greene, among others. This is the second

semester offering of the year-long Literary Studies First-Year

Seminar. Semester one is not prerequisite to semester two.

Students who enroll in this section in the fall are expected to

enroll in this section in the spring.

2261 FYS 102 43 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Ries, Rebecca S

The Shakespearean Temper

For this seminar, we will examine how one particular artist,

William Shakespeare, makes meaning of the life that

surrounded him. Within the artificial world of his dramas

he will supply the very real values and morals of his time-

complete with the conflicts that result. Shakespeare’s

characters must weigh their allegiances-to whom? And at

what cost? A young woman finds she must choose between

her father and her love. How far can the father’s claim hold?

What drives a good man to undermine his own good friend?

Even to murder him? What could propel a man to destroy

the very person whom he loves? FYS102 will pick up with

Much Ado About Nothing, Hamlet and Macbeth.

17 University Core Curriculum

2262 FYS 102 44 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Staff

2264 FYS 102 46 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 8-9:15 Brown, Bonnie K

Writing on Drugs II

This course will introduce students to the study of literary

texts and the social contexts from which they emerge by way

of the stories we tell about drug use and addiction. As we

examine how authors make use of their experience to shape

their lives and their texts, we will investigate the relation-

ship between drugs, self, and community in order to under-

stand the force of representation and how societies code and

codify the use of psychotropic substances. Who gets to write

the narrative of drugs? How is drug use gendered? In what

ways do writers from different cultures or social classes depict

their experience of addiction? Ultimately we want to under-

stand how drugs inhabit culture and how cultures shape the

meanings of drugs. Writing on Drugs is a team-taught

course. Fall semester Professors Colavito and Vance will lead

the course; spring semester Professors Colavito and Brown

will lead the course. This is the second semester of the year-

long Cultural Studies First-Year Seminar. Semester one is not

a prerequisite for semester two. Students who enroll in this

topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the spring.

2267 FYS 102 47 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Hofstetter, Angela D

Blood Will Tell

What do Count Dracula, Vito Corleone, 50 Cent, Jane

Austen, and Seabiscuit have in common? They are all, in

their unique ways, obsessed with blood! This year-long

course will explore the various manners in which metaphors

of blood, xenophobia, violence, kinship, rank, sex, science,

murder—circulate through the cross-currents of Anglo-

American culture in a provocatively indiscriminate fashion.

Semester one begins with an exploration of how Austen’s

focus on rank and birth migrates into 20th-century America

and continues with a detailed study of the evolution of

the vampire from Bram Stoker’s Dracula to True Blood’s Erik

the Northman—with a horrifying detour through Nazi

Germany and its compelling use of the Nosferatu by Hitler’s

propaganda machine. Semester two considers the rise of the

equine superstar, examining the often conflicted constellation

of meanings imposed upon his powerful body in the Great

Depression and contemporary America and then shifts to an

examination of the role of the gangster in cinema from

Scarface and The Godfather to Get Rich or Die Tryin.’

Readings in eugenics, evolutionary biology, sociology,

capitalism, feminism, immigration, and reproduction will

flesh out our understanding the uses of blood! Semester one

is not prerequisite to semester two. Students who enroll in

this section in the fall are expected to enroll in this section in

the spring semester.

2265 FYS 102 48 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MWF 12-12:50 Furuness, Bryan Mark

The Sound and the Funny

Comedy can be serious stuff, as rich and dark and heartbreaking

a path toward meaning as anything more sober.

When it’s done right, the ridiculous is the sublime. In this

course, we’ll look at a range of books and movies and stand-

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


up performances, including works by Diogenes, Nathanael

West, Richard Pryor, and Lorrie Moore. We’ll talk about

how humor can be a way to get at the truth of such grim stuff

as war and grief, how it can be a weapon for the marginalized,

and how that weapon can disarm not only others, but also

yourself. This course is the first semester offering of the year-

long Literary Studies First-Year Seminar. Semester one is not

prerequisite to semester two. Students who enroll in this

topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the spring.

2266 FYS 102 49 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Furuness, Bryan Mark

The Sound and the Funny

Comedy can be serious stuff, as rich and dark and heart-

breaking a path toward meaning as anything more sober.

When it’s done right, the ridiculous is the sublime. In this

course, we’ll look at a range of books and movies and stand-

up performances, including works by Diogenes, Nathanael

West, Richard Pryor, and Lorrie Moore. We’ll talk about

how humor can be a way to get at the truth of such grim stuff

as war and grief, how it can be a weapon for the marginalized,

and how that weapon can disarm not only others, but also

yourself. This course is the first semester offering of the year-

long Literary Studies First-Year Seminar. Semester one is not

prerequisite to semester two. Students who enroll in this

topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in the spring.

2268 FYS 102 50 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Walker, James

The Dark Side: Unraveling the Twisted

The Dark Side: Unraveling the Twisted. We are often drawn

to what we fear most and what we understand least—the

twisted, dark side of ourselves. We’ll experience a wide range

of texts and films including Euripides’ ‘Medea,’ Ernst’s ‘Une

Semaine DeBonte,’ Oates’ ‘American Gothic Tales,’

Vonnegut’s ‘Breakfast of Champions’ and Dobyns’

‘Cemetery Nights’. This course is the first semester offering

of the year-long Literary Studies First-Year Seminar. Semester

one is not a prerequisite to semester two. Students who enroll

in this topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic in

the spring.

3318 FYS 102 51 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 DeLuycker, Anneke

Human Species: Past and Present

What does it mean to be human? This course concerns the

study of human biological evolution and variation, and

focuses on the relationship between human biology and

culture. We will explore all aspects of the human condition.

What is our place in nature? How are we related to other

living beings? How are we unique? What are our origins?

How were our earlier ancestors similar to or different from

us? What causes the patterns of human variation that we

see? Is race meaningful? Are we still evolving? Rather than

provide a dogmatic approach stating various truths, this

course is intended to explore the evidence and allow for

critical evaluation and synthesis. This is the second semester

offering of the two-semester first-year seminar. Note: Semester

one is pre-requisite to semester two. Students who enroll

in this topic in the fall are expected to enroll in this topic

in the spring.

3561 FYS 102 52 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Staff

3562 FYS 102 53 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Lysaker, Judith T

3352 FYS 102 54 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Zurbuchen, Susan J

Creativity

Creativity: What does it mean to be creative? Creativity is too

often linked in our minds with artists, poets or people like

Picasso or Beethoven or Einstein. But any life can be lived

more creatively; any job can be done more creatively. Using

selected readings, discussions with creators and innovators,

and a wide variety of written and oral assignments and activities,

we will explore how each of you can begin to think of your-

self as a creative person.

3353 FYS 102 55 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Erbaugh, Elizabeth

Gender, Race and Reproduction

How do individuals, families and communities share

information and make decisions about reproductive health

and building families? How does access to reproductive

health information and health care shape opportunities for

education, meaningful work and long-term well-being? How

do medical institutions, corporations and nation-states

construct bodies, diagnoses and treatment options to

promote the reproductive health of various communities?

This seminar will explore social aspects of human reproduction

through the lenses of gender, race and global development.

Texts from a range of disciplines will aid our examination of

various aspects of reproduction including biology, culture,

medicine, control of fertility, adoption, and reproductive

technologies.

3354 FYS 102 56 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Erbaugh, Elizabeth

Gender, Race and Reproduction

How do individuals, families and communities share

information and make decisions about reproductive health

and building families? How does access to reproductive

health information and health care shape opportunities for

education, meaningful work and long-term well-being? How

do medical institutions, corporations and nation-states

construct bodies, diagnoses and treatment options to

promote the reproductive health of various communities?

This seminar will explore social aspects of human reproduction

through the lenses of gender, race and global development.

Texts from a range of disciplines will aid our examination of

various aspects of reproduction including biology, culture,

medicine, control of fertility, adoption, and reproductive

technologies.

3355 FYS 102 57 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Erbaugh, Elizabeth

Social Change and Identity

This seminar will explore how a range of historical and

contemporary social movements have constructed and

re-constructed the identities of groups seeking and resisting

change in society. Movements of interest will include anti-

lynching campaigns, the U.S. Civil Rights Movement, and

movements promoting civil, human and social rights related

to gender, class and sexuality. Using texts from a range of

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. University Core Curriculum 17


disciplines as well as documentary film, we will especially

consider the roles students have played in social movements

in both U.S. and transnational contexts. As seminar partici-

pants you will have the opportunity to consider through

discussion and your own writing how your particular identities

(gender, race, class, sexuality, etc.) situate you with respect to

a range of movements and social change agendas.

3356 FYS 102 58 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Erbaugh, Elizabeth

Social Change and Identity

This seminar will explore how a range of historical and

contemporary social movements have constructed and

re-constructed the identities of groups seeking and resisting

change in society. Movements of interest will include anti-

lynching campaigns, the U.S. Civil Rights Movement, and

movements promoting civil, human and social rights related

to gender, class and sexuality. Using texts from a range of

disciplines as well as documentary film, we will especially

consider the roles students have played in social movements

in both U.S. and transnational contexts. As seminar partici-

pants you will have the opportunity to consider through

discussion and your own writing how your particular identities

(gender, race, class, sexuality, etc.) situate you with respect to

a range of movements and social change agendas.

3317 FYS 102 59 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Walsh, Ryan J

Stories Across Media

This seminar will examine the dynamic between a story’s

origins and its evolution as it makes the transition from one

medium to another. This is NOT a class that will take sides

in the debate of Was the book better than the movie? Instead,

we will look at the different media styles of the stories them-

selves and determine which changes were made artistically

and which ones were necessary to make the story work in

its new medium. We will look at stories that went from

books to movies, movies to comics, radio dramas to books,

and just about every other combination, including texts such

The Princess Bride, Batman: Year One, Dracula, The

Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Red Alert, and Pride and

Prejudice. Before the end of the seminar, students will come

to understand that sometimes making the transition isn’t

always about making new money off of old work, but giving

those old works a new method of reaching people.

3357 FYS 102 60 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Solomon, Harris

Science, Medicine and Culture

This course examines the cultural, social, and political

dimensions of science and medicine globally and cross-

culturally. Traversing both fantasy and reality, science and

medicine fundamentally structure our thinking about

divisions between life and death, mind and body, and

human and machine. Through ethnography, films, and

literature, the course explores biomedical and scientific

debates in depth, from organ transplants to AIDS, and from

genetics to cyberculture. In doing so, it traces how these

debates contest the very boundaries between nature, culture,

and technology.

19 University Core Curriculum

3358 FYS 102 61 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Solomon, Harris

Cultures of South Asia: Imag India

This course introduces South Asia, and especially India, in

its cultural, historical, and political contexts. It explores

concepts of identity, ritual, kinship, gender, colonialism, and

nationalism, guided by their expression in literature, film,

food, and current events. It opens contemporary issues

facing the region up for debate, including the diaspora, the

environment, communal violence, terrorism, international

aid, consumerism, and globalized media. The course will

deepen understandings of the people and politics of South

Asia, and their growing impact around the world.

3359 FYS 102 62 First Year Seminar 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Rosenberg, Gabriel

Food in America

This course examines the cultural and political dynamics of

food in modern America. Using historical documents,

literature, film, and cuisine, it explores the local, regional,

ethnic, and national foodways of the United States. In the

process, it also uncovers the roots of contemporary systems

of food production, marketing and consumption and

surveys volatile food controversies, including: the organic

and locavore movements; vegetarianism and animal rights;

obesity and public health; industrialized agriculture and the

green revolution. Food will be served.

3360 FYS 102 63 First Year Seminar 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Adney, Karley Kristine

From Warp Speed to Wizards: Science

This course examines various works of fantasy and science-

fiction (including video games, fantasy sports leagues, and

popular series like Harry Potter, Twilight, Star Wars, and Star

Trek among others). While studying these examples with

a careful critical eye, we will also attempt to answer the

following questions: Why do so many people gravitate

toward fantasy and science fiction? What impact do science

fiction and fantasy have on American culture?

Global and Historical Studies

The University core curriculum requirement of two semesters of

Change and Tradition has been replaced by a requirement of two

semesters of Global and Historical Studies (GHS). Students who

have previously taken one semester of Change and Tradition (ID201

or ID202) need to take only one more Global and Historical Studies

course. Those who have taken ID202/GHS209 (Revolutionary

Europe and Nigeria) cannot satisfy the second semester of GHS

with GHS203 (Modernizing and Contemporary Europe).

Postcolonial Studies: The Caribbean. Ever since Toussaint-

L’Ouverture led the first successful modern slave rebellion in Haiti

in the late 18th century, defeating the armies of France, Britain and

Spain, the Caribbean has been a pivotal region in understanding the

legacy of colonialism in the Americas. In this course, we will examine,

from an interdisciplinary and comparative framework, the long history

of interaction between the Caribbean and the West. Beginning with

Christopher Columbus’s ‘discovery’ of the New World, Europe’s

development of the Atlantic slave trade, and the world-changing

Haitian Revolution, we will follow the efforts of formerly colonized

people of this region to forge new nations, cultures and identities

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


in the aftermath of European imperialism. Topics likely to receive

particular emphasis this semester include Black Nationalism and

Pan-Africanism, Rastafarianism and Obeah (Voodoo), Bob Marley

and Jamaican popular music, international capitalism and the tourist

industry, and the role of Caribbean women in the struggle for postcolonial

identity and the development of a diasporic consciousness.

3243 GHS 202 01 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Spyra, Ania

Postcolonial Studies: The Caribbean

3244 GHS 202 02 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Spyra, Ania

Postcolonial Studies: The Caribbean

3605 GHS 202 03 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Staff

Postcolonial Studies: The Caribbean

3606 GHS 202 04 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Staff

Postcolonial Studies: The Caribbean

Modernizing and Contemporary Europe. This course

will study the early modern establishment of nation states, the

enlightenment advocacy of human rights and constitutional

government and the revolutionary movements to realize those

ideas, the World Wars and the Cold War, and the establishment and

expansion of the European Union. Students who have taken one

semester of GHS209 Change and Tradition in Revolutionary

Europe and Colonial Nigeria: may not satisfy the second semester

of Global and Historical Studies with GHS203 Modernizing and

Contemporary Europe due to an overlap in the material.

3245 GHS 203 01 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Porter, Jon

Modernizing and Contemporary Europe

3607 GHS 203 02 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Oprisko, Robert

Modernizing and Contemporary Europe

Frontiers in Latin America. This interdisciplinary course

explores the historical development of the notion of ‘frontiers’

in Latin America through three units of study: 1) The Frontier as

Contact Zone: The Amazon, 2) The Promise of Modernization

in the Southern Cone, and 3) Crossing Frontiers: Mexico and

the United States. The themes of social and cultural identity, citizen

participation, sustainable development and migration will be

interwoven throughout the course.

3246 GHS 204 01 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Osland, Gregory E

Frontiers in Latin America

3247 GHS 204 02 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Osland, Gregory E

Frontiers in Latin America

3608 GHS 204 03 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Sluis, Ageeth

Frontiers in Latin America

3609 GHS 204 04 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Sluis, Ageeth

Frontiers in Latin America

East Asian Interactions. This course explores the interactions

among China, Korea and Japan. It will examine how each of the

three states has contributed to the evolution of a common tradition,

how each of them has benefited from the interactions, and how

some of the interactions have caused destruction in the regions.

3248 GHS 205 01 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Smith, Scott Edward

East Asian Interactions

3249 GHS 205 02 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Smith, Scott Edward

East Asian Interactions

3250 GHS 205 03 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Smith, Scott Edward

East Asian Interactions

3251 GHS 205 04 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Smith, Scott Edward

East Asian Interactions

3610 GHS 205 05 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

TR 8-9:15 Han, Xiaorong

East Asian Interactions

3611 GHS 205 06 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Ooi, Su-Mei

East Asian Interactions

Resistance and Rights: Global Women. In this course, we

will examine the means by which women around the globe work

individually and collectively to gain basic human rights. Issues of

culture, religion, tradition, beauty, tourism, health, war, immigration

and the media will be explored as we consider the possibilities

for activism and resistance to oppression.

3253 GHS 207 01 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Staff

Resistance and Rights: Global Women

3254 GHS 207 02 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Staff

Resistance and Rights: Global Women

Change and Tradition in China and the Islamic Middle East.

This course examines the roots of the oldest continuing civilization

today, China, and the origin and emergence of Islam as a major

world culture and religion. It addresses the challenges of modernity

for these two traditional cultures, particularly as they have responded

to a world increasingly influenced by the West.

3257 GHS 208 01 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Staff

Change and Trad in China and the Islamic

Middle East

Revolutionary Europe and Colonial Nigeria. This course

explores the cultural traditions of Europe and Nigeria and their

confrontations with modernity in the 19th and 20th centuries. The

old order ends in violence, and a new order emerges, shaped by the

forces of democracy, science, capitalism, and imperialism.

3258 GHS 209 01 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

MWF 8-8:50 Vance, Michael A

Revolutionary Europe and Colonial Nigeria

3259 GHS 209 02 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Walsh, William P

Revolutionary Europe and Colonial Nigeria

3260 GHS 209 03 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Porter, Jon

Revolutionary Europe and Colonial Nigeria

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. University Core Curriculum 19


3261 GHS 209 04 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Hanson, Paul R

Revolutionary Europe and Colonial Nigeria

3262 GHS 209 05 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Porter, Jon

Revolutionary Europe and Colonial Nigeria

3263 GHS 209 06 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Staff

Revolutionary Europe and Colonial Nigeria

3264 GHS 209 07 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

MWF 12-12:50 Cornell, John S

Revolutionary Europe and Colonial Nigeria

3265 GHS 209 08 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

TR 8-9:15 Riggs, Larry W

Revolutionary Europe and Colonial Nigeria

3266 GHS 209 09 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 McGowan, Richard J

Revolutionary Europe and Colonial Nigeria

3267 GHS 209 10 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Anokwa, Kwadwo

Revolutionary Europe and Colonial Nigeria

3268 GHS 209 11 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

TR 5:15-6:30 Staff

Revolutionary Europe and Colonial Nigeria

3612 GHS 209 12 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Bigelow, Bruce

Revolutionary Europe and Colonial Nigeria

3613 GHS 209 13 Global and Historical Studies 3, UG

MWF 12-12:50 Swanson, Scott G

Revolutionary Europe and Colonial Nigeria

Core Courses

Core courses for incoming freshman Fall 2010

Analytic Reasoning

3319 AR 210-MA 01 Statistically Speaking 3, UG

MWF 8-8:50 Echols, Lacey P

3320 AR 210-MA 02 Statistically Speaking 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Echols, Lacey P

3321 AR 210-MA 03 Statistically Speaking 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Echols, Lacey P

3322 AR 211-MA 01 Codes and Secret Messages 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Holmes, Karen

3323 AR 211-MA 02 Codes and Secret Messages 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Holmes, Karen

3324 AR 212-MA 01 Win, Lose or Draw 3, UG

MWF 12-12:50 Holmes, Karen

3325 AR 212-MA 02 Win, Lose or Draw 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Holmes, Karen

3326 AR 212-MA 03 Win, Lose or Draw 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Chen, Zhihong

3198 AR 220-CS 01 Robot Programming 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Linos, Panos K

3208 AR 231-PL 01 Principles of Reasoning 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Popa, Tiberiu M

21 University Core Curriculum

The Natural World

3186 NW 200-BI 01 Biology and Society 5, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Meadows, Marva

R 9-9:50 Meadows, Marva

3187 NW 200-BI 01A Laboratory 0, UG

R 10-11:50 Meadows, Marva

3188 NW 200-BI 02 Biology and Society 5, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Meadows, Marva

R 2:25-3:15 Meadows, Marva

3189 NW 200-BI 02A Laboratory 0, UG

R 3:25-5:15 Meadows, Marva

3190 NW 201-BI 01 Environmental Biology 5, UG

T 5:30-8 Holm, Robert F

R 5:30-6:20 Holm, Robert F

3191 NW 201-BI 01A Laboratory 0, UG

R 6:30-8 Holm, Robert F

3192 NW 202-BI 01 The World of Plants 5, UG

MTWF 1-1:50 Schmid, Katherine M

3193 NW 202-BI 01A Laboratory 0, UG

W 2-3:50 Schmid, Katherine M

3194 NW 203-BI 01 Genetics and Evolution 5, UG

TR 1-2:15 Dolan, Thomas E

W 2-2:50 Dolan, Thomas E

3195 NW 203-BI 01A Laboratory 0, UG

W 3-4:50 Dolan, Thomas E

3509 NW 210-CH 01 Chemistry and Society 5, UG

MWRF 9-9:50 Wilson, Anne M

3510 NW 210-CH 01A Laboratory 0, UG

W 2:25-4:15 Wilson, Anne M

3511 NW 210-CH 02 Chemistry and Society 5, UG

MTWF 10-10:50 LeGreve, Tracy

3512 NW 210-CH 02B Laboratory 0, UG

M 2:25-4:15 LeGreve,Tracy

3513 NW 210-CH 02C Laboratory 0, UG

T 2:25-4:15 LeGreve,Tracy

3592 NW 221-PS 01 Human Behavioral Measurement 5, UG

MTWR 10-10:50 Padgett, Robert J

R 2:25-3:25 Padgett, Robert J

3593 NW 221-PS 01A Laboratory 0, UG

R 3:25-5:25 Padgett, Robert J

Perspectives in the Creative Arts

3437 PCA 200-ART 01 Introduction to Visual Art 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Mix, Elizabeth

3438 PCA 200-ART 02 Introduction to Visual Art 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Gauthier, Leah

3439 PCA 200-ART 03 Introduction to Visual Art 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Rao, Gautam

3440 PCA 200-ART 04 Introduction to Visual Art 3, UG

R 7-9:30 Walker, James

3436 PCA 220-DA 01 American Dance Black Tradition 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Reid, Derek Enrico

3442 PCA 241-MU 01 Music in Action 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Brooks,Lisa E

3443 PCA 241-MU 02 Music in Action 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Mulholland, James Q

3444 PCA 241-MU 03 Music in Action 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Mulholland, James Q

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


3596 PCA 241-MU I 04 Music in Action 3, UG

MW 12:30-2:30 Leck, Henry H

F 12:30-1:50 Leck, Henry H

3435 PCA 250-TH 01 Masks 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Meaden, Wendy J

3441 PCA 261 01 Aesthetics and Design 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Skinner, Deborah K

The Social World

3449 SW 200-SO 01 Understanding Society 3, UG

TR 8-9:15 Scott, Marvin B

Race, Ethnicity and Society

3450 SW 200-SO 02 Understanding Society 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Staff

Education and Society

3451 SW 200-SO 03 Understanding Society 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Scott, Marvin B

Race, Ethnicity and Society

3452 SW 200-SO 04 Understanding Society 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Staff

Inequalities in Society

3453 SW 200-SO 05 Understanding Society 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Cline, Krista

Health, Illness and Society

3454 SW 200-SO 06 Understanding Society 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Staff

Sports and Society

3546 SW 220-COB 01 The Economy and Society 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Kirk, Bob

3395 SW 230-JR 01 New Media and 3, UG

Public Communication

MW 3:50-5:05 Geertsema, Margaretha

3520 SW 250-PS 01 Psychological Inquiry 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Giesler, Raymond B

3521 SW 250-PS 02 Psychological Inquiry 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Giesler, Raymond B

3522 SW 250-PS 03 Psychological Inquiry 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Dale, Robert H

3523 SW 250-PS 04 Psychological Inquiry 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Stilson, Stephanie R

3524 SW 250-PS 05 Psychological Inquiry 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 O’Malley, Alison

3525 SW 250-PS 06 Psychological Inquiry 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 O’Malley, Alison

3579 SW 261-RX 01 Health Disparities 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Ryder, Priscilla T

3580 SW 270-IS 01 Understanding Global Issues 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Oprisko, Robert

Texts and Ideas

3582 TI 201-CLA 01 Ancient Greek Perspectives 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Saffire,Paula

3597 TI 211-EN 01 Inquiries in Am Lit and His II 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Forhan,Chris

Childhood: Mystery and Muse

One of the great, inexhaustible sources of inspiration for

literature is childhood: that period of vivid wonder and

terror, of our first fumblings toward knowledge about who

we are and what it is like to live in this oddly beautiful (and

beautifully odd) world. In this course, we will investigate

how American literature in various genres-fiction, poetry,

and memoir-has explored and explained childhood, and we

will use those models as inspiration for our own attempts to

capture, in language, what is worth retrieving from our own

beginnings. To establish a template by which to appreciate

some fundamental elements of the tale of childhood, we will

start the semester by reading a few of the more wildly strange

and mythically resonant Grimms’ fairy tales. After that, we

will focus on American writers of the last century, with

possible authors being Elizabeth Bishop, Theodore Roethke,

Norton Juster, Tobias Wolff, Susan Minot, and Joanne Beard.

This course counts toward completion of Core Curriculum

requirements but not the Inquiries in American Literature

requirement for English majors.

3598 TI 212-EN 01 Inquiries in Brit Lit and His I 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Walsh, William P

Shakespeare and Love

This course supposes that Shakespeare (who I think invents

romantic comedy) has something to tell us about romantic

love. Shakespeare portrays love as a process that may either

succeed or fail. We will do romantic comedy and romantic

tragedy-and the sonnets, which probably portray some of

Shakespeare’s personal bouts with love. Basic requirement for

the course-you must be in or fall in love during the term.

How else can we know? (kidding of course.)

3645 TI220-MU 01 Music and Religion 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Eyerly, Sarah

3201 TI 242-PL 01 Marginalized in America 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Dulckeit, Katharina

3202 TI 243-PL 01 Knowledge and Reality 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Popa, Tiberiu M

3203 TI 243-PL 02 Knowledge and Reality 3, UG

T 2:25-4:55 Dulckeit, Katharina

3204 TI 243-PL 03 Knowledge and Reality 3, UG

W 2:25-4:55 Muntean, Ioan

3205 TI 244-PL 01 Ethics,The Good Life and Society 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 McGowan, Richard J

3206 TI 244-PL 02 Ethics,The Good Life and Society 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Watson, Whitten

3207 TI 244-PL 03 Ethics,The Good Life and Society 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Watson, Whitten

3214 TI 250-RL 01 Religions of the World 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Valliere, Paul R

3215 TI 250-RL 02 Religions of the World 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Hege, Brent

3216 TI 251-RL 01 The Bible 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Snyder, Glenn

3217 TI 251-RL 02 The Bible 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Snyder,Glenn

3196 TI 261-STS 01 Science and Society 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Zimmerman, Michael

Creationism in America

3197 TI 261-STS 02 Science and Society 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Zimmerman, Michael

Creationism in America

3578 TI 262 01 Self and Service 1.5, UG

TBA Hochman, Arthur W

Brown, Bonnie K

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. University Core Curriculum 21


Core courses for students matriculated before Fall 2010

Division 1–Humanities:

See departmental listing for more information.

2537 EN 246 01 Inquiries in Am Lit and Hist II 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Swenson, Brynnar Nelson

The Value of Literature: Realism,

Naturalism, Mode

See departmental listing for course description

2538 EN 246 02 Inquiries in Am Lit and Hist II 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Swenson, Brynnar Nelson

The Value of Literature: Realism,

Naturalism, Mode

See departmental listing for course description

2539 EN 266 01 Inquiries in Am Lit and Hist II 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Goldsmith, Jason

Literature and Movement: Britain,

Empire and Identity

See departmental listing for course description

2540 EN 266 02 Inquiries in Am Lit and Hist II 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Goldsmith, Jason

Literature and Movement: Britain,

Empire and Identity

See departmental listing for course description

3548 HS 312 01 19th Century Europe 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Cornell, John S

3549 HS 331 01 History of Children and Youth 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Cornell, John S

3550 HS 338 01 The Early American Republic 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Geib, George W

3551 HS 383 01 American Military History 3, UG

T 7-9:15 Geib, George W

3552 HS 390 01 Topics in History 3, UG

M 2:25-4:55 Hanson, Paul R

Junior Research Seminar

See departmental listing for course description

3553 HS 390 02 Topics in History 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Bigelow, Bruce

Hot Times in the City: US Urban History

See departmental listing for course description

3554 HS 390 03W Topics in History 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Bigelow, Bruce

Global Society

See departmental listing for course description

3555 HS 390 04 Topics in History 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Cornell,John S

Walls

See departmental listing for course description

3556 HS 390 05 Topics in History 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Han, Xiaorong

China and the US

See departmental listing for course description

3504 HS 390 06 Topics in History 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Sluis, Ageeth

Imagining Latin-American Cultures

See departmental listing for course description

23 University Core Curriculum

3557 HS 390 07 Topics in History 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Rosenberg, Gabriel

Green and Permanent Land: Environment

and Agriculture

See departmental listing for course description

3558 HS 390 08 Topics in History 3, UG

T 7:15-9:45 Garniewicz, Rex

Arch Field Methods and Artifact Analysis

See departmental listing for course description

3559 HS 390 09 Topics in History 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Grossman, Peter Z

Economic History of the US

See departmental listing for course description

3211 PL 363 01 Biomedical Ethics 3, UG

M 6:30-9 Brown, Brandon

3218 RL 354 01 Islam: Religion, Culture, Society 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Bauman, Chad

Division 2–Fine Arts:

See departmental listing for more information

1629 MH 110 01 Music: A Living Language 3, UG

MWF 8-8:50 DeRusha, Stanley E

Division 3–Social Sciences:

See departmental listing for more information

3498 AN 102 01 Introductory Anthropology 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Edwards, Elise M

3499 AN 102 02 Introductory Anthropology 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Shahrokhi, Sholeh

2621 IS 101 01 Intro International Studies 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Oprisko, Robert

Division 4–Natural Sciences:

See departmental listing for more information

2699 AS 102 01 Modern Astronomy with Lab 5, UG

MWRF 11-11:50 Murphy, Brian W

2700 AS 102 01A Laboratory 0, UG

T 9-11 Murphy,Brian W

2701 AS 102 01B Laboratory 0, UG

T 11-1 Murphy, Brian W

2672 PH 105 01 Concepts of Physical Science 5, UG

MTWF 1-1:50 Dixon, H Marshall

2673 PH 105 01A Laboratory 0, UG

R 2-4 Dixon, H Marshall

2686 PH 105 01B Laboratory 0, UG

R 10-12 Dixon, H Marshall

3565 PH 105 02 Concepts of Physical Science 5, UG

MTWR 10-10:50 Han, Xianming

3566 PH 105 02A Laboratory 0, UG

F 10-12 Han, Xianming

Division 5–Quantitative and Formal Reasoning:

See departmental listing for more information

3100 CS 142 01 Intro to Comp Sci and Prog 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Chen, Zhihong

3110 CS 142 02 Intro to Comp Sci and Prog 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Hardikar, Rahul P

3119 CS 142 03 Intro to Comp Sci and Prog 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Chen, Zhihong

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


3330 MA 106 01 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 5, UG

M-F 9-9:50 Krohn, Mary

3331 MA 106 02 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 5, UG

M-F 10-10:50 Leatherman, Duane L

3332 MA 106 03 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 5, UG

M-F 11-11:50 Freed, Kathie Jane

3333 MA 106 04 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 5, UG

M-F 12-12:50 Gaisser, John W

3334 MA 106 05 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 5, UG

M-F 1-1:50 Pham, Du

3338 MA 125 01 Business Calculus 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Freed, Kathie Jane

3339 MA 125 02 Business Calculus 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Krohn, Mary

3340 MA 125 03 Business Calculus 3, UG

MWF 12-12:50 Krohn, Mary

3341 MA 125 04 Business Calculus 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Leatherman, Duane L

3342 MA 162 01 Statistical Methods 4, UG

MTWF 9-9:50 Wilson, Chris

3343 MA 162 02 Statistical Methods 4, UG

MTWF 10-10:50 Wilson, Chris

3210 PL 210 01 Logic 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Glennan, Stuart S

Physical Well Being

3270 PWB 101 01 Ballroom Dance Sport 1, UG

F 9-10:50 Ablog Jr, Angelo G

3271 PWB 101 02 Ballroom Dance Sport 1, UG

F 11-12:50 Ablog Jr,Angelo G

3289 PWB 102 01 Israeli Dancing 1, UG

MW 2-2:50 McDonald, Rhea

3291 PWB 103-DA 01 Beginning Ballet II (non-majors) 1, UG

MF 8-8:50 Ladner, Jennifer A

3292 PWB 104-DA 01 Begining Jazz 1, UG

TR 8-8:50 Ladner, Jennifer A

3293 PWB 105-DA 01 Intermediate/Advanced Jazz 1, UG

TR 9:35-10:25 Ladner, Jennifer A

3294 PWB 106-DA 01 Modern Dance (non-majors) 1, UG

MF 9-9:50 Ladner, Jennifer A

3274 PWB 121-PE 01 Beginning Tennis 1, UG

MW 8-8:50 Williams, Pamela R

3275 PWB 121-PE 02 Beginning Tennis 1, UG

MW 9-9:50 Williams, Pamela R

3276 PWB 121-PE 03 Beginning Tennis 1, UG

MW 10-10:50 Williams, Pamela R

3277 PWB 122-PE 01 Advanced Tennis 1, UG

MW 11-11:50 Williams, Pamela R

3284 PWB 123-PE 01 Learning Golf Through Games 1, UG

MW 11-11:50 Staff

3295 PWB 124-PE 01 Basketball 1, UG

MW 11-11:50 Mason, Angel Monique

3272 PWB 125-PE 01 T’ai Chi 1, UG

MW 11-11:50 Heinz, Michael

3273 PWB 125-PE 02 T’ai Chi 1, UG

MW 12-12:50 Heinz, Michael

3280 PWB 126-PE 01 Buda Khi 1, UG

TR 1-1:50 Easley, Lester

3281 PWB 126-PE 02 Buda Khi 1, UG

TR 2-2:50 Easley, Lester

3285 PWB 127-PE 01 Weighing in on Optimal Health 1, UG

MW 12-12:50 Staff

3286 PWB 129-PE 01 Strength and Conditioning 1, UG

TR 8-8:50 Staff

3287 PWB 129-PE 02 Strength and Conditioning 1, UG

TR 9:35-10:25 Staff

3288 PWB 129-PE 03 Strength and Conditioning 1, UG

MW 10-10:50 Strawbridge, Marilyn

3290 PWB 160 01 Women’s Self Defense 1, UG

TR 11-11:50 Ryan, Andrew N

3282 PWB 162 01 Wagging, Walking, and Wellness 1

TR 1-1:50 Farley, Lisa A

3283 PWB 162 02 Wagging, Walking, and Wellness 1

TR 2-2:50 Farley, Lisa A

3278 PWB 163-DA 01 Introduction to Study of Yoga 1, UG

MF 10-10:50 Wang, Tong

3279 PWB 164-DA 01 Continued Study of Yoga 1, UG

TR 11-11:50 Wang,Tong

3296 PWB 166 01 Intercollegiate Athletics 1, UG

TBA Goetz, Beth

Writing Intensive Courses

2921 EC 352 01W Personnel Economics 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Gjerde, Tom

2855 FN 347 01W Investments 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Dolvin, Steven

2896 IB 320 01W International Business Environ 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Yagi, Noriko

2846 MK 385 01W Marketing Research 3, UG

TR 8-9:15 Fetter Jr, Richard E

2858 MK 385 02W Marketing Research 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Fetter Jr, Richard E

3545 MS 375 01W Systems Analysis and Design 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Arling, Priscilla

2276 JR 324W 01W Case Problems Public Relations 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Campbell, Rose G

2277 JR 324W 02W Case Problems Public Relations 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Campbell, Rose G

2313 JR 328 01W Public Relations Techniques 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Holt, Lanier

3184 BI 480 01W Biology Capstone 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Villani, Philip

Capstone: Cancer Biology

3185 BI 480 02W Biology Capstone 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Kowalski, Jennifer

Capstone: Neurosystem Function in

Physiology and Disorders

3048 CH 424 01W Instrumental Analysis Lab 2, UG

W 1-4:50 Akinbo, Olujide T

Food Analysis

3059 CH 463W 01W Biochemistry Laboratory I 2, UG

R 8-11:50 Johnson, Jeremy

3060 CH 463W 02W Biochemistry Laboratory I 2, UG

R 1-4:40 Johnson, Jeremy

3057 CH 474 01W Physical Chemistry Lab II 2, UG

M 1-4:50 Hopkins,

Todd

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. University Core Curriculum 23


2535 EN 218 01W Intro Creative Writing: Poetry 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Roeser, Dana B

2536 EN 219 01W Intro Creative Writing: Prose 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Barden, Dan

Prose

3231 EN 301 01W Topics in Advanced Composition 3, UG

M 5:15-7:45 Sutherlin, Susan J

Advanced Composition

3239 EN 303 01W Scientific Writing 3, UG

W 7-9:45 Reeves, Carol A

Prof Writing: Writ about Nature and

the Environment

3240 EN 310 02W Intermediate Writing Workshop 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Forhan, Chris

2542 EN 410 01W Senior Creative Writing Seminar 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Staff

Fiction and Creative Nonfiction

2602 EN 450 50W The Senior Essay 3, UG

M 5:15-7:45 Garver, Lee A

2622 IS 410 01W The Global Society 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Bigelow, Bruce

2965 SP 320S 01W Service Learning in Spanish 3, UG

F 11-12:30 Carney, Terri M

3165 SP 320S 02W Service Learning in Spanish 3, UG

F 1-2:30 Carney, Terri M

3213 PL 410 01W Seminar in Philosophy 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Dulckeit, Katharina

Hegel and Nietzsche

2791 PS 440 01W Psychology of Personality 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Martin, Joel

3459 SO 335 01W The Global Society 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Bigelow, Bruce

3467 SO 391 01W Social Theory Seminar 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Colburn Jr, Kenneth D

1040 ED 303 01W Read and Lang Arts: Erly Chldhd 6, UG

MW 12-4 Hargrove, Cathy

1054 ED 308S 01W Read and Lang Arts:Mid Chldhd 6, UG

M 8-4 Corpus, Deborah A

W 12-4 Corpus, Deborah

1042 ED 498 01W Theory and Practice of ENL 3, UG

T 4:30-7 Kandel, Brooke E

1306 RX 608 01W Doctor of Pharm Sen Sem II 1, UG

TBA Gervasio, Jane Maria

1323 RX 664 01W Drug Information Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1381 RX 664 02W Drug Information Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

3384 ART 312 01W Design: History and Theory 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Mix, Elizabeth

2173 AA 450W 01W Arts Administration Senior Sem 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Zurbuchen, Susan J

1908 DA 366 01W Dance History II 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Attaway, Larry A

1697 TH 333 01W Play Analysis 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Schaub, Owen

25 University Core Curriculum

University Honors Program

For updated course listings, see the Spring 2011 course catalog on

My.Butler.edu.

3619 HN 111 01 Honors First-Year Seminar 4, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Valliere, Paul R

Faith, Doubt and Reason II

In the second semester of this year-long course, we read and

discuss philosophical, religious and literary texts, exploring

how human beings define themselves in terms of the various

communities to which they belong. We examine different

explanations of injustice and prescriptions for creating a

more just world.

3620 HN 111 02 Honors First-Year Seminar 4, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Lantzer, Jason

Revisiting the Cabin II:

Slave Narratives Strike Back

During the first portion of Revisiting the Cabin, the focus

was on Harriet Beecher Stowe’s classic “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,”

looking not only at the book itself but also the historical

events that shaped it and its author. In this second portion,

the focus will shift to accounts written by actual slaves who

actually gained their freedom in ways that Stowe recounted

in fictional terms. The purpose is not only to study and

contextualize this genre of historic literature, but also to see

how well Stowe did (or not) in capturing what was really

occurring in her book.

3621 HN 111 03 Honors First-Year Seminar 4, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Bungard, Christopher

Heroic Temper: Roman Reimaginings

The Roman comic playwright Plautus once remarked, I want

to follow up on this, whether we are our own selves or some-

body else’s, lest one of our neighbors changed us when we

weren’t looking. A poetic genre is always in flux, as poets

attempt to carve out a space for their own ideas. Roman

poets, such as Vergil and Ovid, looked to previous masters

of epic poetry, and found within those models room for their

own projects. In this course, we will be interested in how

these poets explored the untapped potentials of epic poetry.

How do poets of different generations find creative potential

in an age old model such as Homer? Why do we continue

to turn to these poems? How do we tap into the past to

understand our own world? As in the first semester of this

sequence, we will be exploring our thinking through writing

and discussions.

3622 HN 200 01 In-Depth Honors Seminar 2, UG

W 2-3:40 Guerriero, Sam J

Isaac Asimov’s Foundation Novels

The course will examine the science fiction works of Isaac

Asimov and relate four of his novels to the rise and fall of

empires in a “generic” sense as well as a reference to the

history of the United States as a world power. Isaac Asimov,

who passed away in 1992, was one of the most prolific

science fiction and science writers in America. The four

books listed below describe the “Fall” of an Empire and the

“Rise” in a different format of a Second Foundation/pseudo-

empire. The course instructor will use concepts from United

States history to compare the ideas presented in the novels

with historical events.

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


3623 HN 300 01 Interdisciplinary Honors Semin 2, UG

M 6-8:30 Saffire, Paula

Hands-On Spirituality

A hands-on exploration of spritual practices that involve the

body. Practices will include: dervish whirling, tai chi, hatha

yoga, walking meditation, footwashing, Thai medicinal

massage, and mandala drawing. This is a spritual lab course.

Experience comes first; readings are for the sake of enhancing

experience. Requirements: (a) open-mindedness, respect for

others, (b) a desire for experience, (c) some self-discipline,

and (d) some courage. Consult the instructor if you have (a)

and (b) and want to ask about (c) and (d). Some information

about the course will be posted on the door of JH374D or

available by request in the Honors Program office (JH153D)

or lmarkus@butler.edu. Please read before you sign up.

3624 HN 300 02 Interdisciplinary Honors Seminar 2, UG

T 2:25-4:05 Alexander, Peter Gregory

Dead Man Walking

Students in The Dead Man Walking Project will examine the

application of the death penalty in America through reading

and discussing books and articles, viewing films and photo-

graphs and doing internet research. The purpose of the

course is to take a broad and balanced look at the death

penalty in order to help each student develop their own

position concerning this sanction. Students will have ample

opportunities to articulate their personal, evolving views in a

variety of written and verbal formats.

3625 HN 300 03 Interdisciplinary Honors Seminar 2, UG

R 2:25-4:05 Alexander, Peter Gregory

The Mahler Project

Through reading, discussion, attendance at performances

and films on campus and across Indianapolis, the Mahler

Project will introduce students to the music, art, architecture,

design and drama of Germany and Austria from 1890–1940,

a turbulent period that gave rise to modernism and

totalitarianism.

3626 HN 300 04 Interdisciplinary Honors Seminar 2, UG

T 11-12:40 Zimmerman, Michael

Evolution-Creation Controversy:

Exploring Diff

This course will explore many aspects of the evolution-

creation controversy. In addition to examining some of the

underlying scientific issues, religious, legal and philosophical

issues will also be discussed. Students will explore ways

various groups are attempting to educate the public about

this controversy today.

3627 HN 300 05 Interdisciplinary Honors Seminar 2, UG

TBA Winings, Roseanne

24-Hour Museum: Museums in the

21st Century

What does it mean to be a museum in the 21st century?

How has technology and social media altered the experience

of museum-going? Through an exploration of the varied

departments at the Indianapolis Museum of Art and other

local institutions, learn about a museum’s changing relationship

to the public. Discover the many ways in which visitors

interact with works of art, and study the creation of tools

and programs that enhance those experiences. The course

will culminate in a look at public art and its digital

components as both a permanent and temporal art form that

takes art work outside of the museum, and sometimes even

onto the web. Expect to hear from guest speakers, have probing

discussions with your fellow students and visit different areas

of the museum, including some behind-the-scenes tours!

3628 HN 300 06 Interdisciplinary Honors Seminar 2, UG

M 2:25-4:05 Dowd, Alan William

An Empire from the Beginning:

The Growth of US Global Power

Enfolding elements of history, political science, public policy,

military policy and international relations, this course will

challenge students to consider a series of weighty, consequential

questions. It will first examine the various definitions of

“empire,” and in so doing help students explore what kind of

empire the United States is. Is it like the Roman Empire?

The British Empire? The Nazi or Soviet Empires? Or is it

something without precedent or parallel? When was America’s

empire born? What triggered its growth spurts? When did

America’s empire come of age? What are the consequences

of empire? Is America’s empire benign and beneficial,

dangerous and destructive, or both-or neither? What does

the future hold for America’s empire, and what does this

mean for the world? Course readings, assignments and

projects will help students identify historical parallels and

answer these questions.

Learning Resource Center

Check for more detailed and up-to-date listings on My.Butler.edu,

or visit the LRC in Jordan Hall 136.

2220 LC 100 01 Becoming a Master Student 0, UG

T 1-1:50 Staff

2221 LC 200 01 Peer Education 1, UG

TBA Barnes, Sarah

2222 LC 201 01 Res Life:Coll Student Develpmt 1, UG

TBA Cunningham, Karla

Washington DC Semester

2083 AH 110 DC Art: A Visual Dialogue 3, UG

TBA Morrel, Judith Harper

Arts of Public Washington

2082 AH 202 DC Intro to the History of Art 3, UG

TBA Morrel, Judith Harper

Arts of Public Washington

3632 PO 358 DC Foreign Policy Making 3, UG

TBA Morrel, Judith 3079

DC 300 01 Washington Semester Enrollment 0, UG

TBA Morrel, Judith Harper

3078 DC 301 01 Washington DC Seminar 1, UG

TBA Morrel, Judith Harper

3080 DC 301 02 Washington DC Seminar 1, UG

TBA Morrel, Judith Harper

3081 DC 301 03 Washington DC Seminar 1, UG

TBA Morrel, Judith Harper

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. University Core Curriculum 25


27 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

College of Liberal

Arts and Sciences

Anthropology

Independent Studies and Internships are available; please contact

the department for course numbers and permissions to register.

3498 AN 102 01 Introductory Anthropology 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Edwards, Elise M

3499 AN 102 02 Introductory Anthropology 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Shahrokhi, Sholeh

3500 AN 346 01 The Anthropology of Sport 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Edwards, Elise M

3501 AN 368 01 Coming of Age in the Mid East 3, UG

W 2:25-4:55 Shahrokhi, Sholeh

3502 AN 380 01 Selected Topics in Anthro 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Shahrokhi, Sholeh

Trespassing: An Anthro of

Our Segmented Lives

This is a course about exclusions and inclusions. It’s about

emigration and immigration. All around us, there are walls

and fences erected to keep people out and hold ‘others’ in.

Some partitions are concrete—harsh and visible; the rest

remain fluid and negotiable. This class opens the dialogue

about the societal coming together and the fissures of

humanity; it looks at the movements of large groups of

people in and out of public space. This is a class on segmented

cities around the globe and the patterns of segregation based

on race, ethnicity, age, gender, sexuality, economic wealth,

and political clout. This is a course on power and the social

life of humans in the contemporary.

3503 AN 380 02 Selected Topics in Anthro 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Sluis, Ageeth

Imagining Latin American Cultures

This course provides students with the opportunity to study

the discipline of anthropology of Latin America from a

historical perspective. Through case studies of Mexico, Brazil

and the Andean and Caribbean regions, we will look at how

both US and Latin American anthropologists have shaped

general perceptions of race, gender, and class in the area. By

tracing imagined Latin American cultures through time and

space, students will examine the political ramifications of

doing anthropology. The course will be conducted as a seminar

and fulfills requirements for both history and anthropology

majors.

3505 AN 380 03 Selected Topics in Anthro 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 DeLuycker, Anneke

Human Evolution

This course covers human origins and human evolution. The

fossil record and archaeological evidence for human biological

evolution will be examined and interpreted. We will review

evolutionary theory, patterns of human variation, the hominin

fossil record, comparative behavior, and modern human

diversity. We will critically examine different models for

human origins, and examine the history of controversies and

current debates in various theories of human evolution and

human variation.

3506 AN 380 04 Selected Topics in Anthropology 3, UG

W 5:15-7:45 DeLuycker, Anneke

Behavioral Research at the Zoo

This course covers instruction on methodologies of collecting

data on the behavior of primates in particular, and animals in

general. A significant portion of the course will involve

developing an independent research project, and analysis

and interpretation of data. Students will conduct behavioral

observations and data collection at the Indianapolis Zoo.

This course is an excellent introduction to those interested in

primatology, applied animal behavior, exotic animal studies,

animal care and management, and zoo, museum or

conservation work.

3507 AN 380 05 Selected Topics in Anthropology 3, UG

T 7:15-9:45 Garniewicz, Rex

Archaeological Field Methods

and Artifact Analysis

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic

techniques archaeologists use for scientific data collection

and analysis. Along with a field school in archaeology, it will

prepare students to conduct fieldwork at the level of an

archaeological technician. Students will learn how to define

research problems, locate and survey sites, and prepare for

excavation. Students will perform hands-on work with

prehistoric and historic artifacts to familiarize themselves

with material identification and typologies. They will also

participate in artifact analysis, cataloging, and interpretation.

3567 AN 380 06W Selected Topics in Anthropology 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Bigelow, Bruce

Global Society

The history of globalization covers 2000 years with the

emphasis on the era since 1500 C.E. The geography of

empires and long distance trade and the diffusion of religions

and languages is stressed.

3508 AN 390 01 Development of Anthro Thought 3, UG

R 2:25-4:55 Edwards, Elise M

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


Biology

Independent Studies and Internships are available; please contact

the department for course numbers and permissions to register.

3128 BI 105 01 Introductory Cell Biology 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Gerecke, Erin E

3129 BI 105 02 Introductory Cell Biology 3, UG

MWF 12-12:50 Gerecke, Erin E

3130 BI 105 03 Introductory Cell Biology 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Dolan, Thomas E

3131 BI 122 01 Principles of Biology II 3, UG

MWF 8-8:50 Hauck, Nat

3132 BI 122 02 Principles of Biology II 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Kowalski, Jennifer

3133 BI 122 03 Principles of Biology II 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Osborne, Charissa D

3134 BI 122 04 Principles of Biology II 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Hess, Christopher Michael

3135 BI 122 05 Principles of Biology II 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Osborne, Charissa D

3136 BI 122 06 Principles of Biology II 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Ryan, Travis James

3137 BI 122 07 Principles of Biology II 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Villani, Philip

3138 BI 123 01 Biological Investigations II 2, UG

M 2-4:50 Kowalski, Jennifer

3139 BI 123 02 Biological Investigations II 2, UG

T 8-10:50 Osborne, Charissa D

3140 BI 123 03 Biological Investigations II 2, UG

T 11-1:50 Osborne, Charissa D

3143 BI 123 04 Biological Investigations II 2, UG

T 2:25-5:15 Villani, Philip

3142 BI 123 05 Biological Investigations II 2, UG

W 2-4:50 Ryan, Travis James

3141 BI 123 06 Biological Investigations II 2, UG

R 9:35-12:25 Hess, Christopher Michael

3144 BI 123 07 Biological Investigations II 2, UG

R 2:25-5:15 Hauck, Nat

3145 BI 301 01 Principles of Zoology 4, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Salsbury, Carmen M

3146 BI 301 01A Laboratory 0, UG

T 2:25-4:15 Salsbury, Carmen M

3147 BI 302 01 Principles of Botany 4, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Schmid, Katherine M

3148 BI 302 01A Laboratory 0, UG

R 2:25-5:15 Schmid, Katherine M

3149 BI 303 01 Principles of Physiology 4, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Etnier, Shelley A

3150 BI 303 01A Laboratory 0, UG

R 1-2:50 Etnier, Shelley A

3151 BI 303 01B Laboratory 0, UG

R 3-4:50 Etnier, Shelley A

3152 BI 322 01 Vertebrate Biology 4, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Hess, Christopher Michael

3153 BI 322 01A Laboratory 0, UG

MW 2:25-4:15 Hess, Christopher Michael

3154 BI 325 01 Princ Pathogenic Microbiology 3, UG

TR 12-12:50 Shellhaas, James L

3155 BI 325 01A Laboratory 0, UG

M 1-2:50 Shellhaas, James L

3156 BI 325 01B Laboratory 0, UG

M 3-4:50 Shellhaas, James L

3157 BI 325 01C Laboratory 0, UG

T 9-10:50 Gerecke, Erin E

3158 BI 325 01D Laboratory 0, UG

T 2-3:50 Gerecke, Erin E

3159 BI 325 01E Laboratory 0, UG

W 1-2:50 Shellhaas, James L

3160 BI 325 01F Laboratory 0, UG

W 3-4:50 Shellhaas, James L

3161 BI 325 01G Laboratory 0, UG

R 9-10:50 Gerecke, Erin E

3162 BI 325 01H Laboratory 0, UG

R 2-3:50 Gerecke, Erin E

3163 BI 325 02 Princ Pathogenic Microbiology 3, UG

TR 1-1:50 Shellhaas, James L

3171 BI 330 01 Tropical Field Biology 3, UG

W 6:30-9:30 Salsbury, Carmen M

3172 BI 350 01 Cell Biology 4, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Maloney, Michael

3173 BI 350 01A Laboratory 0, UG

R 2:25-5:15 Maloney, Michael

3174 BI 357 01 General Genetics 4, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Hauck, Nat

3175 BI 357 01A Laboratory 0, UG

W 2-4:50 Hauck, Nat

3176 BI 406 01 Topics in Biology 2, UG

W 2-4:50 Hennessy, Marjorie

Environmental Practicum

3177 BI 408 01 Topics in Biology 4, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Etnier, Shelley A

Biomechanics

3178 BI 408 01A Laboratory 0, UG

T 2:25-5:15 Etnier, Shelley A

Biomechanics

3179 BI 408 02 Topics in Biology 4, UG

TR 11-12:15 Ryan, Travis James

Urban Ecology

3180 BI 408 02A Laboratory 0, UG

M 2-4:50 Ryan, Travis James

Urban Ecology

3181 BI 412 01 Local Flora 3, UG

T 2:25-5:15 Dolan, Rebecca W

3182 BI 430 01 Developmental Biology 4, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Maloney, Michael

3183 BI 430 01A Laboratory 0, UG

T 2:25-5:15 Maloney, Michael

3184 BI 480 01W Biology Capstone 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Villani, Philip

Capstone: Cancer Biology

3185 BI 480 02W Biology Capstone 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Kowalski, Jennifer

Capstone: Neurosystem Function in

Physiology and Disorders

3186 NW 200-BI 01 Biology and Society 5, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Meadows, Marva

R 9-9:50 Meadows, Marva

3187 NW 200-BI 01A Laboratory 0, UG

R 10-11:50 Meadows, Marva

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 27


3188 NW 200-BI 02 Biology and Society 5, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Meadows, Marva

R 2:25-3:15 Meadows, Marva

3189 NW 200-BI 02A Laboratory 0, UG

R 3:25-5:15 Meadows, Marva

3190 NW 201-BI 01 Environmental Biology 5, UG

T 5:30-8 Holm, Robert F

R 5:30-6:20 Holm, Robert F

3191 NW 201-BI 01A Laboratory 0, UG

R 6:30-8 Holm, Robert F

3192 NW 202-BI 01 The World of Plants 5, UG

MTWF 1-1:50 Schmid, Katherine M

3193 NW 202-BI 01A Laboratory 0, UG

W 2-3:50 Schmid, Katherine M

3194 NW 203-BI 01 Genetics and Evolution 5, UG

TR 1-2:15 Dolan, Thomas E

W 2-2:50 Dolan, Thomas E

3195 NW 203-BI 01A Laboratory 0, UG

W 3-4:50 Dolan, Thomas E

Chemistry

Independent Studies and Internships are available; please contact

the department for course numbers and permissions to register.

2989 CH 106 01 General Chemistry 5, UG

MTWR 9-9:50 Kirsch, Joseph L

2990 CH 106 01A Laboratory 0, UG

M 2-4:50 Kirsch, Joseph L

2991 CH 106 01B Laboratory 0, UG

F 8-10:50 Kirsch, Joseph L

3058 CH 106 01C Laboratory 0, UG

F 1-3:50 Kirsch, Joseph L

2992 CH 106 02 General Chemistry 5, UG

MTWF 8-8:50 Hoops, Geoffrey C

2993 CH 106 02D Laboratory 0, UG

R 9-11:50 Hoops, Geoffrey C

3028 CH 106 02E Laboratory 0, UG

T 2-4:50 Hoops, Geoffrey C

3514 CH 106 02F Laboratory 0, UG

R 2-4:50 Hoops, Geoffrey C

2995 CH 106 03 General Chemistry 5, UG

MTWR 11-11:50 Pribush, Robert A

2996 CH 106 03G Laboratory 0, UG

M 2-4:50 Pribush, Robert A

3036 CH 106 03H Laboratory 0, UG

T 2-4:50 Pribush, Robert A

2998 CH 106 03I Laboratory 0, UG

W 2-4:50 Pribush, Robert A

2997 CH 106 04 General Chemistry 5, UG

MWRF 10-10:50 Samide, Michael J

2999 CH 106 04J Laboratory 0, UG

R 2-4:50 Samide, Michael J

3027 CH 106 04K Laboratory 0, UG

T 9-11:50 Samide,Michael J

2994 CH 106 05 General Chemistry 5, UG

MTWF 11-11:50 Hopkins,Todd

3033 CH 106 05L Laboratory 0, UG

W 2-4:50 Hopkins, Todd

3047 CH 106 05M Laboratory 0, UG

R 9-11:50 Hopkins, Todd

29 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

3052 CH 106 06 General Chemistry 5, UG

MTWR 1-1:50 Lieb, Shannon G

3053 CH 106 06N Laboratory 0, UG

T 9-11:50 Lieb,Shannon G

3054 CH 106 06O Laboratory 0, UG

F 1-3:50 LeGreve, Tracy

3000 CH 321 01 Analytical Chemistry I 5, UG

MWRF 9-9:50 Akinbo, Olujide T

3001 CH 321 01A Laboratory 0, UG

M 1-4:50 Akinbo, Olujide T

3002 CH 321 01B Laboratory 0, UG

T 1-4:50 Akinbo, Olujide T

3003 CH 332 01 Inorganic Chemistry 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 O’Reilly, Stacy A

3515 CH 332 02 Inorganic Chemistry 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 O’Reilly, Stacy A

3004 CH 352 01 Organic Chemistry II 5, UG

MWRF 9-9:50 Esteb, John Joseph

3005 CH 352 01A Laboratory 0, UG

M 2-4:50 Esteb, John Joseph

3006 CH 352 01B Laboratory 0, UG

T 9-11:50 Esteb, John Joseph

3007 CH 352 02 Organic Chemistry II 5, UG

MTWF 11-11:50 Azman,Adam M

3008 CH 352 02C Laboratory 0, UG

W 2-4:50 Azman, Adam M

3037 CH 352 02D Laboratory 0, UG

R 9-11:50 Azman, Adam M

3055 CH 352 02E Laboratory 0, UG

R 2-4:50 Azman, Adam M

3029 CH 352 03 Organic Chemistry II 5, UG

MTWF 8-8:50 McNulty, LuAnne

3030 CH 352 03F Laboratory 0, UG

T 9-11:50 Wilson, Anne M

3031 CH 352 03G Laboratory 0, UG

T 2-4:50 Wilson, Anne M

3038 CH 352 04 Organic Chemistry II 5, UG

MTWF 10-10:50 McNulty, LuAnne

3042 CH 352 04H Laboratory 0, UG

T 2-4:50 Azman, Adam M

3040 CH 352 04I Laboratory 0, UG

W 2-4:30 Morgan, Paul

3516 CH 352 05 Organic Chemistry II 5, UG

MTWF 1-1:50 Morgan, Paul

3039 CH 352 05J Laboratory 0, UG

M 2-4:30 Morgan, Paul

3517 CH 352 05K Laboratory 0, UG

R 9-11:50 Morgan, Paul

3518 CH 352 05L Laboratory 0, UG

R 2-4:50 Morgan, Paul

3056 CH 392 01 Chemistry Seminar I 1, UG

F 12-12:50 Samide, Michael J

3048 CH 424 01W Instrumental Analysis Lab 2, UG

W 1-4:50 Akinbo, Olujide T

Food Analysis

3049 CH 432 01 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory 2, UG

T 1-4:50 O’Reilly, Stacy A

3583 CH 459 51 Special Topics in Organic Chem 3, UG

M 5:30-8 Savin, Kenneth

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


3009 CH 462 01 Biochem IIA:Central Metabolism 4, UG

MTWF 11-11:50 Johnson,Jeremy

3059 CH 463 01W Biochemistry Laboratory I 2, UG

R 8-11:50 Johnson, Jeremy

3060 CH 463 02W Biochemistry Laboratory I 2, UG

R 1-4:40 Johnson, Jeremy

3519 CH 469 01 Special Topics in Biochemistry 3, UG

R 2:25-4:55 LeGreve, Tracy

3032 CH 471 01 Physical Chemistry I 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Lieb, Shannon G

3057 CH 474 01W Physical Chemistry Lab II 2, UG

M 1-4:50 Hopkins, Todd

3010 CH 492 01 Chemistry Seminar II 1, UG

F 12-12:50 Samide, Michael J

3011 CH 493 01H Undergraduate Research 1, UG

TBA Kirsch, Joseph L

3012 CH 493 03H Undergraduate Research 1, UG

TBA Samide, Michael J

3013 CH 493 04H Undergraduate Research 1, UG

TBA Akinbo, Olujide T

3014 CH 493 05H Undergraduate Research 1, UG

TBA Pribush, Robert A

3015 CH 493 06H Undergraduate Research 1, UG

TBA Lieb, Shannon G

3016 CH 493 07H Undergraduate Research 1, UG

TBA Wilson, Anne M

3017 CH 493 08H Undergraduate Research 1, UG

TBA O’Reilly, Stacy A

3034 CH 493 09H Undergraduate Research 1, UG

TBA Esteb, John Joseph

3050 CH 493 13H Undergraduate Research 1, UG

TBA Morgan, Paul

3018 CH 493 15H Undergraduate Research 1, UG

TBA Hoops, Geoffrey C

3043 CH 493 16H Undergraduate Research 1, UG

TBA McNulty, LuAnne

3044 CH 493 17H Undergraduate Research 1, UG

TBA Hopkins, Todd

3066 CH 493 18H Undergraduate Research 1, UG

TBA Johnson, Jeremy

3019 CH 494 01H Undergraduate Research 2, UG

TBA Kirsch, Joseph L

3020 CH 494 03H Undergraduate Research 2, UG

TBA Samide, Michael J

3021 CH 494 04H Undergraduate Research 2, UG

TBA Akinbo, Olujide T

3022 CH 494 05H Undergraduate Research 2, UG

TBA Pribush, Robert A

3023 CH 494 06H Undergraduate Research 2, UG

TBA Lieb, Shannon G

3024 CH 494 07H Undergraduate Research 2, UG

TBA Wilson, Anne M

3025 CH 494 08H Undergraduate Research 2, UG

TBA O’Reilly, Stacy A

3035 CH 494 09H Undergraduate Research 2, UG

TBA Esteb, John Joseph

3051 CH 494 13H Undergraduate Research 2, UG

TBA Morgan, Paul

3026 CH 494 15H Undergraduate Research 2, UG

TBA Hoops, Geoffrey C

3045 CH 494 16H Undergraduate Research 2, UG

TBA McNulty, LuAnne

3046 CH 494 17H Undergraduate Research 2, UG

TBA Hopkins, Todd

3067 CH 494 18H Undergraduate Research 2, UG

TBA Johnson, Jeremy

3509 NW 210-CH 01 Chemistry and Society 5, UG

MWRF 9-9:50 Wilson, Anne M

3510 NW 210-CH 01A Laboratory 0, UG

W 2:25-4:15 Wilson, Anne M

3511 NW 210-CH 02 Chemistry and Society 5, UG

MTWF 10-10:50 LeGreve, Tracy

3512 NW 210-CH 02B Laboratory 0, UG

M 2:25-4:15 LeGreve, Tracy

3513 NW 210-CH 02C Laboratory 0, UG

T 2:25-4:15 LeGreve, Tracy

Classical Studies

3581 CLA 303 01 Drama on the Ancient Stage 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Saffire, Paula

Murder, hatred, revenge, madness, grief: these are at the

center of Greek tragedy. Why did the Athenian state pay to

have its citizens watch plays about how people end the lives

of others and destroy their own lives? And why should we

care? We will read all seven surviving dramas of Aeschylus

and Sophocles, and six of Euripides. We will have a taste of

Athenian comedy—equally thoughtful but an antidote to

sorrow? Theater, like life, makes demands of us—if we let it.

We will consider character, story line, and language in our

lives, on stage, on screen.

3225 CLA 360 01 Topics in Classics 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Bungard, Christopher

Law

An Athenian on trial would speak, without the aid of a

lawyer, before a jury of 600 fellow citizens. A Roman could

launch a meteoric political career by prosecuting a corrupt

official. In this course, we will examine the laws of ancient

Athens and Rome through court speeches, and we will aim

to gain an understanding of how societies craft laws that

reflect the interests, assumptions, prejudices, and ideologies,

of those in power. The laws of the ancients, which form some

of the basis of our own system of law, will provide a stimulating

ground for such an exploration.

3582 TI 201-CLA 01 Ancient Greek Perspectives 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Saffire, Paula

Greek

3229 GK 402 01 Independent Study 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Saffire, Paula

Latin

3226 LT 102 50 Elementary Latin II 4, UG

MW 6:30-8:10 Gilmartin, William A

3227 LT 204 01 Intermediate Latin II 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Bungard, Christopher

3228 LT 301 01 Advanced Latin 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Bungard, Christopher

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 29


Computer Science

3111 CS 101 01 Computers in the Modern World 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Leatherman, Duane L

3100 CS 142 01 Intro to Comp Sci and Prog 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Chen, Zhihong

3110 CS 142 02 Intro to Comp Sci and Prog 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Hardikar, Rahul P

3119 CS 142 03 Intro to Comp Sci and Prog 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Chen, Zhihong

3112 CS 248 01 Object-Oriented Programming 5, UG

M-F 1-1:50 Sorenson, Jonathan P

3103 CS 252 01 Foundations of Computing II 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Gupta, Ankur

3101 CS 282S 01 EPICS I Service Learning 2, UG

MW 3:50-4:40 Gupta, Ankur

3102 CS 283S 01 EPICS I Service Learning 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Gupta, Ankur

3108 CS 300 01 Teaching Practicum 3, UG

TBA Sorenson, Jonathan P

3114 CS 308 01 Problem Seminar 1, UG

F 2:25-3:15 Gupta, Ankur

3104 CS 382S 01 EPICS II Service Learning 2, UG

MW 3:50-4:40 Gupta, Ankur

3105 CS 383S 01 EPICS II Service Learning 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Gupta, Ankur

3116 CS 401 01 Independent Study 1, UG

TBA Sorenson, Jonathan P

3115 CS 403 01 Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Sorenson, Jonathan P

3109 CS 411 01 Internship 3, UG

TBA Sorenson, Jonathan P

3199 CS 451 01 Theory of Computation 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Sorenson, Jonathan P

3269 CS 452 01 Parallel Algorithm Design and Pr 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Gupta, Ankur

3106 CS 482S 01 EPICS III Service Learning 2, UG

MW 3:50-4:40 Gupta, Ankur

3107 CS 483S 01 EPICS III Service Learning 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Gupta, Ankur

3120 CS 499 01 Honors Thesis 3, UG

TBA Sorenson, Jonathan P

3198 AR 220-CS 01 Robot Programming 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Linos, Panos K

Software Engineering

3127 SE 267 88S Business Application Dev. 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Linos, Panos K

3126 SE 361 01 Object-Oriented Design 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Linos, Panos K

3123 SE 411 01 Internship 3, UG

TBA Linos, Panos K

Dual Degree Engineering IUPUI

2468 DD 200ME 01 Thermodynamics I 3, UG

M 7:30-8:20 McCormick, Jessica Risley

MW 4:30-5:45 McCormick, Jessica Risley

2454 DD 202ECE 01 Linear Circuit Analysis II 3, UG

TR 4:15-5:30 McCormick, Jessica Risley

31 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

2503 DD 222BME 01 Biomeasurements 4, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 McCormick, Jessica Risley

R 3:30-6:30 McCormick, Jessica Risley

2453 DD 270ME 01 Basic Mechanics I 3, UG

MW 6-7:15 McCormick, Jessica Risley

W 7:30-8:20 McCormick, Jessica Risley

English

Independent Studies and Internships are available; please contact

the department for course numbers and permissions to register.

2607 EN 101 01 Writing Tutorial 3, UG

MWF 12-12:50 Sutherlin, Susan J

2561 EN 185 01 Intro to Discipline of English 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Flanzbaum, Hilene S

Introduction to the Discipline of English. The course will

be built around study of three major genres (poetry, fiction

and drama). Through close reading, class discussion and

writing we will exercise our ability to interpret, argue for

interpretations and appreciate diverse interpretations. At the

same time we will gain practical knowledge of literary terms

and become acquainted with major approaches in critical

theory.

2535 EN 218 01W Intro Creative Writing: Poetry 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Roeser, Dana B

An introduction to the writing of short stories and poetry.

Required of English majors with an emphasis in writing.

Non-majors who enjoy reading contemporary fiction and

poetry and who would like to try writing in order to deepen

their understanding and enjoyment of those genres are also

welcome.

2536 EN 219 01W Intro Creative Writing: Prose 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Barden, Dan

Prose

Introduces students to techniques used by good writers in all

disciplines. Readings designed to turn students’ eyes out onto

the world. Practice in techniques of non-fiction prose and

journal writing.

2537 EN 246 01 Inquiries in Am Lit and His II 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Swenson, Brynnar Nelson

The Value of Literature: Realism,

Naturalism, Mode

The Value of Literature: Realism, Naturalism, Modernism.

In this course we will trace the history of American literature

through the realist, naturalist, and modern periods. Whether

responding to the development of mass production in the

publishing industry, documenting the emergence of the

notion of the writer as worker, or intervening to depict

and condemn inhumane working conditions in mills and

factories, American literature after the Civil War has

persistently grappled with economic questions. Accordingly,

our class will explore themes of work, value, and alienation

in both the art and business of American Literature, empha-

sizing the way that literature not only documented the

conditions of emergent industrial America, but also played a

crucial role in shaping that America. Authors will include

William Dean Howells, Theodore Dreiser, Stephen Crane,

William Carlos Williams, Gertrude Stein, Langston Hughes,

Zora Neale Hurston, and Richard Wright. This course is

cross-listed with CC211P Texts and Ideas.

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


2538 EN 246 02 Inquiries in Am Lit and His II 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Swenson, Brynnar Nelson

The Value of Literature: Realism,

Naturalism, Mode

The Value of Literature: Realism, Naturalism, Modernism.

In this course we will trace the history of American literature

through the realist, naturalist, and modern periods. Whether

responding to the development of mass production in the

publishing industry, documenting the emergence of the

notion of the writer as worker, or intervening to depict

and condemn inhumane working conditions in mills and

factories, American literature after the Civil War has

persistently grappled with economic questions. Accordingly,

our class will explore themes of work, value, and alienation

in both the art and business of American Literature,

emphasizing the way that literature not only documented

the conditions of emergent industrial America, but also

played a crucial role in shaping that America. Authors will

include William Dean Howells, Theodore Dreiser, Stephen

Crane, William Carlos Williams, Gertrude Stein, Langston

Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, and Richard Wright. This

course is cross-listed with CC211P Texts and Ideas.

2539 EN 266 01 Inquiries in Brit Lit and His II 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Goldsmith, Jason

Literature and Movement: Britain,

Empire, and Identity

From the French and the Industrial Revolutions to the

Reform bills and suffrage, the nineteenth century was

marked by vast and radical change, change variously

promoted and resisted. The Industrial Revolution gave rise

to new configurations and movements of labor. The

uncoupling of capital from property increased social mobility.

Geological discoveries by Hutton and Lyell showing the

earth to be a process of gradual change culminated in

Darwin’s theory of evolution. New technologies of travel

made possible the expansion of empire under Queen

Victoria, and commerce swept the globe. How do these

various notions of movement, of change, and of circulation

shape the writings of this new world, and how do they

continue to inform poems, plays, and novels over a century

later? Considering the role and representation of progress,

of travel, and of change, this class will investigate how notions

of the past, the present, and the future might configure the

spaces of individual and national consciousness. This course

is cross-listed with CC211P Texts and Ideas.

2540 EN 266 02 Inquiries in Brit Lit and His II 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Goldsmith, Jason

Literature and Movement: Britain,

Empire and Identity

From the French and the Industrial Revolutions to the

Reform bills and suffrage, the nineteenth century was

marked by vast and radical change, change variously promoted

and resisted. The Industrial Revolution gave rise to new

configurations and movements of labor. The uncoupling of

capital from property increased social mobility. Geological

discoveries by Hutton and Lyell showing the earth to be a

process of gradual change culminated in Darwin’s theory of

evolution. New technologies of travel made possible the

expansion of empire under Queen Victoria, and commerce

swept the globe. How do these various notions of movement,

of change, and of circulation shape the writings of this new

world, and how do they continue to inform poems, plays,

and novels over a century later? Considering the role and

representation of progress, of travel, and of change, this class

will investigate how notions of the past, the present, and

the future might configure the spaces of individual and

national consciousness. This course is cross-listed with

CC211P Texts and Ideas.

3231 EN 301 01W Topics in Advanced Composition 3, UG

M 5:15-7:45 Sutherlin, Susan J

Advanced Composition

Theory and Practice of Writing: Peer Tutoring. This course

introduces students to the field of composition studies with

particular emphasis on the role of writing centers. The readings

and discussion explore various ways in which writers and

readers construct meaning, engage in dialogue over written

expression, and understand the composing process. Students

write extensively in a variety of formal and informal modes.

Students are admitted to the course based on professor

recommendation.

3239 EN 303 01W Scientific Writing 3, UG

W 7-9:45 Reeves, Carol A

Prof Writing: Writ about Nature and

the Environment

This class will introduce students to various professional

writing genres by focusing on the topics of nature and the

environment. These genres will include those that inform

and educate the public as well as those that may influence

policy. There will be a service-learning component to this

class.

3240 EN 310 02W Intermediate Writing Workshop 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Forhan,Chris

This course is a continuation of the study of poetry writing.

Through reading assignments and writing exercises, we will

explore the implications of the choices poets make in their

use of the basic elements of the art of poetry, such as imagery,

sound, rhythm, syntax, and structure. You will compose a

number of poems to be critiqued in a workshop setting and

will simultaneously study the work of a number of contem-

porary poets, with special emphasis on the poets slated to

appear in the Visiting Writers Series this semester. At the end

of the semester, you will submit a portfolio of revised poems.

Prerequisites: EN218 and 219 or permission of the director

of creative writing

3232 EN 319 01 History of English Language 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Watts, William H

3230 EN 321 01 Comparative Literature I 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Spyra, Ania

Caribbean Crosscurrents

This course familiarizes students with the diverse literary

production of the Caribbean region, as well as the cultural,

historical and political movements that this literature reflects

and engages. It provides a critical vocabulary needed to

discuss the Caribbean as a region united by its geographical

and historical specificity. Writers from the region have always

focused on issues of migratory movements, creolization of

languages, and intermixing of cultures that now help

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 31


approach and theorize the phenomena associated with

globalization. Concentrating on Hispanic and Francophone

writers, this class introduces comparative approaches to

literature and highlights issues of translation. Readings

include, among others, Alejo Carpentier, Gabriel Garcia

Marquez, Aimo Cosaire and Maryse Condo. Open to

juniors and seniors.

3233 EN 341 01 Literature of the American Ren 3, UG

W 5:15-7:45 Swenson, Brynnar Nelson

Americana Renaissance and its Others

In 1941 the critic F.O. Matthiessen declared that the half

decade between 1850 and 1855 was the age of American

Renaissance, and he identified the work of Emerson,

Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, and Whitman as evidence

that American literature had reached maturity during this

time. In this course we will study primary works of the

“American Renaissance” and ask how Matthiessen’s “best

books” critical strategy effectively naturalized a particular

version of American literature that obscured the history of

women and minority writers and readers. In order to contest

the narrowness of Matthiessen’s literary strategy we will seek

to expand the definition of American Renaissance by placing

its traditional authors into dialogue with those, such as

Fanny Fern, Harriet Wilson, Fredrick Douglas, and Edgar

Allan Poe who were originally defined as outside its ambit.

3234 EN 362 01 Renaissance Literature 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Walsh, William P

The overriding concern of the Renaissance is order—

theological, political, social and personal-and inevitably,

disorder. There are assumptions about order and one’s place

in it underlying all our texts, cultural and literary. This is an

age of crisis, doubt, in traditional belief patterns and the

advent of new ways of knowing and reasoning, e.g.,

empiricism. The ultimate consequences are a breakdown of

universal truths, the rise of individualism and personal

truths. Inevitably humankind is descended from his glorious

position as the focus of creation. Nowadays we call this a

paradigm shift, a turn from one construction of reality to

another (modern). The changes are both gradual and

sudden, systematic and random, new ideas are juxtaposed to

old, and so on. This is our subject matter.

3235 EN 366 01 Romanticism 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Goldsmith, Jason

Romantic Media and Poetics of Experience

An artistic response to a world in crisis, Romanticism is

fundamentally concerned with knowledge. It asks: how do

we know the world? Can poetry provide a viable framework

for organizing experience? Can it serve as a means to know-

ledge and identity? What is the role of poetry (and of poets)

in society more generally? We will consider how Romantic-era

writers respond to these and other questions by tracing the

interrelations among poetry, personal experience, and

history during one of the most tumultuous and vital

moments in literary and political history. Writing against the

backdrop of the French and Industrial Revolutions, poets,

novelists, critics, and journalists of the day redefined

literature, authorship, and, most importantly, subjectivity—

how we understand ourselves as active agents in the world.

Framing our discussion of literature with an eye towards this

33 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

frequently volatile history, we will consider Romanticism as

an attempt to deal with and understand these vexing changes

to the nature of lived and imagined experience.

3236 EN 382 01 Studies in Poetry 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Flanzbaum, Hilene S

The Moderns

Affecting painting, music, philosophy, dance, architecture

and literature, Modernism was an aesthetic movement that

transformed the way humans perceived and rendered the

world around them. In this course, we will study the great

poets of Modernism, including T.S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens,

Hilda Doolittle, Ezra Pound and William Carlos Williams.

3237 EN 384 01 Studies in Drama 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Saffire, Paula

Drama on the Ancient Stage

Murder, hatred, revenge, madness, grief: these are at the

center of Greek tragedy. Why did the Athenian state pay to

have its citizens watch plays about how people end the lives

of others and destroy their own lives? And why should we

care? We will read all seven surviving dramas of Aeschylus

and Sophocles, and six of Euripides. We will have a taste of

Athenian comedy—equally thoughtful but an antidote to

sorrow? Theater, like life, makes demands of us—if we let it.

We will consider character, story line, and language in our

lives, on stage, on screen.

2541 EN 385 50 Studies in Literary Criticism 3, UG

TR 5:15-6:30 Gregory, Marshall

Traditional Voices, Contemporary Issues

This course is designed to help students 1) acquire an

understanding of how critical positions, literary theories,

and literary evaluations are developed, 2) acquire an under-

standing of the aims that critical theories attempt to

accomplish, 3) acquire an understanding of how critical

positions, critical arguments, and critical evaluations grow

out of their fundamental assumptions, 4) acquire an historical

perspective on the influences and interrelationships among

the great critical utterances, both traditional and contemporary,

5) and acquire an understanding of new directions in

contemporary criticism.

2566 EN 390 01 Research Seminar 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Reeves, Carol A

Toni Morrison

In this seminar, we will read the Morrison novels, The Bluest

Eye, Sula, Jazz, Beloved, and Paradise in the first six weeks

of the semester. During this reading time, students will be

introduced to various theories of African American Litera-

ture and Criticism. After that, we will focus on research and

writing the seminar essay.”

2600 EN 390 50 Research Seminar 3, UG

F 1-3:30 Watts, William H

Chaucer

We will read selected Canterbury Tales, and consider the

overall shape and meaning of Chaucer’s great frame tale.

Each student will select an interpretive problem in an

individual tale for his or her research project.

2591 EN 393 01 Special Topics in Literature 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Barden, Dan

Visiting Writers Series

In this course, we will study, meet with, eat with, present

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


upon, and get to know the writers on the VWS schedule.

Open to juniors and seniors.

2581 EN 395 01 Internship 3, UG

TBA Walsh, William P

2601 EN 395 02 Internship 3, UG

TBA Sutherlin, Susan J

First Year Seminar Writing Fellows

FYS Writing Fellows work with a designated class through-

out the semester, attending class meetings, completing reading

assignments, serving as writing consultants conducting

individual and group student conferences, as well as modeling

critical reading, discussion, and writing skills. Students will

meet on a regularly scheduled basis with the internship director,

complete assigned pedagogical readings, and prepare an

internship report at the conclusion of the semester. For

further details, please consult Susan Sutherlin (ssutherl@

butler.edu/JH302A).

2582 EN 396 01 Internship 6, UG

TBA Walsh, William P

2583 EN 396 DC Internship 6, UG

TBA Walsh, William P

2542 EN 410 01W Senior Creative Writing Sem 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Dahlie, Michael

Fiction and Creative Nonfiction

Students will participate in an advanced writing workshop,

critique other student’s work, attend Visiting Writers Series

events, and will work on a longer prose project such as a

novella or the beginning of a novel, a collection of short

stories or essays, or a memoir. This project will be added to

the student’s creative writing portfolio. Prerequisites: Senior

standing and pre-approval of course project by Director of

Creative Writing.

2602 EN 450 50W The Senior Essay 3, UG

M 5:15-7:45 Garver, Lee A

In this course, students will work towards completing their

Senior Essay, a 20–25 page literary research-based paper that

is a requirement for graduation in the English major.

Students will master professional writing and research

methods in their field, as well as techniques for revising prose.

3238 EN 493 01 Special Topics in Literature 3, UG

T 7:15-9:45 Garver, Lee A

Sex, Suffrage and Empire

Sex, Suffrage, and Empire: Modernism and the New Woman:

The first decades of the twentieth century were a tumultuous

time in Great Britain. Even before World War I plunged the

nation into bloody conflict, British society was deeply

divided over such matters as industrial reform, national

defense, and sexual and racial “degeneration.” In this seminar,

we will examine the emergence of literary modernism in the

context of two of the most contentious developments of this

period, imperial decline and the rise of militant feminism.

Authors studied will include Olive Schreiner, George

Bernard Shaw, Virginia Woolf, Katherine Mansfield, Mina

Loy, D.H. Lawrence, Rebecca West, and Jean Rhys. Supple-

mental readings will include contemporaneous political

pamphlets, Suffragette manifestoes, and eugenic tracts.

3597 TI 211-EN 01 Inquiries in Am Lit and His II 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Forhan, Chris

Childhood: Mystery and Muse

One of the great, inexhaustible sources of inspiration for

literature is childhood: that period of vivid wonder and

terror, of our first fumblings toward knowledge about who

we are and what it is like to live in this oddly beautiful (and

beautifully odd) world. In this course, we will investigate

how American literature in various genres-fiction, poetry,

and memoir-has explored and explained childhood, and we

will use those models as inspiration for our own attempts to

capture, in language, what is worth retrieving from our own

beginnings. To establish a template by which to appreciate

some fundamental elements of the tale of childhood, we will

start the semester by reading a few of the more wildly strange

and mythically resonant Grimms’ fairy tales. After that, we

will focus on American writers of the last century, with

possible authors being Elizabeth Bishop, Theodore Roethke,

Norton Juster, Tobias Wolff, Susan Minot, and Joanne Beard.

This course counts toward completion of Core Curriculum

requirements but not the Inquiries in American Literature

requirement for English majors.

3598 TI 212-EN 01 Inquiries in Brit Lit and His I 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Walsh, William P

Shakespeare and Love

This course supposes that Shakespeare (who I think invents

romantic comedy) has something to tell us about romantic

love. Shakespeare portrays love as a process that may either

succeed or fail. We will do romantic comedy and romantic

tragedy-and the sonnets, which probably portray some of

Shakespeare’s personal bouts with love. Basic requirement for

the course-you must be in or fall in love during the term.

How else can we know? (kidding of course.)

2562 EN 501 50 Graduate Seminar Special Topic 3, UG

M 7:15-9:45 Levy, Andrew G

Nonfiction Workshop

2590 EN 501 51 Graduate Seminar Special Topic 3, UG

T 6-8:30 Dahlie, Michael

Craft of Prose

2606 EN 501 52 Graduate Seminar Special Topic 3, UG

T 6:30-9 Roeser, Dana B

Poetry Workshop

3241 EN 501 53 Graduate Seminar Special Topic 3, UG

W 6:30-9 Staff

Fiction Workshop

3242 EN 501 54 Graduate Seminar Special Topic 3, UG

R 6:30-9 Staff

New and Alternative Forms

2614 EN 710 01 Research Problems 3, GR

TBA Colavito, Joseph J

2579 EN 710 02 Research Problems 3, GR

TBA Garver, Lee A

2577 EN 711 02 Thesis 3, GR

TBA Garver, Lee A

History

3547 HS 124 01 Introductory Seminar 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Swanson, Scott G

Michelangelo

Michelangelo was one of two or three omnicompetent

geniuses who gave rise to the ideal of the Renaissance man.

He was a brilliant sculptor, painter, architect, engineer, poet,

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 33


political activist, and friend. Happily, in addition to his

sculpture and painting, his letters and his poems give us a

closer look at him than almost any other personality of the

Renaissance, and this course will study his character, private

life, artistic genius, and art against the background of

endemic political and religious violence in Italy during his

lifetime.

3548 HS 312 01 19th Century Europe 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Cornell, John S

3549 HS 331 01 History of Children and Youth 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Cornell, John S

3550 HS 338 01 The Early American Republic 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Geib, George W

3551 HS 383 01 American Military History 3, UG

T 7-9:15 Geib, George W

3552 HS 390 01 Topics in History 3, UG

M 2:25-4:55 Hanson, Paul R

Junior Research Seminar

This course aims to build upon the theoretical and methodological

work that students have done in HS357, and to

provide an opportunity for students, particularly history

majors, to undertake a substantial research project. The class

will meet collectively for the first four weeks of the semester,

discussing an array of practical issues related to doing historical

research and visiting some local archives and libraries. For

the remainder of the semester students will work indepen-

dently, meeting weekly with the professor to discuss their

progress on their projects, and coming back together at

semesters end to share their research with the others in the

class. This class is highly recommended to those students

contemplating a senior thesis.

3553 HS 390 02 Topics in History 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Bigelow, Bruce

Hot Times in the City: US Urban History

The history of urbanism and suburbanism from the Colonial

era to the present, with the emphasis on the era since 1900.

The changing spatial structure of ethnicity, class and gender

and the rise of urban politics is stressed.

3554 HS 390 03W Topics in History 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Bigelow, Bruce

Global Society

The history of globalization covers 2000 years with the

emphasis on the era since 1500 C.E. The geography of

empires and long distance trade and the diffusion of religions

and languages is stressed.

3555 HS 390 04 Topics in History 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Cornell, John S

Walls

This course explores three different walls in their historical

contexts: the Berlin Wall, the Israeli security fence (in the

Palestinian West Bank), and the U.S.-Mexico separation

barrier. What were the reasons each was (or is now being)

built? How does each wall change the conditions of conflict

and possible outcomes? In the case of the Berlin Wall, how

did it fall and what are the continuing effects twenty years

later? For Israel/Palestine and the U.S./Mexico, what are

current policy options and possible solutions? Students will

apply their expanded historical knowledge to evaluate three

dramatic sites of contestation.

35 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

3556 HS 390 05 Topics in History 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Han, Xiaorong

China and the US

This course explores the political, economic, and cultural

relations between China and the United States since 1780,

with a focus on the twentieth century. The course will start

with a comparison of the two countries and an overview of

the changing relations between them. It will then turn to

analyze specific topics and historical moments, including

Americans in China, Chinese in America, China and US as

allies and enemies, American perceptions of China, Chinese

perceptions of America, trading relations, and the impact of

the China-US relations on the world.

3504 HS 390 06 Topics in History 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Sluis, Ageeth

Imagining Latin-American Cultures

This course provides students with the opportunity to study

the discipline of anthropology of Latin America from a

historical perspective. Through case studies of Mexico, Brazil

and the Andean and Caribbean regions, we will look at how

both US and Latin American anthropologists have shaped

general perceptions of race, gender, and class in the area.

By tracing imagined Latin American cultures through time

and space, students will examine the political ramifications

of doing anthropology. The course will be conducted as a

seminar and fulfills requirements for both history and

anthropology majors.

3557 HS 390 07 Topics in History 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Rosenberg, Gabriel

Green and Permanent Land:

Environment and Agriculture

During the past three centuries American landscape and life

has shaped, and been shaped by, colonization, the growth

and demise of slavery, the re-settlement of the American

West, urban industrialization, and most recently, globalization.

This course analyzes the interplay between environment,

agriculture, and these social changes in the US from the

colonial period to the present, affording particular emphasis

to the ways in which America’s real and imagined agrarian

past influences contemporary political debate.

3558 HS 390 08 Topics in History 3, UG

T 7:15-9:45 Garniewicz, Rex

Arch Field Methods and Artifact Analysis

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic

techniques archaeologists use for scientific data collection

and analysis. Along with a field school in archaeology, it will

prepare students to conduct fieldwork at the level of an

archaeological technician. Students will learn how to define

research problems, locate and survey sites, and prepare for

excavation. Students will perform hands-on work with

prehistoric and historic artifacts to familiarize themselves

with material identification and typologies. They will also

participate in artifact analysis, cataloging, and interpretation.

3559 HS 390 09 Topics in History 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Grossman, Peter Z

Economic History of the US

This course examines the rise of the United States as the

preeminent economic power in all of human history. Using

the tools of economic theory and analysis as well as narrative

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


history, the course explores the factors that contributed to 3342 MA 162 01 Statistical Methods 4, UG

America’s economic development from colonial times to the

MTWF 9-9:50 Wilson,Chris

post World War II era. While the course will emphasize 3343 MA 162 02 Statistical Methods 4, UG

America’s economic development, it will place economic

MTWF 10-10:50 Wilson,Chris

change within the larger context of America’s political and 3344 MA 200 01 Basics of Advanced Mathematics 3, UG

cultural evolution. An understanding of America’s economic

MWF 12-12:50 Sharma,Prem L

development will also provide insights into America’s role 3345 MA 206 01 Discrete Mathematics II 3, UG

in an increasingly interconnected world. Prerequisite is

MWF 11-11:50 Sharma,Prem L

EC101 or EC231.

3346 MA 208 01 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III 3, UG

3560 HS 480 01 Seminar in History 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Farrell, Jeremiah P

W 2:25-4:55 Han, Xiaorong 3347 MA 215 01 Linear Algebra 3, UG

The World in 1968

MWF 8-8:50 Pham, Du

This research seminar examines the eventful year of 1968 3348 MA 308 01 Problem Seminar 1, UG

from a global perspective. It will analyze some of the

TBA Gaisser, John W

important events taking place in that year in different parts 3349 MA 312 01 Modern Algebra I 3, UG

of the world (Vietnam War, Civil Rights Movement, Cultural

MWF 10-10:50 Sharma, Prem L

Revolution, student and worker revolt in France, Soviet 3350 MA 327 01 Real Analysis II 3, UG

Union’s invasion of Czechoslovakia, military coup in Peru,

TR 11-12:15 Sharma, Prem L

and the summer Olympics in Mexico City, to name a few), 3351 MA 330 01 Complex Analysis 3, UG

with an emphasis on their connections with the past and

MWF 12-12:50 Wahl, Rebecca G

with one another, and their impact on the post-1968 world. 3361 MA 334 01 Differential Equations 3, UG

Students will have opportunities to study a particular event

MWF 1-1:50 Wahl, Rebecca G

focusing on its multiple connections and to present their 3200 MA 341 01 Theory of Computation 3, UG

research in class. Does not fulfill Division One requirement.

MW 2:25-3:40 Sorenson, Jonathan P

3362 MA 351 01 Geometry 3, UG

Mathematics

MWF 8-8:50 Farrell, Jeremiah P

Independent Studies and Internships are available; please contact 3363 MA 361 01 Probability and Statistics II 3, UG

the department for course numbers and permissions to register.

MW 1-2:15 Gaisser, John W

3327 MA 101 01

3328 MA 101 02

3329 MA 102 01

3330 MA 106 01

3331 MA 106 02

3332 MA 106 03

3333 MA 106 04

3334 MA 106 05

3335 MA 107 01

3336 MA 107 02

3337 MA 107 03

3338 MA 125 01

3339 MA 125 02

3340 MA 125 03

3341 MA 125 04

Algebra 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Hutslar, Paul Thomas

Algebra 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Farrell, Jeremiah P

Precalculus 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Freed, Kathie Jane

Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 5, UG

M-F 9-9:50 Krohn, Mary

Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 5, UG

M-F 10-10:50 Leatherman, Duane L

Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 5, UG

M-F 11-11:50 Freed, Kathie Jane

Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 5, UG

M-F 12-12:50 Gaisser,John W

Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 5, UG

M-F 1-1:50 Pham,Du

Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4, UG

MTWR 9-9:50 Carpenter,Amos J

Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4, UG

MTWR 10-10:50 Pham,Du

Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4, UG

MTWF 11-11:50 Wahl,Rebecca G

Business Calculus 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Freed,Kathie Jane

Business Calculus 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Krohn,Mary

Business Calculus 3, UG

MWF 12-12:50 Krohn,Mary

Business Calculus 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Leatherman,Duane L

3364 MA 363 01 Intro to Actuarial Science 3, UG

MWF 12-12:50 Wilson, Chris

3365 MA 372 01 Loss Models 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Gaisser, John W

3366 MA 399 01 Derivative Investments 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Miles, James

3371 MA 473 01 Topics in Mathematics 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Farrell, Jeremiah P

Boolean Algebra and Applications

We explore the algebra of sets and introduce the axiomatic

system of Boolean Algebra. This is then applied to symbolic

logic and the algebra of switching circuits. The course is

geared toward students of mathematics, computer science

and electrical engineering.

3319 AR 210-MA 01 Statistically Speaking 3, UG

MWF 8-8:50 Echols, Lacey P

3320 AR 210-MA 02 Statistically Speaking 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Echols, Lacey P

3321 AR 210-MA 03 Statistically Speaking 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Echols, Lacey P

3322 AR 211-MA 01 Codes and Secret Messages 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Holmes, Karen

3323 AR 211-MA 02 Codes and Secret Messages 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Holmes, Karen

3324 AR 212-MA 01 Win, Lose or Draw 3, UG

MWF 12-12:50 Holmes, Karen

3325 AR 212-MA 02 Win, Lose or Draw 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Holmes, Karen

3326 AR 212-MA 03 Win, Lose or Draw 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Chen, Zhihong

3367 MA 401 01 Independent Study 1, UG

TBA Carpenter, Amos J

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 35


3368 MA 402 01 Independent Study 2, UG

TBA Carpenter, Amos J

3369 MA 403 01 Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Carpenter, Amos J

3370 MA 411 01 Internship 3, UG

TBA Carpenter, Amos J

3372 MA 490 01 Senior Seminar 1, UG

TBA Carpenter, Amos J

3373 MA 499 01 Honors Thesis 3, UG

TBA Carpenter, Amos J

Modern Languages, Literature and Cultures

Chinese

2657 CN 102 01 Beginning Chinese II 4, UG

MTWR 10-10:50 Staff

2659 CN 204 01 Intermediate Chinese II 4, UG

MTWR 9-9:50 Liu, Xiaoqing

2658 CN 306 01 Advanced Chinese II 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Liu, Xiaoqing

French

2643 FR 101 01 Beginning French I 4, UG

MTWR 11-11:50 Staff

2644 FR 102 01 Beginning French II 4, UG

MTWR 10-10:50 Staff

2645 FR 203 01 Intermediate French I 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Staff

2646 FR 203 02 Intermediate French I 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Riggs, Larry W

2647 FR 204 01 Intermediate French II 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Vanbaelen, Sylvie

2648 FR 204 02 Intermediate French II 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Vanbaelen, Sylvie

2650 FR 305 01 French Communic: Oral Emphasis 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Sureau-Hale, Eloise

Charlotte

2649 FR 310 01 French Comm: Written Emphasis 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Riggs, Larry W

3599 FR 340 01 France: 18th and 19th Century 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Sureau-Hale, Eloise

Charlotte

3600 FR 485 01 Topics in Francophone Studies 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Vanbaelen, Sylvie

Francophone Belgian Cinema has gained momentum in the

last twenty years, receiving increasing international praise,

and winning several prestigious prizes (including at the

Cannes Film Festival). This course will focus on 12 films

from the last twenty years. We will read essays offering critical

interpretations of the films, and study them as cultural products

reflecting a time, a place, and the vision of filmmakers.

German

2668 GR 102 01 Beginning German II 4, UG

MTWR 11-11:50 Stigter, Michelle

2666 GR 204 01 Intermediate German II 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Painitz, Sarah

2667 GR 204 02 Intermediate German II 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Painitz, Sarah

37 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

3601 GR 315 01 German for Business 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Painitz, Sarah

3602 GR 490 01 Seminar 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Painitz, Sarah

Turn of the Century German

Liturature and Culture

This seminar offers an in-depth study of the literature of the

fin-de-siècle in its historical context. Students will read a

variety of different literary texts, including poems, plays,

short stories, and novellas, as well as theoretical essays and

philosophical writings. Throughout the semester we will

consider the circumstances and conditions that provided

such a fertile ground for the time period’s literary, artistic,

and philosophical innovations. By reading literary works in

the context of the prominent philosophical and political

debates of the day, as well as other artistic expressions (art,

architecture, and music), students will gain a detailed picture

of the time, generally considered the pinnacle of the modernist

era in the German-speaking world.

Italian

2664 IT 102 01 Beginning Italian II 4, UG

MTWF 12-12:50 Staff

2663 IT 204 01 Intermediate Italian II 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Lucchi-Riester, Elisa

Spanish

3603 SP 101 01 Beginning Spanish I 4, UG

TWRF 8-8:50 Staff

2953 SP 102 01 First Year Spanish 4, UG

TWRF 8-8:50 Staff

2987 SP 102 02 First Year Spanish 4, UG

TWRF 9-9:50 Staff

2954 SP 203 01 Intermediate Spanish I 3, UG

TR 8-9:15 Staff

2955 SP 203 02 Intermediate Spanish I 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Staff

2956 SP 203 03 Intermediate Spanish I 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Staff

2957 SP 203 50 Intermediate Spanish I 3, UG

TR 6-7:15 Staff

2958 SP 204 01 Intermediate Spanish II 3, UG

TR 8-9:15 Staff

2959 SP 204 02 Intermediate Spanish II 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Staff

2960 SP 204 03 Intermediate Spanish II 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Rodriguez, Juan

2961 SP 204 04 Intermediate Spanish II 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Rodriguez, Juan

2962 SP 204 05 Intermediate Spanish II 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Lucchi-Riester, Elisa

2970 SP 204 06 Intermediate Spanish II 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Lucchi-Riester, Elisa

2971 SP 204 07 Intermediate Spanish II 3, UG

MWF 12-12:50 Lucchi-Riester, Elisa

2972 SP 204 50 Intermediate Spanish II 3, UG

MW 6-7:15 Staff

2975 SP 305 01 Spanish for Oral Communication 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Goens, Liliana T

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


2969 SP 305 02 Spanish for Oral Communication 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Goens, Liliana T

2976 SP 305 3 Spanish for Oral Communication 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Willem, Linda M

2963 SP 310 01 Spanish Written Communication 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Rodriguez, Juan

2964 SP 310 02 Spanish Written Communication 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Rodriguez, Juan

2966 SP 310 03 Spanish Written Communication 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Goens, Liliana T

2967 SP 310 04 Spanish Written Communication 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Goens, Lilia

3164 SP 315 01 Spanish for Business 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Staff

2965 SP 320S 01W Service Learning in Spanish 3, UG

F 11-12:30 Carney, Terri M

Supervised community volunteer work in Spanish supported

by weekly class meetings for discussion and reflection.

Service hours arranged individually by student and represen-

tative of partner institution and/or professor. This course

fulfills the skills requirement for the major.

3165 SP 320S 02W Service Learning in Spanish 3, UG

F 1-2:30 Carney, Terri M

3166 SP 330 01 Themes in Hispanic Studies 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Muniz, Gabriela

Iconography

The word “icon” refers to an object of devotion in the form

of an immediately recognizable, easily reproducible image,

often a figure or a face. This course will be concentrated on

the cultural mechanisms (symbols, rituals, media, images,

representations, literature and arts) that construct icons and

bring them into representation. We will explore the “life” and

images of great icons such as: Virgen de Guadalupe, la

Malinche, José Martí, Simon Bolivar, Frida Kahlo, Che

Guevara, Eva Peron, Rigoberta Menchú, Cesar Chavez,

Shakira and Evo Morales. One of our goals will be to examine

the propagandistic side of imagery and power. The course

will be a great asset for students interested in languages and

culture, art and, since many of Latin America’s famous icons

become associated with heightened forms of masculinity or

of hyperbolic or hybrid forms of femininity, gender.

3648 SP330 02 Themes in Hispanic Studies 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Quintanilla, Jose R

Spanish Pronunciation

An introduction to the sounds of Spanish and its correct

pronunciation. It also includes the study, practice and imitation

of different accents of the Spanish world. Prerequisite: three

years of Spanish or equivalent.

3649 SP330 03 Themes in Hispanic Studies 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Quintanilla, Jose R

Spanish Pronunciation

An introduction to the sounds of Spanish and its correct

pronunciation. It also includes the study, practice and imitation

of different accents of the Spanish world. Prerequisite: three

years of Spanish or equivalent.

3167 SP 355 01 Span Amer Culture: S America 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Muniz, Gabriela

3168 SP 355 02 Span Amer Culture: S America 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Muniz, Gabriela

2981 SP 365 01 Hispanic Short Story 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Willem, Linda M

2982 SP 365 02 Hispanic Short Story 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Willem, Linda M

3169 SP 450 50 Topic: Spanish-American Studies 3, UG

M 6-8:30 Gabiola, Irune del Rio

Slavery in the New World

Slavery in the New World examines ideas related to the

construction of the “human” from a traditional Euro-

centric perspective reinforced during the period of Enlight-

enment. By looking at ways in which Spaniards invented the

indigenous population, the Africans slaves and the Latin

American landspace, on the one hand, and at testimonies or

slave narratives, on the other, we will be able to conceptualize

alternative visions of the human from the perspective of the

marginal subjects in terms of race, ethnicity and gender.

3170 SP 450 51 Topic: Spanish-American Studies 3, UG

W 6-8:30 Gabiola, Irune del Rio

Slavery in the New World

Slavery in the New World examines ideas related to the

construction of the “human” from a traditional Euro-

centric perspective reinforced during the period of Enlight-

enment. By looking at ways in which Spaniards invented the

indigenous population, the Africans slaves and the Latin

American landspace, on the one hand, and at testimonies or

slave narratives, on the other, we will be able to conceptualize

alternative visions of the human from the perspective of the

marginal subjects in terms of race, ethnicity and gender.

3650 SP490 01 Seminar 3, UG

T 2:25-4:55 Quintanilla, Jose R

Topics in Hispanic Linguistics

Study of a selected topic in the field of Linguistics (the study

of human language) from the perspective of Spanish. Themes

may deal with Phonetics, Syntax, Morphology, History,

Semantics, Pragmatics, Sociolinguistics, Spanish in contact,

etc. Prerequisite: three years of Spanish or equivalent.

Philosophy

3210 PL 210 01 Logic 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Glennan, Stuart S

3209 PL 311 01 History of Ancient Philosophy 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Popa, Tiberiu M

3211 PL 363 01 Biomedical Ethics 3, UG

M 6:30-9 Brown, Brandon

3212 PL 375 01 Topics in Philosophy 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Hege, Brent

Philosophical and Religious Explorations

of Evil

In this course we will consider the problem of evil from both

a theoretical and a practical perspective, asking questions

about the nature and persistence of evil and about our duty

to understand the conditions that give rise to the possibility

of evil and to name and fight evil wherever we find it. We will

do so with the aid of a broad range of sources, including

religious texts as well as classic and contemporary works of

philosophy, theology and literature.

3213 PL 410 01W Seminar in Philosophy 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Dulckeit, Katharina

Hegel and Nietzsche

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 37


3201 TI 242-PL 01 Marginalized in America 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Dulckeit, Katharina

3202 TI 243-PL 01 Knowledge and Reality 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Popa, Tiberiu M

3203 TI 243-PL 02 Knowledge and Reality 3, UG

T 2:25-4:55 Dulckeit, Katharina

3204 TI 243-PL 03 Knowledge and Reality 3, UG

W 2:25-4:55 Muntean, Ioan

3205 TI 244-PL 01 Ethics,The Good Life,& Society 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 McGowan, Richard J

3206 TI 244-PL 02 Ethics,The Good Life,& Society 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Watson, Whitten

3207 TI 244-PL 03 Ethics,The Good Life,& Society 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Watson, Whitten

Religion

3218 RL 354 01 Islam: Religion, Culture, Soc 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Bauman, Chad

3219 RL 366 01 Topics in Jewish and Christian Trad 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Valliere, Paul R

Global Christianity

3220 RL 375 01 Topics in Religious Studies 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Hege, Brent

Philosophical and Religious Explorations

of Evil

In this course we will consider the problem of evil from both

a theoretical and a practical perspective, asking questions

about the nature and persistence of evil and about our duty

to understand the conditions that give rise to the possibility

of evil and to name and fight evil wherever we find it. We will

do so with the aid of a broad range of sources, including

religious texts as well as classic and contemporary works of

philosophy, theology and literature.

3221 RL 375 02 Topics in Religious Studies 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 McGrath, James

Heresy

3222 RL 392 01 Topics in Religion 2, UG

TBA Bauman, Chad

CFV Seminar: Religion Peace Making

Conflict

Readings, public seminars, workshops and writing assign-

ments on the role of religion around the world in perpetuating

violence and promoting peace. RL391 does not have regular

class meetings. Instead, it is linked to Butler’s public Seminar

on Religion and World Civilization. Students will attend

two Tuesday evening seminars (5-9 p.m., including dinner

with the speakers) and two Saturday morning workshops

(9-11:45 a.m., with breakfast). Students who enroll in

RL391 are expected to enroll in RL392 in Spring, 2011, for

the continuation of the seminar series. RL392 follows the

same format as RL391 but earns 2 hours of credit. Completion

of RL391 is a prerequisite for RL392.

3214 TI 250-RL 01 Religions of the World 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Valliere, Paul R

3215 TI 250-RL 02 Religions of the World 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Hege, Brent

3216 TI 251-RL 01 The Bible 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Snyder, Glenn

39 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

3217 TI 251-RL 02 The Bible 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Snyder, Glenn

Astronomy

2698 AS 100 50 The Astronomical Universe 3, UG

M 6:30-9 Brown, Richard B

2699 AS 102 01 Modern Astronomy with Lab 5, UG

MWRF 11-11:50 Murphy,Brian W

2700 AS 102 01A Laboratory 0, UG

T 9-11 Murphy, Brian W

2701 AS 102 01B Laboratory 0, UG

T 11-1 Murphy, Brian W

3313 AS 301 01 Modern Astronomical Techniques 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Murphy, Brian W

Physics

2672 PH 105 01 Concepts of Physical Science 5, UG

MTWF 1-1:50 Dixon, H Marshall

2673 PH 105 01A Laboratory 0, UG

R 2-4 Dixon, H Marshall

2686 PH 105 01B Laboratory 0, UG

R 10-12 Dixon, H Marshall

3565 PH 105 02 Concepts of Physical Science 5, UG

MTWR 10-10:50 Han, Xianming

3566 PH 105 02A Laboratory 0, UG

F 10-12 Han, Xianming

2674 PH 108 01 Elementary Physics II 4, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Poor, Jennifer L

R 10-10:50 Poor, Jennifer L

2675 PH 108 01A Laboratory 0, UG

T 10-12 Staff

2676 PH 108 01B Laboratory 0, UG

T 1-3 Staff

2677 PH 108 01C Laboratory 0, UG

T 3-5 Staff

3314 PH 108 02 Elementary Physics II 4, UG

MWF 12-12:50 Ordonez, Gonzalo

T 12-12:50 Ordonez, Gonzalo

3315 PH 108 02A Laboratory 0, UG

R 3-5 Staff

3316 PH 108 02B Laboratory 0, UG

R 5-7 Ordonez, Gonzalo

2678 PH 202 01 Intro to Analytical Physics 5, UG

M-F 11-11:50 Kosik, Dan W

2679 PH 202 01A Laboratory 0, UG

T 1-3 Kosik, Dan W

2680 PH 202 01B Laboratory 0, UG

T 3-5 Kosik, Dan W

2681 PH 311 01 Experimental Modern Physics 3, UG

F 2-6 Han, Xianming

2682 PH 325 01 Thermodynamic-Statistical Phys 4, UG

MTWF 10-10:50 Ordonez, Gonzalo

2688 PH 332 01 Electromagnetic Theory II 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Kosik, Dan W

2684 PH 422 01 Quantum Theory II 4, UG

MW 11-12:40 Dixon, H Marshall

2683 PH 491 01 Under Tutorial and Research 3, UG

TBA Murphy, Brian W

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


2687 PH 491 02 Under Tutorial and Research 3, UG

TBA Ordonez, Gonzalo

2692 PH 491 03 Under Tutorial and Research 3, UG

TBA Han, Xianming

2691 PH 495 01 Senior Seminar 1, UG

TBA Ordonez, Gonzalo

2693 PH 499 01 Honors Thesis 3, UG

TBA Han, Xianming

2694 PH 499 02 Honors Thesis 3, UG

TBA Ordonez, Gonzalo

2695 PH 499 03 Honors Thesis 3, UG

TBA Murphy, Brian W

Political Science

3303 PO 102 01 Introduction to Peace Studies 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 McEvoy-Levy, Siobhan M

3301 PO 141 01 Intro International Politics 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Ooi, Su-Mei

3302 PO 201S 01 Research and Analysis 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Turner, Robin

3651 PO210 01 Basic Political Thought 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Brabant, Margaret A

3304 PO 322 01 Intl Conflict and Peace Build 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 McEvoy-Levy, Siobhan M

3308 PO 332 01 State & Local Govt & Politics 3, UG

W 4-6:30 Williamson, Larry

3309 PO 377 01 Constitutional Law 3, UG

M 4-6:30 Williamson, Larry

3305 PO 380 01 Topics in Political Science 3, UG

T 2:25-4:55 Turner, Robin

Environmental Justice

How can we create a just environment in which people have

access to clean, safe, and welcoming places to live, work,

learn, play, and pray, and ecosystems, habitats, and species

are conserved? Why have some communities been dispro-

portionately burdened with unsafe water, polluted air, and

toxic trash? What can we do to change this? These questions

are at the heart of environmental justice activism and analysis

and the focus of this course. Local, national, and global case

studies will help students develop a thorough understanding

of this movement.

3310 PO 380 02 Topics in Political Science 3, UG

R 2:25-4:55 Williamson, Larry

Political Advocacy & Lobbying

This class will explore the practical, real-world processes and

procedures that seek to exert influence over executive branch

and legislative branch decision-makers in the political area.

Students will distinguish among the purposes for lobbying,

understand the methods and techniques for success in

lobbing, and determine the relevance and potential of mean-

ingful lobbying in the contemporary era.

3311 PO 380 03 Topics in Political Science 3, UG

TBA Williamson, Larry

Politics Practicum

3306 PO 381 01 Ancient and Medieval Pol Thought 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Brabant, Margaret A

3312 PO 490 01 Seminar in Political Science 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Ooi, Su-Mei

International Political Econom

This course is designed as an introduction to the politics of

international economic relations. The purpose of the course

is to give you a broad theoretical and historical overview of

the workings of the global trade, production, monetary and

financial systems, and an understanding of pressing develop-

mental issues as well as the problems that confront us all

today as a result of a rapidly globalizing world economy.

Psychology

Independent Studies and Internships are available; please contact

the department for course numbers and permissions to register.

2703 PS 105 01 Careers in Psychology 1, UG

M 5:15-6:05 Gingerich, Mandy

2790 PS 202 01 Learning 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Dale, Robert H

2792 PS 202 02 Learning 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Dale, Robert H

3530 PS 210 01 Research Methods/Statistics I 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 O’Malley, Alison

2796 PS 211 01 Research Methods/Statistics II 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Gingerich, Mandy

2797 PS 211 02 Research Methods/Statistics II 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Gingerich, Mandy

2794 PS 235 01 Biological Bases of Behavior 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Lineweaver, Tara M

3534 PS 235 02 Biological Bases of Behavior 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Lineweaver, Tara M

2704 PS 310 01 Statistics in Psychology 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Giesler, Raymond B

2705 PS 320 01 Life Span Developmental Psych 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Bohannon III, Neil

3535 PS 350 01 Social Psychology 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Morris, Kathryn A

2730 PS 385 01 Cognitive Processes 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Gingerich, Mandy

3630 PS 412 01 Advanced Applied Neuroscience 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Lineweaver, Tara T

3536 PS 415 01 Psychological Testing 3, UG

T 3:50-6:20 Padgett, Robert J

2791 PS 440 01W Psychology of Personality 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Martin, Joel

2805 PS 475 01 Adv Seminar Cognitive Psych 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Bohannon III, Neil

Psychology and the Law

Psychology and the Law: The role of behavioral science in

the legal system. This experiential course takes advanced

psychology students through exercises in courtroom roles

to illustrate the psychological assumptions made by the legal

system. Opposing counsel and fact providers (psychological

experts, witnesses and principals in legals action) and fact

deciders (judges and juries) will be represented by students.

Classes will consist of moot trials where legal issues of

evidence and procedure that assume psychological laws

(often misunderstood) will be investigated. Trial work, a class

presentation and term paper will determine grades.

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 39


2806 PS 479 01 Adv Seminar in Applied Psych 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Martin, Joel

Adv Psychopathology and Intervention

The focus of this seminar will be an in-depth examination of

behavioral and psychological disorders. We will scrutinize

the phenomena and presumptive etiologies of different

mental disorders, and we will explore empirically supported

psychological treatments for those disorders. Because this

seminar is an extension of material discussed in Abnormal

Psychology, students should have already taken PS441 (or its

equivalent).

3592 NW 221-PS 01 Human Behavioral Measurement 5, UG

MTWR 10-10:50 Padgett, Robert J

R 2:25-3:25 Padgett, Robert J

3593 NW 221-PS 01A Laboratory 0, UG

R 3:25-5:25 Padgett, Robert J

3520 SW 250-PS 01 Psychological Inquiry 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Giesler, Raymond B

3521 SW 250-PS 02 Psychological Inquiry 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Giesler, Raymond B

3522 SW 250-PS 03 Psychological Inquiry 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Dale, Robert H

3523 SW 250-PS 04 Psychological Inquiry 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Stilson, Stephanie R

3524 SW 250-PS 05 Psychological Inquiry 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 O’Malley, Alison

3525 SW 250-PS 06 Psychological Inquiry 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 O’Malley, Alison

Sociology

Independent Studies and Internships are available; please contact

the department for course numbers and permissions to register.

3455 SO 205 01 Contemporary Social Issues 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Colburn Jr, Kenneth D

3456 SO 293 01 Statistics for Social Research 3, UG

MW 11-11:50 Novak, Katherine B

F 11-11:50 Novak, Katherine B

3640 SO 317 01 Gender and Society 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Cline, Krista

3457 SO 329 01 The Sociology of Racism 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Scott, Marvin B

3458 SO 333 01 European Societies 3, UG

TR 8-9:15 Menendez, Antonio V

3459 SO 335 01W The Global Society 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Bigelow, Bruce

The history of globalization covers 2000 years with the

emphasis on the era since 1500 C.E. The geography of

empires and long distance trade and the diffusion of religions

and languages is stressed.

3461 SO 339 01 Violence, Media, and Culture 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Colburn Jr, Kenneth D

3462 SO 351 01 Punishment and Society 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Staff

3463 SO 355 01 International Crime 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Cline, Krista

3464 SO 380 01 Special Topics in Sociology 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Staff

Medical Sociology

41 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

3465 SO 380 02 Sel Topics in Sociology 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Oprisko, Robert

Social Groups, Identity and Citizenships

This class focuses on group formation and dissolution up to

and including states as specialized groups designed, as

Schmitt suggests, to engage in political relations. This course

will emphasize the development of “us” and “them”

beginning with the psychology of the individual, moving to

association of basic subsistence units such as the family, and

the development of the nation-state, to supernational groups

such as Christendom, the proletariat, and the global citizenry.

3466 SO 383 01 Social Work Methods 3, UG

R 5:15-7:45 Staff

3467 SO 391 01W Social Theory Seminar 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Colburn Jr, Kenneth D

3468 SO 393 01 Research Methods Seminar 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Novak, Katherine B

3449 SW 200-SO 01 Understanding Society 3, UG

TR 8-9:15 Scott, Marvin B

Race, Ethnicity, and Society

3450 SW 200-SO 02 Understanding Society 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Staff

Education and Society

3451 SW 200-SO 03 Understanding Society 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Scott, Marvin B

Race, Ethnicity, and Society

3452 SW 200-SO 04 Understanding Society 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Staff

Inequalities in Society

3453 SW 200-SO 05 Understanding Society 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Cline, Krista

Health, Illness, and Society

3454 SW 200-SO 06 Understanding Society 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Staff

Sports and Society

International Studies

Independent Studies and Internships are available; please contact

the department for course numbers and permissions to register.

I. Core Courses

2621 IS101 01 Intro International Studies 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Oprisko, Robert Lee

3301 PO141 01 Intro International Politics 3, UG

TR 1-2:15PM Ooi, Su-Mei

2317 JR417 01H Internatnl Communication 3, UG

R 2:25-4:55 Geertsema, Margaretha

2896 IB320 01W International Business Environ 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Yagi, Noriko

3304 PO322 01 Intl Conflict and Peace Build 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 McEvoy, Siobhan M

3560 HS480 01 Seminar in History 3, UG

W 2:25-4:55 Han, Xiaorong

The World in 1968

3312 PO490 01 Seminar in Political Science 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Ooi, Su-Mei

International Political Economy

3463 SO355 01 International Crime 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Cline, Krista

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


3460 IS470 01 Topics International Studies 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Oprisko, Robert Lee

Social Groups, ID and Citizensh

2379 COM356 01 Comm Research Methods 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Richie, Carolyn Jane

Hoerl, Kristen Elizabeth

3302 PO201S 01 Research and Analysis 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Turner, Robin Lanette

3468 SO393 01 Research Methods Seminar 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Novak, Katherine B

DC Internship, US Foreign Relations

No other course is offered this semester in this area. If needed you

could register for an Independent Study.

Capstone

2622 IS410 01W The Global Society 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Bigelow, Bruce

II. Area Courses

Africa

Please see your advisor to conduct an independent study in this area

if needed.

Asia

3501 AN368 01 Coming of Age in the Mid East 3, UG

W 2:25-4:55 Shahrokhi, Sholeh

3556 HS390 05 Topics in History 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Han, Xiaorong

China and The US

Europe

3458 SO333 01 European Societies 3, UG

TR 8-9:15 Menendez, Antonio V

3600 FR485 01 Topics in Francophone Studies 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Vanbaelen, Sylvie

2981 SP365 01 Hispanic Short Story 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Willem, Linda M

2982 SP365 02 Hispanic Short Story 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Willem, Linda M

3539 MG495 01 Special Topics in Management 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Bennett Jr, Robert B

Doing Business in the EU

Latin America

3230 EN321 01 Comparative Literature I 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Spyra, Anna Janina

Caribbean Crosscurrents

3504 HS390 06 Topics in History 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Sluis, Ageeth

Imagining Latin-Amer Cultures

3167 SP355 01 Span Amer Culture:S America 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Muniz, Gabriela

3168 SP355 02 Span Amer Culture: S America 3, UG

TR 2:253:40 Muniz, Gabriela

Elective Courses

2897 IB433 01 International Economics 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Rieber, William J

2898 IB451 01 International Financial Mgmt 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Curci, Roberto

2899 IB451 02 International Financial Mgmt 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Curci, Roberto

2919 IB491 01 International Marketing 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Osland, Gregory E

III. Special International Studies Courses

2619 IS401 01 Independent Study 1, UG

TBA Menendez, Antonio V

2620 IS402 01 Independent Study 2, UG

TBA Menendez, Antonio V

2626 IS402 DC Independent Study 2, UG

TBA Menendez, Antonio V

2615 IS403 01 Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Menendez, Antonio V

2624 IS403 DC Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Menendez, Antonio V

2616 IS404 01 Internship International St 3, UG

TBA Menendez, Antonio V

2623 IS404 DC Internship International St 3, UG

TBA Menendez, Antonio V

2617 IS405 01 Internship International St 6, UG

TBA Menendez, Antonio V

2627 IS405 DC Internship International St 6, UG

TBA Menendez, Antonio V

2618 IS406 01 Internship International St 9, UG

TBA Menendez, Antonio V

2625 IS499 01 Honors Thesis 3, UG

TBA Menendez, Antonio V

2628 IS499 02 Honors Thesis 3, UG

TBA Cline, Krista M C

Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies

Independent Studies and Internships are available; please contact

the department for course numbers and permissions to register.

3590 GWS 202 01 Resist for Social Change in US 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Campbell, Brooke Meredith

We will in this course take an interdisciplinary, intersectional

approach to radical social movements in the United States,

post-1960. Taking seriously Audre Lorde’s proposition that

The Master’s Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master’s

House, we will ask why and how various groups of people

found other tools to dismantle the “house” of an America in

which they did not or could not live. We will ask why and

how “the master” takes radical movements down (e.g.,

COINTELPRO) and/or absorbs them (e.g., the non-profit

industrial complex) into “the master’s house.” Finally, we will

ask where radical America is to be found today.

2450 GWS 303 01 Topics in Gender Studies 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Campbell, Brooke Meredith

Written out of Wedlock: Living in Sin

For many these days, the age-old question To be or not to be

“seems to hang upon whether one says” “I do,” or “I don’t,”

to marriage. But in all the hoopla, questions of how the

institution of marriage means-what it is, what it does, and

why some folks get figured as marriageable while others

do not—often get lost in the shuffle. In this class, we will

examine lives written “out of wedlock”—the unconventional

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 41


and criminalized couplings; clerical celibates; pioneering

polyamorists; wanton hussies, libertines, and lotharios; the

quirkyalones; intrepid adulterers; confirmed bachelors and

steadfast spinsters; and the otherwise polymorphously

perverse-in the interests of better understanding why

marriage has become such a critical issue for American

identity politics today.

2451 GWS 303 02 Topics in Gender Studies 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Dulckeit, Katharina

Marginalized in America

Marginalized in America: Gender at the Intersection of Race

and Class. This course introduces the student to the

philosophical method and skills of thinking out problems

and issues that confront women in contemporary American

society, viewed from the intersection of gender, race and

class.

2452 GWS 303 03 Topics in Gender Studies 3, UG

W 5:15-8 Swenson, Brynnar Nelson

American Renaissance and its Oth

In 1941 the critic F.O. Matthiessen declared that the half

decade between 1850 and 1855 was the age of American

Renaissance,” and he identified the work of Emerson,

Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, and Whitman as evidence

that American literature had reached maturity during this

time. In this course we will study primary works of the

“American Renaissance” and ask how Matthiessen’s “best

books” critical strategy effectively naturalized a particular

version of American literature that obscured the history of

women and minority writers and readers. In order to

contest the narrowness of Matthiessen’s literary strategy we

will seek to expand the definition of American Renaissance

by placing its traditional authors into dialogue with those,

such as Fanny Fern, Harriet Wilson, Fredrick Douglas, and

Edgar Allan Poe who were originally defined as outside its

ambit.

3586 GWS 303 04 Topics in Gender Studies 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Campbell, Brooke Meredith

Intersections of ID: Gender and Race

We will in this course take an interdisciplinary, intersectional

approach to the study of race, gender, sexuality and class

(primarily) in the United States. Equally premised in the

convictions that the “personal is political” and “the political

is gendered,” this course aims to foster critical consciousness

of the many and varied ways in which race, gender, sexuality,

and class shape our daily lives.

3587 GWS 303 05 Topics in Gender Studies 3, UG

M 6-8:30 Gabiola, Irune del Rio

Slavery in the New World

Slavery in the New World examines ideas related to the

construction of the human” from a traditional Eurocentric

perspective reinforced during the period of Enlightenment.

By looking at ways in which Spaniards invented the indig-

enous population, the Africans slaves and the Latin American

landspace, on the one hand, and at testimonies or slave

narratives, on the other, we will be able to conceptualize

alternative visions of the human from the perspective of the

marginal subjects in terms of race, ethnicity and gender

43 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

3588 GWS 303 06 Topics in Gender Studies 3, UG

W 2:20-4:50 Savage, Ann M

Genres in Cinema: Queer Image

From a critical-cultural studies perspective, this course will

critically examine gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and

queer (GLBTQ) images in film. We will examine both

historical and contemporary examples while also recognizing

the cultural conditions and industry restrictions imposed on

queer life and images.

3589 GWS 303 07 Topics in Gender Studies 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Swenson, Kristin

Gender and Communication

3631 GWS303 08 Topics in Gender Studies 3, UG

W 6-8:30 Gabioloa, Irune del Rio

Slavery in the New World

Peace Studies

Peace Studies Core Classes

3303 PO 102 01 Introduction to Peace Studies 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 McEvoy-Levy, Siobhan M

3304 PO 322 01 Intl Conflict and Peace Build 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 McEvoy-Levy, Siobhan M

3301 PO 141 01 Intro International Politics 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Ooi, Su-Mei

2965 SP 320S 01W Service Learning in Spanish 3, UG

F 11-12:30 Carney, Terri M

3165 SP 320S 02W Service Learning in Spanish 3, UG

F 1-2:30 Carney, Terri M

Peace Studies Electives

2378 COM 353 01 Interpersonal Communication 3, UG

W 4-6:30 Comstock, Jamie

2317 JR 417 01H Internatnl Communication 3, UG

R 2:25-4:55 Geertsema, Margaretha

3404 COM 412 01 Advocacy 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Hoerl, Kristen

3501 AN 368 01 Coming of Age in the Mid East 3, UG

W 2:25-4:55 Shahrokhi, Sholeh

3502 AN 380 01 Selected Topics in Anthro 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Shahrokhi, Sholeh

Trespassing: An Anthro of Our

Segmented Lives

3305 PO 380 01 Topics in Political Science 3, UG

T 2:25-4:55 Turner, Robin

Environmental Justice

3310 PO 380 02 Topics in Political Science 3, UG

R 2:25-4:55 Williamson, Larry

Political Advocacy and Lobbying

3218 RL 354 01 Islam: Religion, Culture, Soc 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Bauman, Chad

3222 RL 392 01 Topics in Religion 2, UG

TBA Bauman, Chad

CFV Seminar: Religion Peace Making

Conflict

3463 SO 355 01 International Crime 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Cline, Krista

3578 TI 262S 01 Self and Service 1.5, UG

TBA Hochman, Arthur W

Brown, Bonnie

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


Science, Technology and Society

Independent Studies and Internships are available; please contact

the department for course numbers and permissions to register.

3085 ST 390 05 Topics in Sci, Tech and Society 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Gupta, Ankur

Epics I

Supervised team software project for a local charity or non-

profit organization.

3618 ST 390 06 Topics in Sci, Tech and Society 3, UG

TBA Reeves, Carol A

Community and Sustain:

Spring Break Study Trip

This is a week-long intensive study of an intentional

community called “The Farm” which has been in existence

since 1969. We will travel to the community in Summer-

town, Tennessee and stay during the week of spring break

(March 14 to 18). Students will learn the history of this

intentional community, its challenges over time, and how it

has sustained itself. Other topics that will be covered include

midwifery, sustainable development and agriculture, eco-

business, and vegetarian cooking. In addition to regular

tuition, students will pay for their travel and accommodations.

3089 ST 390 09 Topics in Sci, Tech and Society 3, UG

M 6-8:30 Brown,Brandon

Biomedical Ethics

A study of fundamental ethical problems in medical

practice, health policy, and biomedical research. Topics

include patients’ rights and professional responsibilities,

abortion, physician-assisted suicide, surrogate motherhood,

justice in the allocation of medical resources, human genetics

and experimentation on human subjects and animals.

3096 ST 392 02 Topics in Sci, Tech and Society 2, UG

TBA Hennessy, Marjorie

Environmental Practicum

Related classes for STS credit: see departmental listing for more

information.

3196 TI 261-STS 01 Science and Society 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Zimmerman, Michael

Creationism in America

3197 TI 261-STS 02 Science and Society 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Zimmerman, Michael

Creationism in America

3190 NW 201-BI 01 Environmental Biology 5, UG

T 5:30-8 Holm, Robert F

R 5:30-6:20 Holm, Robert F

3191 NW 201-BI 01A Laboratory 0, UG

R 6:30-8 Holm, Robert F

3579 SW 261-RX 01 Health Disparities 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Ryder, Priscilla T

3505 AN 380 03 Selected Topics in Anthro 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 DeLuycker, Anneke

Human Evolution

3506 AN 380 04 Selected Topics in Anthro 3, UG

W 5:15-7:45 DeLuycker,Anneke

Behavioral Research at the Zoo

3176 BI 406 01 Topics in Biology 2, UG

W 2-3:45 Hennessy, Marjorie

Environmental Practicum

3177 BI 408 01 Topics in Biology 4, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Etnier, Shelley A

Biomechanics

3178 BI 408 01A Laboratory 0, UG

T 2:25-5:15 Etnier, Shelley A

Biomechanics

3179 BI 408 02 Topics in Biology 4, UG

TR 11-12:15 Ryan, Travis James

Urban Ecology

3180 BI 408 02A Laboratory 0, UG

M 2-4:50 Ryan, Travis James

Urban Ecology

3181 BI 412 01 Local Flora 3, UG

T 2:25-5:15 Dolan, Rebecca W

3104 CS 382S 01 EPICS II Service Learning 2, UG

MW 3:50-4:40 Gupta, Ankur

3105 CS 383S 01 EPICS II Service Learning 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Gupta, Ankur

3239 EN 303 01W Scientific Writing 3, UG

W 7-9:45 Reeves, Carol A

Prof Writing: Writ about Nature

and the Environment

3557 HS 390 07 Topics in History 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Rosenberg, Gabriel

Green and Permanent Land:

Environment and Agriculture

3211 PL 363 01 Biomedical Ethics 3, UG

M 6:30-9 Brown, Brandon

3305 PO 380 01 Topics in Political Science 3, UG

T 2:25-4:55 Turner, Robin

Environmental Justice

3464 SO 380 01 Sel Topics in Sociology 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Staff

Medical Sociology

3540 EC 339 01 Economic History of the US 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Grossman, Peter Z

2920 EC 495 50 Special Topics in Economics 3, UG

W 6-8:40 Zimmer, Timothy E

Health Care Economics

3538 MG 495 01 Special Topics in Management 3, UG

M 2:25-4:55 Staff

Health Care Administration

1308 RX 611 50 Sp Top: Pharmacy and Health Sci 3, UG

R 2:25-5:15 Ryder, Priscilla T

Exploring Public Health

2383 COM 481 02 Topics Communication Studies 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Swenson, Kristin

Technologies of the Body

Army ROTC

3074 RZ 102 01 Basic Leadership 1, UG

W 3:30-4:20 Rapp, Douglas Charles

3075 RZ 202 01 Leadership and Teamwork 2, UG

T 9-10:50 Rapp, Douglas Charles

3076 RZ 302 01 Leadership and Ethics 3, UG

TR 1:30-2:45 Rapp, Douglas Charles

3077 RZ 402 01 Officership 3, UG

TR 1:30-2:45 Rapp, Douglas Charles

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 43


Air Force ROTC

3069 AI 102 01 The Air Force Today II 2, UG

T 11:15-12:05 Staff

R 3:35-5:35 Staff

3070 AI 102 02 The Air Force Today II 2, UG

R 2:30-3:20 Staff

R 3:35-5:35 Staff

45 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

3073 AI 202 01 The Development of Air Power II 2, UG

TBA Staff

3071 AI 302 01 Air Force Mngmt and Ldrshp II 3, UG

R 3:35-5:35 Staff

R 6-8:30 Staff

3072 AI 402 01 Natl Sec Forc Cont Amer Soc II 3, UG

R 3:35-5:35 Staff

TBA Staff

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


College of Education

Educational Foundations

1033 ED 112 01 Intro to Profession of Teaching 2, UG

T 12:35-2:15 Pangan, Catherine Lee

1034 ED 112 02 Intro to Profession of Teaching 2, UG

W 12:35-2:15 Staff

1002 ED 241 01 Developmental Theory & App: Ed 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Esteves, Kelli J

1003 ED 241 02 Developmental Theory & App: Ed 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Esteves, Kelli J

1164 ED 241 03 Developmental Theory & App: Ed 3, UG

F 8-10:30 Esteves, Kelli J

1004 ED 242 01 Educ Children w/ Special Needs 2, UG

R 2:25-4:05 Staff

1005 ED 242 02 Educ Children w/ Special Needs 2, UG

MW 9-9:50 Staff

1182 ED 242 03 Educ Children w/ Special Needs 2, UG

TR 11-11:50 Abbott, Daniel

1007 ED 244 01 Concepts of Education 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Guerriero, Sam J

1008 ED 244 02 Concepts of Education 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Guerriero, Sam J

1185 ED 244 03 Concepts of Education 3, UG

R 4:15-6:45 Boop, Roger W

1006 ED 245 01 Intro to Computers in Educ 3, UG

M 2:25-4:55 Maurer, Matt M

1052 ED 245 02 Intro to Computers in Educ 3, UG

W 2:25-4:55 Maurer, Matt M

3646 ED403 99 Workshop in Education 3, UG

R 4:15-6:45 Gavaghan, William Joseph

Perspectives in Leadership

Early/Middle Childhood

1009 ED 206 01 Intro Early/Mid Childhood Ed 3, UG

T 12:30-03:30 Hochman, Arthur W

1014 ED 307 01 Children’s Literature 3, UG

R 8:30-10:50 Hargrove, Cathy

1035 ED 442 01 Early/Middle Child Student II 6, UG

TBA Lupton, Angela Christine

1036 ED 443 01 Integrated Lab: Middle Chldhd 5, UG

W 4:30-6:30 Staff

Lupton, Angela Christine

1209 ED444 01 MC/EA Student Teaching Seminar 2, UG

TBA Pangan, Catherine Lee

Lupton, Angela Christine

Block A

1040 ED 303 01W Read and Lang Arts: Erly Chldhd 6, UG

MW 12-4 Hargrove, Cathy

1043 ED 316 01 Teach Math: Early Childhood 3, UG

T 8-12 Bloom, Stephen J

1044 ED 416 01 Curric: Early Childhood 6, UG

MW 8-12 Flessner, Ryan Bates

Block B

1054 ED 308S 01W Read and Lang Arts: Mid Chldhd 6, UG

M 8-4 Corpus, Deborah A

W 12-4 Corpus, Deborah A

1056 ED 317S 01 Teach Soc Stu: Mid Chldhd 2, UG

T 8-9:50 Pangan, Catherine Lee

1055 ED 414S 01 Teach Math: Mid Chldhd 3, UG

W 8-12 Bloom, Stephen J

1057 ED 418S 01 Teach Sci: Mid Chldhd 2, UG

T 10-12 Pangan, Catherine Lee

Block C

1032 ED 204 01 Infus Arts Ear/Mid Child Curri 4, UG

M 4-7 Hubbard, Tim

Middle/Secondary Education

1212 ED 227 02 Intro to Mid and Sec Students/Sc 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Campbell, Jannine

1010 ED 228 01 Content Area Lit in Mid-Sec Cu 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Campbell, Jannine

1048 ED 228 03 Content Area Lit in Mid-Sec Cu 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Furuness, Shelly Renae

1011 ED 328 01 Integrated Curric Methods IIB 3, UG

R 12:30-4 Boop, Roger W

1041 ED 398 01 Eng Lang Lrnrs & Cult Contexts 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Brooks, Kathryn

1058 ED 423 01 Student Teaching Jr/Mid High 5, UG

TBA Staff

1049 ED 425 01 Secondary Student Teaching I 5, UG

TBA Beilfuss, Meredith Lynn

1050 ED 426 01 Secondary Student Teaching II 5, UG

TBA Beilfuss, Meredith Lynn

1179 ED 431 50 Cur Iss Ear/Mid Chldhd Ed II 1, UG

TBA Pangan, Catherine Lee

Lupton, Angela Chirstine

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. College of Education 45


1012 ED 433 01 Special Methods 4, UG

MW 12:15-4:45 Campbell, Janine

English Education Methods

1236 ED 433 02 Special Methods 4, UG

TBA Staff

Campbell, Janine

Science Education Methods

1239 ED 433 03 Special Methods 4, UG

TBA Staff

Campbell, Janine

Math Education Methods

1242 ED 433 04 Special Methods 4, UG

TBA Staff

Campbell, Janine

Modern Foreign Language Methods

1245 ED 433 05 Special Methods 4, UG

TBA Staff

Campbell, Janine

Social Studies Methods

1013 ED 434 50 Middle Secondry Stud Teach Sem 2, UG

W 5:30-7:10 Beilfuss, Meredith Lynn

1038 ED 434 51 Middle Secondry Stud Teach Sem 2, UG

W 5:30-7:10 Campbell, Jannine

1042 ED 498 01W Theory and Practice of ENL 3, UG

T 4:30-7 Kandel, Brooke E

Special Education

1116 ED 243 01 Methods and Mat: Mild Interven 2, UG

F 10-11:40 Knipstein, Theresa A

3300 ED 480 50 Found Teach Children w/Diff 2, UG

R 4:30-7 Abbott, Daniel Jose

1053 ED 490 01 Assmnt of Childrn w Spec Needs 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Kercood, Suneeta

1149 ED 490 02 Assmnt of Childrn w Spec Needs 3, UG

R 4:15-6:45 Staff

3297 ED 491 01 Behavior Mgt for Incl Classrm 3, UG

M 7:15-9:45 Kercood, Suneeta

1152 ED 491 02 Behavior Mgt for Incl Classrm 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Staff

1037 ED 492 50 Special Education Law 1, UG

TBA Knipstein, Theresa A

1046 ED 493 01 Profess Prac:Mild Int Erly Chl 3, UG

TBA Knipstein, Theresa A

1047 ED 494 01 Prof Prac: Mild Int Mid Chld 3, UG

TBA Knipstein, Theresa A

1188 ED 496 01 Prof Prac: Mild Int Early Adol 3, UG

TBA Staff

Knipsteen, Theresa A

3584 ED 583 50 Char of Chld Needing Mld Inter 3, GR

R 7-9:30 Kercood, Suneeta

School Counseling

1024 ED 572 50 Fund Counseling Theory and Tech 3, GR

T 4:30-7 Oliver, Brandie Michelle

1025 ED 577 50 Group Procedures 3, GR

T 7:15-9:45 Oliver, Brandie Michelle

1026 ED 630 50 Valuing Diversity and Similarity 3, GR

M 4:30-7 Oliver, Brandie Michelle

1039 ED 673 01 Research for School Counselors 3, GR

47 College of Education

M 7:15-9:45 Keller, Thomas J

1027 ED 712 50 Practicum – Counseling 3, GR

M 4:30-7 Waldner, Laura J

1028 ED 712 51 Practicum – Counseling 3, GR

M 4:30-7 Keller, Thomas J

1029 ED 722 50 Internship: Counseling 3, GR

M 7:15-9:45 Oliver, Brandie Michelle

1030 ED 722 51 Internship: Counseling 3, GR

T 4:30-7 Bloom, John W

1051 ED 722 53 Internship: Counseling 3, GR

T 7:15-9:45 Bloom, John W

Ed Administration

1022 ED 557 50 School Principalship-Phase I 6, GR

TR 7-9:30 Sudsberry, Marilyn Jane

1023 ED 559 50 The Sch Principalship-Phase III 6, GR

TR 7-9:30 Gavaghan, William

Emmert, David J

Master’s in Effective Teaching and Leadership

1161 ED 465 01 Second Lang. Acquis and Assmt 3, UG

R 4:30-7 Brooks, Kathryn

1155 ED 497 01 Inclusive Education for ELLs 3, GR

TR 9:35-10:50 Brooks, Kathryn

1125 ED 569 01 Prob/Issues/Trends in Educ 3, GR

W 4:30-7 Kandel, Brooke E

1134 ED 534 01 Topical Readings 3, GR

R 4:30-6:45 Shelley, Ena M

Reggio Emilia

This course focuses on using workshops in K–12 classrooms

to improve writing and content comprehension. This course

is for elementary and secondary teachers.

1122 ED 658 01 Leadership in Education 3, GR

W 4:30-7 Flessner, Ryan Bates

Physical Education

See Core Curriculum for Physical Well-Being Offerings.

1176 PE 127 01 Intro Health PE Recreatn Dance 2, UG

MW 8-8:50 Welch, Mindy M

1119 PE 128 01 Intro to Health Education 2, UG

MW 11-11:50 Farley, Lisa A

1137 PE 202 01 Skills Series: Basketball/Soccer 1, UG

TR 1-1:50 Reagan, Brian

1140 PE 203 01 Skills Series: Pickleball/Golf 1, UG

MW 12-12:50 Reagan, Brian

1170 PE 204 01 Skills Series: Tennis/Badminton 1, UG

MW 11-11:50 Reagan, Brian

1173 PE 205 01 Skills Series: Ult Frisb/TmHBl 1, UG

TR 2-2:50 Linzmeier, Stephen

1143 PE 206 01 Skill Series: Softball/Volleyball 1, UG

TR 1-1:50 Linzmeier, Stephen

1146 PE 207 01 Skills Series: Weight Trng/Fit 1, UG

MW 12-12:50 Staff

1167 PE 218 01 Water Safety Instructor 2, UG

F 12-2 Landwehr, Todd J

1015 PE 224 01 Coordinated School Health 2, UG

MW 9-9:50 Farley, Lisa A

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


1016 PE 237 01 Educational Dance and Games 3, UG

TR 8-9:15 Staff

1128 PE 261 01 Theory and Practice of Coaching 2, UG

MW 10-10:50 Welch, Mindy M

3585 PE 297 01 Orient to Internships in PE 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Reagan, Brian

1018 PE 324 01 Physiology of Exercise 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Strawbridge, Marilyn J

1019 PE 325 50 Adapted Program in Phys Ed 3, UG

MWF 8-8:50 Reagan, Brian

1031 PE 331 01 PE Mthd Ear/Mid Chldhd 3, UG

TR 9:35-12:15 Welch, Mindy M

1215 PE 331 02 PE Mthd Ear/Mid Chldhd 3, UG

TR 9:35-12:15 Farley, Lisa A

Section 02 will meet with section 01 in FHWC.

3298 PE 352 01 Exercise Prescription 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Strawbridge, Marilyn J

3299 PE 445 50 Internships in Physical Educat 9, UG

T 2:25-4:55 Staff

Reagan, Brian

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. College of Education 47


49 College of Business

College of Business

Accounting

2871 AC 100 01 Volunteer Income Tax Assist 1, UG

TBA Rouse, Pamela J

2880 AC 203 01 Introduction to Accounting 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Mahenthiran, Sakthi

2822 AC 203 02 Introduction to Accounting 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Sander, James F

3529 AC 203 03 Introduction to Accounting 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Sander, James F

2893 AC 204 01 Introduction to Accounting II 3, UG

TR 8-9:15 Updyke, Karel A

2823 AC 204 02 Introduction to Accounting II 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Updyke, Karel A

2824 AC 204 03 Introduction to Accounting II 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Terando, Bill

2825 AC 204 04 Introduction to Accounting II 3, UG

MWF 8-8:50 Rouse, Pamela J

2826 AC 204 05 Introduction to Accounting II 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Rouse, Pamela J

2935 AC 204 06 Introduction to Accounting II 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Kelly, Anne

3531 AC 204 07 Introduction to Accounting II 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Kelly, Anne

2873 AC 301 01 Framework Finan Acct Val 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Updyke, Karel A

2859 AC 302 01 Fin Acct Rsrch/Appli 3, UG

TR 8-9:15 Sander, James F

2861 AC 310 01 Advanced Managerial Accounting 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Wilson, George

3532 AC 342 01 Financial Statement Analysis 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Uchida, Mark F

Business

2922 COB 101 01 Profess and Career Development I 0, UG

TBA Wolfsie, MaryEllen

2923 COB 201 01 Profess and Career Development II 0, UG

TBA Wolfsie, MaryEllen

2924 COB 300 01 Career Planning and Development 1, UG

T 9:35-10:50 Recht, Marvin L

2925 COB 300 02 Career Planning and Development 1, UG

T 11-12:15 Recht, Marvin L

2926 COB 300 03 Career Planning and Development 1, UG

R 8-9:15 Williams, Charles H

2927 COB 301 01 Profess and Career Development III 0, UG

TBA Wolfsie, MaryEllen

2928 COB 401 01 CBA Internship I 3, UG

F 8-8:50 Templeton, Bill

2929 COB 402 01 CBA Internship II 3, UG

M 8-8:50 Templeton, Bill

W 8-8:50 Templeton, Bill

Economics

2827 EC 231 01 Principles of Microeconomics 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Rieber, William J

2828 EC 231 02 Principles of Microeconomics 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Gjerde, Tom

3537 EC 231 03 Principles of Microeconomics 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Gjerde, Tom

2829 EC 232 01 Principles of Macroeconomics 3, UG

MWF 8-8:50 Litkowski, Thomas

2830 EC 232 02 Principles of Macroeconomics 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Litkowski, Thomas

2831 EC 232 03 Principles of Macroeconomics 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Litkowski, Thomas

2832 EC 232 04 Principles of Macroeconomics 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Main, Robert S

2833 EC 232 05 Principles of Macroeconomics 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Main, Robert S

3540 EC 339 01 Economic History of the US 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Grossman, Peter Z

This course examines the rise of the United States as the

preeminent economic power in all of human history. Using

the tools of economic theory and analysis as well as narrative

history, the course explores the factors that contributed to

America’s economic development from colonial times to the

post World War II era. While the course will emphasize

America’s economic development, it will place economic

change within the larger context of America’s political and

cultural evolution. An understanding of America’s economic

development will also provide insights into America’s role

in an increasingly interconnected world. Prerequisite is

EC101 or EC231.

3541 EC 351 01 Urban Economics 3, UG

TR 8-9:15 Grossman, Peter Z

2921 EC 352 01W Personnel Economics 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Gjerde, Tom

2862 EC 354 01 Intermediate Microeconomics 3, UG

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


TR 1-2:15 Main, Robert S

2834 EC 433 01 International Economics 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Rieber, William J

2863 EC 464 01 Quant Methods - Econometrics 3, UG

TR 6:30-7:45 Kuhn, Theodore F

2920 EC 495 50 Special Topics in Economics 3, UG

W 6-8:40 Zimmer, Timothy E

Health Care Economics

The course will apply economic tools and methods to better

understand the current health care system and possible

reform policy initiatives. It is intended to be discussion-

based and should be attractive to students with a diverse

academic background. Prerequisite: EC101 or EC231

Finance

2835 FN 340 01 Corporate Finance 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Stephen, Sheryl Ann K

2881 FN 340 02 Corporate Finance 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Stephen, Sheryl Ann K

3542 FN 342 01 Financial Statement Analysis 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Uchida, Mark F

2855 FN 347 01W Investments 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Dolvin, Steven

2900 FN 350 1 Risk and Insurance 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Kirby, Jill E

2875 FN 451 01 International Financial Mgt 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Curci, Roberto

2882 FN 451 02 International Financial Mgt 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Curci, Roberto

2883 FN 470 01 Applied Portfolio Management 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Dolvin, Steven

2934 FN 495 01 Special Topics in Finance 3, UG

TBA Dolvin, Steven

CFA Global Investment Competition

International Business

2896 IB 320 01W International Business Environ 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Yagi, Noriko

2897 IB 433 01 International Economics 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Rieber, William J

2898 IB 451 01 International Financial Mgmt 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Curci, Roberto

2899 IB 451 02 International Financial Mgmt 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Curci, Roberto

2919 IB 491 01 International Marketing 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Osland, Gregory E

Management

2864 MG 101 01 Freshman Business Experience 3, UG

TR 8-9:15 McKneight, James Robert

F 2-4 McKneight, James Robert

2865 MG 101 02 Freshman Business Experience 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 McKneight, James Robert

F 2-4 McKneight, James Robert

2887 MG 201 01 Real Business Experience I 3, UG

MWF 8-8:50 Uchida, Mark F

2911 MG 201 02 Real Business Experience I 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Uchida, Mark F

2912 MG 201 03 Real Business Experience I 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Uchida, Mark F

2860 MG 202 01 Real Business Experience II 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Halstead, Richard

2888 MG 202 02 Real Business Experience II 3, UG

MWF 12-12:50 Halstead, Richard

2869 MG 262 01 Ethics and Law in Business Envir 6, UG

TR 1-2:15 McGowan, Richard J

MW 1-2:15 Hicks, Harry E

2870 MG 262 02 Ethics and Law in Business Envir 6, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Hicks, Harry E

TR 2:25-3:40 McGowan, Richard J

2836 MG 263 01 Legal Environment of Business 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Koehler, Michael John

2837 MG 350 01 Operations Management 3, UG

MWF 12-12:50 Jeon, Sunran

2856 MG 350 02 Operations Management 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Jeon, Sunran

2857 MG 360 01 Organizational Behavior 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Padgett, Margaret Y

2838 MG 360 02 Organizational Behavior 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Padgett, Margaret Y

2886 MG 360 03 Organizational Behavior 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Staff

2839 MG 365 01 Business Law I 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Koehler, Michael John

2840 MG 365 02 Business Law I 3, UG

MWF 12-12:50 Koehler, Michael John

2841 MG 365 03 Business Law I 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 McKneight, James Robert

2842 MG 490 01 Administrative Policy 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Fernhaber, Stephanie A

2907 MG 490 02 Administrative Policy 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Fernhaber, Stephanie A

2908 MG 490 03 Administrative Policy 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Caldwell, Craig B

3538 MG 495 01 Special Topics in Management 3, UG

M 2:25-4:55 Staff

Health Care Administration

3539 MG 495 02 Special Topics in Management 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Bennett Jr, Robert B

Doing Business in the EU

Marketing

2843 MK 280 01 Principles of Marketing 3, UG

TR 8-9:15 King, Kathryn W

2844 MK 380 01 Intro to Marketing Management 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 King, Kathryn W

2874 MK 380 02 Intro to Marketing Management 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 King, Kathryn W

2845 MK 381 01 Salesmanship and Sales Mgmt 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 McQuiston, Daniel H

2846 MK 385 01W Marketing Research 3, UG

TR 8-9:15 Fetter Jr, Richard E

2858 MK 385 02W Marketing Research 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Fetter Jr, Richard E

2889 MK 471 01 Advertising and Promotion Mgmt 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Skinner, Deborah K

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. College of Business 49


2847 MK 480 01 Marketing Management/Strategy 3, UG

TR 8-9:15 Skinner, Deborah K

2848 MK 480 02 Marketing Management/Strategy 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Skinner, Deborah K

3543 MK 481 01 Adv Selling Contmp Busnss Env 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 McQuiston, Daniel H

2938 MK 483 01 Consumer Behavior 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Mackoy, Robert

2913 MK 491 01 International Marketing 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Osland, Gregory E

2902 MK 495 50 Special Topics in Marketing 3, UG

M 6-8:40 Morton, David B

Sports Marketing

2914 MK 495 51 Special Topics in Marketing 3, UG

T 6-8:40 Staff

Social Media and E-Commerce

Management Science

2891 MS 100 01 Basic Excel Skills for Bus App 1, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Davidson, Jason

2892 MS 100 02 Basic Excel Skills for Bus App 1, UG

MWF 12-12:50 Davidson, Jason L

2904 MS 100 03 Basic Excel Skills for Bus App 1, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Davidson, Jason L

2905 MS 100 04 Basic Excel Skills for Bus App 1, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Davidson, Jason L

2906 MS 100 05 Basic Excel Skills for Bus App 1, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Davidson, Jason L

3544 MS 100 06 Basic Excel Skills for Bus App 1, UG

MWF 12-12:50 Davidson, Jason L

2849 MS 264 01 Statistics 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 King, Barry E

2850 MS 264 02 Statistics 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Orris, J Burdeane

2872 MS 264 03 Statistics 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Orris, J Burdeane

2851 MS 265 01 Information Technology 3, UG

MWF 8-8:50 Davidson, Jason L

2852 MS 265 02 Information Technology 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Davidson, Jason L

2853 MS 265 03 Information Technology 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Rondeau, Patrick

2854 MS 265 04 Information Technology 3, UG

MWF 12-12:50 Rondeau, Patrick

2890 MS 265 05 Information Technology 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 King, Barry E

2909 MS 265 06 Information Technology 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Arling, Priscilla

2917 MS 370 01 Data Networks/Comm Systems 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Arling, Priscilla

2868 MS 374 01 E-Commerce and Internet Tech 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Xu, Hongjiang

3545 MS 375 01W Systems Analysis and Design 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Arling, Priscilla

2916 MS 476 01 Web Design and Consulting 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Rondeau, Patrick

51 College of Business

Master Business Administration

2811 MBA 410 50 Organizational Behavior 1, GR

S 8-12 Futrell, David

2812 MBA 420 50 Financial and Managerial Acctng 2, GR

MW 7:45-9:45 Halstead, Richard

2876 MBA 425 50 Foundations in Economics 2, GR

MW 7:45-9:45 Main, Robert S

2813 MBA 430 50 Foundations in Finance 1, GR

MW 5:30-7:30 Forsythe, Richard

2814 MBA 435 50 Foundations in Marketing 1, GR

S 8-12 Staff

2815 MBA 440 50 Statistical Analysis 3, GR

MW 5:30-7:30 Orris, J Burdeane

3604 MBA 505 50 Gateway Experience 1, GR

R 5:30-9 Paulson Gjerde, Kathy A

F 8-7:30 Paulson Gjerde, Kathy A

2816 MBA 510 50 Leadership 3, GR

T 6-8:40 Caldwell, Craig B

2817 MBA 515 50 Legal and Ethical Oper of Busnss 3, GR

R 6-8:40 Robinson, Timothy P

2818 MBA 520 50 Managerial Accounting 3, GR

M 6-8:40 Wilson, George

2894 MBA 525 50 Managerial Economics 3, GR

W 6-8:40 Paulson Gjerde, Kathy A

2819 MBA 530 50 Financial Management 3, GR

W 6-8:40 Stephen, Sheryl Ann K

2820 MBA 535 50 Mktg Mngmt and Rsrch Methods 3, GR

T 6-8:30 Mackoy, Robert

2901 MBA 540 50 Operations Mngmt and Systems 3, GR

R 6-8:40 Staff

2821 MBA 545 50 Integrative Capstone Experienc 3, GR

T 6-8:40 Fetter Jr, Richard E

2877 MBA 552 50 Managing People in Global Orga 2, GR

T 6-7:40 Yagi, Noriko

2878 MBA 557 50 Managing Change 2, GR

W 6-7:40 Staff

Class will meet on the following dates: Jan 30, Feb 27, March

27 and April 24.

2879 MBA 562 50 International Finance 3, GR

R 6-8:40 Curci, Roberto

2884 MBA 583 50 Buyer Behavior 2, GR

T 6-7:40 Mackoy, Robert

2903 MBA 594 50 Special Topics 2, GR

S 8-12 Staff

Non-Profit Board Management

This course is the first of two semesters in the MBA Board

Fellows program. Students learn the different challenges of

operating a non-profit organization from a board member’s

perspective. This course has limited enrollment so students

should apply to the MBA Program Director’s Office.

3614 MBA 594 51 Special Topics 2, GR

TR 4:50-5:50 Hicks, Harry E

Advanced Law

2895 MBA 595 50 Special Topics 3, GR

W 6-8:40 Kirby, Jill E

Risk Management

The focus of the course is on the management of risks facing

businesses and organizations. Organizations that manage

risk well are more likely to be successful than those that do

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


not. Effective risk management requires a solid understanding

of the sources, dimensions and qualities of risk as well as the

development and implementation of efficient techniques to

respond to these conditions. This course will focus on the

operational risks facing a firm with an emphasis on insurance.

3615 MBA 595 51 Special Topics 3, GR

T 6-8:40 Xu, Hongjiang

IT Auditing and Forensic Accounting

This course will cover a variety of facets related to Infor-

mation Technology (IT) Auditing and Forensic Accounting

especially fraud audits. The course will present tools,

concepts, and techniques necessary to properly audit IT. It

also covers forensic accounting processes and tools used in

the detection and prevention of fraud against the company.

Prerequisites: MPA degree-seeking status or permission of

graduate Program Director. (G)(3)

3616 MBA 595 52 Special Topics 3, GR

R 6-8:40 Mahenthiran, Sakthi

Internat Corp Governance and

Financial Reporting

The course compares corporate governance structures in

different countries, and emphasizes how legal environments

affect the enforcements of contracts and regulations. It high-

lights ownership structures, and their implications for

protecting minority shareholders. The course will relate the

legal environments and ownership structures to reporting

quality. Study abroad may be required. Prerequisites: MPA

degree-seeking or permission of graduate Program Director.

(G)(3)

3617 MBA 595 53 Special Topics 3, GR

W 6-8:40 Terando, Bill

Taxation of Corporations/Partnerships

Master Public Accounting

2866 MPA 513 50 Applied Financial Accounting 3, GR

M 6-8:40 Kelly, Anne

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. College of Business 51


College of Pharmacy

and Health Sciences

A listing of specific classes for the physician assistant and pharmacy

experiential rotations is available in the Butler University Bulletin

and online at www.butler.edu/coursesearch. Additionally, specific

Independent Study and Research and Thesis courses are also listed

in the same resource.

PreProfessional Health Science

1455 PX 200S 01 Intro to Professional Practice 2, UG

R 8-8:50 Devine, Trish

1459 PX 200S 02 Intro to Professional Practice 2, UG

R 5:45-6:35 Albert, Erin

1456 PX 200S 03 Intro to Professional Practice 2, UG

W 2-2:50 Devine, Trish

1457 PX 200S 04 Intro to Professional Practice 2, UG

W 2-2:50 Hancock, Bruce G

1454 PX 315 01 Human Physiology Health Sci 4, UG

MWF 12-12:50 Cole, Henry F

F 2-2:50 Cole, Henry F

3573 PX 325 01 Ethical Issues in Health Care 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Schultz, Michele A

3633 PX 325 02 Ethical Issues in Health Care 3, UG

T 2:25-4:55 Range, Jason T

Physician Assistant

1555 AP 302 01 Anatomy for PA’s 4, UG

M 9-9:50 Lucich, John

MWF 8-8:50 Lucich, John

1559 AP 302 01A Laboratory 0, UG

T 8-9:50 Lucich, John

1563 AP 302 01B Laboratory 0, UG

R 8-9:50 Lucich, John

1445 AP 309 01 Pathophysiology II 5, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Monts, Beverly S

R 12:35-2:15 Monts, Beverly S

1446 AP 310 01 Pharmacology II 3, UG

MW 12:35-2:15 Gurevitz, Samuel Louis

1595 AP 314 01 Issues in Professional Practic 2, UG

MW 11-11:50 Zorn, Jennifer S

F 11-11:50 Zorn, Jennifer S

1551 AP 315 01 Evidence-Bases Medicine (EBM) 2, UG

T 12:35-2:15 Lucich, John

F 12:35-01:25 Lucich, John

1567 AP 405 01 History and Phys Assessment II 4, UG

MT 12:35-2:15 Ladika, Douglas

53 College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

1571 AP 405 01A Laboratory 0, UG

M 2:25-5:15 Schultz, Michele A

1575 AP 405 01B Laboratory 0, UG

T 2:25-5:15 Schultz, Michele A

1579 AP 405 01C Laboratory 0, UG

W 2:25-5:15 Schultz, Michele A

1583 AP 405 01D Laboratory 0, UG

R 2:25-5:15 Schultz, Michele A

3568 AP 409 01 Clinical Integration II 1, UG

R 12:35-2:15 Roscoe, Mike

3569 AP 409 02 Clinical Integration II 1, UG

R 12:35-2:15 Lucich, John

3570 AP 409 03 Clinical Integration II 1, UG

R 12:35-2:15 Zorn, Jennifer S

3571 AP 409 04 Clinical Integration II 1, UG

R 12:35-2:15 Snyder, Jennifer A.

3572 AP 409 05 Clinical Integration II 1, UG

R 12:35-2:15 Lynn, Larry

1587 AP 414 01 Therapeutics for Phys Asst II 5, UG

MTWR 10-10:50 Gurevitz, Samuel Louis

F 9-10:50 Gurevitz, Samuel Louis

1447 AP 417 01 Diagnostic and Therapeutic Pr II 3, UG

M 9-9:50 Frosch, Don

W 12:35-2:15 Frosch, Don

1448 AP 417 01A Laboratory 0, UG

F 12-2 Frosch, Don

1449 AP 417 01B Laboratory 0, UG

F 3-5 Frosch, Don

1591 AP 422 01 Clinical Medicine for PA’s II 6, UG

MWF 8-8:50 Snyder, Jennifer A.

TR 8-9:50 Snyder, Jennifer A.

1663 AP 501 01 Physician Assistant Project 2, GR

TBA Zorn, Jennifer S

1607 AP 502 01 Physician Assistant Project Pr 2, GR

TBA Lucich, John

1655 AP 502 02 Physician Assistant Project Pr 2, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1453 AP 516 02 Community Mental Health Rotati 4, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1450 AP 531 01 Elective Rotation 2, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1543 AP 531 02 Elective Rotation 2, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1475 AP 533 01 General Elective Rotation IV 4, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


1468 AP 540 01 Family Practice Rotation VI 6, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1469 AP 541 01 Internal Medicine Rotation VI 6, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1470 AP 542 01 Pediatric Rotation VI 6, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1471 AP 543 01 Community Mental Health Ro VI 6, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1472 AP 544 01 Obstetrics/Gynecology Ro VI 6, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1473 AP 545 01 Emergency Medicine Rotation VI 6, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1474 AP 546 01 General Surgery Rotation VI 6, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1451 AP 558 01 Pediatric Rotation 4, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1452 AP 590 01 Core Content IV 2, GR

R 2:25-4:05 Lynn, Larry

1476 AP 640 01 Family Practice Elective Ro II 2, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1479 AP 641 01 Internal Medicine Elec Ro II 2, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1483 AP 642 01 Pediatrics Elective Rotation II 2, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1487 AP 643 01 Community Mental Health Elec II 2, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1491 AP 644 01 Obstetrics/Gynecolgy Elec Ro II 2, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1495 AP 645 01 Emergency Medicine Elec Ro II 2, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1499 AP 646 01 General Surgery Elective Ro II 2, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1503 AP 650 01 Family Practice Elective Ro IV 4, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1507 AP 651 01 Internal Medicine Elec Ro IV 4, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1511 AP 652 01 Pediatrics Elective Rot IV 4, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1515 AP 653 01 Comm Mental Hlth Elec Ro IV 4, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1519 AP 654 01 Obstetrics/Gynecology Elc Ro IV 4, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1523 AP 655 01 Emergency Medicine Elec Ro IV 4, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

1527 AP 656 01 General Surgery Elective Ro IV 4, GR

TBA Lynn, Larry

Pharmacy

1411 RX 314 01 Pharmaceutical Biotechnology 3, UG

MF 8-8:50 Hrubey, Todd W

1412 RX 314 01A Laboratory 0, UG

T 8-9:50 Hrubey, Todd W

1413 RX 314 01B Laboratory 0, UG

R 8-9:50 Hrubey, Todd W

1414 RX 318 01 Intro Prin of Drug Action 5, UG

MTWR 1-1:50 Cumbay, Medhane

F 1-1:50 Cumbay, Medhane

1415 RX 318 01A Laboratory 0, UG

M 2-3:50 Vance, Michael A

1416 RX 318 01B Laboratory 0, UG

T 8-9:50 Vance, Michael A

1417 RX 318 01C Laboratory 0, UG

W 2-3:50 Vance, Michael A

1418 RX 318 01D Laboratory 0, UG

R 8-8:50 Vance, Michael A

1464 RX 320 01 Delivery of Health Care 2, UG

MW 11-11:50 Richey-Smith, Carriann

1270 RX 324 01 Clinical Assessment 2, UG

MW 10-10:50 Hatcher, Ralph E

1261 RX 324 01A Laboratory 0, UG

F 9-10:20 Wyss, Holly

1263 RX 324 01B Laboratory 0, UG

F 9-10:20 VanTyle, Jeanne H

1371 RX 324 01C Laboratory 0, UG

F 9-10:20 Pylitt, Laurie Lipsig

1379 RX 324 01D Laboratory 0, UG

F 9-10:20 Williams, Kristal L

1271 RX 324 01E Laboratory 0, UG

F 10:30-11:50 Wyss, Holly

1372 RX 324 01F Laboratory 0, UG

F 10:30-11:50 VanTyle, Jeanne H

1373 RX 324 01G Laboratory 0, UG

F 10:30-11:50 Pylitt, Laurie Lipsig

1262 RX 324 01H Laboratory 0, UG

F 10:30-11:50 Williams, Kristal L

1419 RX 351 01 Intro to Pharm Care II 4, UG

MW 9-9:50 Das, Nandita

1420 RX 351 01A Laboratory 0, UG

R 2-3:50 Das, Nandita

1421 RX 351 01A1 Laboratory 0, UG

M 2:25-5:15 Stratford, Margaret

1422 RX 351 01B1 Laboratory 0, UG

T 8-10:50 Enz, Stephanie L

1423 RX 351 01C1 Laboratory 0, UG

W 2:25-5:15 Stratford, Margaret

1424 RX 351 01D1 Laboratory 0, UG

R 8-10:50 Enz, Stephanie L

1264 RX 404 01 Therapeutics II Case Studies 1, UG

F 2-5 Sprunger, Tracy Lynn

1265 RX 404 02 Therapeutics II Case Studies 1, UG

F 2-5 Sprunger, Tracy Lynn

1266 RX 404 03 Therapeutics II Case Studies 1, UG

F 2-5 Sprunger, Tracy Lynn

1267 RX 404 04 Therapeutics II Case Studies 1, UG

F 2-5 Sprunger, Tracy Lynn

1268 RX 404 05 Therapeutics II Case Studies 1, UG

F 2-5 Sprunger, Tracy Lynn

1269 RX 404 06 Therapeutics II Case Studies 1, UG

F 2-5 Sprunger, Tracy Lynn

1374 RX 404 07 Therapeutics II Case Studies 1, UG

F 2-5 Sprunger, Tracy Lynn

1375 RX 404 08 Therapeutics II Case Studies 1, UG

F 2-5 Sprunger, Tracy Lynn

1368 RX 412 01 Principles of Drug Action II 4, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Vance, Michael A

R 11-11:50 Vance, Michael A

1531 RX 412 01A Laboratory 0, UG

T 2:25-4:15 Vance, Michael A

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences 53


1535 RX 412 01B Laboratory 0, UG

R 2:15-4:15 Vance, Michael A

1272 RX 414 01 Therapeutics 2 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Ramey, Cathy

1277 RX 416 01 Self-Care and Health Promo II 3, UG

M 9-10:50 Maffeo, Carrie Marie

1278 RX 416 01A Laboratory 0, UG

T 9-10:50 Maffeo, Carrie Marie

1279 RX 416 01B Laboratory 0, UG

T 2:25-4:15 Maffeo, Carrie Marie

1280 RX 416 01C Laboratory 0, UG

W 9-10:50 Maffeo, Carrie Marie

1377 RX 416 01D Laboratory 0, UG

F 9-10:50 Maffeo, Carrie Marie

1273 RX 422 01 Advanced Dosage Forms 4, UG

MW 2-2:50 Das, Sudip

T 10-11:50 Das, Sudip

1274 RX 422 01A Laboratory 0, UG

T 2:25-5:15 Stratford, Margaret

1384 RX 422 01B Laboratory 0, UG

W 8-10:50 Stratford, Margaret

1275 RX 422 01C Laboratory 0, UG

R 2:25-5:15 Stratford, Margaret

1370 RX 422 01D Laboratory 0, UG

F 8-10:50 Stratford, Margaret

1386 RX 432 01 Personnel and Financial Mgmt 3, UG

MWF 1-1:50 Kennedy, Laurence A

1276 RX 500 01 Intro to Experiential Rotation 1, UG

TR 1-1:50 Hancock, Bruce G

1388 RX 504 01 Therapeutics IV Case Studies 1, UG

M 1-3:55 Pylitt, Laurie Lipsig

1389 RX 504 02 Therapeutics IV Case Studies 1, UG

M 1-3:55 Pylitt, Laurie Lipsig

1390 RX 504 03 Therapeutics IV Case Studies 1, UG

M 1-3:55 Pylitt, Laurie Lipsig

1391 RX 504 04 Therapeutics IV Case Studies 1, UG

M 1-3:55 Pylitt, Laurie Lipsig

1392 RX 504 05 Therapeutics IV Case Studies 1, UG

M 1-3:55 Pylitt, Laurie Lipsig

1393 RX 504 06 Therapeutics IV Case Studies 1, UG

M 1-3:55 Pylitt, Laurie Lipsig

1394 RX 504 07 Therapeutics IV Case Studies 1, UG

M 1-3:55 Pylitt, Laurie Lipsig

1395 RX 504 08 Therapeutics IV Case Studies 1, UG

M 1-3:55 Pylitt, Laurie Lipsig

1387 RX 514 01 Therapeutics IV 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Ramey, Cathy

1385 RX 523 01 Clinical Pharmacokinetics 3, UG

MTW 12-12:50 VanTyle, Jeanne H

R 12-12:50 VanTyle, Jeanne H

1408 RX 526 01 Pharmacy and the Law 3, UG

W 1-3:50 Blue, Missy L

1404 RX 528 01 Adv Drug Info and Lit Eval 2, UG

T 2:25-5:15 Peak, Amy S

1405 RX 528 02 Adv Drug Info and Lit Eval 2, UG

W 8-10:50 Peak, Amy S

1406 RX 528 03 Adv Drug Info and Lit Eval 2, UG

R 2:25-5:15 Jordan, Joseph Kendall

55 College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

1407 RX 528 04 Adv Drug Info and Lit Eval 2, UG

F 8-10:50 McFarland, Annette Theresa

1281 RX 600 01 Honors Thesis 1, UG

TBA Cumbay, Medhane

1643 RX 600 02 Honors Thesis 1, UG

TBA Knoderer, Chad A.

1282 RX 601 01 Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 1, UG

TBA

Indpt Study Bionucleonics

Staff

1283 RX 601 02 Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 1, UG

TBA

Indpt Study Medicinal Chemistry

Staff

1284 RX 601 03 Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 1, UG

TBA Staff

1285 RX 601 04

Indpt Study Pharmacuetical Chemistry

Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 1, UG

TBA

Indpt Study Pharmaceutics

Staff

1286 RX 601 05 Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 1, UG

TBA

Indpt Study Pharmacognosy

Staff

1287 RX 601 06 Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 1, UG

TBA

Indpt Study Pharmacogology

Staff

1288 RX 601 07 Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 1, UG

TBA Staff

1289 RX 601 08

Indpt Study Pharmacy Administration

Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 1, UG

TBA Kennedy, Laurence A

1290 RX 602 01

Indpt Study Pharmacy Practice

Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 2, UG

TBA

Indpt Study Bionucleonics

Staff

1291 RX 602 02 Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 2, UG

TBA

Indpt Study Medicinal Chemistry

Staff

1292 RX 602 03 Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 2, UG

TBA

Indp Study Pharmaceutical Chem

Staff

1293 RX 602 04 Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 2, UG

TBA

Indpt Study Pharmaceutics

Staff

1294 RX 602 05 Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 2, UG

TBA

Indpt Study Pharmacognosy

Staff

1295 RX 602 06 Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 2, UG

TBA

Indpt Study Pharmacology

Staff

1296 RX 602 07 Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 2, UG

TBA Staff

1297 RX 602 08

Indpt Study Pharmacy Administration

Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 2, UG

TBA Maffeo, Carrie Marie

1659 RX 602 09

Indpt Study Pharmacy Practice

Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 2, UG

TBA Williams, Kristal L

1298 RX 603 01

Indpt Study Pharmacy Practice

Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 3, UG

TBA

Indpt Study Bionucleonics

Staff

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


1299 RX 603 02 Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 3, UG

TBA Staff

Indp Study Medicinal Chemistry

1300 RX 603 03 Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 3, UG

TBA Staff

Indp Study Pharmaceutical Chem

1301 RX 603 04 Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 3, UG

TBA Staff

Indpt Study Pharmaceutics

1302 RX 603 05 Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 3, UG

TBA Staff

Indpt Study Pharmacognosy

1303 RX 603 06 Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 3, UG

TBA Staff

Indpt Study Pharmacogology

1304 RX 603 07 Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 3, UG

TBA Staff

Indpt Study Pharmacy Administration

1305 RX 603 08 Ind Study: Pharm and Health Sci 3, UG

TBA Staff

Indpt Study Pharmacy Practice

1306 RX 608 01W Doctor of Pharm Sen Sem II 1, UG

TBA Gervasio, Jane Maria

1647 RX 609 80 Sp Top: Pharm and Health Sci 1, UG

F 12-2 VanTyle, W Kent

Current Topics in Pharmacy Sci

1599 RX 610 01 Sp Tp: Pharm and Health Sci 2, UG

M 5:15-7:05 Healey, Kristine Leah

Clinical Drug Development

1444 RX 610 02 Sp Tp: Pharm and Health Sci 2, UG

T 2:25-4:15 VanTyle, W Kent

College Teaching with Technology

3629 RX610 05 Sp Tp: Pharm and Health Sci 2, UG

W 8-9:50 Staff

Topics in Neuroscience

3574 RX 610 06 Sp Tp: Pharm and Health Sci 2, UG

TBA Staff

Pharmacotherapy of Renal Disease

1308 RX 611 50 Sp Top: Pharmacy and Health Sci 3, UG

R 2:25-5:15 Ryder, Priscilla T

Range, Jason

Exploring Public Health

1466 RX 611 51 Sp Top: Pharmacy and Health Sci 3, UG

W 5:15-8:05 Ruekert, Laura

Principles of Psychiatric Therapeutics

1467 RX 611 68 Sp Top: Pharmacy and Health Sci 3, UG

TBA VanTyle, W Kent

Spanish Immersion Trip

3575 RX 611 72 Sp Top: Pharmacy and Health Sci 3, UG

TR 3:50-4:40 Kennedy,Gala D

Medical Spanish Service Learning

3577 RX 611 82 Sp Top: Pharmacy and Health Sci 3, UG

R 2:25-5:15 Albert,Erin L

Intrapreneurship and Entrepreneurship

1460 RX 615 01 Introductory Medical Spanish 3, UG

MWF 8-8:50 Kennedy, Gala D

1461 RX 616 01 Critical Care 3, UG

R 2:25-5:15 McCann, Jennifer A

1462 RX 617 01 Advanced Medical Spanish 3, UG

MW 4-5:15 Kennedy, Gala D

1465 RX 622 50 Drug Disposition & Drug Intera 3, UG

T 5:15-8:05 Murphy, Patrick J

1378 RX 641 01 Pediatric Pharmacotherapy 3, UG

R 2:25-5:15 Whitmore,J Maria Mikuta

1307 RX 642 01 Geriatric Therapeutics 3, UG

T 2:25-4:55 Gurevitz,Samuel Louis

1463 RX 644 01 Women’s Health Issues 3, UG

T 2:25-4:55 VanTyle,Jeanne H

1260 RX 650 01 Academic Experience Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1310 RX 651 01 Admin, Mgmt and Law Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1409 RX 651 02 Admin, Mgmt and Law Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1311 RX 652 01 Adv Ambulatory Care Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1312 RX 653 01 Adv Clinic Comm Pract Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1313 RX 654 01 Adv General Medicine Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1397 RX 654 02 Adv General Medicine Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1314 RX 655 01 Prescription Compounding Rot 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1315 RX 656 01 Alt Comp Med Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1316 RX 657 01 Ambulatory Care Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1383 RX 657 02 Ambulatory Care Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1317 RX 658 01 Cardiology Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1442 RX 658 02 Cardiology Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1318 RX 659 01 Clinical Comm Pharm Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1382 RX 659 02 Clinical Comm Pharm Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1319 RX 660 01 Clinical Research Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1443 RX 660 02 Clinical Research Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1320 RX 661 01 Community Practice Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1440 RX 661 02 Community Practice Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1539 RX 661 03 Community Practice Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1321 RX 662 01 Critical Care Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1396 RX 662 02 Critical Care Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1322 RX 663 01 Disease State Mgmt Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1323 RX 664 01W Drug Information Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences 55


1381 RX 664 02W Drug Information Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1324 RX 665 01 Emergency Med/Trauma Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1325 RX 666 01 General Medicine Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1376 RX 666 02 General Medicine Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1326 RX 667 01 Geriatric Medicine Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1403 RX 667 02 Geriatric Medicine Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1327 RX 668 01 GI/Liver Renal Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1328 RX 669 01 HIV Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1329 RX 670 01 Home Health Care Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1330 RX 671 01 Industrial Pharmacy Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1331 RX 672 01 Infectious Diseases Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1410 RX 672 02 Infectious Diseases Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1332 RX 673 01 Health Policy Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1333 RX 674 01 Long-Term Care Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1334 RX 675 01 Managed Care Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1335 RX 676 01 Institutional Practice Rotatio 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1336 RX 677 01 Neurology Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1337 RX 678 01 Nutrition Support Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1338 RX 679 01 Oncology Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1398 RX 679 02 Oncology Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1339 RX 680 01 Pain Management Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1340 RX 681 01 Neonatology Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1341 RX 682 01 Pediatric Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1380 RX 682 02 Pediatric Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1342 RX 683 01 Pharm Marketing/Sales Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1343 RX 684 01 Pharmacoecon Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1344 RX 685 01 Pharmcokinetics Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1345 RX 686 01 Pharmacy Systems/Tech Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1346 RX 687 01 Poison Control/Toxin Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

57 College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

1347 RX 688 01 Pulmonary Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1348 RX 689 01 Veterinary Medicine Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1349 RX 690 01 Psychiatry and Neuropsychology Ro 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1350 RX 691 01 Radiopharmaceutical Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1351 RX 692 01 Rural and Indigent Care Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1441 RX 692 02 Rural and Indigent Care Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1352 RX 693 01 Pharmacy Board and Assn Ro 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1353 RX 694 01 Surgery Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1354 RX 695 01 Transplantation Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1355 RX 696 01 Women’s Health Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1356 RX 699 01 Spec Topics: Pharmacy Rotation 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1369 RX 700 01 Reg Aff and Pharmacovigilence Ro 4, UG

TBA Hancock, Bruce G

1400 RX 701 01 Research and Thesis 1, GR

TBA Staff

1426 RX 701 02

Res/Thesis: Medicinal Chemistry

Research and Thesis 1, GR

TBA

Res/Thesis: Pharmaceutics

Das, Sudip

1427 RX 701 03 Research and Thesis 1, GR

TBA Cumbay, Medhane

1428 RX 701 04

Res/Thesis: Pharmacology

Research and Thesis 1, GR

TBA

Res/Thesis: Pharmacy Admin

Staff

1429 RX 701 05 Research and Thesis 1, GR

TBA

Res/Thesis: Clinical Science

Staff

1611 RX 701 07 Research and Thesis 1, GR

TBA

Res/Thesis: Pharmaceutics

Das, Nandita

3634 RX701 08 Research and Thesis 1, GR

TBA Erkine, Alexandre M

1309 RX 702 01

Res/thesis: Pharmacology

Research and Thesis 1, GR

TBA

Medicinal Chemistry

Staff

1357 RX 702 02 Research and Thesis 1, GR

TBA

Pharmaceutics

Das, Sudip

1358 RX 702 03 Research and Thesis 1, GR

TBA

Pharmacology

Cumbay, Medhane

1430 RX 702 04 Research and Thesis 1, GR

TBA Staff

1431 RX 702 05

Pharmacy Administration

Research and Thesis 1, GR

TBA

Clinical Science

Staff

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


1615 RX 702 07 Research and Thesis 1, GR

TBA Das, Nandita

Pharmaceutics

3635 RX702 08 Research and Thesis 1, GR

TBA Erkine, Alexandre M

Res/thesis: Pharmacology

1401 RX 703 01 Research and Thesis 2, GR

TBA Staff

Res/Thesis: Medicinal Chemistry

1432 RX 703 02 Research and Thesis 2, GR

TBA Das, Sudip

Res/Thesis: Pharmaceutics

1433 RX 703 03 Research and Thesis 2, GR

TBA Cumbay, Medhane

Res/Thesis: Pharmacology

1434 RX 703 04 Research and Thesis 2, GR

TBA Staff

Res/Thesis: Pharmacy Administration

1435 RX 703 05 Research and Thesis 2, GR

TBA Staff

Res/Thesis: Clinical Science

1619 RX 703 07 Research and Thesis 2, GR

TBA Das, Nandita

Res/Thesis: Pharmaceutics

3636 RX703 08 Research and Thesis 2, GR

TBA Erkine, Alexandre M

Res/thesis: Pharmacology

1359 RX 704 02 Research and Thesis 2, GR

TBA Das, Sudip

Res/Thesis: Pharmaceutics

1360 RX 704 03 Research and Thesis 2, GR

TBA Cumbay, Medhane

Res/Thesis: Pharmacology

1361 RX 704 04 Research and Thesis 2, GR

TBA Staff

Res/Thesis: Pharmacy Admin

1362 RX 704 05 Research and Thesis 2, GR

TBA Staff

Res/Thesis: Clinical Science

1623 RX 704 07 Research and Thesis 2, GR

TBA Das, Nandita

Res/Thesis: Pharmaceutics

3637 RX704 08 Research and Thesis 2, GR

TBA Erkine, Alexandre M

Res/thesis: Pharmacology

1402 RX 705 01 Research and Thesis 3, GR

TBA Staff

Res/Thesis: Medicinal Chemistry

1436 RX 705 02 Research and Thesis 3, GR

TBA Das, Sudip

Res/Theis: Pharmaceutics

1437 RX 705 03 Research and Thesis 3, GR

TBA Cumbay, Medhane

Res/Thesis: Pharmacology

1438 RX 705 04 Research and Thesis 3, GR

TBA Staff

Res/Thesis: Pharmacy Administration

1439 RX 705 05 Research and Thesis 3, GR

TBA Staff

Res/Thesis: Clinical Science

1627 RX 705 07 Research and Thesis 3, GR

TBA Das, Nandita

Res/Theis: Pharmaceutics

3638 RX705 08 Research and Thesis 3, GR

TBA Erkine, Alexandre M

Res/thesis: Pharmacology

1363 RX 706 01 Research and Thesis 3, GR

TBA Staff

Res/Thesis: Medicinal Chem

1364 RX 706 02 Research and Thesis 3, GR

TBA Das, Sudip

Res/Thesis: Pharmaceutics

1365 RX 706 03 Research and Thesis 3, GR

TBA Cumbay, Medhane

Res/Thesis: Pharmacology

1366 RX 706 04 Research and Thesis 3, GR

TBA Staff

Res/Thesis: Pharmacy Admin

1367 RX 706 05 Research and Thesis 3, GR

TBA Staff

Res/Thesis: Clinical Science

1631 RX 706 07 Research and Thesis 3, GR

TBA Das, Nandita

Res/Thesis: Pharmaceutics

3639 RX706 08 Research and Thesis 3, GR

TBA Erkine, Alexandre M

Res/thesis: Pharmacology

1399 RX 780 01 Current Topics in Pharm Sci 1, GR

F 2:30-4:30 Staff

1635 RX 783 01 Introduction to Pharm Research 2, GR

TBA Das, Nandita

1639 RX 785 01 Biopharmaceutical Analysis 3, GR

TBA Das, Sudip

1547 RX 788 01 Molecular Pharmacology 3, GR

TBA Cumbay, Medhane

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences 57


59 Jordan College of Fine Arts

Jordan College

of Fine Arts

Jordan College

Freshman

1894 JC 100 04 Performance Attendance 0, UG

TBA Thoreson, Glen V

Theatre Majors

1709 JC 100 05 Performance Attendance 0, UG

TBA Zurbuchen, Susan J

Arts Administration Majors

3641 JC 100 06 Performance Attendance 0, UG

TBA Rao, Gautam

Art Program Majors

Sophomores

1896 JC 200 04 Performance Attendance 0, UG

TBA Thoreson, Glen V

Theatre Majors

1710 JC 200 05 Performance Attendance 0, UG

TBA Zurbuchen, Susan J

Arts Administration Majors

3642 JC 200 06 Performance Attendance 0, UG

TBA Rao, Gautam

Art Program Majors

Juniors

1887 JC 300 04 Performance Attendance 0, UG

TBA Thoreson, Glen V

Theatre Majors

1888 JC 300 05 Performance Attendance 0, UG

TBA Zurbuchen, Susan J

Arts Administration Majors

3643 JC 300 06 Performance Attendance 0, UG

TBA Rao, Gautam

Art Program Majors

Seniors

2021 JC 400 04 Performance Attendance 0, UG

TBA Thoreson, Glen V

Theatre Majors

2022 JC 400 05 Performance Attendance 0, UG

TBA Zurbuchen, Susan J

Arts Administration Majors

3644 JC 400 06 Performance Attendance 0, UG

TBA Rao, Gautam

Art Program Majors

Art

3382 ART 210 01 Process: Design Exploration 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Rao, Gautam

By permission of instructor only.

3383 ART 216 01 Introduction to Photography 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Rao, Gautam

Enrollment by permission of instructor only.

2200 ART 304 01 Depiction 3, UG

T 2:25-4:55 Gauthier, Leah

By permission of instructor only.

3384 ART 312 01W Design: History and Theory 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Mix, Elizabeth

This course provides an introduction to the history of Modern

and Postmodern Design. It is expressly designed to explore

the relationship between the design disciplines (graphic

design, furniture design, architecture, textile design, interior

design and fashion), as well as the dialogue between design

history and design theory.

3385 ART 360 01 Space 3, UG

R 2:25-4:55 Gauthier, Leah

By permission of instructor only.

Arts Administration

2075 AA 301 01 Principles and Practices Art Adm 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Kleiman, Rose

2116 AA 371 01S Experiential Learning 1, UG

TBA Kleiman, Rose

2117 AA 372 01S Experiential Learning 2, UG

TBA Kleiman, Rose

2118 AA 373 01S Experiential Learning 3, UG

TBA Kleiman, Rose

2163 AA 373 DC Experiential Learning 3, UG

TBA Zurbuchen, Susan J

2120 AA 383 01 Special Seminar in Arts Admin 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Zurbuchen, Susan J

Arts in Society

3594 AA 383 02 Special Seminar in Arts Admin 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Zurbuchen, Susan J

Special Event Management

2172 AA 383 50 Special Seminar in Arts Admin 3, UG

T 6:30-9 Newman, Mark A

Arts Marketing

2113 AA 400 01 Internship Preparation 0, UG

TBA Zurbuchen, Susan J

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


2119 AA 401 01 Arts Administration Seminar 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Kleiman, Rose

3374 AA 401 02 Arts Administration Seminar 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Kleiman, Rose

2173 AA 450W 01W Arts Administration Senior Sem 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Zurbuchen, Susan

1898 AA 475 01 Internship in Arts Admin 6, UG

TBA Zurbuchen, Susan J

2162 AA 475 DC Internship in Arts Admin 6, UG

TBA Zurbuchen, Susan J

1899 AA 481 01 Independent Study 1, UG

TBA Kleiman, Rose

1900 AA 482 01 Independent Study 2, UG

TBA Kleiman, Rose

1901 AA 483 01 Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Kleiman, Rose

1892 AA 499 50 Honors Thesis 3, UG

TBA Zurbuchen, Susan J

Art History

2208 AH 400 01 Independent Study 1, UG

TBA Rao, Gautam

2206 AH 402 01 Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Gauthier, Leah

2207 AH 402 02 Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Rao, Gautam

Dance

Courses open to non-majors

1902 DA 100 01 Dance Training for Athletes 2, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Attaway, Larry A

1889 DA 102 01 Beginning Ballet II (non-majors) 1, UG

MF 8-8:50 Ladner, Jennifer A

1890 DA 104 01 Beginning Jazz 1, UG

TR 8-8:50 Ladner, Jennifer A

1903 DA 106 01 Intermediate/Advanced Jazz 1, UG

TR 9:35-10:25 Ladner, Jennifer A

1904 DA 108 01 Modern Dance (non-majors) 1, UG

MF 9-9:50 Ladner, Jennifer A

1905 DA 202 01 Intermediate Ballet (non-majors) 1, UG

TR 8-9:15 Wong, Roberta Anne

1906 DA 302 01 Intermed Ballet (non-majors) 2, UG

TR 8-9:15 Wong, Roberta Anne

1907 DA 402 01 Inter/Adv Ballet (non-majors) 2, UG

TR 8-9:15 Wong, Roberta Anne

Courses Reserved for Dance Majors

Studio courses

2026 DA 110 01 Professional Practices 0, UG

F 3:40-4:30 Attaway, Larry A

2068 DA 190 01 Performance Attendance 0, UG

TBA Attaway, Larry A

2070 DA 290 01 Performance Attendance 0, UG

TBA Attaway, Larry A

2071 DA 390 01 Performance Attendance 0, UG

TBA Attaway, Larry A

2074 DA 490 01 Performance Attendance 0, UG

TBA Attaway, Larry A

2121 DA 112 01 Ballet Technique I Freshman 2, UG

MWF 2-3:30 Attaway,Larry A

TR 1-2:30 Attaway, Larry A

3386 DA 112 02 Ballet Technique I Freshman 2, UG

MWF 2-3:30 Attaway, Larry A

TR 1-2:30 Attaway, Larry A

1909 DA 212 01 Ballet Technique I 2, UG

MWF 2-3:30 Attaway, Larry A

TR 1-2:30 Attaway, Larry A

1910 DA 114 01 Ballet Technique II 2, UG

MWF 2-3:20 Attaway, Larry A

TR 1-2:30 Attaway, Larry A

1911 DA 214 01 Ballet Technique II 2, UG

MWF 2-3:20 Attaway, Larry A

TR 1-2:30 Attaway, Larry A

1912 DA 314 01 Ballet Technique II 2, UG

MWF 2-3:230 Attaway, Larry A

TR 1-2:30 Attaway, Larry A

1913 DA 116 01 Ballet Technique III 2, UG

MWF 12:20-1:50 Attaway, Larry A

TR 1-2:30 Attaway, Larry A

1914 DA 216 01 Ballet Technique III 2, UG

MWF 12:20-1:50 Attaway, Larry A

TR 1-2:30 Attaway, Larry A

1915 DA 316 01 Ballet Technique III 2, UG

MWF 12:20-1:50 Attaway, Larry A

TR 1-2:30 Attaway, Larry A

1916 DA 416 01 Ballet Technique III 2, UG

MWF 12:20-1:50 Attaway, Larry A

TR 1-2:30 Attaway, Larry A

1917 DA 118 01 Ballet Technique IV 2, UG

MWF 12:20-1:50 Attaway, Larry A

TR 1-2:30 Attaway, Larry A

1918 DA 218 01 Ballet Technique IV 2, UG

MWF 12:20-1:50 Attaway, Larry A

TR 1-2:30 Attaway, Larry A

1919 DA 318 01 Ballet Technique IV 2, UG

MWF 12:20-1:50 Attaway, Larry A

TR 1-2:30 Attaway, Larry A

1920 DA 418 01 Ballet Technique IV 2, UG

MWF 12:20-1:50 Attaway, Larry A

TR 1-2:30 Attaway, Larry A

1921 DA 120 01 Ballet Technique – Men 1, UG

MWF 12:20-1:50 Attaway, Larry A

1922 DA 220 01 Ballet Technique – Men 1, UG

MWF 12:20-1:50 Attaway, Larry A

1923 DA 320 01 Ballet Technique – Men 1, UG

MWF 12:20-1:50 Attaway, Larry A

1924 DA 420 01 Ballet Technique – Men 1, UG

MWF 12:20-1:50 Attaway, Larry A

1925 DA 410 01 Ballet Technique 1, UG

MWF 12:20-1:50 Attaway, Larry A

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. Jordan College of Fine Arts 59


1926 DA 410 02 Ballet Technique 1, UG

TBA Jarvis, Michelle M

TR 1-2:30 Attaway, Larry A

Students must attend class three times weekly.

1927 DA 410 03 Ballet Technique 1, UG

MWF 2-3:30 Attaway, Larry A

1928 DA 122 01 Pointe I 1, UG

MW 3:40-4:30 Cholewa, Rosanna S

3387 DA 122 02 Pointe I 1, UG

MW 3:40-4:30 Byram, Laura H

1929 DA 222 01 Pointe I 1, UG

MW 3:40-4:30 Cholewa, Rosanna S

1930 DA 124 01 Pointe II 1, UG

TR 2:40-3:40 Byram, Laura H

1931 DA 224 01 Pointe II 1, UG

TR 2:40-3:40 Byram, Laura H

1932 DA 322 01 Pointe III 1, UG

TR 2:40-3:40 Cholewa, Rosanna S

1933 DA 422 01 Pointe III 1, UG

TR 2:40-3:40 Cholewa, Rosanna S

1934 DA 126 01 Pas de Deux I 1, UG

M 3:40-4:40 Cholewa, Rosanna S

1935 DA 226 01 Pas de Deux II 1, UG

M 3:40-4:40 Cholewa, Rosanna S

1936 DA 326 01 Pas de Deux III 1, UG

W 3:40-4:50 Cholewa, Marek

1937 DA 426 01 Pas de Deux IV 1, UG

W 3:40-4:50 Cholewa, Marek

1938 DA 128 01 Men’s Allegro Technique I 1, UG

TR 2:40-3:40 Reid, Derek Enrico

1939 DA 228 01 Men’s Allegro Technique II 1, UG

TR 2:40-3:40 Reid, Derek Enrico

1940 DA 328 01 Men’s Allegro Technique III 1, UG

TR 2:40-3:40 Reid, Derek Enrico

1941 DA 428 01 Men’s Allegro Technique IV 1, UG

TR 2:40-3:40 Reid, Derek Enrico

1942 DA 132 01 Modern Technique I 1, UG

MF 11-12:30 McGuire, Susan

1943 DA 232 01 Modern Technique II 1, UG

TR 9:15-11 McGuire, Susan

1944 DA 332 01 Modern Technique III 1, UG

MWF 2-3:30 McGuire, Susan

1945 DA 432 01 Modern Technique IV 1, UG

2-3:30 McGuire, Susan

1946 DA 142 01 Jazz I 1, UG

TR 11-12:15 Pratt, Cynthia A

3389 DA 142 02 Jazz I 1, UG

TBA Pratt, Cynthia A

1947 DA 242 01 Jazz II 1, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Pratt, Cynthia A

1948 DA 342 01 Jazz III 1, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Pratt, Cynthia A

61 Jordan College of Fine Arts

1951 DA 152 01 Butler Ballet – Freshman 1, UG

M 4:45-5:30 Attaway, Larry A

TR 3:45-6 Attaway, Larry A

S 8-5 Attaway, Larry A

1952 DA 252 01 Butler Ballet – Sophomore 1, UG

M 4:45-5:30 Jarvis, Michelle M

TR 3:45-6 Jarvis, Michelle M

S 8-5 Jarvis, Michelle M

1953 DA 352 01 Butler Ballet – Junior 2, UG

M 4:45-5:30 Attaway, Larry A

TR 3:45-6 Attaway, Larry A

S 8-5 Attaway, Larry A

1954 DA 452 01 Butler Ballet – Senior 2, UG

M 4:45-5:30 Attaway, Larry A

TR 3:45-6 Attaway, Larry A

S 8-5 Attaway, Larry A

1949 DA 248 01 Character Dance-Spanish 1, UG

TR 11-11:50 Jarvis, Michelle M

2108 DA 311 01 Performance Lab 1, UG

TBA Attaway, Larry A

1950 DA 344 01 Theatre Dance Forms 1, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Shepard, Kenneth D

Dance Academics and Theoretical Courses

1956 DA 162 01 Body Placement II 1, UG

TR 10-10:50 Owsley, Anna L

3390 DA 162 02 Body Placement II 1, UG

TBA Owsley, Anna L

1996 DA 166 01 Masterworks of Dance 2, UG

MWF 8-8:50 Wang, Tong

2069 DA 261 01 Laban Movement Analysis 2, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Pratt, Cynthia A

Open to Non-majors with consent of the department chair.

1957 DA 264 01 Music for Dance 1, UG

TR 11-11:50 Attaway, Larry A

1958 DA 362 01 Choreography II 1, UG

TR 11-11:50 McGuire, Susan

1908 DA 366 01W Dance History II 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Attaway, Larry A

1955 DA 454 50 Senior Production Project 2, UG

TBA Laurent-Faesi, Stephan

1959 DA 466 01 Theory and Philosophy of Dance 1, UG

T 8-8:50 Laurent-Faesi, Stephan

Lab

3405 DA 466 02 Theory and Philosophy of Dance 1, UG

R 8-8:50 Laurent-Faesi, Stephan

Lab

1960 DA 468 50 Applied Dance Costuming 3, UG

M 7-9:30 Staff

1961 DA 472 01 Tch Analysis Int/Adv Classical 2, UG

TR 10-10:50 Byram, Laura H

2072 DA 474 01 Teaching Analysis Modern Tech 2, UG

MF 9-9:50 McGuire, Susan

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


2073 DA 476 01 Teaching Analysis Jazz Tech 2, UG

TR 11-11:50 Pratt, Cynthia A

1962 DA 478 50 Dance Teaching Practicum 2, UG

TBA Attaway, Larry A

1963 DA 481 50 Independent Study 1, UG

TBA Attaway, Larry A

1964 DA 482 50 Independent Study 2, UG

TBA Attaway, Larry A

1965 DA 483 50 Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Attaway, Larry A

2160 DA 492 51 Special Seminar 2, UG

M 6-8:30 Simmons, Bill

Intro to Acting

1966 DA 499 50 Honors Thesis 3, UG

TBA Attaway, Larry A

Applied Music

Though not listed below, applied music in voice and many instruments

is available, space permitting. Consult the online schedule or

with JCFA for appropriate course numbers. An applied music fee of

$220 per credit hour will be charged for all private instruction. This

is in addition to tuition.

Courses for Non-Majors

2028 AM 126 01 Guitar Class II 1, UG

W 4-4:50 Terrell, Brett

2089 AM 128 02 Voice Class II 1, UG

MW 8-8:50 Rickards, Steven L

3375 AM 130 01 World Drumming Class 1, UG

MW 2-2:50 Crabiel, Jon A

2056 AM 131 02 Beginning Piano Class 1, UG

TR 5-5:50 Thickstun, Karen L

3376 AM 134 01 Jazz Keyboard Skills 1, UG

TR 4-4:50 Walters, Gary

Courses for Dance Majors

1967 AM 12 01 Keyboard Skills II 1, UG

TR 8-8:50 Smith, DJ Joseph

1968 AM 12 02 Keyboard Skills II 1, UG

TR 9-9:50 Smith, DJ Joseph

1969 AM 14 50 Keyboard Skills IV 1, UG

MW 6-6:50 Smith, DJ Joseph

Courses for Music Majors

1970 AM 22 01 Keyboard Skills II 1, UG

MW 10-10:50 Smith, DJ Joseph

1971 AM 22 03 Keyboard Skills II 1, UG

TR 2-2:50 Mobley, Jenny

1972 AM 22 04 Keyboard Skills II 1, UG

MW 9-9:50 Smith, DJ Joseph

1973 AM 22 05 Keyboard Skills II 1, UG

MW 4-4:50 Mobley, Jenny

2076 AM 22 06 Keyboard Skills II 1, UG

TR 11-11:50 Mobley, Jenny

1974 AM 24 01 Keyboard Skills IV 1, UG

MW 11-11:50 Miranda, Julianne M

1975 AM 24 03 Keyboard Skills IV 1, UG

TR 10-10:50 Smith, DJ Joseph

1976 AM 24 04 Keyboard Skills IV 1, UG

TR 12-12:50 Mobley, Jenny

2109 AM 151 01 Bassoon Reed Making I 1, UG

TBA Spaniol, Douglas E

2209 AM 193 01 Secondary Applied Jazz Studies 1, UG

TBA Pivec, Matthew J

1711 AM 222 01 Voice Major Lab 0, UG

M 2-2:50 Stark, Eric

MW 2-2:50 Stark, Eric

2210 AM 293 01 Applied Jazz Studies 2, UG

TBA Pivec, Matthew J

2049 AM 299 01 Upper Divisional Examination 0, UG

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

1891 AM 300 01 Recital 0, UG

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

2211 AM 393 01 Secondary Applied Jazz Studies 1, UG

TBA Pivec, Matthew J

2058 AM 400 01 Recital 0, UG

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

2090 AM 422 01 Voice Major Lab 0, UG

M 2-2:50 Stark, Eric

MW 2-2:50 Stark, Eric

2114 AM 450 01 Advanced Conducting 2, UG

TBA Leck, Henry H

2147 AM 450 03 Advanced Conducting 2, UG

TBA DeRusha, Stanley E

2115 AM 450 04 Advanced Conducting 2, UG

TBA Clark, Richard A

2215 AM 450 05 Advanced Conducting 2, UG

TBA Grechesky, Robert N

2212 AM 493 01 Applied Jazz Studies 2, UG

TBA Pivec, Matthew J

3379 AM 494 01 Jazz Recital 0, UG

TBA Pivec, Matthew J

2132 AM 497 01 Advanced Performance Study 2, UG

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

1859 AM 523 26 Jazz Piano Secondary 1, GR

TBA Walters, Gary

2213 AM 593 01 Secondary Applied Jazz Studies 1, GR

TBA Pivec, Matthew J

2164 AM 600 01 Advanced Conducting 2, GR

TBA Leck, Henry H

1977 AM 600 02 Advanced Conducting 2, GR

TBA DeRusha, Stanley E

1978 AM 600 03 Advanced Conducting 2, GR

TBA Stark, Eric

1979 AM 600 04 Advanced Conducting 2, GR

TBA Clark, Richard A

1980 AM 600 05 Advanced Conducting 2, GR

TBA Grechesky, Robert N

2092 AM 622 01 Voice Major Lab 0, GR

MW 2-2:50 Stark, Eric

2214 AM 693 01 Applied Jazz Studies 2, GR

TBA Pivec, Matthew J

1879 AM 709 01 Recital 0, GR

TBA Spaniol, Douglas E

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. Jordan College of Fine Arts 61


1981 AM 710 50 Conducting Recital 0, GR

TBA Spaniol, Douglas E

2077 AM 799 01 Final Comprehensive Exam 0, GR

TBA Spaniol, Douglas E

Ensemble

Freshman/Sophomore Registrations

3406 ES 100 01 Fundamentals of Chamber Music 1, UG

TBA Grubb, William

1982 ES 101 01 Chamber Music 1, UG

T 1-1:50 Grubb, William

2205 ES 101 02 Chamber Music 1, UG

TBA Brooks, Davis H

1985 ES 102 01 Chamber Music: Guitar 1, UG

TBA Terrell, Brett

1988 ES 103 01 Chamber Music: AJSQ 1, UG

TBA Brightman, Nicholas M

2061 ES 104 01 Jordan Jazz 1, UG

TR 4-5:30 Douce, Michael Andrew

1991 ES 105 01 Madrigal Singers 1, UG

TR 4-5:30 Staff

1481 ES 106 01 Chamber Music: Percussion Ens 1, UG

TR 11-12:30 Crabiel, Jon A

2178 ES 108 01 New Music Ensemble 1, UG

R 7:15-9:45 Schelle, Michael

2148 ES 116 01 University Symphonic Band 1, UG

TR 4:30-6:15 Bolin, Daniel P

1501 ES 117 01 University Choir 1, UG

MWF 12:30-01:50 Leck, Henry H

1513 ES 118 01 University Chorale 1, UG

MWF 12:30-01:50 Stark, Eric

1525 ES 120 01 University Wind Ensemble 1, UG

MW 2-3:30 Grechesky, Robert N

F 2-4 Grechesky, Robert N

1537 ES 121 50 University Basketball Band 1, UG

F 4:15-6:00 McCullough, David H

2133 ES 122 50 University Symphony 1, UG

MW 7-10 Clark, Richard A

1557 ES 124 01 Jazz Ensemble 1, UG

TR 2:30-4:15 Pivec, Matthew J

2062 ES 124 02 Jazz Ensemble 1, UG

MW 3:45-5 Pivec, Matthew J

2029 ES 127 01 Jazz Combo 1, UG

R 5:30-7 Pivec, Matthew J

Meets in Jazz Studio LH246.

2165 ES 127 02 Jazz Combo 1, UG

TBA Walters, Gary

2196 ES 127 03 Jazz Combo 1, UG

TBA Walters, Gary

2216 ES 127 04 Jazz Combo 1, UG

TBA Walters, Gary

Junior/Senior Registrations

1983 ES 301 01 Chamber Music 1, UG

T 1-1:50 Grubb, William

1986 ES 302 01 Chamber Music: Guitar 1, UG

TBA Terrell, Brett

1989 ES 303 01 Chamber Music: AJSQ 1, UG

TBA Brightman, Nicholas M

63 Jordan College of Fine Arts

2063 ES 304 01 Jordan Jazz 1, UG

TR 4-5:30 Douce, Michael Andrew

1992 ES 305 01 Madrigal Singers 1, UG

TR 4-5:30 Staff

1485 ES 306 01 Chamber Music: Percussion Ens 1, UG

TR 11-12:30 Crabiel, Jon A

2179 ES 308 01 New Music Ensemble 1, UG

R 7:15-9:45 Schelle, Michael

1493 ES 313 01 Accompanying 1, UG

T 1-1:50 Bringerud, Catherine W

Secondary Pianists

1497 ES 313 02 Accompanying 1, UG

F 9-9:50 Bringerud, Catherine W

Piano Majors

2149 ES 316 01 University Symphonic Band 1, UG

TR 4:30-6:15 Bolin, Daniel P

1505 ES 317 01 University Choir 1, UG

MWF 12:30-1:50 Leck, Henry H

1517 ES 318 01 University Chorale 1, UG

MWF 12:30-1:50 Stark, Eric

1529 ES 320 50 University Wind Ensemble 1, UG

MW 2-3:30 Grechesky, Robert N

F 2-4 Grechesky, Robert N

1541 ES 321 50 University Basketball Band 1, UG

F 4:15-6 McCullough, David H

1549 ES 322 50 University Symphony 1, UG

MW 7-10 Clark, Richard A

1561 ES 324 01 Jazz Ensemble 1, UG

TR 2:30-4:15 Pivec, Matthew J

2065 ES 324 02 Jazz Ensemble 1, UG

MW 3:45-5 Pivec, Matthew J

2030 ES 327 01 Jazz Combo 1, UG

R 5:30-7 Pivec, Matthew J

Meets in Jazz Studio LH246.

2166 ES 327 02 Jazz Combo 1, UG

TBA Walters, Gary

2197 ES 327 03 Jazz Combo 1, UG

TBA Walters, Gary

2217 ES 327 04 Jazz Combo 1, UG

TBA Walters, Gary

2126 ES 423 01 Two-Piano Ensemble 1, UG

TBA Boyd, Kate

2128 ES 423 02 Two-Piano Ensemble 1, UG

TBA Briscoe, Anna

Graduate Registraions

1984 ES 501 01 Chamber Music 1, GR

T 1-1:50 Grubb, William

1987 ES 502 01 Chamber Music: Guitar 1, GR

TBA Terrell, Brett

1990 ES 503 01 Chamber Music: AJSQ 1, GR

TBA Brightman, Nicholas M

2064 ES 504 01 Jordan Jazz 1, GR

TR 4-5:30 Douce, Michael Andrew

1477 ES 505 01 Madrigal Singers 1, GR

TR 4-5:30 Staff

1489 ES 506 01 Chamber Music: Percussion Ens 1, GR

TR 11-12:30 Crabiel, Jon A

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


2180 ES 508 01 New Music Ensemble 1, GR

R 7:15-9:45 Schelle, Michael

2150 ES 516 01 University Symphonic Band 1, GR

TR 4:30-6:15 Bolin, Daniel P

1509 ES 517 01 University Choir 1, GR

MWF 12:30-1:50 Leck, Henry H

1521 ES 518 01 University Chorale 1, GR

MWF 12:30-1:50 Stark, Eric

1533 ES 520 50 University Wind Ensemble 1, GR

MW 2-3:30 Grechesky, Robert N

F 2-4 Grechesky, Robert N

1545 ES 521 50 University Basketball Band 1, GR

F 4:15-6 McCullough, David H

1553 ES 522 50 University Symphony 1, GR

MW 7-10 Clark, Richard A

2127 ES 523 01 Two-Piano Ensemble 1, GR

TBA Boyd, Kate

2129 ES 523 02 Two-Piano Ensemble 1, GR

TBA Briscoe, Anna

1565 ES 524 01 Jazz Ensemble 1, GR

TR 2:30-4:15 Pivec, Matthew J

2066 ES 524 02 Jazz Ensemble 1, GR

MW 3:45-5 Pivec, Matthew J

2031 ES 527 01 Jazz Combo 1, GR

R 5:30-7 Pivec, Matthew J

Meets in Jazz Studio LH246.

2167 ES 527 02 Jazz Combo 1, GR

TBA Walters, Gary

2198 ES 527 03 Jazz Combo 1, GR

TBA Walters, Gary

2218 ES 527 04 Jazz Combo 1, GR

TBA Walters, Gary

1997 ES 530 01 Independent Study 1, GR

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

Music Education

Independent Studies are available; please contact the department for

course numbers and permission to register.

1999 ME 102 01 Foundations in Music Education 2, UG

TR 11-11:50 Dimmick, Penny G

2134 ME 160 01 Practicum in Music Education 1, UG

TBA Dimmick, Penny G

2135 ME 161 01 Practicum in Music Education 2, UG

TBA Dimmick, Penny G

2153 ME 191 02 Upper Strings Techniques 1, UG

TR 9-9:50 Nobles, Ronald

2199 ME 291 01 Brass Techniques I 1, UG

TR 9-9:50 Lewis, Gail D

2093 ME 299 01 Music Ed Upper Division Exam 0, UG

TBA Dimmick, Penny G

3407 ME 318 01 Piano Pedagogy – Technique 3, UG

W 2:25-4:55 Thickstun, Karen L

1585 ME 326 01 Gen Music Methods: Secondary 2, UG

TR 2:35-3:15 Dimmick, Penny G

1569 ME 345 01 Exploring Digital Arts: Music 2, UG

TR 9:35-10:25 Douce, Michael Andrew

1573 ME 345 50 Exploring Digital Arts: Music 2, UG

W 4:15-6:05 Douce, Michael Andrew

2136 ME 360 01 Practicum in Music Education 1, UG

TBA Dimmick, Penny G

2137 ME 361 01 Practicum in Music Education 2, UG

TBA Dimmick, Penny G

3408 ME 380 01 Special Seminar 1, UG

TR 2:25-3:15 West, Cheryl

Piano Skills for the Choral Director

3409 ME 391 01 Double Reed and Saxophone Tech 1, UG

R 12-12:50 Spaniol, Douglas E

1589 ME 400 01 Independent Study 1, UG

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

1593 ME 401 01 Independent Study 2, UG

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

1597 ME 402 01 Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

3410 ME 407 01 Instrumental Pedagogy and Reper 2, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Spaniol, Douglas E

3411 ME 412 01 Vocal Pedagogy 2, UG

MW 3-3:50 Ferrill, Kyle Wayne

2125 ME 416 01 Piano Teaching Internship 1, UG

W 1-1:50 Thickstun, Karen L

1601 ME 424 01 Comprehensive Instr Music Tech 2, UG

TR 11-11:50 Grechesky, Robert N

1994 ME 425 01 Admin of School Music Program 1, UG

T 12-12:50 Leck, Henry H

2138 ME 426 01 Comp Choral Music Tech 2, UG

TR 1-1:50 West, Cheryl

3412 ME 432 01 Kodaly and Orff in Classroom 2, UG

TR 9:35-10:25 Dimmick, Penny G

1605 ME 480 50 Music Teacher Educ Seminar 1, UG

M 5:30-8 Grechesky, Robert N

1609 ME 499 01 Honors Thesis 3, UG

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

1613 ME 530 01 Independent Study 1, GR

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

1617 ME 531 01 Independent Study 2, GR

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

1621 ME 532 01 Independent Study 3, GR

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

1577 ME 545 01 Exploring Digital Arts: Music 2, GR

TR 9:35-10:25 Douce, Michael Andrew

1581 ME 545 50 Exploring Digital Arts: Music 2, GR

W 4:15-6:05 Douce, Michael Andrew

2139 ME 560 01 Practicum in Music Education 1, GR

TBA Dimmick, Penny G

2140 ME 561 01 Practicum in Music Education 2, GR

TBA Dimmick, Penny G

1625 ME 759 01 Thesis 3, GR

TBA Spaniol, Douglas E

2078 ME 799 01 Final Comprehensive Exam 0, GR

TBA Spaniol, Douglas E

Music History

Independent Studies are available; please contact the department for

course numbers and permission to register.

1629 MH 110 01 Music – A Living Language 3, UG

MWF 8-8:50 DeRusha, Stanley E

Course open to Dance majors only; enrollment with permission

number required.

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. Jordan College of Fine Arts 63


3413 MH 305 01 Music History and Literature I 2, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Briscoe, James R

3414 MH 305 02 Music History and Literature I 2, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Briscoe, James R

1712 MH 308 01 World Music 2, UG

MW 10-10:50 Eyerly, Sarah

2183 MH 308 02 World Music 2, UG

MW 11-11:50 Eyerly, Sarah

1649 MH 400 01 Independent Study 1, UG

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

1653 MH 401 01 Independent Study 2, UG

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

2219 MH 401 02 Independent Study 2, UG

TBA Pivec, Matthew J

1657 MH 402 01 Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

3415 MH 406 01 Graduate Music History Review 3, UG

W 4:15-6:45 Eyerly, Sarah

2094 MH 410 01 Final Music History Paper 0, UG

TBA Briscoe, James R

1661 MH 499 50 Honors Thesis 3, UG

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

2095 MH 510 01 Seminar in Choral Literature 2, GR

R 2:25-4 Stark, Eric

1665 MH 530 50 Independent Study 1, GR

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

1666 MH 531 50 Independent Study 2, GR

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

1995 MH 532 50 Independent Study 3, GR

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

3417 MH 582 50 Special Seminar 3, GR

M 7-9:30 Briscoe, James R

French Music 1890–1918: Rise of Berlioz

1667 MH 729 50 Thesis 3, GR

TBA Spaniol, Douglas E

2079 MH 799 01 Final Comprehensive Exam 0, GR

TBA Spaniol, Douglas E

Modern Language Diction

3418 ML 206 01 English and German Diction 2, UG

TR 11-11:50 Kelton, Kathie

Music Lyric Theatre

2050 MLT 110 01 Lyric Theatre Workshop 1, UG

F 2:30-4:30 Scott, Mary Anne

TR 2-4 Schmid, John A

3419 MLT 201 01 Acting I – Foundations in Acting 2, UG

MW 4:30-5:30 Staff

2187 MLT 202 01 Acting II – Creating a Character 2, UG

MW 4:30-5:30 Staff

3420 MLT 301 01 Musical Theatre I 2, UG

MW 3-3:50 Staff

3421 MLT 302 01 Musical Theatre II 2, UG

MW 3-3:50 Staff

2051 MLT 310 01 Lyric Theatre Workshop 1, UG

F 2:30-4:30 Scott, Mary Anne

TR 2-4 Schmid, John A

65 Jordan College of Fine Arts

2052 MLT 510 01 Lyric Theatre Workshop 1, GR

F 2:30-4:30 Scott, Mary Anne

TR 2-4 Schmid, John A

Music Theory

Independent Studies are available; please contact the department for

course numbers and permission to register.

1668 MT 100 01 Elements of Music 3, UG

MWF 8-8:50 Sanborn, Timothy

1669 MT 102 02 Theory II 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Gillespie, Jeffrey L

1670 MT 102 03 Theory II 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Sanborn, Timothy

1671 MT 102 04 Theory II 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Sanborn, Timothy

2141 MT 106 01 Functional Piano Skills II 2, UG

TR 3:50-4:40 West, Cheryl

1672 MT 112 01 Aural Skills II 1, UG

MW 12-12:50 Sanborn, Timothy

1673 MT 112 02 Aural Skills II 1, UG

MW 11-11:50 Kunda, Keith

1674 MT 112 03 Aural Skills II 1, UG

TR 9-9:50 Gullickson, Andrea

1675 MT 112 04 Aural Skills II 1, UG

TR 10-10:50 Gullickson, Andrea

1998 MT 112 06 Aural Skills II 1, UG

TR 11-11:50 Gillespie, Jeffrey L

2096 MT 112 07 Aural Skills II 1, UG

TR 10-10:50 Murray, David P

1683 MT 202 01 Theory IV 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Kunda, Keith

1684 MT 202 02 Theory IV 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Jones, Rusty

2188 MT 202 03 Theory IV 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Jones, Rusty

3422 MT 212 01 Aural Skills IV 1, UG

MW 12-12:50 Kunda, Keith

2154 MT 212 02 Aural Skills IV 1, UG

TR 8-8:50 Kunda, Keith

1676 MT 212 03 Aural Skills IV 1, UG

TR 10-10:50 Gillespie, Jeffrey L

1677 MT 212 04 Aural Skills IV 1, UG

TR 11-11:50 Lewis, Gail D

2097 MT 219 50 Composition 3, UG

TBA Schelle, Michael

2098 MT 219 51 Composition 3, UG

TBA Felice, Frank

2130 MT 219 52 Composition 3, UG

TBA Mulholland, James Q

3423 MT 299 01 Upper Div Exam-Composition 0, UG

TBA Schelle, Michael

1678 MT 307 01 Choral Arranging 2, UG

M 2:25-4:05 Mulholland, James Q

1679 MT 308 50 Orchestration 3, UG

W 4:15-6:45 Felice, Frank

1680 MT 313 01 Form and Analysis 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Jones, Rusty

1681 MT 321 01 Instrumental Conducting 2, UG

MWF 10-10:50 DeRusha, Stanley E

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


1682 MT 322 01 Choral Conducting 2, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Leck, Henry H

3424 MT 335 01 Jazz Keyboard 2, UG

M 1-1:50 Walters, Gary

2161 MT 380 01 Special Seminar 1, UG

TBA Pivec, Matthew J

Applied Jazz Studies

1685 MT 400 01 Independent Study 1, UG

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

1686 MT 401 01 Independent Study 2, UG

TBA Pivec, Matthew J

1687 MT 402 01 Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

2099 MT 408 01 Composition Recital 0, UG

TBA Schelle, Michael

2101 MT 409 01 Final Composition Project 0, UG

TBA Schelle, Michael

2100 MT 410 01 Final Music Theory Paper 0, UG

TBA Gillespie, Jeffrey L

1688 MT 419 50 Composition 3, UG

TBA Schelle, Michael

1885 MT 419 51 Composition 3, UG

TBA Felice, Frank

2151 MT 419 52 Composition 3, UG

TBA Mulholland, James Q

3425 MT 421 01 Prof Topics in Music Comp 1, UG

M 4:15-6:45 Felice, Frank

2067 MT 441 50 Advanced Electronic Music 2, UG

T 4:15-6:05 Felice, Frank

1689 MT 499 50 Honors Thesis 3, UG

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

3426 MT 509 01 Analysis of Music Since 1900 3, GR

T 4:15-6:45 Gillespie, Jeffrey L

1690 MT 530 50 Independent Study 1, GR

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

1691 MT 531 50 Independent Study 2, GR

TBA Pivec, Matthew J

1692 MT 532 50 Independent Study 3, GR

TBA Bolin, Daniel P

2159 MT 580 01 Special Seminar 1, GR

TBA Pivec, Matthew J

Applied Jazz Studies

2204 MT 604 01 Advanced Keyboard Harmony I 2, GR

TBA Boyd, Kate

1693 MT 619 50 Advanced Composition 3, GR

TBA Felice, Frank

2112 MT 619 51 Advanced Composition 3, GR

TBA Schelle, Michael

2103 MT 620 01 Advanced Electronic Compositio 3, GR

TBA Felice, Frank

2085 MT 708 01 Composition Recital 0, GR

TBA Spaniol, Douglas E

2087 MT 709 50 Thesis: Composition 3, GR

TBA Spaniol, Douglas E

1694 MT 729 50 Thesis: Theory 3, GR

TBA Spaniol, Douglas E

2080 MT 799 01 Final Comprehensive Exam 0, GR

TBA Spaniol, Douglas E

Theatre

Courses open to Non-Majors

1695 TH 110 01 Introduction to Acting 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Koharchik, Constance

Courses for Theatre Majors

Independent Studies, Internships and Honors Theses are available;

please contact the department for course numbers and permission

to register.

1698 TH 100 01 Professional Theatre Practices 0, UG

TBA Thoreson, Glen V

2054 TH 100 02 Professional Theatre Practices 0, UG

TBA Thoreson, Glen V

1707 TH 105 01 Theatre as a Visual Art 3, UG

MWF 9:35-11:50 Meaden, Wendy J

1695 TH110 01 Introduction to Acting 3, UG

TR 12-1:45 Koharchik, Constance

2191 TH 112 01 Acting II 3, UG

MW 11-12:50 Artemiev, Elaina

1699 TH 112 02 Acting II 3, UG

MW 1-2:50 Artemiev, Elaina

1700 TH 114 01 The Idea of Theatre II 2, UG

TR 1-3:20 Fisher, William

3427 TH 202 01 Voice for the Actor I 2, UG

TR 12:30-02:15 Timmerman, Diane M

3595 TH 212 01 Stage Movement III 1, UG

F 1-2:50 Hoppe, Mary H

1701 TH 231 01 Stagecraft 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Thoreson, Glen V

3432 TH 232 01 Stage Lighting I 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Koharchik, Rob M

2024 TH 233 01 Costume Technologies I 3, UG

TR 11-12:50 Conte, Sarah Conyers

1702 TH 300 01 Professional Theatre Practice 0, UG

TBA Thoreson, Glen V

2053 TH 300 02 Professional Theatre Practice 0, UG

TBA Thoreson, Glen V

3428 TH 302 01 Voice for the Actor III 3, UG

MW 9-10:50 Timmerman, Diane M

3429 TH 314 01 Acting IV 3, UG

MW 3:50-6:05 Staff

3430 TH 314 02 Acting IV 3, UG

TR 2:25-4:40 Staff

3431 TH 330 01 Theatre Graphics 2, UG

MW 12-12:50 Thoreson, Glen V

2105 TH 331 01 Scenography 3, UG

TR 11-12:20 Koharchik, Rob M

1697 TH 333 01W Play Analysis 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Schaub, Owen

1703 TH 400 01 Independent Study 1, UG

TBA Fisher, William

1704 TH 401 01 Independent Study 2, UG

TBA Fisher, William

1705 TH 402 01 Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Fisher, William

2122 TH 403 01 Senior Project 1, UG

TBA Fisher, William

2123 TH 404 01 Senior Project 2, UG

TBA Fisher, William

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. Jordan College of Fine Arts 65


2124 TH 405 01 Senior Project 3, UG

TBA Fisher, William

3433 TH 420 01 Audition/Portfolio-Performance 2, UG

TR 11-12:15 Timmerman, Diane M

3434 TH 423 01 History of Theatre IV 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Schaub, Owen

67 Jordan College of Fine Arts

2192 TH 496 01 Internship in Theatre 3, UG

TBA Fisher, William

1708 TH 498 01 Internship in Theatre 6, UG

TBA Fisher, William

1706 TH 499 01 Honors Thesis 3, UG

TBA Fisher, William

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


College of Communication

Strategic Communication:

PR and Advertising

2291 JR 221 01 Principles of Advertising 3, UG

MWF 8-8:50 Rademacher, Mark A

2294 JR 223 01 Intro to Public Relations 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Holt, Lanier

2309 JR 223 02 Intro to Public Relations 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Holt, Lanier

2311 JR 321 01 Advertising Practices 3, UG

F 8-10:30 Gray, Donna

2275 JR 322 50 Advertising Copywriting 3, UG

M 7:15-9:45 Short, Jeffrey

2276 JR 324W 01W Case Problems Public Relations 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Campbell, Rose G

2277 JR 324W 02W Case Problems Public Relations 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Campbell, Rose G

2312 JR 327 01 Res Meth Pub Rel and Advertising 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Rademacher, Mark A

2313 JR 328 01W Public Relations Techniques 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Holt, Lanier

2279 JR 350 01 Media Internship 3, UG

TBA Kanis II, Edward B

2280 JR 351 50 Design and Production in PR-Adv 3, UG

W 5:30-8 Mineo, Christy

2318 JR 351 51 Design and Production in PR-Adv 3, UG

T 6:45-9:15 Mineo, Christy

2285 JR 424S 01 Public Communication Campaigns 3, UG

W 2:25-4:55 Campbell, Rose G

2308 JR 426 01 Topic Public Rel and Advertising 3, UG

T 2:25-4:55 Kanis II, Edward B

Bateman Case Study Competition

Students develop and implement a comprehensive public

relations campaign for the national Public Relations Student

Society of America’s annual Bateman Case Study competition.

Established in 1973, the Bateman challenges a team of

students to exercise the analytical skills and mature judgment

required for public relations problem solving. All elements of

the public relations process research, planning, execution and

evaluation are stressed. Outstanding entries as judged by a

leading panel of experts will be presented to client (United

States Census Bureau) and national Public Relations Society

of America representatives. Given the intense nature of the

competition, students must have completed JR324W,

JR327, JR328W and JR351. Permission of instructor required.

2322 JR 426 02 Topic Public Rel and Advertising 3, UG

R 5:30-8 Gray, Donna

Strategic Communication Practicum

This practicum course is designed to teach students how to

implement public communication campaigns in a real-world

setting. Activities may include writing, producing and/or

editing an organization’s collateral materials; improving the

Web site or creating new content for it; creating public

service announcements; engaging in event planning and

execution; and executing media relations activities for a non-

profit organization. This course is team-taught by professors

with expertise in design, writing, and campaign planning

and execution. Students who take this course will be able to

enhance their portfolios. Prereqs: JR221, JR223 or JR212

plus advanced courses in either public relations and advertising

or news editorial. Students who have completed JR321,

JR328 and/or JR351 are particularly encouraged to take this

course.

2286 JR 426 50 Topic Public Rel and Advertising 3, UG

M 5:30-8 Gray, Donna

NSAC

This course encompasses intensive investigation of the

special problems involved in developing campaignable

concepts. Using the AAF National Student Advertising

Competition to determine client, budget and campaign

objective, students will develop an advertising/marketing/

media strategy. Fully developed and designed campaign will

be ready to present to a panel of industry executives at the

AAF National Conference. Students should have completed

JR321, JR327, JR328 or JR351. Permission of instructor

required.

Communication Sciences and Disorders

2342 COM 139 50 American Sign Language II 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Carlstrand, Glenn

2344 COM 239 50 American Sign Language IV 3, UG

MW 5:15-6:30 Carlstrand, Glenn

2350 COM 331 01 Phonetics 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Gospel, Mary D

2377 COM 331 02 Phonetics 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Gospel, Mary D

2351 COM 332 01 Language Development 3, UG

MWF 10-10:50 Reading, Suzanne P

3445 COM 334 01 Speech Science 3, UG

TR 1-3:40 Richie, Carolyn Jane

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. College of Communication 67


2352 COM 336 50 Fundamentals of Audiology 3, UG

T 6-8:30 Austin, Shannon L

2353 COM 337 01 Clinical Procedures 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Stewart, Jill

2379 COM 356 01 Communication Research Methods 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Hoerl, Kristen

Richie, Carolyn Jane

2357 COM 360S 01 Communication Science 3, UG

TBA Stewart, Jill

3446 COM 363S 01 Comm Screening Practicum-SL 3, UG

F 8-3 Gospel, Mary D

2385 COM 399 01 Directed Research in Com Disor 3, UG

TBA Richie, Carolyn Jane

2360 COM 403 01 Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Reading, Suzanne P

2362 COM 404 01 Communication Internship 3, UG

TBA Reading, Suzanne P

2365 COM 436 01 Neurogenic Communication Disor 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Gospel, Mary D

3447 COM 437 01 Language Disorders in Children 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Reading, Suzanne P

2386 COM 481 04 Topics Communication Studies 3, UG

TBA Carlstrand, Glenn

Teaching Practicum in CSD

Students work with a professor on the development and

discussion of the classroom experience. Student teaching

responsibilities may include organization of material,

announcements, Scantroning, slide preparation, assisting

with small group instruction, and tutoring. By permission of

the instructor.

2388 COM 481 05 Topics Communication Studies 3, UG

TBA Gospel, Mary D

Teaching Practicum in CSD

Students work with a professor on the development and

discussion of the classroom experience. Student teaching

responsibilities may include organization of material,

announcements, Scantroning, slide preparation, assisting

with small group instruction, and tutoring. By permission of

the instructor.

2393 COM 481 06 Topics Communication Studies 3, UG

TBA Richie, Carolyn Jane

Teaching Practicum in CSD

Students work with a professor on the development and

discussion of the classroom experience. Student teaching

responsibilities may include organization of material,

announcements, Scantroning, slide preparation, assisting

with small group instruction, and tutoring. By permission of

the instructor.

2370 COM 499 01 Honors Thesis 3, UG

TBA Reading, Suzanne P

Creative Media and Entertainment

2409 MDA 104 01 Electronic News Writing 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Bridge, Scott E

2395 MDA 105 01 Introduction to Media Studies 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Bridge, Scott E

2439 MDA 106 01 Survey of Digital Media 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Odom, James W

69 College of Communication

2433 MDA 109 01 Survey of the Recording Indust 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Creech, Kenneth

2397 MDA 201 01 Audio Production 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Harris, Mark

2398 MDA 202 01 Multi-Camera Studio Production 3, UG

W 2:25-4:55 Creech, Kenneth

2421 MDA 202 01A Multi-Camera Studio Production 0, UG

T 3:25-4:55 Creech, Kenneth

Labs will meet in FB 042

2399 MDA 212 01 Writing for Electronic Media 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Bridge, Scott E

2400 MDA 215 50 Video Editing 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Odom, James W

2434 MDA 219 01 Design for World Wide Web 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Odom, James W

2429 MDA 220 01 Audio Lab: Independent Study 1, UG

TBA Harris, Mark

Remote Recording Lab

2419 MDA 252 01 Theory & Techniqs of Sound Rec 3, UG

T 2:25-4:55 Armstrong, Cutler

2420 MDA 252 02 Theory and Techniqs of Sound Rec 3, UG

R 2:25-4:55 Armstrong, Cutler

2413 MDA 302 01 Video Production II 3, UG

F 9-11:50 Taylor, Christine A

Will meet in FB 042.

2427 MDA 303 01 Advanced Reporting 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Bridge, Scott E

2426 MDA 304 50 Producing Television News 3, UG

R 7-9:45 Dawson, Shannon L

2431 MDA 310 50 Directing the Narrative 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Taylor,Christine A

2435 MDA 311 01 Genres in Cinema 3, UG

W 2:20-4:50 Savage, Ann M

The Queer Image

From a critical-cultural studies perspective, this course will

critically examine gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and

queer (GLBTQ) images in film. We will examine both

historical and contemporary examples while also recognizing

the cultural conditions and industry restrictions imposed on

queer life and images.

2410 MDA 320 01 Audio Lab: Multi-track Ind St 1, UG

TBA Armstrong, Cutler

2401 MDA 330 01 Production Laboratory 1, UG

TBA Taylor, Christine A

Production

2446 MDA 330 02 Production Laboratory 1, UG

TBA Bridge, Scott E

2445 MDA 330 07 Production Laboratory 1, UG

TBA Hurley, Patrick S

2402 MDA 333 01 Performance Lab 1, UG

TBA Taylor, Christine A

2416 MDA 333 02 Performance Lab 1, UG

TBA Bridge, Scott E

2411 MDA 352 01 Business Aspects of the Record 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Armstrong, Cutler

2403 MDA 400 01 Independent Study 1, UG

TBA Taylor, Christine A

2423 MDA 400 02 Independent Study 1, UG

TBA Armstrong, Cutler

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


2404 MDA 401 01 Independent Study 2, UG

TBA Taylor, Christine A

2424 MDA 401 02 Independent Study 2, UG

TBA Armstrong, Cutler

2405 MDA 402 01 Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Taylor, Christine A

2425 MDA 402 03 Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Armstrong, Cutler

2444 MDA 402 05 Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Hurley, Patrick S

2432 MDA 452 01 Entertainment Media and the Law 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Creech, Kenneth

2418 MDA 454 01 Sem Recording Industry 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Armstrong, Cutler

2406 MDA 455 01 In-Training 3, UG

TBA Taylor, Christine A

3448 MDA 455 02 In-Training 3, UG

TBA Hurley, Patrick S

2428 MDA 457 01 Digital Media Proj Des/Mgmt 3, UG

M 2:25-4:55 Odom, James W

2407 MDA 475 01 Internship in Media Arts 6, UG

TBA Kanis II, Edward B

2443 MDA 490 02 Seminar in Media Arts 3, UG

T 7:15-9:45 Griesemer, Steve

Music Finance in the Digital Age

Learn the rules of music finance before breaking them. This

class will analyze how traditional music finance concepts are

applied to digital reproduction, transmission and perfor-

mance. Special emphasis will be placed on comparing major

label recording and publishing deals with independent

digital music distribution and bundled recording, touring

and merchandising agreements. Students, like today’s music

executives, will be challenged to come up with creative “win-

win” business models that satisfy the needs of composers,

recording artists, copyright owners, distributors and various

industry stakeholders. A basic understanding of copyright

law and a calculator are required. Prerequisite: MDA352.

2408 MDA 499 01 Honors Thesis 3, UG

TBA Taylor, Christine A

Organizational Communication

and Leadership

3396 COM 101 01 Rhetoric and the American Demo 3, UG

MWF 8-8:50 Waite, David H

3397 COM 101 02 Rhetoric and the American Demo 3, UG

MWF 9-9:50 Waite, David H

3398 COM 101 03 Rhetoric and the American Demo 3, UG

TR 9:35-10:50 Swenson, Kristin

3399 COM 101 04 Rhetoric and the American Demo 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Crawford, Janis K

3400 COM 101 05 Rhetoric and the American Demo 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Sandin, Paul J

3401 COM 101 50 Rhetoric and the American Demo 3, UG

TR 6:30-8:10 Staff

2336 COM 102 04 Public Speaking 2, UG

MW 10-10:50 Kelly, Casey Ryan

3402 COM 301 01 Advanced Public Speaking 3, UG

MWF 11-11:50 Waite, David H

2345 COM 306 01 Intercollegiate Speech and Deb 1, UG

TBA Crawford, Janis K

3403 COM 312 50 Criticism of Film 3, UG

MW 5:15-7:15 Hoerl, Kristen

2347 COM 318 01 Wkshp in Presentational Comm 1, UG

T 8-8:50 Crawford, Janis K

2348 COM 318 02 Wkshp in Presentational Comm 1, UG

W 8-8:50 Crawford, Janis K

2349 COM 318 03 Wkshp in Presentational Comm 1, UG

R 8-8:50 Crawford, Janis K

2354 COM 350 01 Contemp Communication Theory 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:50 Neher, William W

2355 COM 351 50 Small Group Communication 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Crawford, Janis K

2378 COM 353 01 Interpersonal Communication 3, UG

W 4:15-6:45 Comstock, Jamie

2356 COM 354 01 Gender Communication 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Swenson, Kristin

2358 COM 401 01 Independent Study 1, UG

TBA Waite, David H

2359 COM 402 01 Independent Study 2, UG

TBA Waite, David H

2384 COM 404 04 Communication Internship 3, UG

TBA Waite, David H

3404 COM 412 01 Advocacy 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Hoerl, Kristen

2366 COM 481 01 Topics Communication Studies 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Sandin, Paul J

Transformational Leadership

Was the decision to invade Iraq a good leadership decision at

the time? If you were in charge back in August of 1945,

would you have decided to drop the atomic bomb on

Hiroshima? Who decided to bail out Wall Street in 2008

and how was that decision made and communicated? This

course picks up where the initial Leadership and Commun-

ication course ended. We will reacquaint ourselves with the

basic theories of leadership and apply them to specific

leadership situations where effective communication skills

are critical. Using decision – making, discernment, judgment,

and balance as our critical lenses we will examine some of

the great leadership decisions throughout history and analyze

the process from both theoretical and communication

perspectives. Students will then analyze a decision made by

a leader in an organization to which they belong using those

same lenses.

2383 COM 481 02 Topics Communication Studies 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Sandin, Paul

Professional Issues in Communication

This course is intended to introduce the upper level under-

graduate Communication Sciences and Disorders majors to

the specialized field of medical speech-language pathology.

The students will become familiar with the scope of practice,

terminology, documentation, and protocols for working in

medical settings. Several topics involving specific medical

conditions also will be explored, including oral/laryngeal

cancer, tracheotomy, persons who are ventilator-dependent,

and health care directives.

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. College of Communication 69


2367 COM 481 50 Topics Communication Studies 3, UG

W 5:15-7:45 Kelly, Casey Ryan

Rhetorical Theory

This course examines the debates about the role of rhetoric in

the formation of society and human identity. Specifically,

this course inquires into the meaning of “rhetoric” in all its

connotations, from the art of persuasion to the symbolic

process of meaning-making. From ancient Athenian society

to our contemporary mass-mediated culture, theorists have

debated the social, political, and ethical implication of various

rhetorical practices. As a Senior Capstone, this course asks

“big picture questions” in communication: What constitutes

communication, rhetoric, persuasion, speech? What role

does communication play in US social/political/cultural

order? Does the role of communication differ between

groups? 4) How does communication affect social change?

5) Does contemporary rhetorical theory have a class, race,

cultural, gender, sexuality bias? In sum, this course examines

debates over the “proper” role of rhetoric in society and how

rhetoric can be fashioned as a mode of human emancipation.

2371 COM 499 02 Honors Thesis 3, UG

TBA Waite, David H

Critical Media and Rhetoric

3403 COM 312 50 Criticism of Film 3, UG

MW 5:15-7:15 Hoerl, Kristen

2356 COM 354 01 Gender Communication 3, UG

TR 2:25-3:40 Swenson, Kristin

3404 COM 412 01 Advocacy 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Hoerl, Kristen

2383 COM 481 02 Topics Communication Studies 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Swenson, Kristin

Technologies of the Body

2367 COM 481 50 Topics Communication Studies 3, UG

W 5:15-7:45 Kelly, Casey Ryan

Retorical Theory

2435 MDA 311 01 Genres in Cinema 3, UG

W 2:20-4:50 Savage, Ann M

The Queer Image

From a critical-cultural studies perspective, this course will

critically examine gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and

queer (GLBTQ) images in film. We will examine both

historical and contemporary examples while also recognizing

the cultural conditions and industry restrictions imposed on

queer life and images.

2317 JR 417 01H International Communication 3, UG

R 2:25-4:55 Geertsema, Margaretha

Journalism and Electronic Media

2270 JR 112 01 Writing for Print Media 3, UG

TR 1-2:15 Staff

2271 JR 112 02 Writing for Print Media 3, UG

MW 2:25-3:40 Anokwa, Kwadwo

2293 JR 112 03 Writing for Print Media 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 McKown, Loni Smith

2310 JR 112 04 Writing for Print Media 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Anokwa, Kwadwo

2272 JR 212 01 Newswriting and Reporting 3, UG

M 2:25-4:55 McKown, Loni Smith

71 College of Communication

3392 JR 309 01 Feature Writing 3, UG

TR 3:50-5:05 Allan, Marc

2274 JR 311 01 News Editing 3, UG

MW 11-12:15 Lindgren, Jim E

2279 JR 350 01 Media Internship 3, UG

TBA Kanis II, Edward B

2323 JR 352 01 Post Media Internship 1, UG

TBA Kanis II, Edward B

2324 JR 353 01 Media Internship 6, UG

TBA Kanis II, Edward B

2325 JR 353 DC Media Internship 6, UG

TBA Kanis II, Edward B

2326 JR 356 01 Sports Promo Markt and Admin 3, UG

W 7:15-9:45 Walpole, Mark A

2327 JR 357 01 Web Design 3, UG

M 5:30-8 Fenton, Rick

2281 JR 401 01 Independent Study 1, UG

TBA Anokwa, Kwadwo

2295 JR 401 02 Independent Study 1, UG

TBA Rademacher, Mark A

2296 JR 401 03 Independent Study 1, UG

TBA Campbell, Rose G

2298 JR 401 05 Independent Study 1, UG

TBA Whitmore, Nancy J

2314 JR 401 06 Independent Study 1, UG

TBA Geertsema, Margaretha

2319 JR 401 07 Independent Study 1, UG

TBA Gray, Donna

2282 JR 402 01 Independent Study 2, UG

TBA Anokwa, Kwadwo

2299 JR 402 02 Independent Study 2, UG

TBA Rademacher, Mark A

2300 JR 402 03 Independent Study 2, UG

TBA Campbell, Rose G

2302 JR 402 05 Independent Study 2, UG

TBA Whitmore, Nancy J

2315 JR 402 06 Independent Study 2, UG

TBA Geertsema, Margaretha

2320 JR 402 07 Independent Study 2, UG

TBA Gray, Donna

2283 JR 403 01 Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Anokwa, Kwadwo

2303 JR 403 02 Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Rademacher, Mark A

2304 JR 403 03 Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Campbell, Rose G

2306 JR 403 05 Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Whitmore, Nancy J

2316 JR 403 06 Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Geertsema, Margaretha

2321 JR 403 07 Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Gray, Donna

2332 JR 403 08 Independent Study 3, UG

TBA Allan, Marc

3393 JR 412W 01 Reporting Public Affairs 3, UG

T 2:25-4:55 McKown, Loni Smith

3394 JR 414 01 Mass Communication Law 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Whitmore, Nancy J

Room assignments will be available online by November 1.


2284 JR 415 01H History and Lit of Journalism 3, UG

W 2:25-4:55 Whitmore, Nancy J

2317 JR 417 01H International Communication 3, UG

R 2:25-4:55 Geertsema, Margaretha

3391 JR 427 01 Special Topics in Journalism 3, UG

W 7:15-9:45 Nichols, Mark

Data-Based Investigation

This course introduces students to how journalists use

computer databases to produce investigative stories. Students

will learn the basics of computer-assisted reporting, using

software tools such as Microsoft Excel , Access, and SPSS.

The course will cover how to find database sources, how to

ask good questions and use the data to find answers, how to

set up an investigation and how to write the story. The final

project will be a publishable investigative story. Prereq:

JR212.

2287 JR 499 01 Honors Thesis 3, UG

TBA Anokwa, Kwadwo

2307 JR 499 05 Honors Thesis 3, UG

TBA Whitmore, Nancy J

2328 JR 499 06 Honors Thesis 3, UG

TBA Geertsema, Margaretha

2329 JR 499 07 Honors Thesis 3, UG

TBA Gray, Donna

2409 MDA 104 01 Electronic News Writing 3, UG

TR 11-12:15 Bridge, Scott E

2398 MDA 202 01 Multi-Camera Studio Production 3, UG

W 2:25-4:55 Creech, Kenneth

2421 MDA 202 01A Multi-Camera Studio Production 0, UG

T 3:25-4:55 Creech, Kenneth

Labs will meet in FB 042

2427 MDA 303 01 Advanced Reporting 3, UG

MW 1-2:15 Bridge, Scott E

2426 MDA 304 50 Producing Television News 3, UG

R 7-9:45 Dawson, Shannon L

3395 SW 230-JR 01 New Media and Public Comm 3, UG

MW 3:50-5:05 Geertsema, Margaretha

Room assignments will be available online by November 1. College of Communication 71

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