ELA READING GRADE 5 CURRICULUM 2012 _Draft as of 3-1-13

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ELA READING GRADE 5 CURRICULUM 2012 _Draft as of 3-1-13

ELA CURRICULUM GRADE 5

COMMON CORE ALIGNMENT

READING WORKSHOP GUIDE

MR. JOHN HOGAN

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS

MRS. ANN PELUSO

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT

MRS. KATHLEEN O’FARRELL

DIRECTOR OF ENGLISH

MR. ANTHONY S. CALI

PRINCIPAL, CORNWELL AVENUE SCHOOL

MRS. THERESA GANLEY

PRINCIPAL, GEORGE WASHINGTON SCHOOL

MRS. MICHELLE NOTTI

PRINCIPAL, CHESTNUT STREET SCHOOL

CURRICULUM WRITERS

GRADE 5

MS. JENNIFER CORRADO – CA

MRS. DESIREE KARROLL - CA

JULY 2012


PROJECT DESCRIPTION

The K-5 ELA Curriculum/Common Core Alignment: Reading and Writing Guide is

intended to help educators teach from the specific body of knowledge that students in

grades K-5 must acquire in order to become highly effective users of oral and written

language. The Common Core Learning Standards in English Language Arts form the

basis for the development of the instructional units. Each unit is designed to target all

components of the Common Core Standards presented through a reading and writing

workshop instructional strategy.

Readers’ workshop and Writers’ workshop are phrases that describe a particular

structure that maximizes students’ learning. This structure does not require prepackaged

curricula or specialized materials. Instead, the workshop model relies on teachers’ deep

understanding of the skills and strategies that reading, writing, listening and speaking

demand. It acknowledges that skillful reading and writing are developed through

experience, practice by explicit teaching of the habits and techniques of accomplished

readers and writers, and by giving students sufficient time to practice with authentic texts

at increasingly higher levels of text complexity.

Teachers have carefully developed instructional plans, in keeping with the identified

units of study and instructional modules, which address the strengths and needs of their

particular students, not based on the sequence of one-size-fits-all lessons in a textbook. In

order to implement these plans effectively, teachers and students need access to lots of

books in various genres matched to their interests, reading levels, and instructional goals.

They also need time to confer and have opportunities for sustained reading/writing in

many different genres. The content of specific reading and writing mini-lessons and titles

may change each day, but teachers can always use the workshop structure to organize

their planning, no matter what strategies or books they use.


Reading Workshop Format

Mini-Lesson (5-10 minutes) Lesson topics are determined by the needs of the class as well as

the curriculum. Lessons are brief, whole group, and often involve both teacher and student

modeling. Topics vary, but typically address the following: procedures, literary craft, reading

and comprehension strategies, response, and conventions. Atwell (1998) and Serafini (2005)

offer a number of practical model mini-lessons that are easily adaptable.

Status of the Class (2-5 minutes at the beginning of silent reading) As the children select

new books or retrieve ones they are still reading from their book boxes, the teacher asks each

student what they will be reading. He records the title and page number on a chart. This

provides an excellent opportunity for a brief conference with every child about their reading

and the books they have chosen. It also provides a reliable assessment tool by which the

teacher can monitor self-selection and provide guidance when necessary.

Silent Reading (minimum of 30 minutes) Once the children have selected their books and

conferred with the teacher, they are expected to read silently and independently. While many

primary age children vocalize while reading and may need the support of reading orally with a

partner, silent independent reading remains the goal. When children finish reading a book,

they record it in their reading logs, return it to the classroom library, and select another book

to read.

Conferences & Book Clubs (during silent reading) Silent reading provides the teacher with

guaranteed time to meet with individuals and small groups for assessment, guidance,

remediation, and enrichment. During a conference, the teacher meets with individual

children to talk about their reading and offer brief individual instruction in an informal

conversation that may last from 8-10 minutes. Conferences focus on the individual needs of

every child, so no two conferences are alike, although the conversation always surrounds books

the child has recently been reading. Occasionally, the teacher groups 4 or 5 children according

to their instructional needs and forms a book club. The teacher is then able to address these

needs with a common text following a lesson structure that involves preparation for reading,

independent reading, and response. Most often, book clubs meet over the course of two or more

days. As children become more sophisticated readers, the book club format becomes

increasingly independent.

Response (10-15 minutes) The children are invited to respond to their reading in both oral

and written ways. Every day the children meet with a friend for book talks, brief conversations

that share reactions and responses to reading. About once a week, the children write more

formal responses in journals or traditional book reviews. The children write independently and

freely, although the teacher occasionally provides a prompt to guide the response. They are

also encouraged to discover interesting new words and record them in a special vocabulary

notebook. Connections between reading and writing are encouraged. Written responses are

always shared with peers and the teacher in order to maintain purpose and audience.

Read Aloud (20 minutes) The teacher reads orally and invites active listening and

participation from the children. Longer, more diverse, and more complicated texts are selected

to provide a rich experience of literature. This provides an excellent opportunity for additional

modeling of reading and response strategies. It also offers closure for the reading workshop

within the community.


What is a Balanced Literacy Program?

Teacher Directed Reading

Reading Aloud

Shared Reading

Guided Reading

Book Clubs

Literature Circles

Class Literature Study

Content Area Text Study

Vocabulary Development

Word Work

Independent Reading

Sustained Silent Reading

Oral & Written Response

Strategy Mini-Lessons

(such as procedures, literary craft,

reading/comprehension strategies,

response, and conventions)

Conferences

Goal Setting

Assessment

Teacher Directed Writing

Modeled Writing

Prompted Writing

Lessons on Writing Formats

Informational Writing

Spelling

Handwriting

Word Processing

Conventions and Grammar

Independent Writing

Writing Workshop

Mini-Lessons on Strategies

Mentored Writing

Research

Revision

Editing

Conventions

Publication/Sharing


A Program Framework

45 Minutes every day INDEPENDENT READING

SSR+R (Sustained Silent Reading & Response

60 Minutes three times/week DIRECTED READING INSTRUCTION

Includes structured lessons using formats such as:

Guided Reading/Book Clubs/Literature Circles

Shared Reading with common texts

Reading Aloud/Shared Reading Aloud

Whole Class Literature Study

Social Studies & Science Text Reading Instruction

Vocabulary Development

Word Work

60 Minutes three times/week WRITING INSTRUCTION

Includes structured lessons, independent practice,

self-selected writing, & prompted writing practice

using formats such as:

Writing Workshop

Guided Writing/Modeled Writing

Mini-Lessons

Prompts & written response

Word Work

Grammar & Conventions

Handwriting & Word Processing

Another Program Framework

90 Minutes every day READING WORKSHOP

Mini-Lesson

Status of the Class

Independent Reading

Book Clubs

Response

Reading Aloud

60 Minutes three times/week WRITING WORKSHOP

Mini-Lesson

Status of the Class

Independent Writing

Conferencing

Author’s Circle

30 Minutes three times/week WORD STUDY

Word Work

Vocabulary enhancing strategies

Spelling

Conventions

Handwriting & Word Processing


Developing A Schedule

EVERY DAY, NO MATTER WHAT

‣ Teacher reads aloud to the class

‣ Teacher observes and notes student achievement

‣ Children read books of their choice independently

‣ Children respond to books orally

‣ Children write for authentic purposes

‣ Children practice problem solving & comprehension strategies

THREE TIMES A WEEK

‣ Children write on topics of their choice & develop pieces of writing

‣ Some children participate in small groups for reading & writing instruction

‣ Children participate in shared reading & writing experiences

‣ Children work with words & conventions of the English language

‣ Teachers provide direct instruction in strategies for reading, writing & thinking

‣ Children participated in content area theme lessons, experiences & thinking.

ONCE A WEEK

‣ Teachers confer with individual children about reading & writing

‣ Children create a written response to reading

‣ Children share piece of writing with others

‣ Children participate in formative spelling assessment

‣ Children explain thinking in math journals

A DAILY SCHEDULE

8:30 – 9:00 Gathering Time/Morning Work

9:00 – 9:20 Morning Meeting

9:20 – 10:20 Writing Workshop (3 times/week) Unified Arts

10:20 – 10:30 Snack Break

10:30 – 11:30 Content Area Studies/Class Literature Study (3 times/week) Unified Arts

11:30 – 12:30 Recess and Lunch Hour

12:30 – 2:00 Reading Workshop

2:00 – 3:05 Math Workshop

3:05 – 3:15 Afternoon Meeting/Dismissal


Balanced Literacy In The Classroom

Balanced literacy is the vehicle that we use in AISD to

deliver the Language Arts TEKS. The balance in

balanced literacy refers to reading and writing done

“to,” “with,” and “by” children.

This balance speaks to the amount of teacher

control and student independence. Some

components of balanced literacy require a higher level

of teacher demonstration while

other components require more student time and

ownership.

Guided

Reading

and Writing

Independent

Reading

and

Writing

Demonstration

Word Study

Response

Teacher

Read and

Write Aloud

Shared

Reading and

Writing

(Interactive

Writing)

Time and Ownership

Literature Circles

Least

Amount of Independence

Most


Read Aloud

• an able reader (usually the teacher or

parent) reads out loud

• students do not see the printed text but

may see the illustrations

• choose text 2-3 grade levels above the

reading level of the listeners

• model fluent reading, advanced sentence

structure, and vocabulary

• introduce new forms such as poetry and

the classics

• develop “story sense”

• limit time; make read-aloud a teaching

event


Read Aloud

Before

Introduction

Why choose this book?

Tie book to experience

Clarify potentially difficult concepts

During

Use expressive voice

Show illustrations

Share personal experiences

Predict, question

Accept and value comments from children

Answer all questions

Talk about author’s ideas and viewpoint

After

Continue discussing predictions

Share life experiences

Make connections

Make books available to children

Allow children to respond through activities that grow

out of their interests


Write Aloud

• an able writer (usually the teacher or

parent) writing on an overhead,

blackboard, or chart paper talking out

loud about the process of writing

• model decision making on choice of topic

to write about

• model writing process and decision

making, capital letters, punctuation, and

spacing

• introduce new conventions of print and

new forms of writing

• model editing techniques and art of

conveying a message

• limit time; this is a direct teach event


Shared Writing

• teachers holds the pen and writes on a

surface large enough for all children to

see

• teacher models writing process and

decision making about conventions used

• children contribute to and experience the

composition process

• writing is a negotiated process with

topics, meanings, and choices of words

jointly decided by students and teacher

• develops understandings of concepts

about print

• allows children to examine print details

closely

• shared writing material becomes reading

materials that are relevant and interesting

to children (poems, charts, wall stories,

daily news)


Interactive Writing

• students and teacher compose, write and

revise text together by sharing the pen

assists students in learning how to record

oral language

• demonstrates concepts about print, lettersound

relationships, and syllabication

• demonstrates use of high-frequency

words, word families, endings, and slow

articulation of words

• demonstrates rereading of text to help

maintain meaning

• students reread finished text in centers or

independent reading


Shared Reading

• teacher reads text, inviting students to

join in the reading

• teacher models strategies in context

• text must be visible to students: big

books, charts, poster, overheads, basal

• develops concepts about print and

language

• text presents supports and challenges

• models repeated readings


Word Study

• daily, direct and explicit letter and word

work

• presented in context or isolation

• fun, manipulative

• supports good spelling and proofreading

• provides opportunity to practice high

frequency words

• uses word families, onsets and rimes,

patterns

• word walls and word wall activities


Guided Reading

• students read a text at their instructional

level (supports and challenges) in a small

group

• teacher provides an introduction and

support as needed

• teacher does not read the text

• each student has a copy of the text

• strategies are practiced in context

• discussion supports comprehension

• provides opportunity for the teacher to

assess and diagnose

• beginning readers use quiet voices to read

aloud at their own rate

• this is not choral reading or round-robin

reading


Guided Writing

• teacher provides topic or purpose for

writing

• student(s) compose written text

• teacher provides guidance and support as

needed

• writing strategies practiced in the process

of writing for a purpose

• provides opportunity to assess and

diagnose individually or in groups

• editing conferences and response groups

provide support for expanding ideas, and

conveying meaning to an audience


Critical Attributes

of

Literature Circles

• group of children discussing a book set

• read the book independently or with their

peers

• heterogeneously grouped

• focuses on student interest

• comprehension strategies addressed

• reaction, reflection, response


Critical Attributes of Independent

Reading and Writing

• students choose and read books at their

independent reading level for a

sustained period of time each day

• students select purposes and topics for

writing

• students practice strategies demonstrated

in shared and guided reading and writing

• students build self-esteem and

competency as readers and writers

• students share their work by reading to

others, conferences, retellings, or

publishing


Critical Attributes of

Learning Centers

• to build upon what children already know

and are able to do

• to provide enjoyable, successful

experiences in learning to read and write

• to interact in meaningful, purposeful ways

with literacy

• to encourage interactions with language

and print at each child’s individual level

• to connect with literacy in a nonfragmented

way

• to create and display literacy for a printrich

environment

• to extend the student’s natural language

• to foster thoughtful processes about

learning to read and write

• to meet the needs of students with

different learning styles


• to encourage students’ organizational

skills and responsibility for learning

materials

• to teach students how to work

cooperatively or collaboratively with

others

• to assist students in learning through the

context of social relationships

• to facilitate flexible small group and

guided reading instruction


Critical Attributes of

Management of Learning Centers

• Center materials should be well organized

and clearly labeled

• Special consideration should be given to

the flow of traffic from one center to

another

• Materials in each center should be

available and easy to access

• Display space in centers should be

available for placing students’ completed

work especially for large art-type projects

• Storage space should be provided for

ongoing and completed student work

• Learning centers should have ongoing

routines that are taught to the children

• Centers should be introduced one at a

time to the students with time to practice

using the center


• Learning center materials may be

changed according to student interest or a

specific learning goal

• Each center should have an adequate but

not overabundant supply of materials

• Quiet and noisier activities should be

separated from noisier activities


West Hempstead Union Free School District

Grade Level Scope and Sequence

LITERARY FORMS/GENRE

LITERARY Focus Grade Level— K 1 2 3 4 5 6

FORMS/GENRE Unit of Study

Nursery Rhymes Kindergarten D M

Poetry ALL D D D D D D D

Fairy Tales Kindergarten & First D D M

Picture Books ALL D D D D D D D

Plays/Reader’s Theater Third Grade E D D D D M M

Fables Fourth Grade E D D M M M M

Biography/Autobiography Third Grade E E E D M M M

Folktales Third Grade E E E D M M

Mystery Third Grade E D M M M

Realistic Fiction Fourth & Fifth Grades E D D M

Historical Fiction Fourth & Fifth Grades E D D M

Legends/Tall Tales E E E E D M M

Fantasy E E E E E E

Mythology Sixth Grade E E D

Non-narrative/non-fiction ALL D D D D D D D

How To Books Kindergarten & First D D M M M M D

All About Books Second & Third D D D M M M

Interviews Second & Fifth E E D M M D M

Literary Essay Fourth, Sixth E D D D D

Persuasive Essay Third through Sixth E D D D D

Memoir/Personal

ALL D D D D D D D

Narrative/Small Moments

Informational Articles Fourth & Fifth E E E E D D M

Diaries/Journals Fifth E E E E E D M

Photo Essay E E E E E E E

Friendly/Business Letters Fifth & Sixth E D D D D D

E Exposure (without formal instruction)

D Direct Instruction (with formal lessons)

M Maintenance (application/reteach when necessary)

Draft 7/08


GRADE 4 ACADEMIC VOCABULARY

Grade 4 Mathematics Social Studies English Language Arts Science

1 Equation Latitude/Longitude Simile Hypothesis

2 Associative Property Natural/Renewable Metaphor

Variable

Resources

3 Expression Population Describe Reproduce

4 Y/X Axis Region Supporting Details Pollination

5 Estimation Artifact Summarize Fertilization

6 Number Sentence Archaeologist Generalizations Classify

7 Similar Prehistory Persuade Photosynthesis

8 Congruent Hunter/Gatherer Theme Produce

9 Equivalent Heritage Analyze Consumer

10 Perimeter/Area Landform Genre Ecosystem

11 Multiple/Factor/Product Culture Narrative Adaptation

12 Customary Units Tax Conclusion Endangered

13 Array Government Organize Extinct

14 Polygons Colony Author’s Purpose Migration

15 Obtuse/Acute/Right Revolution Fable/Myth Hibernation

Angles

16 Solid Figures Representative Predict Matter

17 Elapsed Time Settlement Main idea Mass

18 Line Segments Immigrant Expressive Language Volume

19 Parallel Famine Context Clues Graduated

Cylinder

20 Operation Freedom Compare/Contrast Balance

21 Digits Diversity Disadvantages/Advantages Unit

22 Value Exploration Sequential Energy

23 Scale Ancestry Opinion/Fact Force

24 Numerator Governor Fiction/Non-Fiction Friction

25 Denominator Merchant Synonym/Antonym Work

26 Metric Units Patriotism Difference/Similar Conductor

27 Perpendicular Council Grammar/Punctuation Insulator

28 Communicative

Canal Infer/Inference Circuit

Property

29 Figure Confederacy Character Traits Property

30 Decimal Glacier Story Elements

Magnetism

• Setting

• Plot

• Character

• Event


West Hempstead Union Free School District

Mechanics, Punctuation, and Grammar

Scope and Sequence

MECHANICS K 1 2 3 4 5 6

Abbreviations

acronyms E E E E

address abbreviations D D M M M

common abbreviations D D M M M

Initialisms (CD, DVD, TV) E E E E

Capitalization

abbreviations E E D D M M M

days, months, holidays E D D D M M M

first words (of sentences) D D D D M M M

geographic names E D D D M M M

historical events E D D D

names of people D D D M M M M

official names (business, official products) E D D M M

organizations E D M M

particular sections of the country E D D M M

proper nouns D D D M M M

proper adjectives D D

races, languages, nationalities, religions D D D D

school subjects E E D D

titles E E D D M M M

titles used as names E D D D M M M

words used as names E D M M M

Plurals

Adding an s E E D M M M M

compound nouns E E D M

irregular spelling E D D D D D

nouns ending in ch, sh, s, x, and z E D D M M M

nouns ending in f or fe E D D M M M

nouns ending in –ful E E D M M

nouns ending in o E D D M M

nouns ending in y E D D M M M

plurals that do not change (deer, moose, buffalo) E E E D D D

*Exposure may precede direct instruction at any grade level at the

discretion of the teacher.

1

E = Exposure

7-08

D = Direct Instruction M = Maintenance (continue

to reinforce as needed)


West Hempstead Union Free School District

Mechanics, Punctuation, and Grammar

Scope and Sequence

PUNCTUATION K 1 2 3 4 5 6

Apostrophes

in contractions D D D M M M

in place of omitted letters or numbers D M M

to express time or amount D M M

to form plural possessives E E D D D D

to form possessives with indefinite pronouns E D D

to form singular possessives E D D M M M

to form some plurals D M M

to show shared possession D M M

Colons

after salutations (business letter) E D D

as a formal introduction (of a quote) E D M

between numbers in time E E D D M M M

to introduce lists E D M M M

Commas

between items in a series E D D D M M

in compound sentences E D D M M

in dates and addresses E E D D D M M

in direct address D D D M M

in letter writing E E D D M M M

to keep numbers clear E E E D M M M

to separate equal adjectives E D D D M

to separate introductory clauses and phrases E E D D M

to set off appositives (his teacher, Ms. Chin,…) D M

to set off dialogue E D D D M M

to set off explanatory phrases E D D M

to set off interjections E D D M

to set off interruptions E D D M

to set off nonrestrictive phrases and clauses

D

to set off titles or initials

D

Dashes

for emphasis E D M

to indicate interrupted speech E D M

to indicate a sudden break E D M

Ellipses

to show omitted words E E E

to show pauses E E E D D M M

*Exposure may precede direct instruction at any grade level at the

discretion of the teacher.

2

E = Exposure

7-08

D = Direct Instruction M = Maintenance (continue

to reinforce as needed)


West Hempstead Union Free School District

Mechanics, Punctuation, and Grammar

Scope and Sequence

PUNCTUATION K 1 2 3 4 5 6

Exclamation Points

to express strong feelings E D D D M M M

Hyphens

in compound words D M M

to create new words D M M

to divide words D D M M

to form adjectives E D D

to join letters to words (e-mail, u-turn) D M M

Italics and Underlining

in titles E E D D D M M

Parenthesis

to add information E E E D D M M

Periods

in abbreviations E E D D M M M

after initials E E D D M M M

as decimal points D D D D

at end of sentences D D D D M M M

Question Marks

at end of direct questions E D D M M M M

at end of indirect questions

D

tag questions (…., isn’t it? …., aren’t you?) D D M

to show doubt D M M

Quotation Marks

for quotations within quotations E E

for special words E D D M

placement of punctuation E D D M

to punctuate titles D D M M

to set off long quoted material E E D

to set off quoted material E E

to set off a speaker’s exact words E E D D D M M

Semicolons

to join two independent clauses E E E

to separate groups that contain commas E M M

with conjunctive adverbs

E

*Exposure may precede direct instruction at any grade level at the

discretion of the teacher.

3

E = Exposure

7-08

D = Direct Instruction M = Maintenance (continue

to reinforce as needed)


West Hempstead Union Free School District

Mechanics, Punctuation, and Grammar

Scope and Sequence

GRAMMAR K 1 2 3 4 5 6

Parts of Speech

noun E D D D D D

verb E D D D D D

pronoun E E D D D D

pronoun with clear antecedent D D

adjective E D D D D D

preposition D D

Understanding Sentences

introductory phrases D D

prepositional phrases D D

Transition words D D D D

Compound sentences D D D D

Tense agreement E D D D

Subject/verb agreement D D D D

Interjections D D

Homonyms E D D D D

Synonyms E D D D D

Antonyms E D D D D

*Exposure may precede direct instruction at any grade level at the

discretion of the teacher.

4

E = Exposure

7-08

D = Direct Instruction M = Maintenance (continue

to reinforce as needed)


WEST HEMPSTEAD UFSD

Curriculum Map (2012-2013)

Content Area: Grade 5 ELA READING

Grade September October November December January February March April May June

K

1

2

3

4

5

Launching

Reader’s Workshop

Following

Characters

Into Meaning

Nonfiction

Reading

Nonfiction

Research Projects

Historical Fiction Book

Clubs

Interpretation text

Sets

Test Preparation

Informational

Reading

Author

Study


WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT

Instructional Module

Unit 1 – Module 1 of 1

Content Area: E.L.A. Reader’s Workshop

Unit of Study: Building a Reading Life

Number of Lessons in Module: 20: September Grade Level: 5

Module: Launching Reader’s Workshop

Content Understandings: Establish partnerships, self selection of books, building stamina, making texts matter

Essential Question(s):

How do readers choose books?

How do readers make good book choices?

How do readers think and talk about their reading?

How do readers distinguish between fiction and nonfiction texts?

How do readers record their reading?

How do readers respond to literature?

How do readers keep reading lists?

How do readers check for understanding as they read?

How does a reader recommend a book they have read?

How do readers determine meanings of unknown words?

NYS Common Core

Standards to be Met

RL.5.4. Determine the

meaning of words and phrases

as they are used in a text,

including figurative language

such as metaphors and similes.

Concept Understandings

and Academic Vocabulary

Establishing routines

and expectations

Establishing that

readers choose books in

different ways (easy,

just-right, challenging.)

Instructional Suggestions



Teach students how to

maintain organized

classroom book

collections.

Establish routines for

silent independent

Suggested Assessments/

Evidence

Running Records

Formative

Assessments:

Buzzing

Book Talks

Letter Writing

1


RL.5.9. Compare and contrast

stories in the same genre (e.g.,

mysteries and adventure

stories) on their approaches to

similar themes and topics.

RF.5.3. Know and apply gradelevel

phonics and word analysis

skills in decoding words.

a. Use combined knowledge of

all letter-sound

correspondences, syllabication

patterns, and morphology (e.g.,

roots and affixes) to read

accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic

words in context and

out of context.

RF.5.4. Read with sufficient

accuracy and fluency to support

comprehension.

a. Read grade‐level text with

purpose and understanding.

b.Read grade‐level prose and

poetry orally with accuracy,

appropriate rate, and expression.

c. Use context to confirm or

self‐correct word recognition

and understanding, rereading as

necessary.










Readers are always

thinking about what

they understand and

about how they feel

about what they

understood.

There are two types of

books; fiction and

nonfiction.

Readers talk or ‘buzz’

about their reading.

There are many

different kinds of

fiction.

Readers keep lists of

book they have read to

evaluate their reading.

Readers will share their

thinking about reading.

Quick notes and jots

can help readers

remember their

thinking.

Readers notice when

text does not make

sense to them.

Readers have a variety

of ways to solve

unknown words.









reading time.

Model how to think

carefully about book

choice and to use

several different kinds

of information to help

choose books.

Readers know the

criteria to judge

whether a book is

appropriate for

independent reading.

Model ways for readers

to be aware of their

thinking and remember

it in order to share with

other readers.

Teach students how to

listen to each other and

share effectively as

partners.

Show students the

difference between

fiction and nonfiction

as a foundation for

learning about genre.

Explain that each genre

has specific

characteristics and help

students learn to

categorize types of

fiction and nonfiction.

Students learn a

process to help them

remember their

thinking so it can help

them write about it.

Students learn to

Book Recommendations

Read-Aloud

Note taking and discussion

*Teacher should have an

on-going read-aloud in

which ‘good reading’ is

consistently modeled.

2


ecord their reading

interests.

Model how good

readers monitor their

reading and

comprehension. (Think

aloud)

Implement a variety of

ways to help readers

solve unknown words.

Suggested Module Resources: Organized, leveled classroom library, visible charts, Reader’s Notebooks, on-going read-alouds

Professional Resources:

Guiding Readers and Writers Grades 3-6 by Irene Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell

A Curriculuar Plan For The Reading Workshop Grade 4 by Lucy Calkins

3


WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT

Instructional Module

Unit 2 – Module 2 of 3

Content Area: Reader’s Workshop

Unit of Study: Unit 2 Following Characters into Meaning-October (Level 3 Reading Benchmark: S/T)

Number of Lessons in Module: approximately 10 Grade Level: 5

Module: #2 Theme [From inference toward Interpretation]

Content Understandings:

Students will begin to synthesize their thinking and push themselves to develop big ideas about their characters.

Students will begin to support their thinking with moments and inferences they made earlier on.

Students will begin to organize their thoughts by sorting their post-it notes into piles of ideas that seem to go together.

Students will begin to understand that readers begin to grow ideas into theories.

Essential Question(s):

How do I organize my post-it notes or jottings?

What sort of thinking do I tend to do as I read?

What are the various ways in which characters and people are stuck or trapped (literally and figuratively)?

How are the connections between characters affecting their growth and change?

How are characters voicing or not voicing the truths about themselves?

NYS Common Core

Standards to be Met

RF.5.3. Know and apply grade-level

phonics and word analysis skills in

decoding words.

a. Use combined knowledge of all lettersound

correspondences, syllabication

patterns, and morphology (e.g.,

roots and affixes) to read accurately

unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context

and out of context.

RF.5.4. Read with sufficient accuracy

and fluency to support comprehension.

a. Read grade‐level text with purpose and

Concept Understandings

and Academic Vocabulary

*Synthesizing insights into Ideas

about books.

*Finding a common theme

throughout the story.

*Readers use theories as lenses.

*Readers enlarge ideas by

Instructional Suggestions

*Spotlight one child whose book

is chock-full of thoughtful postit

notes and prepare to celebrate

that work with the class.

*Prepare a chart Titled:

Ways to Get Our Partners to Say

More (page 100) Following

Characters Into Meaning,

Suggested Assessments/

Evidence

*Check the student’s notebooks

and books. They should be filled

with post-it notes and jottings

about their independent books.

*Circulate, coaching to support

children as they reach to develop

big ideas.

1


understanding.

c. Use context to confirm or self‐correct

word recognition and understanding,

rereading as necessary.

SL.5.1. Engage effectively in a range of

collaborative discussions (one‐on‐one, in

groups, and teacher‐led) with diverse

partners on grade 5 topics and texts,

building on others’ ideas and expressing

their own clearly.

a. Come to discussions prepared, having

read or studied required material; explicitly

draw on that preparation and other

information known about the topic to

explore ideas under discussion.

b. Form and use the perfect (e.g., I had

walked; I have walked; I will have walked)

verb tenses.

c. Use verb tense to convey various times,

sequences, states, and conditions.

SL.5.4. Report on a topic or text or

present an opinion, sequencing ideas

logically and using appropriate facts and

relevant, descriptive details to support main

ideas or themes; speak clearly at an

understandable pace.

d. Recognize and correct inappropriate

shifts in verb tense.*

RL.5.4. Determine the meaning of words

and phrases as they

are used in a text, including figurative

language such as metaphors and similes.

RL.5.9. Compare and contrast stories in

the same genre (e.g.,mysteries and

adventure stories) on their approaches to

similar themes and topics.

taking into account more parts

(and people) in the text.

*Seeing texts through the prism

of theories. We need to be open

and flexible about the world

around you.

*Helping readers grow ideas.

*Readers share thinking about

books to grow ideas.




Theme

Theory

Categorize

Volume 2

*You may want to select 4 postits

and rewrite the child’s post-it

notes on larger paper for the

entire class to see. Demonstrate

how two post-it notes are related

and can be categorized.

*You may want to model with

the post-it notes from your read

aloud. Use big pieces of

construction paper to illustrate

the related theories.

*Set partners up to reread and

categorize a few post-its you

will have collected from the

class’s work with the read aloud,

asking them to develop a new

idea from the intersection of the

ideas they placed into one

category.

*Ask children to bring their

current independent book and

their jottings to the meeting

area. The partners should try to

come up with big ideas using the

post-it notes and supportive

examples.

*Continue to monitor their

independent logs.

*Work with small groups to

illustrate and model their

progress.

*Readers share thinking about

their books to grow ideas.

Suggested Module Resources:

Books with Strong Themes (May be used during small-group instruction or read alouds)

Andreae, Giles. Giraffes Can’t Dance, New York: Orchard, 2001.

2


Baylor, Byrd. The Table Where the Rich People Sit, New York: Atheneum, 1994.

Bunting, Eve. Fly Away Home, New York: Clarion, 1989.

Cutler, Jane. The Cello of Mr. O, New York: Dutton, 1999.

Dyer, Sarah. Five Little Fiends, New York: Dutton, 2001.

De Paola, Tomie. Nana Upstairs & Nana Downstairs. New York: Putnam, 1997.

Elliott, Laura Malone. Hunter’s Best Friend at School, New York: HarperCollins, 2002.

Hoffman, Mary. Amazing Grace, Glenview, IL: Foresman, 1991.

Lester, Helen. HooWay for Wodney Wat, Boston: Houghton, 1999.

Polacco, Patricia. Pink and Say, New York: Philomel, 1994.

Professional Resources:

Calkins, Lucy. Units of Study for Teaching Reading, Grades 3-5. Following Characters into Meaning. Volume 2

Calkins, Lucy and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project. A Curricular Plan for The Reading Workshop, Grade 5.

Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2011

3


WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT

Instructional Module

Unit 2 – Module 3 of 3

Content Area: Reader’s Workshop

Unit of Study: Unit 2 Following Characters into Meaning- October (Reading Benchmarks S/T)

Number of Lessons in Module: approximately 5 Grade Level: 5

Module: # 3 Reading across Books and Characters: seeing Similarities and Differences and Growing Bigger Theories

Content Understandings:

Students will use the knowledge they obtained in previous books to compare and contrast characters, settings, or themes across several

stories.

Essential Question(s):

Can I group together books that have similar characters, events or themes?

How are two characters from different texts similar?

How are two characters from different texts different?

How do these characters struggle with a particular issue or long for something?

How do these characters handle this struggle/longing?

How do these characters go about resolving the situation?

What can we learn from each character?

What character traits do they have that may have influenced their responses?

What lessons have you learned from the characters you examined?

NYS Common Core

Standards to be Met

RL.5.1. Quote accurately from a text when

explaining what the text says explicitly and

when drawing inferences from the text.

RL.5.3. Compare and contrast two or more

characters, settings, or events in a story or

drama, drawing on specific details in the

text (e.g., how characters interact).

RL.5.5. Explain how a series of chapters,

scenes, or stanzas fits

Concept Understandings

and Academic Vocabulary

*The children have become

“character experts.” They have

previously thought about a

character’s motivations, traits,

words, longings, and actions.

They have also reflected on their

Instructional Suggestions

*To set up your readers to do

this work, it is probably be the

easiest if students focus on

books they’ve read recently

(either through independent

reading, during read aloud or

Suggested Assessments/

Evidence

*Children need to select books

that share similar characters

(and like settings, events, and

themes).

*The child’s Reader’s Notebook

will be an assessment tool to see

1


together to provide the overall structure of

a particular story, drama, or poem.

RL.5.9. Compare and contrast stories in the

same genre (e.g.,mysteries and adventure

stories) on their approaches to similar

themes and topics.

W.5.1. Write opinion pieces on topics or

texts, supporting a point of view with

reasons and information.

a. Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an

opinion, and create an organizational

structure in which ideas are logically

grouped to support the writer’s purpose.

b. Provide logically ordered reasons that

are supported by facts and details.

c. Link opinion and reasons using words,

phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently,

specifically).

d. Provide a concluding statement or

section related to the opinion presented.

W.5.9. Draw evidence from literary or

informational texts to support analysis,

reflection, and research.

a. Apply grade 5 Reading standards to

literature (e.g.,

“Compare and contrast two or more

characters, settings, or events in a story or a

drama, drawing on specific details in the

text [e.g., how characters interact]”).

W.5.10. Write routinely over extended time

frames (time for research, reflection, and

revision) and shorter time frames (a

single sitting or a day or two) for a range of

discipline‐specific tasks, purposes, and

audiences.

SL.5.4. Report on a topic or text or present

an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and

using appropriate facts and relevant,

descriptive details to support main ideas or

themes; speak clearly at an understandable

pace.

patterns of behavior, when the

character struggled, changed and

grew. Now, it’s time to use all

the knowledge to think across

characters.

*Readers compare characters

who face similar issues or

struggles.
















Analyze

Evidence

Setting

Mood

Events

Character traits

Theme

Plot

Compare

Contrast

Resolution

Theme

Supporting details

Topic

Villain

*Readers don’t just compare

characters with each other. They

compare a character with

themselves. When we look at

the struggles and dreams that

our characters have, we think of

ways in which we are similar to

these characters.

*There are particular characters

that a reader begins to identify

with and learn life-lessons from.

small group instruction).

*Books that share like

characters (and like settings,

events, and themes) are good

choices to steer children toward.

*It may be helpful to group like

books together at first, steering

children to think across those

texts. Eventually, you’ll want to

remove that scaffolding because

the hope is that children will be

able to do this on their own.

*To develop character

connections, the conversations

with partners will help grow

their understanding.

Example prompts:

What does your character really

want?

What is your character’s biggest

struggle?

Why do you think that?

Is there something in the text

that makes you think that?

I think our/these two characters

might be similar because…

I think our/these two characters

might be different because…

Have you found the same thing

with the character in your story?

*Children gather their theme

post-it notes and begin to find

similarities and differences

whether or not they are gaining

understanding.

*To bring this unit to a close is

by asking children to reflect on

themselves. This could be done

by answering questions or a one

to one conference

Who am I as a reader?

What kind of thinking work do I

tend to do?

What can I learn about myself

by comparing and contrasting

my thinking to that of my

partner?

*You might encourage self

reflections through a selfportrait.

*You may want to give blank

bookmarks. Ask them to think

about the books they’ve read

and describe in which ways they

see themselves in the characters

they encountered.

*Study your conferring notes,

students’ reading logs, and

students’ work.

*You may want to the children

to write an essay about how the

two characters compare or

contrast. Use a rubric to guide

their responses and grading.

*Child reads aloud their essay.

2


among characters.

Suggested Module Resources:

Use previous books from your read aloud, the childrens’ independent books or small group mentor texts. They are listed in Module 1 and

2.

Professional Resources:

Calkins, Lucy. Units of Study for Teaching Reading, Grades 3-5. Following Characters into Meaning. Volume 2.Heinemann

Calkins, Lucy and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project. A Curricular Plan for The Reading Workshop, Grade 5.

Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2011

3


WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT

Instructional Module

Unit 2 – Module 3 of 3

Content Area: Reader’s Workshop

Unit of Study: Unit 2 Following Characters into Meaning- October (Reading Benchmarks S/T)

Number of Lessons in Module: approximately 5 Grade Level: 5

Module: # 3 Reading across Books and Characters: seeing Similarities and Differences and Growing Bigger Theories

Content Understandings:

Students will use the knowledge they obtained in previous books to compare and contrast characters, settings, or themes across several

stories.

Essential Question(s):

Can I group together books that have similar characters, events or themes?

How are two characters from different texts similar?

How are two characters from different texts different?

How do these characters struggle with a particular issue or long for something?

How do these characters handle this struggle/longing?

How do these characters go about resolving the situation?

What can we learn from each character?

What character traits do they have that may have influenced their responses?

What lessons have you learned from the characters you examined?

NYS Common Core

Standards to be Met

RL.5.1. Quote accurately from a text when

explaining what the text says explicitly and

when drawing inferences from the text.

RL.5.3. Compare and contrast two or more

characters, settings, or events in a story or

drama, drawing on specific details in the

text (e.g., how characters interact).

RL.5.5. Explain how a series of chapters,

scenes, or stanzas fits

Concept Understandings

and Academic Vocabulary

*The children have become

“character experts.” They have

previously thought about a

character’s motivations, traits,

words, longings, and actions.

They have also reflected on their

Instructional Suggestions

*To set up your readers to do

this work, it is probably be the

easiest if students focus on

books they’ve read recently

(either through independent

reading, during read aloud or

Suggested Assessments/

Evidence

*Children need to select books

that share similar characters

(and like settings, events, and

themes).

*The child’s Reader’s Notebook

will be an assessment tool to see

1


together to provide the overall structure of

a particular story, drama, or poem.

RL.5.9. Compare and contrast stories in the

same genre (e.g.,mysteries and adventure

stories) on their approaches to similar

themes and topics.

W.5.1. Write opinion pieces on topics or

texts, supporting a point of view with

reasons and information.

a. Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an

opinion, and create an organizational

structure in which ideas are logically

grouped to support the writer’s purpose.

b. Provide logically ordered reasons that

are supported by facts and details.

c. Link opinion and reasons using words,

phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently,

specifically).

d. Provide a concluding statement or

section related to the opinion presented.

W.5.9. Draw evidence from literary or

informational texts to support analysis,

reflection, and research.

a. Apply grade 5 Reading standards to

literature (e.g.,

“Compare and contrast two or more

characters, settings, or events in a story or a

drama, drawing on specific details in the

text [e.g., how characters interact]”).

W.5.10. Write routinely over extended time

frames (time for research, reflection, and

revision) and shorter time frames (a

single sitting or a day or two) for a range of

discipline‐specific tasks, purposes, and

audiences.

SL.5.4. Report on a topic or text or present

an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and

using appropriate facts and relevant,

descriptive details to support main ideas or

themes; speak clearly at an understandable

pace.

patterns of behavior, when the

character struggled, changed and

grew. Now, it’s time to use all

the knowledge to think across

characters.

*Readers compare characters

who face similar issues or

struggles.
















Analyze

Evidence

Setting

Mood

Events

Character traits

Theme

Plot

Compare

Contrast

Resolution

Theme

Supporting details

Topic

Villain

*Readers don’t just compare

characters with each other. They

compare a character with

themselves. When we look at

the struggles and dreams that

our characters have, we think of

ways in which we are similar to

these characters.

*There are particular characters

that a reader begins to identify

with and learn life-lessons from.

small group instruction).

*Books that share like

characters (and like settings,

events, and themes) are good

choices to steer children toward.

*It may be helpful to group like

books together at first, steering

children to think across those

texts. Eventually, you’ll want to

remove that scaffolding because

the hope is that children will be

able to do this on their own.

*To develop character

connections, the conversations

with partners will help grow

their understanding.

Example prompts:

What does your character really

want?

What is your character’s biggest

struggle?

Why do you think that?

Is there something in the text

that makes you think that?

I think our/these two characters

might be similar because…

I think our/these two characters

might be different because…

Have you found the same thing

with the character in your story?

*Children gather their theme

post-it notes and begin to find

similarities and differences

whether or not they are gaining

understanding.

*To bring this unit to a close is

by asking children to reflect on

themselves. This could be done

by answering questions or a one

to one conference

Who am I as a reader?

What kind of thinking work do I

tend to do?

What can I learn about myself

by comparing and contrasting

my thinking to that of my

partner?

*You might encourage self

reflections through a selfportrait.

*You may want to give blank

bookmarks. Ask them to think

about the books they’ve read

and describe in which ways they

see themselves in the characters

they encountered.

*Study your conferring notes,

students’ reading logs, and

students’ work.

*You may want to the children

to write an essay about how the

two characters compare or

contrast. Use a rubric to guide

their responses and grading.

*Child reads aloud their essay.

2


among characters.

Suggested Module Resources:

Use previous books from your read aloud, the childrens’ independent books or small group mentor texts. They are listed in Module 1 and

2.

Professional Resources:

Calkins, Lucy. Units of Study for Teaching Reading, Grades 3-5. Following Characters into Meaning. Volume 2.Heinemann

Calkins, Lucy and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project. A Curricular Plan for The Reading Workshop, Grade 5.

Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2011

3


WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT

Instructional Module

Unit 3 – Module 1 of 2

Content Area: Reader’s Workshop

Unit of Study: Unit 3 Nonfiction Reading November (Reading Benchmark: T)

Number of Lessons in Module: approximately 10 Grade Level: 5

Module: #1 Determining Importance and Synthesizing in Expository Nonfiction

Content Understandings:

Students will use headings, subheadings, font differences, and other visual cues to get a “lay of the land,” anticipating how the text might

go and what the text might be trying to teach.

Students will pay attention to expository text features such as the table of contents, diagrams, charts; graphic organizers, photos, and

captions help develop sense for text content.

Students will activate prior knowledge, predict and learn content-specific vocabulary.

Students will form a hypothesis about a nonfiction text.

Students will determine the main idea of a paragraph or passage.

Students will be able to locate supporting details.

Essential Question(s):

How do I choose appropriate books?

What are some text-previewing strategies?

What do I already know about the topic?

How is this text organized?

What are the different parts of the text?

How do I find the main idea?

What are the supporting details?

How do I organize my findings?

How do I synthesize the information in order to teach it to someone else?

NYS Common Core

Concept Understandings Instructional Suggestions Suggested Assessments/

Standards to be Met and Academic Vocabulary

Evidence

RI.5.1. Quote accurately from a *There are some text- *Create a collage that illustrates *Monitor the children’s reading

1


text when explaining what the

text says explicitly and when

drawing inferences from the

text.

RI.5.2. Determine two or more

main ideas of a text and explain

how they are supported by key

details; summarize the text.

RI.5.3. Explain the relationships

or interactions between two or

more individuals, events, ideas,

or concepts in a historical,

scientific, or technical text based

on specific information in the

text.

RI.5.4. Determine the meaning

of general academic and domain

specific words and phrases in a

text relevant to a grade 5 topic

or subject area .

RI.5.9. Integrate information

from several texts on the same

topic in order to write or speak

about the subject

knowledgeably.

RF.5.3. Know and apply gradelevel

phonics and word analysis

skills in decoding words.

a. Use combined knowledge of

all letter-sound correspondences,

syllabication patterns, and

morphology (e.g., roots and

affixes) to read accurately

previewing strategies that help

readers develop a sense for text

content.

*Activate prior knowledge.

*Students are learning to learn

information from texts and not

“browsing” through books.

*Previewing texts helps a reader

to confirm, revise or add to

one’s initial expectations.

*Reading means to be

“engaged” in a text.

*Look for structure within a

nonfiction text.

*Students should look at the

boxes and bullets in the text.

*Most expository texts have a

central idea (theme) followed by

supporting evidence.

*Encourage students to read

broadly, learning as much as

they can on any single topic

before moving to a new one.

*Students will read several

books on the same subject and

should have regular

opportunities to synthesize their

learning by teaching someone

else.

the word “nonfiction.” Invite

students to read maps,

newspapers, brochures, blogs,

photographs, photographs,

websites, or magazines.

*At the beginning of the unit,

you may want to locate the

expository texts that have a

fairly clear infrastructure of

headings and subheadings. The

social studies and science

textbooks are good examples so

you can model or create sametext

partnerships.

*Your teaching might model

that paying attention to

expository text features such as

the table of contents, diagrams,

charts; graphic organizers,

photos, and captions helps the

reader to predict the content.

* Students need to “rev up” the

mind before reading by reading

the title, the subtitle and think.

(See Navigating Nonfiction,

Volume 1, page 9)

What is the text made to do, and

how do its parts go together to

do it?

*Make a chart titled, “Readers

of Nonfiction Texts Get Ready

to Read By:” (See Navigating

Nonfiction, Volume 1, page 15)

logs

*Monitor they are reading the

appropriate number of books.

(See Unit 2 Module 1 for

appropriate amount of book )

*Children should be reading

anywhere from one to four

informational texts per week and

continue reading literature to

keep up their stamina and skill

level.

*Reading informational texts in

social studies and science can

help maintain the required

readings.

*Assessment: Navigating

Nonfiction, Volume 1, pages 23-

29)

*Use a rubric to assess students

understanding when they are

presenting their findings. This

could be done as an oral

presentation.

2


unfamiliar multisyllabic words

in context and out of context.

RF.5.4. Read with sufficient

accuracy and fluency to support

comprehension.

a. Read grade‐level text with

purpose and understanding.

b. Read grade‐level prose and

poetry orally with accuracy,

appropriate rate, and expression.

c. Use context to confirm or

self‐correct word recognition

and understanding, rereading as

necessary.

SL.5.1. Engage effectively in a

range of collaborative

discussions (one‐on‐one, in

groups, and teacher‐led) with

diverse partners on grade 5

topics and texts, building on

others’ ideas and expressing

their own clearly.

a. Come to discussions prepared

having read or studied required

material; explicitly draw on that

preparation and other

information known about the

topic to explore ideas under

discussion.

b. Form and use the perfect

(e.g., I had walked; I have

walked; I will have walked) verb

tenses.

c. Use verb tense to convey

various times, sequences, states,

and conditions.

d. Recognize and correct

*Students will be begin to

formulate “domain language”

when they are exposed to the

same topic on a regular basis.

*Point out details in the pictures

or diagrams that highlight what

the author is saying.

*Link previous learning to the

new information by flipping

back and forth to pictures and

make connections.

*

*Students will use decoding

strategies to tackle unfamiliar

words.





Hypothesis

Central Idea (Theme)

Topic Sentence

Domain language

*Model with the book Bugwise

to study the text features and

pierce together a hypothesis

about the overall content.

How does this all fit together?

*The main goal is to point out

the main idea and supporting

details. This crucial to

understanding the

interconnectedness of ideas

within a text.

Ask, What is the one thing that

this text is teaching, and how do

all the other details connect with

this?

*Model reading to children the

important points of the text.

Teach children to use their

“bold” voice when they read

something important. Then,

have children practice with their

partners.

*Teach children how to ‘chunk”

a text. Alert students to the

boxes (main idea) and the

bullets (details).

*Have children work in

partnerships and provide them

ways in which they will teach

the major concepts to others.

Partners will talk by rehearsing

how they will explain important

information.

3


inappropriate shifts in verb

tense.

SL.5.2. Summarize a written

text read aloud or information

presented in diverse media and

formats, including visually,

quantitatively, and orally.

SL.5.4. Report on a topic or text

or present an opinion,

sequencing ideas logically and

using appropriate facts and

relevant, descriptive details to

support main ideas or themes;

speak clearly at an

understandable pace.

Ex. Point out the details in the

pictures or diagrams that

highlight the information.

Link pictures to other pictures

and build off information

learned.

Add gestures and use their

voices to emphasize what’s

important.

Act out what they learned and

invite a partner to join in.

*Prompt students to have

conversational thoughts.

But, I wonder….

I used to think……

But, now I am realizing……

*Help readers tackle challenging

words, “domain language.” Use

decoding strategies such as

finding synonyms, break apart

the words into root, prefix,

and/or suffix, finding meaning

in context, or using the glossary.

Suggested Module Resources:

Suggested read alouds Bugwise and Frogs and Toads

4


*Star Pictures (Books for Young Learners) Darling, Juliann 9781572741485 K Fountas and Pinnell

The Post Office Book Gibbons, Gail 9780064460293 L Scholastic

*Dinosaurs! Gibbons, Gail 9780823421978 M Fountas and Pinnell

*From Seed to Plant Gibbons, Gail 9780823410255 M Fountas and Pinnell

*How a House Is Built Gibbons, Gail 9780823412327 M Fountas and Pinnell

Animal Babies Squire, Ann O. 9780516221885 M Scholastic

Ice Hockey Ditchfield, Christin 9780516269597 M Scholastic

Sugar Landau, Elaine 9780516267722 M Scholastic

*Penguins! Gibbons, Gail 9780823415168 N Fountas and Pinnell

*Will We Miss Them? Endangered Species Wright, Alexandra 9780881064889 N Fountas and Pinnell

Amphibians Stewart, Melissa 9780516259505 N Scholastic

Independence Day Sanders, Nancy I. 9780516277783 N Scholastic Special Olympics Kennedy, Mike 9780516223384 N Scholastic

The Atlantic Ocean Petersen, Christine 9780516273129 N Scholastic

*Whales Simon, Seymour 9780060877118 O Fountas and Pinnell

*What Makes a Bird a Bird? Garelick, May 9781572550087 O Fountas and Pinnell

Ant Cities Dorros, Arthur 9780064450799 O Scholastic

Giant Pandas Gibbons, Gail 9780823418282 O Scholastic

Planet Earth, Inside Out Gibbons, Gail 9780688158491 O Scholastic

Uranus Vogt, Gregory L. 9780736888936 O Scholastic

*The Dolphin: Prince of the Waves (Animal Close-ups) Lebloas-Julienne, Renee 9781570916274 P Fountas and Pinnell

*The Moon Book Gibbons, Gail 9780823413645 P Fountas and Pinnell

Bicycle Book Gibbons, Gail 9780823414086 P Scholastic

Gorillas Simon, Seymour 9780060891015 P Scholastic

If You Lived in Williamsburg in Colonial Days Brenner, Barbara 9780590929226 P Scholastic

If You Lived When There Was Slavery in America Kamma, Anne 9780439567060 P Scholastic

Kenya Fontes, Justine and Ron 9780516268132 P Scholastic

Shark Attack! Dubowski, Cathy East 9780756656072 P Scholastic

The Moon Simon, Seymour 9780689835636 P Scholastic

*All About Manatees Arnosky, Jim 9780439903615 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*All About Sharks Arnosky, Jim 9780545026000 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*All About Turtles Arnosky, Jim 9780590697811 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*If You Lived 100 Years Ago McGovern, Ann 9780590960014 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*If You Lived at the Time of Martin Luther King Levine, Ellen 9780590425827 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*If You Lived at the Time of the American Revolution Moore, Kay 9780590674447 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*If You Lived at the Time of the Civil War Moore, Kay 9780590454223 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*If You Lived With the Cherokee Kamma, Anne 9780590956062 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*If You Lived With the Hopi Kamma, Anne 9780590397261 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*If You Lived With the Iroquois Levine, Ellen 9780590674454 Q Fountas and Pinnell

5


*If You Lived With the Sioux Indians Kamma, Anne 9780590451628 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*If Your Name Was Changed at Ellis Island Levine, Ellen 9780590438292 Q Fountas and Pinnell

Big Cats Simon, Seymour 9780064461191 Q Scholastic

If You Lived at the Time of the Great

San Francisco Earthquake Levine, Ellen 9780590451574 Q Fountas and Pinnell

If You Lived When Women Won Their Rights Kamma, Anne 9780439748698 Q Scholastic

*The Great Migration Lawrence, Jacob 9780064434287 R Fountas and Pinnell

Jupiter Vogt, Gregory L. 9780736888868 R Scholastic

Mars Kipp, Steven L. 9780736888875 R Scholastic

Rodents: From Mice to Muskrats Miller, Sara Swan 9780531114889 R Scholastic

Earth Kipp, Steven L. 9780736888851 S Scholastic

Mercury Kipp, Steven L. 9780736888882 S Scholastic

*Earthquakes Simon, Seymour 9780060877156 T Fountas and Pinnell

*Lightning Simon, Seymour 9780060884352 T Fountas and Pinnell

*Muscles: Our Muscular System Simon, Seymour 9780688177201 T Fountas and Pinnell

*Sharks Simon, Seymour 9780060877132 T Fountas and Pinnell

Can We Save Them? Dobson, David 9780881068221 X Scholastic

Sun Vogt, Gregory L. 9780736888929 640 Lexile.com

Community Helpers from A to Z Kalman, Bobbie 9780865054042 730 Scholastic

Wolves Simon, Seymour 9780061626579 970 Lexile.com

Tornado Alert Scavuzzo, Wendy 9780778716037 1120 Lexile.com

Early Leaders in Colonial New York Adams, Colleen 9780823984060 Unleveled

Jump into Science: Honeybees Heiligman, Deborah 9781426301575 Unleveled

Pacific Salmon Cooper, Jason 9781589526051 Unleveled

Rain Saunders-Smith, Gail 9780736849173 Unleveled

Sea Lights (Books for Young Learners) Rice, Hugh 9781572741454 Unleveled

Trilobites (Books for Young Learners) Schaefer, Lola 9781572742598 Unleveled

African Elephant (Supersized!) Hall, Kirsten 9781597163873 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Amazing Dinosaur Facts (I Love Reading:

Dino World) Bennett, Leonie 9781597165464 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Blue Whale (SuperSized!) Smith, Molly 9781597163859 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Brown Bear (More SuperSized!) Goldish, Meish 9781936087259 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Capybara (More SuperSized!) Lunis, Natalie 9781936087297 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Chinese Giant Salamander (SuperSized!) Squire, Ann O. 9781597163866 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Dinosaur Babies (I Love Reading: Dino World) Bennett, Leonie 9781597165440 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Dinosaur Fossils (I Love Reading: Dino World) Bennett, Leonie 9781597165556 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Dinosaur Hunting (I Love Reading: Dino World) Bennett, Leonie 9781597165549 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Emerald Boas (Disappearing Acts) Nichols, Catherine 978193608749 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

6


Emperor Penguin (More SuperSized!) Goldish, Meish 9781936087310 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Fighting Dinosaurs (I Love Reading: Dino World) Hughes, Monica 9781597165457 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Flying Giants (I Love Reading: Dino World) Hughes, Monica 9781597165419 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Giraffe (SuperSized!) Goldish, Meish 9781597163743 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Goliath Beetle (SuperSized!) Packard, Mary 9781597163880 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Goliath Bird-Eating Tarantula (SuperSized!) Goldish, Meish 9781597163897 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Great Bustard (SuperSized!) Hall, Kirsten 9781597163903 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Green Anaconda (SuperSized!) Smith, Molly 9781597163910 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Green Tree Frogs (Disappearing Acts) Lunis, Natalie 9781936087440 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Katydids (Disappearing Acts) Lunis, Natalie 9781936087402 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Killer Whale (More SuperSized!) Lunis, Natalie 9781936087280 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Komodo Dragon (SuperSized!) Lunis, Natalie 9781597163927 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Leatherback Turtle (SuperSized!) Hall, Kirsten 9781597163934 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Ostrich (SuperSized!) Lunis, Natalie 9781597163941 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Queen Alexandra’s Birdwing (SuperSized!) Stidworthy, John 9781597163958 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Really Big Dinosaurs and Other Giants (I Love

Reading: Dino World) Hughes, Monica 9781597165433 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Red Kangaroo (More SuperSized!) Lunis, Natalie 9781936087273 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Reticulated Python (More SuperSized!) Goldish, Meish 9781936087242 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Saltwater Crocodile (SuperSized!) Kaufman, Gabriel 9781597163965 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Siberian Tiger (More SuperSized!) Goldish, Meish 9781936087303 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Southern Elephant Seal (More SuperSized!) Goldish, Meish 9781936087266 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Swimming Giants (I Love Reading: Dino World) Hughes, Monica 9781597165426 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Three-Toed Sloths (Disappearing Acts) Lunis, Natalie 9781936087426 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Tiger Sharks (Disappearing Acts) Goldish, Meish 978193608733 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Toco Toucans (Disappearing Acts) Suen, Anastasia 9781936087457 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Whale Shark (SuperSized!) Goldish, Meish 9781597163972 I Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Bloodsucking Leeches (No Backbone!

Creepy Crawlers) Neuman, Pearl 9781597167550 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Bloody Horned Lizards (Gross-out Defenses) Houran, Lori Haskins 9781597167178 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Crafty Garden Spiders (No Backbone! Spiders) White, Nancy 9781597167031 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Crawling Crabs (No Backbone! Marine Invertebrates) Lunis, Natalie 9781597165099 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Creeping Land Snails (No Backbone!

Creepy Crawlers) White, Nancy 9781597167536 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Deadly Black Widows (No Backbone! Spiders) Lunis, Natalie 9781597166676 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Deadly Poison Dart Frogs (Gross-out Defenses) Dussling, Jennifer 9781597167208 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Disgusting Hagfish (Gross-out Defenses) Goldish, Meish 9781597167192 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Electricity (Check It Out!) Twist, Clint 9781597160629 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

7


Force and Motion (Check It Out!) Twist, Clint 9781597160612 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Gooey Jellyfish (No Backbone! Marine Invertebrates) Lunis, Natalie 9781597165105 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Hairy Tarantulas (No Backbone! Spiders) Camisa, Kathryn 9781597167048 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Jumping Spiders (No Backbone! Spiders) Goldish, Meish 9781597167055 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Leggy Centipedes (No Backbone! Creepy Crawlers) Lunis, Natalie 9781597167529 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Light and Sound (Check It Out!) Twist, Clint 9781597160605 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Materials (Check It Out!) Twist, Clint 9781597160599 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Prickly Porcupines (Gross-out Defenses) Nichols, Catherine 9781597167215 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Prickly Sea Stars (No Backbone! Marine Invertebrates) Lunis, Natalie 9781597165082 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Roly-Poly Pillbugs (No Backbone! Creepy Crawlers) Smith, Molly 9781597167543 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Slimy Sea Slugs (No Backbone! Marine Invertebrates) Lunis, Natalie 9781597165112 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Smelly Skunks (Gross-out Defenses) Nichols, Catherine 9781597167161 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Spooky Wolf Spiders (No Backbone! Spiders) Goldish, Meish 9781597167062 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Squirting Squids (No Backbone! Marine Invertebrates) Lunis, Natalie 9781597165136 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Squishy Sponges (No Backbone! Marine Invertebrates) Lunis, Natalie 9781597165129 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Stinging Scorpions (No Backbone! Creepy Crawlers) Lunis, Natalie 9781597167567 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Tricky Opossums (Gross-out Defenses) Nichols, Catherine 9781597167185 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Tricky Trapdoor Spiders (No Backbone! Spiders) Goldish, Meish 9781597167079 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Wiggly Earthworms (No Backbone! Creepy Crawlers) Lunis, Natalie 9781597167512 K Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Armored and Dangerous (Dino Times Trivia) Zimmerman, Howard 9781597167123 L Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Beautiful Butterflies (No Backbone! Insects) Goldish, Meish 9781597165877 L Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Bloodthirsty Mosquitoes (No Backbone! Insects) Goldish, Meish 9781597165853 L Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Deadly Praying Mantises (No Backbone! Insects) Goldish, Meish 9781597165822 L Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Giant-o-saurs (Dino Times Trivia) White, Nancy 978597167116 L Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Helpful Ladybugs (No Backbone! Insects) Smith, Molly 9711597165846 L Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Hidden Walkingsticks (No Backbone! Insects) Goldish, Meish 9781597166461 L Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Hungry Cockroaches (No Backbone! Insects) Goldish, Meish 9781597165884 L Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Killer Bees (No Backbone! Insects) Goldish, Meish 9781597165815 L Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Smelly Stink Bugs (No Backbone!

The World ofInvertebrates) Goldish, Meish 9781597165808 L Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Speedy Dragonflies (No Backbone! Insects) Smith, Molly 9781597165839 L Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Orangutans in Danger (Wildlife Survival) Orme, Helen 9781597162630 M Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Polar Bears in Danger (Wildlife Survival) Orme, Helen 9781597162647 M Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

*The Reasons for Seasons Gibbons, Gail 9780823412389 M Fountas and Pinnell Medium to Heavy

Do Whales Have Belly Buttons? Questons and

Answers About Whales and Dolphins Berger, Melvin 9780439085717 N Scholastic Medium to Heavy

Elephants in Danger (Wildlife Survival) Orme, Helen 9781597162609 N Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Gorillas in Danger (Wildlife Survival) Orme, Helen 9781597162616 N Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

8


*Ladybugs (Minibeasts) Llewellyn, Claire 9780531148266 N Fountas and Pinnell Medium to Heavy

Lions in Danger (Wildlife Survival) Orme, Helen 9781597162623 N Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Rhinos in Danger (Wildlife Survival) Orme, Helen 9781597162654 N Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Whales Short, Joan 9781572551909 N Scholastic Medium to Heavy

*Caves and Caverns Gibbons, Gail 9780152013653 O Fountas and Pinnell Medium to Heavy

Building Green-scrapers (Going Green) Stern, Steven L. 9781597169622 P Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Do Tarantulas Have Teeth? Questions and Answers

About Poisonous Creatures Berger, Melvin and Gilda 9780439148771 P Scholastic Medium to Heavy

Eating Green (Going Green) Apte, Sunita 9781597169653 P Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

How Do Bats See in the Dark?: Questions and

Answers About Night Creatures Berger, Melvin and Gilda 9780439229043 P Scholastic Medium to Heavy

Making Cities Green (Going Green) Leardi, Jeanette 9781597169615 P Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Traveling Green (Going Green) Ball, Jacqueline A. 9781597169646 P Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Using Earth’s Underground Heat (Going Green) White, Nancy 9781597169639 P Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Water Ditchfield, Christin 9780516293691 P Scholastic Medium to Heavy

What Do Sharks Eat for Dinner? Questions

and Answers About Sharks Berger, Melvin and Gilda 9780439229050 P Scholastic Medium to Heavy

Why Don’t Haircuts Hurt? Questions and

Answers about the Human Body Berger, Melvin 9780439085694 P Scholastic Medium to Heavy

Can Snakes Crawl Backward? Questions and

Answers about Reptiles Berger, Melvin and Gilda 9780439193818 Q Scholastic Medium to Heavy

Oceans Morris, Neil 9780865058408 Q Scholastic Medium to Heavy

Why Do Volcanoes Blow Their Tops? Questions and Answers About Volcanoes and Earthquakes Berger, Melvin and Gilda

9780439148788 Q Scholastic Medium to Heavy

*Can It Rain Cats and Dogs? Questions and Answers About Weather Berger, Melvin and Gilda 9780439085731 R Fountas and Pinnell

Medium to Heavy

*Do Stars Have Points? Questions and Answers About Stars and Planets Berger, Melvin and Gilda 9780439085700 R Fountas and

Pinnell Medium to Heavy

*How Do Flies Walk Upside Down?: Questions and Answers About Insects Berger, Melvin and Gilda 9780439085724 R Fountas and

Pinnell Medium to Heavy

Leaping Grasshoppers (No Backbone! Insects) Goldish, Meish 9781597165860 L Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Ocean Monsters (Dino Times Trivia) Lunis, Natalie 9781597167130 L Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Pet-sized Dinos (Dino Times Trivia) Lunis, Natalie 9781597167109 L Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Savage Slashers (Dino Times Trivia) Lunis, Natalie and 9781597167093 L Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Sky Terrors (Dino Times Trivia) Lunis, Natalie 9781597167147 L Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

*How Do Frogs Swallow With Their Eyes? Questions and Answers about Amphibians Berger, Melvin and Gilda 9780439266772 R

Fountas and Pinnell Medium to Heavy

Don’t Know Much about the Solar System Davis, Kenneth C. 9780064462303 R Scholastic Medium to Heavy

9


Rocks and Minerals Morris, Neil 9780865058477 R Scholastic Medium to Heavy

The Armadillo Potts, Steve 9780736884822 R Scholastic Medium to Heavy

You Wouldn’t Want to Sail on the Titanic! Stewart, David 9780531162101 R Scholastic Medium to Heavy

*The Humpback Whale Frahm, Randy 9780736884877 S Fountas and Pinnell Medium to Heavy

Butterflies Simonson, Ned 9780516235288 S Scholastic Medium to Heavy

Do Tornadoes Really Twist? Questions and Answers

About Tornadoes and Hurricanes Berger, Melvin 9780439148801 S Scholastic Medium to Heavy

Insects and Spiders Clarke, Penny 9780531152829 S Scholastic Medium to Heavy

*China: The Culture Kalman, Bobbie 9780778797487 T Fountas and Pinnell Medium to Heavy

Japan: The People Kalman, Bobbie 9780778797449 X Scholastic Medium to Heavy

Come Back, Salmon Cone, Molly 9780871564894 630 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

Insect Bodies Aloian, Molly, and 9780778723745 700 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

Kalman, Bobbie

What Is the Animal Kingdom? Kalman, Bobbie 9780865058897 700 Scholastic Medium to Heavy

Bug-a-licious (Extreme Cuisine) Goldish, Meish 9781597167574 730 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

Prehistoric Beasts (Top 10s) Goldsmith, Andrew 9781597160636 730 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Killer Dinosaurs (Top 10s) Goldsmith, Andrew 9781597160667 740 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Insect Life Cycles Aloian, Molly, and 9780778723776 760 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

Web Weavers and Other Spiders Kalman, Bobbie 9780865057326 760 Scholastic Medium to Heavy

Can You Hear a Shout in Space?: Questions and

Answers About Space Exploration Berger, Melvin and Gilda 9780439148795 770 Scholastic Medium to Heavy

Communication Inventions (Which Came First?) Ball, Jacqueline A 9781597161299 770 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Clothing Creations (Which Came First?) Ball, Jacqueline A. 9781597161282 780 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Amazing Inventions (Top 10s) Stevens, Ian 9781597160674 790 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Transportation Inventions (Which Came First?) Will, Sandra 9781597161336 790 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Deadly Creatures (Top 10s) Graham, Anna 9781597160643 800 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Extreme Machines (Top 10s) Stevens, Ian 9781597160650 800 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Mammal Menu Goldish, Meish 9781597167604 810 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

Habitat Destruction (Earth in Danger) Orme, Helen 9781597167253 820 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Shocking Seafood Williams, Dinah 9781597167611 820 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

Spider-Tizers and Other Creepy Treats Goldish, Meish 9781597167598 820 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

The Life Cycle of a Butterfly Kalman, Bobbie 9780778706809 820 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

Aliens (Tales of Horror) Pipe, Jim 9781597162029 830 Scholastic Medium to Heavy

Ghosts (Tales of Horror) Pipe, Jim 9781597162036 830 Scholastic Medium to Heavy

Vampires (Tales of Horror) Pipe, Jim 9781597162050 830 Scholastic Medium to Heavy

Household Inventions (Which Came First?) Lunis, Natalie 9781597161312 840 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Monsters (Tales of Horror) Pipe, Jim 9781597162043 840 Scholastic Medium to Heavy

Slithery, Slimy, Scaly Treats Williams, Dinah 9781597167628 840 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

10


Werewolves (Tales of Horror) Pipe, Jim 9781597162067 840 Scholastic Medium to Heavy

Fierce Predators (Top 10s) Graham, Anna 9781597160681 850 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Food Creations (Which Came First?) Ball, Jacqueline A. 9781597161305 850 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

What Is a Primate? Kalman, Bobbie 9780865059504 860 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

Heart-Stopping Roller Coasters Goldish, Meish 9781597169561 870 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

Huge Earthmovers Goldish, Meish 9781597169554 870 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

Volcanoes Morris, Neil 9780865058385 870 Scholastic Medium to Heavy

What Makes an Ocean Wave? Questions and

Answers About Oceans and Ocean Life Berger, Melvin and Gilda 9780439148825 870 Scholastic Medium to Heavy

Garbage and Recycling (Earth in Danger) Orme, Helen 9781597167260 880 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Slimy Salamanders (Amphibiana) Goldish, Meish 9781936087372 880 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Zombies (Tales of Horror) Pipe, Jim 9781597162074 880 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

Leaping Ground Frogs (Amphibiana) Oldfield, Dawn Bluemel 9781936087358 890 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Rivers and Lakes Morris, Neil 9780865058460 890 Scholastic Medium to Heavy

Freaky-Big Airplanes Goldish, Meish 9781597169592 900 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

The Life Cycle of a Tree Kalman, Bobbie 9780778706892 900 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

Amazing Water Frogs (Amphibiana) Goldish, Meish 9781936087341 910 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Climate Change (Earth in Danger) Orme, Helen 9781597167239 910 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Orme, Helen Goldish, Meish 9781936087365 910 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Sporting Events (Which Came First?) Kaufman, Gabriel 9781597161329 910 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Little Newts (Amphibiana) Goldish, Meish 9781936087389 920 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Pollution (Earth in Danger) Orme, Helen 9781597167246 920 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Titanic Trucks Goldish, Meish 9781597169578 920 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

What Is Hibernation? Kalman, Bobbie 9780865059641 920 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

Baby Bug Dishes (Extreme Cuisine) Goldish, Meish 9781597167581 930 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

Caves Morris, Neil 9780865058422 930 Scholastic Medium to Heavy

Energy for the Future (Earth in Danger) Orme, Helen 9781597167277 930 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Sharks Walker, Niki and 9780865057371 930 Scholastic Medium to Heavy

The Life Cycle of a Sea Turtle Kalman, Bobbie 9780778706823 930 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

Eating Green Apte, Sunita 9781597169653 950 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

The Life Cycle of a Spider Kalman, Bobbie 9780778706885 950 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

Tricky Tree Frogs (Amphibiana) Lunis, Natalie 9781936087334 960 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Sand and Soil Gurney, Beth 9780778714491 980 Lexile.com Medium to HeavyMaking Cities Green Leardi, Jeanette 9781597169615

1000 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

Deadly Spiders and Scorpions Solway, Andrew 9781403457738 1020 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

Deadly Reptiles Solway, Andrew 9781403465740 1060 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

Traveling Green Ball, Jacqueline A. 9781597169646 1100 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

Amazing Flights Hansen, Ole Steen 9780778712183 Unleveled Medium to Heavy

11


Birds of Prey Solway, Andrew 9781403457714 Unleveled Medium to Heavy

Deadly Insects Solway, Andrew 9781403465726 Unleveled Medium to Heavy

Deadly Snakes Solway, Andrew 9781403457721 Unleveled Medium to Heavy

Endangered Elephants (Earth’s Endangered Animals) Kalman, Bobbie 9780778719069 Unleveled Medium to Heavy

Endangered Pandas (Earth’s Endangered Animals) Kalman, Bobbie 9780778719045 Unleveled Medium to Heavy

Extraordinary Girls Ajmera, Maya, 9780881060669 Unleveled Medium to Heavy

Omolodun, Olateju, and Strunk, Sarah

Extreme Dinosaurs! Thomson, Sarah L. 9780060899677 Unleveled Medium to Heavy

Killer Carnivores Solway, Andrew 9781403465733 Unleveled Medium to Heavy

Killer Cats Solway, Andrew 9781403465719 Unleveled Medium to Heavy

Sea Hunters: Dolphins, Whales, and Seals Solway, Andrew 9781403465757 Unleveled Medium to Heavy

The Life Cycle of a Flower Aloian, Molly 9780778706977 Unleveled Medium to Heavy

The Life Cycle of Insects Spilsbury, Richard and 9781403434067 Unleveled Medium to Heavy

Using Earth’s Underground Heat (Going Green) White, Nancy 9781597169639 Unleveled Medium to Heavy

Wolves and Other Dogs Solway, Andrew 9781403457752 Unleveled Medium to Heavy

Me and My Amazing Body Sweeney, Joan 9780375806230 M Scholastic Heavy

*The Magic School Bus and the Electric Field Trip Cole, Joanna 9780590446839 P Fountas and Pinnell Heavy

*The Magic School Bus and the Science

Fair Expedition Cole, Joanna 9780590108249 P Fountas and Pinnell Heavy

*The Magic School Bus at the Waterworks Cole, Joanna 9780590403603 P Fountas and Pinnell Heavy

*The Magic School Bus Explores The Senses Cole, Joanna 9780590446983 P Fountas and Pinnell Heavy

*The Magic School Bus in the Time of the Dinosaurs Cole, Joanna 9780590446891 P Fountas and Pinnell Heavy

*The Magic School Bus Inside a Beehive Cole, Joanna 9780590257213 P Fountas and Pinnell Heavy

*The Magic School Bus Inside a Hurricane Cole, Joanna 9780590446877 P Fountas and Pinnell Heavy

*The Magic School Bus Inside the Earth Cole, Joanna 9780590407601 P Fountas and Pinnell Heavy

*The Magic School Bus Inside the Human Body Cole, Joanna 9780590414272 P Fountas and Pinnell Heavy

*The Magic School Bus Lost in the Solar System Cole, Joanna 9780590414296 P Fountas and Pinnell Heavy

*The Magic School Bus on the Ocean Floor Cole, Joanna 9780590414319 P Fountas and Pinnell Heavy

*Ellis Island Stein, R. Conrad 9780516466538 V Fountas and Pinnell Heavy

Abigail Adams: Famous First Lady Glass, Maya 9780823941728 Unleveled Heavy

Alexander Hamilton Degraw, Aleine 9780823941735 Unleveled Heavy

Annie Oakley: Wild West Sharpshooter Porterfield, Jason, and 9780823941742 Unleveled Heavy

Life in a Plains Camp Kalman, Bobbie 9780778704614 990 Lexile.com Medium to Heavy

Living Green (Earth in Danger) Orme, Helen 9781597167284 990 Bearport Publishing Medium to Heavy

Building Greenscrapers Stern, Steven 9781597169622 1000 Lexile.com Medium to HeavyBenjamin Franklin: Early American Genius

Glass, Maya 9780823941759 Unleveled Heavy

Betsy Ross: Creator of the American Flag Silate, Jennifer 9780823941766 Unleveled Heavy

Crispus Attucks: Hero of the Boston Massacre Beier, Anne 9780823941780 Unleveled Heavy

12


Cynthia Ann Parker Egan, Tracie 9780823941797 Unleveled Heavy

Davy Crockett: Frontier Hero Moriarty, J. T. 9780823941803 Unleveled Heavy

Florence Nightingale Davis, Lucile 9780736802055 Unleveled Heavy

Francisca Alavez, the Angel of Goliad Egan, Tracie 9780823941810 Unleveled Heavy

George Washington Egan, Tracie 9780823941834 Unleveled Heavy

Jesse James: Western Bank Robber Collins, Kathleen 9780823941841 Unleveled Heavy

John Paul Jones Egan, Tracie 9780823941858 Unleveled Heavy

Paul Revere: Freedom Rider McCarthy, Rose 9780823941902 Unleveled Heavy

Sitting Bull Hayhurst, Chris 9780823941926 Unleveled Heavy

Sojourner Truth: Equal Rights Advocate Collins, Kathleen 9780823941933 Unleveled Heavy

Professional Resources:

Calkins, Lucy. Units of Study for Teaching Reading, Grades 3-5. Navigating Nonfiction in Expository Text, Volume 1

Calkins, Lucy and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project. A Curricular Plan for The Reading Workshop, Grade 5.

Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2011

13


WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT

Instructional Module

Unit 3 – Module 2 of 2

Content Area: Reader’s Workshop

Unit of Study: Unit 3 Nonfiction Reading-November (Reading Benchmark: T)

Number of Lessons in Module: approximately 10 Grade Level: 5

Module: #2 Navigating Narrative and Hybrid Nonfiction Texts

Content Understandings:

Students will learn to read narrative nonfiction texts with attentiveness to structure.

Students will use story grammar to synthesize nonfiction texts.

Students will determine importance across large stretches of text.

Students will understand that most narrative nonfiction texts focuses on the goals and struggles of a central character, that the text conveys

an underlying idea, and that nonfiction narratives culminate in an achievement or a disaster.

Essential Question(s):

What strategies are needed to read a narrative nonfiction text?

How do I tell the difference between expository nonfiction and narrative nonfiction?

How do find the underlying idea in a text?

How do I locate the facts in a nonfiction narrative text?

NYS Common Core

Standards to be Met

RI.5.1. Quote accurately from a

text when explaining what the

text says explicitly and when

drawing inferences from the

text.

RI.5.2. Determine two or more

main ideas of a text and explain

how they are supported by key

details; summarize the text.

RI.5.3. Explain the relationships

or interactions between two or

Concept Understandings

and Academic Vocabulary

*Nonfiction texts are hybrids,

containing chunks that are

expository as well as chunks that

are narratives.

*The goal is to help readers see

ways in which their knowledge

of story grammar can help them

read nonfiction that is

exclusively narrative in nature.

Instructional Suggestions

*Remind students that they can

draw upon prior experience with

texts about similar topics to

anticipate information about the

text.

*Begin to sort informational

texts into two categories:

expository and nonfiction

narrative. Some books are a

combination of expository and

narrative. These are called,

Suggested Assessments/

Evidence

Teacher will monitor their

student’s notebooks.

Teacher will check their reading

logs on a frequent basis.

Assessment: Navigating

Nonfiction in Expository text,

Volume 2, pages 19-21.

Questions to ask students:

What is the big idea the text

1


more individuals, events, ideas,

or concepts in a historical,

scientific, or technical text based

on specific information in the

text.

RI.5.6. Analyze multiple

accounts of the same event or

topic, noting important

similarities and differences in

the point of view they represent.

RI.5.8. Explain how an author

uses reasons and evidence to

support particular points in a

text, identifying which reasons

and evidence support which

point(s).

RI.5.9. Integrate information

from several texts on the same

topic in order to write or speak

about the subject

knowledgeably.

SL.5.1. Engage effectively in a

range of collaborative

discussions (one‐on‐one, in

groups, and teacher‐led) with

diverse partners on grade 5

topics and texts , building on

others’ ideas and expressing

their own clearly.

a. Come to discussions prepared,

having read or studied

required material; explicitly

draw on that preparation and

other information known about

the topic to explore ideas under

discussion.

b. Form and use the perfect

(e.g., I had walked; I have

*Narrative nonfiction has many

of the components of fiction

reading. Characters have traits

and motivations, and overcome

obstacles.

*Narrative nonfiction contains

underlying ideas.

*Narrative nonfiction teaches

both information and ideas.

*Moving the students away

from retelling to inferring.













Characters

Characterization

Conflict

Diagram

Glossary

graphics/graphic features

Hybrid

illustration

informational texts

supporting details

supporting ideas

textual features

“hybrid.” Children need to know

the structure. However, choose

books are solely nonfiction

narrative for this module.

*Suggested read aloud, Cactus

Hotel.

*Read aloud a variety of

nonfiction texts to provide

students with opportunities to

synthesize, have thought off the

text, make connections, and

activate prior knowledge, and so

on.

*Your read aloud should

“mirror” the reading work you

want your students to do

independently.

1. how readers learn new

words

2. assess a text

3. make plans for how to

read it

4. begin by “chunking’ it

5. look at pictures and

diagrams

6. pause at strategic points

to nudge readers into

making an inference

7. scaffold strategies

Construct a poster titled,

“Thinking about Text

Structures” see page 26.

teaches me?

What is this letter or story

teaching me?

How does this fir in with what I

have been learning?

Quick methods to check

understanding;

Turn to your partner….

Stop and jot……

Stop and sketch….

2


walked; I will have walked) verb

tenses.

c. Use verb tense to convey

various times, sequences, states,

and conditions.

d. Recognize and correct

inappropriate shifts in verb

tense.*

SL.5.2. Summarize a written text

read aloud or information

presented in diverse media and

formats, including visually,

quantitatively, and orally.

SL.5.4. Report on a topic or text

or present an opinion,

sequencing ideas logically and

using appropriate facts and

relevant, descriptive details to

support main ideas or themes;

speak clearly at an

understandable pace.

SL.5.6. Adapt speech to a variety

of contexts and tasks, using

formal English when appropriate

to task and situation.

Navigating Nonfiction in

Expository text, Volume 2.

Model with students.

*Readers need to develop

generalizations and formulate

ideas about a character. See

Session IX, Volume Two of

Navigation Nonfiction on ways

to expand the definition of a

main character.

*Students will track their ideas

using the same boxes and bullets

structure, jotting post-its as they

read, talking to a partner,

expecting their books to teach

them important ideas and

information.

*Having partners teach one

another will be just as important

as in Module #1.

Suggested Module Resources:

Mentor text suggestions

Cactus Hotel by Brenda Z. Guiberson

Into the Sea by Brenda Z. Guiberson

3


Wilma Unlimited by Kathleen Krull

Narrative Nonfiction

Ringo Saves the Day: A True Story (Pets to the Rescue) Clements, Andrew 9780689834394 H Scholastic

Tara and Tiree, Fearless Friends: A True Story

(Pets to the Rescue) Clements, Andrew 9780689834417 H Scholastic

Brave Norman (Pets to the Rescue) Clements, Andrew 9780689834387 I Scholastic

Sitting Bull Evento, Susan 9780516258294 I Scholastic

Fire Fighter Royston, Angela 9780789429605 J Scholastic

Friends at School Bunnett, Rochelle 9781595720405 J Scholastic

Cactus Hotel Guiberson, Brenda Z. 9780805029604 K Scholastic

Chickens Aren’t the Only Ones Heller, Ruth 9780698117785 K Scholastic

Helen Keller and the Big Storm Lakin, Patricia 9780689841040 K Scholastic

Ibis: A True Whale Story Himmelman, John 9780590428491 K Scholastic

Red, White and Blue Herman, John 9780448412702 K Scholastic

The Mississippi River Fowler, Allan 9780516265568 K Scholastic

An Earthworm’s Life Himmelman, John 9780516265353 L Scholastic

By My Brother’s Side Barber, Tiki, and 9780689865596 L Scholastic

Cowboys Penner, Lucille Recht 9780448409474 L Scholastic

Save the Rain Forests Fowler, Allan 9780516260846 L Scholastic

*Abe Lincoln’s Hat Brenner, Martha 9780679849773 M Fountas and Pinnell

*Buddy, the First Seeing Eye Dog Moore, Eva 9780590265850 M Fountas and Pinnell

*Twisters! Hayden, Kate 9780756658809 M Fountas and Pinnell

Fireboat: The Heroic Adventures of the John J. Harvey Kalman, Maira 9780142403624 M Bearport Publishing

Freaky-Big Airplanes (World’s Biggest) Goldish, Meish 9781597169592 M Bearport Publishing

Great White Sharks Markle, Sandra 9781575057477 M Scholastic

Heart-Stopping Roller Coasters (World’s Biggest) Goldish, Meish 9781597169561 M Bearport Publishing

Huge Earthmovers (World’s Biggest) Goldish, Meish 9781597169554 M Bearport Publishing

Titanic Trucks (World’s Biggest) Goldish, Meish 9781597169578 M Bearport Publishing

*Pompeii... Buried Alive! Kunhardt, Edith 9780394888668 N Fountas and Pinnell

*The Popcorn Book DePaola, Tomie 9780823405336 N Fountas and Pinnell

Natural Disasters Boskey, Madeline 9780516246055 N Scholastic

The Cod’s Tale Kurlansky, Mark 9780399234767 N Scholastic

The Story of Money Maestro, Betsy 9780688133047 N Scholastic

The Story of the Statue of Liberty Maestro, Betsy 9780688087463 N Scholastic

Trapped By the Ice: Shackleton’s Amazing

Antarctic Adventure McCurdy, Michael 9780802776334 N Scholastic

*A Mother’s Journey Markle, Sandra 9781570916229 O Fountas and Pinnell

*Baseball’s Best: Five True Stories Gutelle, Andrew 9780394809830 O Fountas and Pinnell

4


*How My Family Lives in America Kuklin, Susan 9780689822216 O Fountas and Pinnell

Disasters at Sea Donkin, Andrew 9780789473813 O Scholastic

Mailing May Tunnell, Michael O. 9780064437240 O Scholastic

My Visit to the Aquarium Aliki 9780064461863 O Scholastic

Rattlesnakes Markle, Sandra 9781580135399 P

Bermuda Triangle Donkin, Andrew 9780789454157 P Scholastic

*Amazing But True Sports Stories Hollander, Phyllis and Zander 9780590437363 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*Johnny Appleseed Kellogg, Steven 9780590426169 Q Fountas and Pinnell

Immigrant Kids Freedman, Russell 9780140375947 Q Scholastic

The Snake Scientist Montgomery, Sy 9780618111190 Q Scholastic

Twenty-One Elephants and Still Standing Prince, April Jones 9780618448876 Q Scholastic

*Chocolate By Hershey: A Story About Milton S. Hershey Burford, Betty 9780876146415 R Fountas and Pinnell

*Desert Giant Bash, Barbara 9781578050857 R Fountas and Pinnell

*Owen and Mzee: The True Story of Hatkoff, Isabella and Craig, 9780439829731 R Fountas and Pinnell

a Remarkable Friendship with Paula Kahumbu

Crocodiles Markle, Sandra 9781575057422 R Scholastic

Killer Whales Markle, Sandra 9781575057439 R Scholastic

Lions Markle, Sandra 9781575057446 R Scholastic

Polar Bears Markle, Sandra 9781575057460 R Scholastic

Wolves Markle, Sandra 9781575057484 R Scholastic

Mosquito Bite Siy, Alexandra, and 9781570915925 S Scholastic

Kunkel, Dennis

Owls Markle, Sandra 9781575057453 S Scholastic

*Kids at Work: Lewis Hine and the Crusade

Against Child Labor Freedman, Russell 9780395797266 T Fountas and Pinnell

*Shh! We’re Writing the Constitution Fritz, Jean 9780698116245 T Fountas and Pinnell

*The Colony of New York Whitehurst, Susan 9780823961740 T Fountas and Pinnell

*Walk in the Tundra Johnson, Rebecca 9781575055268 T Fountas and Pinnell

Footprints on the Moon Siy, Alexandra 9781570914096 T Scholastic

George vs. George: The American Revolution As Seen

from Both Sides Schanzer, Rosalyn 9781426300424 T Scholastic

*Buried in Ice: The Mystery of a Lost Arctic Expedition Beattie, Owen, and 9780590438490 U Fountas and Pinnell

Geiger, John

Quest for the Tree Kangaroo: An Expedition To The

Cloud Forest of New Guinea Montgomery, Sy 9780547248929 U Scholastic

The Tarantula Scientist Montgomery, Sy 9780618915774 U Scholastic

*Jackie Robinson Breaks the Color Line Santella, Andrew 9780516260310 V Fountas and Pinnell

*The California Gold Rush Stein, R. Conrad 9780516466910 V Fountas and Pinnell

5


An American Plague: The True and Terrifying Story of

the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793 Murphy, Jim 9780395776087 V Scholastic

Bodies from the Ash: Life and Death in Ancient Pompeii Deem, James M. 9780547133638 V Scholastic

*Black Diamond: The Story of the Negro Baseball Leagues McKissack, Patricia 9780590682138 W Fountas and Pinnell

and Fredrick

*The Great Fire Murphy, Jim 9780439203074 W Fountas and Pinnell

*Children of the Wild West Freedman, Russell 9780395547854 X Fountas and Pinnell

*Cowboys of the Wild West Freedman, Russell 9780395548004 X Fountas and Pinnell

*Freedom Walkers: The Story of the Montgomery

Bus Boycott Freedman, Russell 9780823421954 X Fountas and Pinnell

*Growing Up in Coal Country Bartoletti, Susan C. 9780395979143 X Fountas and Pinnell

Children of the Great Depression Freedman, Russell 9780618446308 X Scholastic

Gorilla Doctors: Saving Endangered Great Apes Turner, Pamela S. 9780547014333 X Scholastic

Oh, Rats! The Story of Rats and People Marrin, Albert 9780525477624 X Scholastic

Owen and Mzee: The Language of Friendship Hatkoff, Isabella, et al. 9780439899598 X Scholastic

*Hana’s Suitcase Levine, Karen 9780807531471 Y Fountas and Pinnell

Black Potatoes: The Story of the Great Irish Famine,

1845–1850 Bartoletti, Susan C. 9780618548835 Y Scholastic

Blizzard! The Storm That Changed America Murphy, Jim 9780590673105 Y Scholastic

Chew on This (Young Readers Edition) Schlosser, Eric 9780618593941 Y Scholastic

Freedom Riders: John Lewis and Jim Zwerg on the

Front Lines of the Civil Rights Movement Bausum, Ann 9780792241737 Y Scholastic

Hitler Youth: Growing Up in Hitler’s Shadow Bartoletti, Susan C. 9780439353793 Y Scholastic

Secrets of a Civil War Submarine: Solving the Mysteries

of the H. L. Hunley Walker, Sally M. 9781575058306 Y Scholastic

Shipwreck at the Bottom of the World: The Extraordinary

True Story of Shackleton and the Endurance Armstrong, Jennifer 9780375810497 Y Scholastic

Team Moon: How 400,000 People Landed “Apollo 11”

on the Moon Thimmesh, Catherine 9780618507573 Y Scholastic

The Story of Salt Kurlansky, Mark 9780399239984 Y Scholastic

A Dream of Freedom: The Civil Rights Movement from

1954 to 1968 McWhorter, Diane 9780439576789 Z Scholastic

Guinea Pig Scientists: Bold Self-Experimenters in Science Dendy, Leslie, and

and Medicine Boring, Mel 9780805073164 Z Scholastic

Left for Dead: A Young Man’s Search for Justice for

the USS Indianapolis Nelson, Peter 9780385730914 Z Scholastic

Revenge of the Whale: The True Story of the

Whaleship of Essex Philbrick, Nathaniel 9780142400685 Z Scholastic

6


Professional Resources:

Calkins, Lucy. Units of Study for Teaching Reading, Grades 3-5. Navigating Nonfiction in Narrative and Hybrid Text, Volume 2.

Calkins, Lucy and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project. A Curricular Plan for The Reading Workshop, Grade 5.

Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2011

7


WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT

Instructional Module

Unit 4 – Module 1 of 2

Content Area: Reader’s Workshop

Unit of Study: #4 Nonfiction Research Projects – December (Level 3 Reading Benchmark: T)

Number of Lessons in Module: approximately 10 Grade Level: 5

Module: #1 Synthesizing Complex Information across Diverse Texts and Working in the Company of Fellow Researchers

Content Understandings:

Students will compare and contrast texts.

Students will analyze the author’s claims and the validity of the argument presented.

Students will investigate authors’ point of view, to critique, and to design their own independent analysis of urgent nonfiction research

topics that they’ll pursue in small research groups.

Students will acquire and apply technical vocabulary.

Students will learn note-taking strategies and skills that will help them to develop their thinking as they read, gather information from

multiple sources, keeping track of those sources, and develop the essential skills of researchers.

Essential Question(s):

How will I compare and contrast texts?

How do I find reliable resources?

How do I take efficient notes?

How do I organize my notes?

How do I keep track of the sources I use?

How do I find the meanings of words I am unfamiliar with?

NYS Common Core

Standards to be Met

RI.5.5. Compare and contrast the

overall structure (e.g.,

chronology, comparison,

cause/effect, problem/solution)

Concept Understandings

and Academic Vocabulary

*Students will become “experts”

at gathering information.

*Students will pick the key

Instructional Suggestions

* Build on all the essential

nonfiction comprehension

reading skills that you taught in

the prior unit. Refer to old charts

Suggested Assessments/

Evidence

*Constantly monitor your

children’s book selections.

*Check their reading levels.

1


of events, ideas, concepts, or

information in two or more

texts.

RI.5.6. Analyze multiple

accounts of the same event or

topic, noting important

similarities and differences in

the point of view they represent.

RI.5.4. Determine the meaning of

general academic and domain

specific words and phrases in a

text relevant to a grade 5 topic

or subject area .

RI.5.7. Draw on information

from multiple print or digital

sources, demonstrating the

ability to locate an answer to a

question quickly or to solve a

problem efficiently.

RI.5.8. Explain how an author

uses reasons and evidence to

support particular points in a

text, identifying which reasons

and evidence support which

point(s).

RI.5.9. Integrate information

from several texts on the same

topic in order to write or speak

about the subject knowledgeably

RF.5.3. Know and apply gradelevel

phonics and word analysis

skills in decoding words.

a. Use combined knowledge of

all letter-sound

correspondences, syllabication

patterns, and morphology (e.g.,

roots and affixes) to read

accurately unfamiliar

words to search on the internet,

have the ability to pick one

source of information to trust

over multiple others, and the

ability to make up our own mind

about aspects of a topic once

they’ve read enough about it.

* Children will be reading

rapidly to evaluate and compare

resources, and to construct indepth,

critical understandings of

research topics that feel urgent.

*So, readers, dig for treasure

and read for treasure. They dig

deeper to find meaning.

*Information is all around us.

* Researchers don’t just take

information in while reading.

They also think about whatever

they’ve read—readers wonder at

this, they think more deeply

about that, they make

connections, they ponder, they

consider the implications of

what they read.

*When you become an expert on

a topic, it is important to begin

using the technical vocabulary

of that subject.

*You’ll want readers to move

across texts cumulatively adding

to their understanding of a topic.

in classroom.

* When students select books

for this unit, they should be

moving up a level due to the fact

they have already explored

nonfiction texts.

*You’ll begin with a research

project that you will initiate as a

demonstration study and that

you will carry through during

your read-aloud and whole-class

lessons. As you choose the topic

and the texts with which you

will model, you may decide to

choose a complex subject and

high-level texts, and your

modeling will particularly aim

to support the highest level of

reading that you think your

students can aim for. Or you

may choose to model with an

accessible subject and text set

that you will then hand over to a

group of more emergent

readers—thus your instruction

will launch them each day into

their independent work.

*For the shared topic that you’ll

draw on to demonstrate your

lessons and read alouds, gather

two or three short books and an

article or two. You may also

want to compile a few primary

documents to share with

students.

*Assess their note-taking skills

with a rubric. You’ll want to

look at your students’ Post-its

because they will serve as a

great assessment for you as you

tailor your instruction to your

class’ specific needs. If you

notice that they are copying

down fact after fact, word for

word, you’ll probably want to

spend more time teaching into

the strategies in the unit on

determining importance and

taking notes.

*Perhaps, assigning a grade for

club project. A rubric might be

used to monitor and assess their

skills.

*Though this work will be done

orally, this is the essential

foundation for opinion (and in

the case of a challenge to the

claim, argument) writing. You

might ask students to “record”

the opinion essays they’ve

generated through club

conversations by flash

drafting(quick writing) them on

papers to place within club

folders.

2


multisyllabic words in context

and out of context.

RF.5.4. Read with sufficient

accuracy and fluency to support

comprehension.

a. Read grade‐level text with

purpose and understanding.

* Researchers need not only to

collect, but researchers also need

to think.

*Set students up in research

work groups.

* Take a couple of days to let

students browse the text sets you

have available, help them

communicate their interests and

bring in any resources they find

on their own, and perhaps visit a

local library, so they can share

in the act of gathering texts.

*In your first lesson, you’ll

teach your students that when

researchers embark on a

learning project, it’s helpful to

gather and preview a collection

of texts, mapping out the lay of

the land to plan a learning

journey. Keep reminding the

children to refer back to

previous strategies to preview

texts.

*What is important at this

starting out stage is that you

teach students to review several

books across one topic to

independently generate a list of

subtopics. You may want to

teach children how to make a

big display and place boxes

(main) and bullets (details) to

organize their thoughts.

*Teach students

that they don’t have to start

3


whole new pages of notes for

each book, but that instead, they

may make charts and diagrams

that let them gather evidence for

a few important ideas and

categories of information.

*Have students pay attention to

the “technical vocabulary” or

“domain language.” They will

need to know these terms when

they present their findings.

*When gathering information

take some of what you are

thinking, jot it down, and write

deeper off of it.

In other words . . .

Stated differently . . .

This matters because . . .

This makes me realize . . .

This is interesting because . . .

This makes sense because . . .

This reminds me of ……

*You might also nudge readers

to move between texts, catching

conflicting information. If they

find this, direct the students to

search another resource.

*Teach students to pay specific

attention to images, identifying

why they qualify as primary

sources and what one might

learn or interpret from studying

these closely.

4


*Teach clubs to talk often about

their topic.

*If you want to your students to

have a close connection to

writing, or to convey their ideas

that they are speaking in flashdrafts

of opinion pieces, you

may push clubs toward planning

and mentally drafting opinion

pieces dealing with their topic.

*During their club

conversations, teach students

that each member might state an

opinion as a “thesis statement”

or “claim.”

*Then, have your readers to

speak as experts and to teach

their fellow researchers what

they are learning, to compare

information and ideas.

* Refer to Session XVI of

Navigating Nonfiction, Volume

2.

Suggested Module Resources:

Check out the list in Unit 3, Module 1 for the list of nonfiction books.

Use the internet to search for additional resources: primary or secondary sources and other information.

5


Professional Resources:

Calkins, Lucy. Units of Study for Teaching Reading, Grades 3-5. Navigating Nonfiction in Narrative and Hybrid Text, Volume 2.

Calkins, Lucy and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project. A Curricular Plan for The Reading Workshop, Grade 5.

Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2011

6


WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT

Instructional Module

Unit 4 – Module 2 of 2

Content Area: Reader’s Workshop

Unit of Study: #4Nonfiction Research Projects - December (Level 3 Reading Benchmark: T)

Number of Lessons in Module: approximately 7 Grade Level: 5

Module: #2 Critiquing Texts with Analytical Lenses and Sharing Our Research

Content Understandings:

Students will begin to understand what the author’s intent of writing this text is.

Students will begin to understand note craft moves-how the author engineered a certain response from a reader.

Students will form opinions about a certain area in their topic?

Essential Question(s):

What is the author trying to make the reader feel about this topic?

What opinion am I forming?

How do I feel about a certain topic?

How do I differentiate websites?

How will I present my findings?

NYS Common Core

Standards to be Met

RI.5.8. Explain how an author

uses reasons and evidence to

support particular points in a

text, identifying which reasons

and evidence support which

point(s).

RI.5.6. Analyze multiple

accounts of the same event or

Concept Understandings

and Academic Vocabulary

* Students will tune themselves

to noticing whether a particular

text evokes pity, anger,

admiration, or some other

emotion for a topic.

* “Nonfiction” texts may claim

a truth but that they are authored

Instructional Suggestions

* Your first lesson in this part

will demonstrate how to

ascertain what an author gets us

to feel about a subject, through

the images, stories, and

information that author chooses.

Model this with a nonfiction text

or nonfiction narrative you have

Suggested Assessments/

Evidence

*Partners and clubs who have

read many books on a topic can

come together and plan a

presentation. A rubric might be

used to determine an

assessment.

*They may make a poster board

1


topic, noting important

similarities and differences in

the point of view they represent.

W.5.7. Conduct short research

projects that use several sources

to build knowledge through

investigation of different aspects

of a topic.

W.5.8. Recall relevant

information from experiences or

gather

relevant information from print

and digital sources; summarize

or paraphrase information in

notes and finished work, and

provide a list of sources.

W.5.9. Draw evidence from

literary or informational texts to

support analysis, reflection, and

research.

b. Apply grade 5 Reading

standards to informational texts

(e.g., “Explain how an author

uses reasons and evidence to

support particular points in a

text, identifying which reasons

and evidence support which

point[s]”).

W.5.10. Write routinely over

extended time frames (time for

research, reflection, and

revision) and shorter time

frames (a

single sitting or a day or two) for

a range of discipline‐specific

tasks, purposes, and audiences.

by people who have their own

perspectives, angles, motives,

and lenses.

*Some of their “burning

questions” cannot be answered

by their texts, or that they are

ready to outgrow their current

text set and find more resources.

*We decide what we want to say

and organize what we know, and

we decide how to share

information and ideas with our

communities, through

presentations, artwork, and

multimedia.

read earlier. You’ll have to

demonstrate this concept

multiple times, if your students

are new to reading analytically

for the author’s point of view

rather than as consumers of

information.

*Children need to look through

all the nonfiction books that

have read to date and decide

how the author made them feel.

* Teach your students here how

to differentiate websites that end

in .org (not-for-profit), .gov

(government), and .edu

(educational institutions) from

.com, which might be for profit

or highly biased.

*Teach your students how to do

library searches, how to talk to

librarians, how to seek local

experts, and how to visit

museums. Teach them to look

inside and outside of books, to

pursue their interests, and to

seek knowledge.

*A celebration is required. You

might have your students teach

others in the school community

what they have learned from

their research and thinking,

especially the angle on their

learning that they consider most

significant.

including diagrams or charts.

They may choose to read a part

and act it out or make a model

or put together a PowerPoint

presentation or make some

social action artwork to educate

their community. These

presentations are meant to be

simple and fairly quick, but can

help solidify what students have

learned and add interest and

investment to the topic studied.

2


Suggested Module Resources:

Use texts from previous units and the internet.

Professional Resources:

Calkins, Lucy. Units of Study for Teaching Reading, Grades 3-5.Heinemann

Calkins, Lucy and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project. A Curricular Plan for The Reading Workshop, Grade 5.

Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2011

3


WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT

Instructional Module

Unit 5 – Module 1 of 2

Content Area: Reader’s Workshop

Unit of Study: Unit 5 Tackling Complex Texts with Historical Fiction January/Mid-February

Number of Lessons in Module 1: approximately 10 Grade Level: 5

Module: Synthesizing Perspectives

Content Understandings:

*The students will learn that historical fiction creates an opportunity to tackle complex texts.

*The students will emerge from this unit of study as knowledgeable readers who have new confidence in tackling complicated literature.

*The students will focus on deep comprehension and synthesis of complex story elements.

*The students will focus on strategies that will aid their synthesis of emerging plots.

*The students will learn to accumulate and synthesize details, using reading tools such as timelines and graphic organizers.

*The students will discover what they know of reading fiction into their work with historical fiction.

*The students will learn to empathize with characters and notice their complexity.

*The students will construct a sense of the setting and let this inform their understanding of the story.

*The students will understand complicated themes that have recurred in human history and continue to be relevant today.

*The students will grow their understanding of a topic by reading multiple accounts of the same historical events. In other words, book

clubs in this month will be organized not around one specific book but rather around one specific historical era, and you can set the

expectation that they will read several novels dealing with this particular era.

Essential Question(s):

* Aim to teach readers to read complex texts with deep comprehension.

* Where do the characters live?

* How does the setting impact the events?

* What are the different plotlines?

* How does the plot shift from place to place?

* What clues about the setting are present?

* Is it a place that is on a brink of change?

* What is the mood of this place?

* What is the theme of the story?

1


NYS Common Core

Standards to be Met

RL.5.1. Quote accurately from a

text when explaining what the text

says explicitly and when drawing

inferences from the text.

RL.5.2. Determine a theme of a

story, drama, or poem from

details in the text, including how

characters in a story or drama

respond to challenges or how the

speaker in a poem reflects upon a

topic; summarize the text.

RL.5.3. Compare and contrast two

or more characters, settings,

or events in a story or drama,

drawing on specific details in the

text (e.g., how characters interact).

RL.5.9. Compare and contrast

stories in the same genre (e.g.,

mysteries and adventure stories)

on their approaches to similar

themes and topics.

RI.5.1. Quote accurately from a text

when explaining what the text says

explicitly and when drawing

inferences from the text.

RI.5.2. Determine two or more main

ideas of a text and explain how

they are supported by key details;

summarize the text.

RI.5.3. Explain the relationships or

interactions between two or

more individuals, events, ideas, or

concepts in a historical, scientific,

or technical text based on specific

information in the text.

RF.5.4. Read with sufficient

accuracy and fluency to support

comprehension.

a. Read grade‐level text with

purpose and understanding.

Concept Understandings

and Academic Vocabulary

*setting

* plot

*climax

*resolution

*timeline or plotlines

*theme

Instructional Suggestions

*Provide those readers with

book introductions, with film

versions of the start of a book,

or with background information

on the time period.

* So you’ll want to draw on all

possible resources (for

example, historical images,

movie clips, and social studies

texts) to augment readers’

understanding and awareness

of this time and place.

*Review previous lessons on

envisionment, prediction and

knowledge of story structures to

help them develop theories

about characters.

*Suggested instruction:

Introduction of Book Clubs

(If possible, try to find books on

the same topic)

Mini-lessons-

**Set students to listen up as

you read aloud the start of a

picture book. (pg.7)

**Have students notice the time

frame words during the read

aloud. (pg.9)

**Have students pay close

attention to details about the

setting and record their

ideas.(share and reflect) (pg.10)

**Send children off to read a

picture book you have selected.

Have the students “stop and jot”

and “turn and talk.” Concentrate

Suggested Assessments/

Evidence

*This unit is best for students

reading levels P and above.

*Potential to overlap and

integrate nonfiction texts,

possibly from your social studies

curriculum.

*Read multiple texts that deal

with the same era.

* With the support of multiple

texts on the same time period,

they will be offered opportunities

to “compare and contrast the

overall structure (for example,

chronology, comparison,

cause/effect, problem/solution)

of events, ideas, concepts, or

information in two or more texts”

and “analyze multiple accounts

of the same event or topic,

noting important similarities and

differences in the point of view

they represent.

*Have students’ complete

graphic organizers for an

assessment on the above items.

*Collect Reader’s Notebooks

and read the students

responses when they “stop and

jot.”

*Through the month tackling

2


. Read grade‐level prose and

poetry orally with accuracy,

appropriate rate, and expression.

c. Use context to confirm or

self‐correct word recognition and

understanding, rereading as

necessary.

on what is the setting, what

does it feel like, and what are

the changes? (pg.11)

complex plots together, you will

prepare for the fact that book

club conversations toward the

end of this month will touch on

issues such as war, oppression,

famine, and migration. You can

assess their understanding

through having the students

write journals, newspaper

articles, blogs, etc.

*If using Book Clubs, you can

use Literature Circle sheets to

assess their understanding.

Suggested Module Resources:

Number the Stars by Lois Lowry

Rose Blanche by Roberto Innocenti

Bud, Not Buddy

Freedom Summer

Winn Dixie

Books with Strong Setting

Berger, Barbara Helen. All the Way to Lhasa. NY: Philomel, 2002.

Gerstein, Mordicai. The Man Who Walked Between the Towers, Brookfield, CT: Millbrook, 2003.

Locker, Thomas. Mountain Dance, San Diego: Harcourt, 2001.

Polacco, Patricia. Pink and Say, NY: Philomel, 1994.

Rylant, Cynthia. When I Was Young in the Mountains, NY: Dutton, 1982.

Sharmat, Marjorie Wienman. Gila Monsters Meet You at the Airport, Glenview, IL: Foresman, 1980.

Sis, Peter. Madlenka, NY: Francis Foster, 2000.

Wood, Audrey. The Napping House, NY: Harcourt, 1984.

Wright, Betty Ren. The Blizzard, NY: Holiday, 2003.

Yolen, Jane, Owl Moon. NY: Philomel, 1987.

3


Books with Strong Plots

Cronin, Doreen. Click, Clack, Moo: Cows that Type. NY: Simon, 2000.

Goble, Paul. Iktomi and the Boulder, NY: Orchard, 1988.

Henkes, Kevin. Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse, NY: Greenwillow, 1996.

Noble, Trinka Hakes. Jimmy’s Boa and the Bungee Jump Slam Dunk, NY: Dial, 2003.

Numeroff, Laura. If You Take a Mouse to School, NY: HarperCollins, 2002.

Rylant, Cynthia. The Great Gracie Chase, NY: Blue Sky, 2001.

Shannon, David. David Goes to School, NY: Blue Sky Press, 1999. Historical Fiction Booklist

HISTORICAL FICTION

*A Little Prairie House Wilder, Laura Ingalls 9780064435260 J Fountas and Pinnell

*Going West Wilder, Laura Ingalls 9780064406932 J Fountas and Pinnell

*Small Wolf Benchley, Nathaniel 9780064441803 J Fountas and Pinnell

*Wagon Wheels Brenner, Barbara 9780064440523 K Fountas and Pinnell

*Pioneer Sisters Wilder, Laura Ingalls 9780064420464 M Scholastic

*Prairie School Avi 9780060513184 M Scholastic

*Dandelions Bunting, Eve 9780152024079 N Scholastic

*Apples to Oregon Hopkinson, Deborah 9781416967460 O Fountas and Pinnell

*Going West Van Leeuwen, Jean 9780140560961 O Fountas and Pinnell

*Riding Freedom Ryan, Pam Munoz 9780439087964 P Fountas and Pinnell

*The Indian School Whelan, Gloria 9780064420563 P Fountas and Pinnell

*The Ghost Dance McLerran, Alice 9780618111435 P Scholastic

*Black Eyed Susan Armstrong, Jennifer 9780679885566 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*Changes for Kirsten Shaw, Janet 9780937295458 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*Happy Birthday, Kirsten! Shaw, Janet 9780937295335 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*Kirsten Learns a Lesson Shaw, Janet 9780937295106 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*Kirsten Saves the Day Shaw, Janet 9780937295397 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*Kirsten’s Surprise Shaw, Janet 9780937295199 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*Little House on the Prairie Wilder, Laura Ingalls 9780064400022 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*Changes for Josefina Tripp,Valerie 9781562475918 Q Scholastic

*Happy Birthday, Josefina! Tripp,Valerie 9781562475871 Q Scholastic

*Josefina Learns a Lesson Tripp,Valerie 9781562475178 Q Scholastic

*Josefina Saves the Day Tripp,Valerie 9781562475895 Q Scholastic

*Josefina’s Surprise Tripp,Valerie 9781562475192 Q Scholastic

*Meet Josefina, an American Girl Tripp,Valerie 9781562475154 Q Scholastic

*Meet Kirsten, an American Girl Shaw, Janet 9780937295014 Q Scholastic

*Cabin Faced West Fritz, Jean 9780698119369 R Fountas and Pinnell

*Caddie Woodlawn Brink, Carol 9780689815218 R Fountas and Pinnell

4


*Our Only May Amelia Holm, Jennifer L. 9780064408561 R Fountas and Pinnell

*Sarah, Plain and Tall MacLachlan, Patricia 9780064402057 R Fountas and Pinnell

*Skylark MacLachlan, Patricia 9780064406222 R Fountas and Pinnell

*Caleb’s Story MacLachlan, Patricia 9780064405904 R Scholastic

*Trouble for Lucy Stevens, Carla 9780899195230 R Scholastic

*Caleb’s Choice Wisler, G. Clifton 9780140382563 S Fountas and Pinnell

*Children of the Longhouse Bruchac, Joseph 9780140385045 S Fountas and Pinnell

*Facing West Kudlinski, Kathleen V. 9780140369144 S Fountas and Pinnell

*Fair Weather Peck, Richard 9780142500347 T Fountas and Pinnell

*The Birchbark House Erdrich, Louise 9780786814541 T Fountas and Pinnell

*The Sign of the Beaver Speare, Elizabeth G. 9780440479000 T Fountas and Pinnell

The Ballad of Lucy Whipple Cushman, Karen 9780064406840 T Scholastic

*Mr. Tucket Paulsen, Gary 9780440411338 U Fountas and Pinnell

*Thunder Rolling in the Mountains O’Dell, Scott 9780440408796 U Fountas and Pinnell

*By the Great Horn Spoon Fleischman, Sid 9780316286121 V Fountas and Pinnell

*Sweetgrass Basket Carvell, Marlene 9780525475477 W Scholastic

*The Game of Silence Erdrich, Louise 9780064410298 W Scholastic

*Soft Rain: A Story of the Cherokee Trail of Tears Cornelissen, Cornelia 9780440412427 650 Lexile.com

*The Porcupine Year Erdrich, Louise 9780060297879 840 Lexile.com

*Cheyenne Again Bunting, Eve 9780618194650 Unleveled

*Potato: A Tale from the Great Depression Lied, Kate 9780792269465 L Fountas and Pinnell

*Mimmy and Sophie All Around Town Cohen, Miriam and 9780374349899 L Scholastic

*Dust for Dinner Turner, Ann 9780064442251 M Scholastic

*Kit’s Surprise: A Christmas Story Tripp,Valerie 9781584850205 M Scholastic

*Blizzard of the Blue Moon Osborn, Mary Pope 9780375830389 N Fountas and Pinnell

*Pop’s Bridge Bunting, Eve 9780152047733 N Scholastic

*The Babe and I Adler, David A. 9780152050269 N Scholastic

*Goldie’s Fortune Holub, Joan 9780439401791 O Scholastic

*Kit Learns a Lesson: A School Story, 1934 Tripp,Valerie 9781584850182 O Scholastic

*Leah’s Pony Friedrich, Elizabeth 9781563978289 O Scholastic

*Meet Kit, An American Girl: 1934 Tripp,Valerie 9781584850168 O Scholastic

*Changes For Kit: A Winter Story, 1934 Tripp,Valerie 9781584850267 Q Scholastic

*Happy Birthday, Kit! A Springtime Story, 1934 Tripp,Valerie 9781584850229 Q Scholastic

*Kit Saves the Day! A Summer Story, 1934 Tripp,Valerie 9781584850243 Q Scholastic

*Song of the Trees Taylor, Mildred D. 9780142500750 R Fountas and Pinnell

*Mississippi Bridge Taylor, Mildred D. 9780141308173 S Fountas and Pinnell

*Tales from Homeplace Dale, Shelley 9780440414940 S Fountas and Pinnell

*The Friendship Taylor, Mildred D. 9780140389647 S Fountas and Pinnell

5


*Uncle Jed’s Barbershop King, Margaree 9780689819131 S Fountas and Pinnell

*Al Capone Shines My Shoes Choldenko, Gennifer 9781408801550 T Scholastic

*The Truth about Sparrows Hale, Marian 9780312371333 T Scholastic

*Bud, Not Buddy Curtis, Christopher Paul 9780440413288 U Fountas and Pinnell

*A Long Way from Chicago Peck, Richard 9780141303529 V Fountas and Pinnell

*A Year Down Yonder Peck, Richard 9780142300701 V Fountas and Pinnell

*Esperanza Rising Ryan, Pam Munoz 9780439120425 V Fountas and Pinnell

*Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry Taylor, Mildred D. 9780142401125 W Fountas and Pinnell

*Al Capone Does My Shirts Choldenko, Gennifer 9780142403709 X Fountas and Pinnell

*Out of the Dust Hesse, Karen 9780590371254 X Fountas and Pinnell

*The Bread Winner Whitmore, Arvella 9780618494798 Z Fountas and Pinnell

*Witness Hesse, Karen 9780439272001 Z Fountas and Pinnell

*Hard Times for Jake Smith Henderson, A. 9781571316493 830 Lexile.com

*freedom summer Wiles, Deborah 9780689878299 M Scholastic

*Goin’ Someplace Special McKissack, Patricia 9781416927358 M Scholastic

*Freedom on the Menu: The Greensboro Sit-Ins Weatherford, Carole B. 9780142408940 N Scholastic

*Freedom School,Yes! Littlesugar, Amy 9780399230066 O Scholastic

*Granddaddy’s Gift Mitchell, Margaree 9780816740116 O Scholastic

*Tree of Hope Littlesugar, Amy 9780698119031 P Scholastic

*The Other Side Woodson, Jacqueline 9780399231162 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*The Gold Cadillac Taylor, Mildred D. 9780140389630 S Fountas and Pinnell

*Sounder Armstrong, William H. 9780064400206 T Fountas and Pinnell

*The Well Taylor, Mildred D. 9780140386424 T Fountas and Pinnell

*Black Angels Murphy, Rita 9780440229346 T Scholastic

*The Watsons Go to Birmingham—1963 Curtis, Christopher Paul 9780440414124 U Scholastic

*Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry Taylor, Mildred D. 9780140384512 W Fountas and Pinnell

*Belle Teal Martin, Ann M. 9780439098243 W Scholastic

*Let the Circle Be Unbroken Taylor, Mildred D. 9780140348927 X Fountas and Pinnell

*Walking to the Bus Rider Blues Robinet, Harriette G. 9780689838866 550 Lexile.com

*White Socks Only Coleman, Evelyn 9780807589564 650 Lexile.com

*A Sweet Smell of Roses Johnson, Angela 9781416953616 710 Lexile.com

*A Thousand Never Evers Burg, Shana 9780385734707 830 Lexile.com

*Fire From the Rock Draper, Sharon 9780142411995 830 Scholastic

*Starplace Grove,Vicki 9780698118683 1000 Lexile.com

*Birmingham 1963 Weatherford, Carole B. 9781590784402 Unleveled

*Riding to Washington Swain, Gwenyth 9781585363247 Unleveled

*The Long Way to a New Land

*Watch the Stars Come Out

6


*Molly’s Pilgrim

*The Copper Lady

*The Keeping Quilt

*Lily and Miss Liberty

*The Memory Coat

*The Lotus Seed

A Picnic in October

*In the Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson

*Letters from Rifka

*When Jessie Came Across the Sea

*Nory Ryan’s Song

*Penny from Heaven

*Streets of Gold

*The Drinking Gourd

*Follow the Drinking Gourd

The Secret to Freedom

*The Patchwork Quilt

*Willie McLean and the Civil War Surrender

*Addy Learns a Lesson

*Addy Saves the Day

*Addy’s Surprise

*Changes for Addy

*Happy Birthday, Addy!

*The Lucky Stone

Meet Addy, an American Girl

*Freedom Crossing

*Ajeemah and His Son

*Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt Hopkinson, Deborah 9780679874720 S Fountas and Pinnell

*Pink and Say Polacco, Patricia 9780399226717 S Scholastic

*Nettie’s Trip South Turner, Ann 9780689801174 T Fountas and Pinnell

*Which Way Freedom Hansen, Joyce 9780380714087 T Scholastic

*Stealing Freedom Carbone, Elisa L. 9780440417071 U Fountas and Pinnell

How I Found the Strong McMullan, Margaret 9780553494921 U Scholastic

*Jip: His Story Paterson, Katherine 9780140386745 V Fountas and Pinnell

*Soldier’s Heart Paulsen, Gary 9780440228387 V Fountas and Pinnell

*The House of Dies Drear Hamilton,Virginia 9781416914051 V Fountas and Pinnell

*Elijah of Buxton Curtis, Christopher Paul 9780439023450 W Fountas and Pinnell

*Sarny, a Life Remembered Paulsen, Gary 9780440219736 W Scholastic

7


*Letters from a Slave Girl: The Story of Harriet Jacobs Lyons, Mary E. 9781416936374 X Fountas and Pinnell

*River Between Us Peck, Richard 9780142403105 X Fountas and Pinnell

*Numbering All the Bones Rinaldi, Ann 9780786813780 Y Fountas and Pinnell

*With Every Drop of Blood Collier, James Lincoln 9780440219835 Y Fountas and Pinnell

*Bull Run Fleischman, Paul 9780064405881 Y Scholastic

*Across Five Aprils Hunt, Irene 9780425182789 Z Fountas and Pinnell

*Little Women Alcott, Louisa May 9780451529305 Z Fountas and Pinnell

*The Land Taylor, Mildred D. 9780142501467 Z Fountas and Pinnell

*Henry’s Freedom Box Levine, Ellen 9780439777339 380 Scholastic

*Letters from a Slave Boy Lyons, Mary E. 9780689878688 710 Lexile.com

*Gabriel’s Horses Hart, Alison 9781561455287 730 Lexile.com

*Water Street Giff, Patricia Reilly 9780440419211 740 Lexile.com

*January’s Sparrow Polacco, Patricia 9780399250774 760 Lexile.com

*Red Moon at Sharpsburg Wells, Rosemary 9780142412053 760 Lexile.com

*Sound the Jubilee Forrester, Sandra 9780140379303 790 Scholastic

*Silent Thunder: A Civil War Story Pinkney, Andrea Davis 9780786815692 880 Scholastic

*The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg Philbrick, Rodman 9780439668187 950 Lexile.com

World War II

*Coming on Home Soon Woodson, Jacqueline 9780399237485 L Scholastic

*The Yellow Star: The Legend of King Christian X of Denmark Deedy, Carmen Agra 9781561452088 L Scholastic

*A New Coat for Anna Ziefert, Harriet 9780394898612 M Fountas and Pinnell

*Boxes for Katje Fleming, Candace 9780374309220 M Scholastic

*One Candle Bunting, Eve 9780060085605 M Scholastic

*Players in Pigtails Corey, Shana 9780439183062 M Scholastic

*Baseball Saved Us Mochizuki, Ken 9781880000199 O Fountas and Pinnell

*Mieko and the Fifth Treasure Coerr, Eleanor 9780698119901 O Fountas and Pinnell

*The Night Crossing Ackerman, Karen 9780679870401 O Fountas and Pinnell

The Greatest Skating Race: A WWII Story from

the Netherlands Borden, Louise 9780689845024 P Scholastic

*Changes for Molly Tripp,Valerie 9780937295496 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*Happy Birthday, Molly! Tripp,Valerie 9780937295373 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*Molly Learns a Lesson Tripp,Valerie 9780937295168 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*Molly Saves the Day Tripp,Valerie 9780937295434 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*Molly’s Surprise Tripp,Valerie 9780937295250 Q Fountas and Pinnell

Meet Molly, an American Girl Tripp,Valerie 9780937295076 Q Scholastic

*Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes Coerr, Eleanor 9780698118027 R Fountas and Pinnell

*Snow Treasure McSwigan, Marie 9780142402245 R Fountas and Pinnell

*The Bracelet Uchida,Yoshiko 9780698113909 R Fountas and Pinnell

8


Shadows on the Sea Harlow, Joan Hiatt 9780689849275 R Scholastic

*Hiroshima Yep, Laurence 9780590208338 S Fountas and Pinnell

*Lily’s Crossing Giff, Patricia Reilly 9780440414537 S Fountas and Pinnell

Don’t You Know There’s a War On? Avi 9780380815449 S Scholastic

The Little Ships: The Heroic Rescue at Dunkirk

in World War II Borden, Louise 9780689853968 S Scholastic

The Quilt Paulsen, Gary 9780440229360 S Scholastic

A Boy at War: A Novel of Pearl Harbor Mazer, Harry 9780689841606 T Scholastic

A Boy No More Mazer, Harry 9781416914044 T Scholastic

The Art of Keeping Cool Lisle, Janet Taylor 9780689837883 T Scholastic

The Journal of Scott Pendleton Collins, a World War II

Soldier, Normandy, France, 1944 Myers, Walter Dean 9780439050135 T Scholastic

*Number the Stars Lowry, Lois 9780440403272 U Fountas and Pinnell

*Autumn Street Lowry, Lois 9780440403449 V Fountas and Pinnell

*Behind the Bedroom Wall Williams, Laura E. 9781571316585 V Fountas and Pinnell

*Kensuke’s Kingdom Morpurgo, Michael 9780439591812 V Fountas and Pinnell

*The Cats in Krasinski Square Hesse, Karen 9780439794244 V Fountas and Pinnell

Heroes Don’t Run: A Novel of the Pacific War Mazer, Harry 9781416933946 V Scholastic

Eyes of the Emperor Salisbury, Graham 9780440229568 W Scholastic

The Harmonica Johnston, Tony 9781570914898 W Scholastic

*Dawn of Fear Cooper, Susan 9780152061067 X Fountas and Pinnell

*Milkweed Spinelli, Jerry 9780440420057 Y Fountas and Pinnell

*The Boy Who Dared Bartoletti, Susan Campbell 9780439680134 Y Fountas and Pinnell

Aleutian Sparrow Hesse, Karen 9781416903277 Y Scholastic

*Bat 6 Wolff,Virginia 9780590898003 Z Fountas and Pinnell

*Summer of My German Soldier Greene, Bette 9780142406519 Z Fountas and Pinnell

The Lily Cupboard: A Story of the Holocaust Oppenheim, Shulamith Levey 9780064433938 420 Lexile.com

Rose Blanche Gallaz, Cristophe 9780898123852 430 Lexile.com

The Butterfly Polacco, Patricia 9780142413067 430 Lexile.com

Star of Fear, Star of Hope Hoestlandt, Jo 9780802775887 490 Lexile.com

Edenville Owls Parker, Robert 9780399246562 580 Lexile.com

(Hardcover)

Faithful Elephants Tsuchiya,Yukio 9780395861370 640 Lexile.com

War Games Couloumbis, Audrey and Akila 9780375856280 710 Lexile.com

Soldier X Wulffson, Don L. 9780142500736 740 Lexile.com

The House of Sixty Fathers DeJong, Meindert 9780064402002 820 Lexile.com

The Boy in the Striped Pajamas Boyne, John 9780385751537 1080 Lexile.com

Pre-Colombian-American Revolution

9


*Sam the Minuteman Benchley, Nathaniel 9780064441070 J Fountas and Pinnell

George, the Drummer Boy Benchley, Nathaniel 9780064441063 K Scholastic

*Buttons for General Washington Roop, Peter and Connie 9780876144763 M Fountas and Pinnell

*Sybil Ludington’s Midnight Ride Amstel, Marsha 9781575054568 N Fountas and Pinnell

Encounter Yolen, Jane 9780152013899 N Scholastic

*Molly Pitcher: Young Patriot Stevenson, Augusta 9780020420408 O Fountas Pinnell

*The Secret Soldier McGovern, Ann 9780590430524 O Fountas and Pinnell

*A Lion to Guard Us Bulla, Clyde R. 9780064403337 P Fountas and Pinnell

*Changes for Felicity Tripp,Valerie 9781562470371 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*Felicity Learns a Lesson Tripp,Valerie 9781562470074 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*Felicity Saves the Day Tripp,Valerie 9781562470340 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*Felicity’s Surprise Tripp,Valerie 9781562470104 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*Hannah of Fairfield Van Leeuwen, Jean 9780141304991 Q Fountas and Pinnell

*Happy Birthday, Felicity! Tripp,Valerie 9781562470319 Q Fountas and Pinnell

Changes for Kaya: A Story of Courage Shaw, Janet 9781584854333 Q Scholastic

Kaya and Lone Dog: A Friendship Story Shaw, Janet 9781584854296 Q Scholastic

Kaya Shows the Way: A Sister Story Shaw, Janet 9781584854319 Q Scholastic

Kaya’s Escape! A Survival Story Shaw, Janet 9781584854258 Q Scholastic

Kaya’s Hero: A Story of Giving Shaw, Janet 9781584854272 Q Scholastic

Meet Felicity, an American Girl Tripp,Valerie 9781562470043 Q Scholastic

Meet Kaya, an American Girl Shaw, Janet 9781584854234 Q Scholastic

*Phoebe the Spy Griffin, Judith Berry 9780698119567 R Fountas and Pinnell

*Morning Girl Dorris, Michael 9780786813582 S Fountas and Pinnell

*Samuel’s Choice Berleth, Richard 9780590464567 S Fountas and Pinnell

*George Washington’s Socks Woodruff, Elvira 9780590440363 T Fountas and Pinnell

*Guests Dorris, Michael 9780786813568 T Fountas and Pinnell

*The Rifle Paulsen, Gary 9780152058395 T Fountas and Pinnell

*Toliver’s Secret Brady, Esther W. 9780679848042 T Fountas and Pinnell

*Guns for General Washington Reit, Seymour 9780152164355 U Fountas and Pinnell

*Night Journeys Avi 9780380732425 U Fountas and Pinnell

*The Fighting Ground Avi 9780064401852 V Fountas and Pinnell

*The Keeping Room Myers, Ann 9780141304687 V Fountas and Pinnell

*The Witch of Blackbird Pond Speare, Elizabeth George 9780007148974 W Fountas and Pinnell

*My Brother Sam Is Dead Collier, James Lincoln 9780590427920 Y Fountas and Pinnell

*Fever 1793 Anderson, Laurie Halse 9780689848919 Z Fountas and Pinnell

*Johnny Tremain Forbes, Esther 9780440942504 Z Fountas and Pinnell

Katie’s Trunk Turner, Ann 9780689810541 660 Scholastic

Chains Anderson, Laurie Halse 9781416905868 780 Scholastic

10


The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Traitor to the Nation,Volume I Anderson, M. T. 9780763636791 Unleveled

Professional Resources:

Calkins, Lucy. Units of Study for Teaching Reading, Grades 3-5.Tackling Complex Texts /Historical Fiction in Book Clubs Volume 1

Calkins, Lucy and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project. A Curricular Plan for The Reading Workshop, Grade 5.

Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2011

Readworks.org

11


WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT

Instructional Module

Unit 5 – Module 2 of 2

Content Area: Reader’s Workshop

Unit of Study: Unit 5 Tackling Complex Texts with Historical Fiction January/Mid-February

Number of Lessons in Module 2: approximately 10 Grade Level: 5

Module: Interpretation and Critical Reading with Historical Fiction

Content Understandings:

*Students will need to look beyond what’s happening to uncover the ideas and themes that underlie the books they read during this unit.

*Students will understand that each book they read will be about more than one idea.

*Students will learn to grow nuanced ideas and to read to be changed by the new worlds and characters we encounter.

*Students will learn to articulate significant ideas about their books, that they learn to revise those ideas on their own, and that they learn to reconsider,

elaborate on, and defend those ideas in the company of other readers.

*Students will learn to think critically and that there are no “right answers” when it comes to a student’s view points.

*Students will almost wear special lenses as they develop ideas—lenses that help them maintain a focus on some of those ideas as they read.

*Students will discover the value their own ideas about books and then hold onto these as they read, grounding them in details, deepening them, and

sharing them with others. (cause and effect relationships are essential)

*Students will learn teach readers to use allusions, figurative language, and symbolism to convey ideas that are not easily contained in ordinary

language.

*Students will learn to become more empathetic and imaginative, as well as more observant and discerning.

Essential Question(s):

*How does the story relate to your own ideas or theories?

*What is the main theme of the story?

*What are the details that are important to the essential theme?

*What lessons we can take from characters’ experiences?

*Why does history unfold the way it does?

*How does a scene or the different points of view that characters in that scene bring to the action help develop the character?

1


NYS Common Core

Standards to be Met

RF.5.4. Read with sufficient

accuracy and fluency to support

comprehension.

a. Read grade‐level text with

purpose and understanding.

b. Read grade‐level prose and

poetry orally with accuracy,

appropriate rate, and expression.

c. Use context to confirm or

self‐correct word recognition and

understanding, rereading as

necessary.

RI.5.1. Quote accurately from a text

when explaining what the text says

explicitly and when drawing

inferences from the text.

RI.5.2. Determine two or more main

ideas of a text and explain how

they are supported by key details;

summarize the text.

RI.5.3. Explain the relationships or

interactions between two or

more individuals, events, ideas, or

concepts in a historical, scientific,

or technical text based on specific

information in the text.

RI.5.5. Compare and contrast the

overall structure (e.g., chronology,

comparison, cause/effect,

problem/solution) of events, ideas,

concepts, or information in two or

more texts.

RI.5.6. Analyze multiple accounts

of the same event or topic, noting

important similarities and

differences in the point of view they

represent.

RI.5.9. Integrate information from

several texts on the same topic in

order to write or speak about the

subject knowledgeably.

RL.5.1. Quote accurately from a

Concept Understandings

and Academic Vocabulary

*symbolism

*theme

*characterization

*climax

*rising action

*falling action

*initiating conflict

*resolution

*cause and effect

Instructional Suggestions

* Teach a lesson where you

encourage your readers to

pause as they read, lingering in

certain passages— Readers

linger in those parts, jot about

them, reread them with their

clubs, compare their thinking,

connect them to other parts, and

have long discussions about

them again and again.

*You may want your students to

read nonfiction stories or articles

about the topic to gain a better

understanding of the era or

circumstance.

* Plan to use your read-alouds

to anchor this unit.

* In turn-and-talk you might say

things like:

“So the main character is

facing a big problem. Turn and

talk to your club about how you

think she may try to solve it.”

(prediction, interpretation,

intertextuality)

“Hmm, I’m thinking that if I

were this character in this

situation, I might have

done something different. Stop

and jot what you would do.

Keep in mind what you know

about that time.” (interpretation,

envisionment, accumulating the

text)

“So far we’ve gathered a lot of

details about the setting! Stop

and jot how you think the setting

is affecting the main character.”

Suggested Assessments/

Evidence

* As you teach the unit, keep

your eye on the work that

children are doing. Study their

Post-its and reader’s notebooks

to assess their comprehension.

* You might encounter

children struggling with growing

ideas about their characters, so

you might revisit the Post-it to

theory work that you taught in

the unit, “Following Characters

into Meaning,” encouraging

children to again sort their Postits

into piles of ideas that seem

to go together.

*If using Book Clubs, you can

use Literature Circle sheets to

assess their understanding.

*Have students’ complete

graphic organizers for an

assessment.

*Have students write a compare

and contrast essay based upon

their findings on the settings,

theme or character’s struggles

after they read several historical

fiction books.

2


text when explaining what the text

says explicitly and when drawing

inferences from the text.

RL.5.3. Compare and contrast two

or more characters, settings,

or events in a story or drama,

drawing on specific details in the

text (e.g., how characters interact).

RL.5.4. Determine the meaning of

words and phrases as they

are used in a text, including

figurative language such as

metaphors and similes.

RL.5.9. Compare and contrast

stories in the same genre (e.g.,

mysteries and adventure stories)

on their approaches to similar

themes and topics.

(determining importance,

interpretation)

“How do you think what just

happened will affect the

character? Turn and tell your

partner.” (prediction)

“How does this situation

compare to other experiences or

situations we’ve read about?”

(intertextuality)

_What is the initiating conflict

within the story?

_Whatt are the events that lead

up to the climax?

_What is the resolution in the

story?

_What changes or obstacles did

the character go through?

*You may want to have a group

of students read the same book

and have a discussion on the

character’s struggles.(You could

do this through “Book Clubs” or

small group guided reading.

*Eventually, you would like the

students to point out the

character’s struggles within their

own independent books.

*To extend this unit, have the

students compare and contrast

the various settings or

characters’ struggles in order to

learn more about the plot.

*You can also concentrate on

theme. Model with a read aloud

and then have students find the

theme within various historical

fiction books. There are several

books with similar themes that

you may want to read to your

students.

3


Suggested Module Resources: Historical Fiction Picture Books

Adler, David A. The Babe & I. [OLDER] E Adler

While helping his family make ends meet during the Depression by selling newspapers, a boy meets Babe Ruth.

Adler, David A. Mama Played Baseball. [OLDER] E Adler

Young Amy helps her mother to get a job as a player in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League while Amy's father is

serving in the army during World War II.

Altman, Linda Jacobs. Amelia's Road. [OLDER] E Altman

Tired of moving around so much, Amelia, the daughter of migrant farm workers, dreams of a stable home.

Atkins, Jeannine. Anne Hutchinson's Way. [OLDER] E Atkins

A fictionalized episode from the life of Anne Hutchinson, who arrived with her family in Massachusetts in 1634, but was soon banished

for holding religious meetings and teaching ideas with which Puritan ministers disagreed.

Avi. Silent Movie. [OLDER] E Avi

In the early years of the twentieth century, a Swedish family encounters separation and other hardships upon immigrating to New York

City until the son is cast in a silent movie, in a picture book that evokes an actual silent movie

Bartone, Elisa. American Too.[OLDER] E Bartone

Story of how one young girl's imagination made her American dream come true.

Bildner, Phil. The Hallelujah Flight. [OLDER] E Bildner

In 1932, James Banning, along with his co-pilot Thomas Allen, make history by becoming the first African Americans to fly across the

United States, relying on the generosity of people they meet in the towns along the way who help keep their "flying jalopy" going.

Birtha, Becky. Lucky Beans. [OLDER] E Birtha

During the Great Depression, Marshall, an African American boy, uses lessons learned in arithmetic class and guidance from his mother

to figure out how many beans are in a jar in order to win her a new sewing machine in a contest.

Blaisdell, Molly. Rembrandt and the Boy Who Drew Dogs : A Story About Rembrandt van Rijn. [OLDER] E Blaisdell

This picture book accurately portrays the story of Titus, Rembrandt van RijnÆs son who longed to paint like his father, and the struggle

he had to get his father to notice his work when he was a young boy

4


Borden, Louise. Across the blue Pacific : a World War II story. [OLDER] E Borden

A woman reminisces about her neighbor's son who was the object of a letter writing campaign by some fourth-graders when he went away

to war in 1943.

Borden, Louise. Sleds on Boston Common : A Story from the American Revolution. [OLDER] E Borden

Henry complains to the royal governor, General Gage, after his plan to sled down the steep hill at Boston Common is thwarted by the

masses of British troops camped there.

Castrovilla, Selene. By the Sword. J 973.332 C (Non fiction picture book)

Follows Benjamin Tallmadge's participation in the U.S. revolutionary war.

Deedy, Carmen Agra. The Yellow Star : The Legend of King Christian X of Denmark.[OLDER] E Deedy

Retells the story of King Christian X and the Danish resistance to the Nazis during World War II

Edwards, Pamela Duncan. Barefoot : Escape on the Underground Railroad.[OLDER] E Edwards

In the forest, a group of animals help a runaway slave escape his pursuers.

Fletcher, Susan. Dadblamed Union Army cow. [OLDER] E Fletcher

During the Civil War, a devoted cow follows her owner when he joins the Union Army and, despite all his efforts to send her home, stays

with him and his regiment until the end of the war. Based on a true story.

Glaser, Linda. Hannah's Way. [Older] E Glaser

In rural Minnesota in 1938, Hannah, a young orthodox Jewish girl, deals with being the new girl in class.

Hazen, Barbara Shook. Katie's Wish.[OLDER] E Shook

Soon after Katie wishes for her potatoes to disappear during dinner, a potato famine ravages her native Ireland, forcing her to leave for

America.

Howard, Elizabeth Fitzgerald. Virgie Goes to School With us Boys. [OLDER] E Howard

In the post-Civil War South, a young African American girl is determined to prove that she can go to school just like her older brothers.

Johnson, Angela. Just like Josh Gibson. E Johnson

A young girl's grandmother tells her of her love for baseball and the day they let her play in the game even though she was a girl.

Joosse, Barbara. Lewis and Papa : Adventure on the Santa Fe Trail. [OLDER] E Joosse

While accompanying his father on the wagon train along the Santa Fe Trail, Lewis discovers what it is to be a man.

5


Judge, Lita. One thousand tracings : healing the wounds of World War II. [OLDER] E Judge

The author describes her family's efforts to help their friends and others who were left homeless and hungry in the aftermath of World

War II.

Lowell, Susan. Elephant Quilt. [OLDER] E Lowell

Lily Rose and Grandma stitch a quilt that tells the story of their family's journey from Missouri to California by covered wagon in 1859.

Lubner, Susan. A Horse's Tale. E Lubner

In Williamsburg, Virginia, in colonial days, Lancer the horse runs loose and behaves oddly while his owner and owner's friends try

everything they can think of to help him feel better, until Margaret the Milliner realizes that Lancer needs a friend, too.

McCully, Emily Arnold. The escape of Oney Judge [OLDER] E McCully

Young Oney Judge risks everything to escape a life of slavery in the household of George and Martha Washington and to make her own

way as a free black woman.

McGugan, Jim . Josepha : A Prairie Boy's Story.[OLDER] E McGugan

Josepha, an immigrant boy, leaves school to begin working and says good-bye to his best friend.

Mackall, Dandi Daley. Rudy rides the rails : a Depression era story [OLDER] E Mackall

In 1932, during the Depression in Ohio, thirteen-year-old Rudy, determined to help his family weather the hard times, hops a train going

west to California and experiences the hobo life.

Noble, Trinka Hakes. The Last Brother : a Civil War tale. [OLDER] E Noble

Eleven-year-old Gabe enlists in the Union Army in Pennsylvania along with his older brother Davy and, as bugler, does his best to protect

Davy during the Battle of Gettysburg.

Peterson. Dont Forget Winona [OLDER] E Peterson

A young girl describes her family's experiences--and her younger sister's antics--when a drought forces them to make their way on Route

66 from Oklahoma to California.

Sherman, Patrice. Ben and the Emancipation Proclamation. [OLDER] E Sherman

Young Benjamin Holmes, a slave in Charleston who has taught himself to read, reads Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation to his fellow

slaves in prison.

Smith, Icy. Half spoon of rice : a survival story of the Cambodian genocide [OLDER] E Smith

Nine-year-old Nat and his family are forced from their home on April 17, 1975, marched for many days, separated from each other, and

forced to work in the rice fields, where Nat concentrates on survival. Includes historical notes and photographs documenting the

Cambodian genocide.

6


Spiotta-DiMare, Loren. Rockwell : A Boy and His Dog. [OLDER] E Spiotta-DiMare

This biographical fiction recounts Norman Rockwell's painting his Stockbridge neighbor, Scotty Ingram, in Rockwell's Four Seasons

series.

Stanley, Diane. Joining the Boston Tea Party.[OLDER] E Stanley

With the help of their grandmother's hat, the twins journey back in time to the Boston Tea Party.

Stanley, Diane. Roughing it on the Oregon Trail.[OLDER] E Stanley

Twins Liz and Lenny, along with their time-traveling grandmother, join a group of pioneers journeying west on the Oregon Trail in 1843.

Tarbescu, Edith. Annushka's Voyage.[OLDER] E Tarbescu

The Sabbath candlesticks given to them by their grandmother when they leave Russia help two sisters make it safely to join their father in

New York.

Wiviott, Meg. Benno and the Night of Broken Glass. [OLDER] E Wiviott

In 1938 Berlin, Germany, a cat sees Rosenstrasse change from a peaceful neighborhood of Jews and Gentiles to an unfriendly place

where, one November night, men in brown shirts destroy Jewish-owned businesses and arrest or kill Jewish people. Includes facts about

Kristallnacht and a list of related books and web resources.

More Historical Fiction -- and a few Biographies

Barasch, Lynne. Knockin' on Wood: Starring Peg Leg Bates 2004 [AA]

Barron, . High as a Hawk. Il Ted Lewin. 2004

Bartone, Elisa. American Too. Il. Ted Lewin. 1996

Bartone, Elisa. Peppe the Lamplighter. Il. Ted Lewin. 1993CH

Bedard, Michael. Emily. Il. Barbara Cooney. 1992

Brown, Don. Alice Ramsay's Grand Adventure. 1998

Bryant, Jen. Call Me Marianne . il David Johnson 2006 WCU

Bryant, Jen. Georgia's Bones . Il. Bethanne Anderson 2005 WCU

Bunting, Eve. Dandelions. Il. Greg Shed 1995

Bunting, Eve. So Far from the Sea. Il. Chris Soentpiet. 1998 AsA

Bunting, Eve. Train to Somewhere. Il. Ronald Himler 1996

Coerr, Eleanor. Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes. Il. Ronald Himler. AsA

Collier, Bryan. Martin's Big Words [CH; AA]

Cooney, Barbara. Hattie and the Wild Waves. 1990

Cooney, Barbara. Island Boy. 1988

Cooney, Barbara. Miss Rumphius. 1982

7


Corey, Shana. Milly and the Macy's Parade 2002

dePaola, Tomie. Bonjour, Mr. Satie.

Dillon, Leo & Diane. Rap a Tap Tap: Here’s Bojangles – Think of That! 2002 AA

Dunrea, Olivier. Painter Who Loved Chickens. 1995 WCU

Gerstein, Mordicai. What Charlie Heard. Il. Farrar/Frances Foster. 2002

Giovanni, Nikki. Rosa. Il. Bryan Collier. 2005 CH AA

Grimes, Nikki. Talkin’ about Bessie: The Story of Aviator Elizabeth Coleman. Il. E.B. Lewis. 2002 [AA]

Guthrie, Woody. This Land Is Your Land. Il. Kathy Jakobsen. 1998

Hall, Donald. Ox-Cart Man. Il. Barbara Cooney. 1979 CL

Hall, Donald. When Willard Met Babe Ruth. Il. Barry Moser 1996

Harrington, Janice N. Going North; il. Jerome Lagarrigue. 2004 [AA]

Hesse, Karen. The Cats in Krasinski Square. il. Wendy Watson. 2004

Hest, Amy. When Jessie Came across the Sea. il. P. J. Lynch. [GM]

Hopkinson, Deborah. Apples to Oregon: Being the Slightly True Narrative of How a Brave Pioneer Father Brought Apples, Peaches,

Pears, Plums, Grapes, and Cherries and Children Across the Plains. il. Nancy Carpenter. 2004

Hopkinson, Deborah. Band of Angels: A Story Inspired by the Jubilee Singers. Il. Raul Colon. 1999 AA

Hopkinson, Deborah. Birdie's Lighthouse. Il. Kimberly Root. 1997

Hopkinson, Deborah. Fannie in the Kitchen. 2001

Hopkinson, Deborah. Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt. Il. James Ransome. AA

Hopkinson, Deborah. Under the Quilt of Night. Il. James Ransome. AA 2005

Houston, Gloria. My Great-Aunt Arizona. Il. Susan Lamb. 1992

Howard, Elizabeth. Aunt Flossie's Hats (and Crab Cakes Later). Il. James Ransome. 1991 AA

Hurst, Carol Otis Rocks in His Head. Il. James Stevenson. 2001

James, Betsy. Mud Family. Il. Paul Morin.

Johnson, D. B. Henry Builds a Cabin 2002

Johnson, D. B. Henry Hikes to Fitchburg. 2000

Johnston, Tony. The Quilt Story.Il Tomie dePaola. 1985

Kalman, Maira. Fireboat: The Heroic Adventures of the John J. Harvey. 2002

Kay, Verla. Gold Fever. Il. S. D. Schindler. 1999

Kerley, Barbara. The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins: An Illuminating History of Mr. Waterhouse Hawkins, Artist and Lecturer. Il.

Brian Selznick. 2001 [CH]

Lasky, Kathryn. Marven of the Great North Woods. 1997

Levinson, Riki. I Go with My Family to Grandma's.

Levinson, Riki. Watch the Stars Come Out. 1985

Lied, Kate. Potato: A Tale from the Great Depression. Il. Lisa Campbell Ernst. 1997

Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth. The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere. Il. Christopher Bing. 2001

Martin, Jacqueline. Snowflake Bentley. Il. Mary Azarian. CL

McClintock, Barbara. Dahlia 2002

8


McCully, Emily. Beautiful Warrior: The Legend of the Nun's Kung Fu. 1998 AsA

McCully, Emily. Mirette on the High Wire. CL

McKissack, Patricia & Frederick. Christmas in the Big House, Christmas in the Quarters.

McKissack, Patricia. Goin Someplace Special. Il. Jerry Pinkney. 2001 AA

McKissack, Patricia. Mirandy and Brother Wind. Il. Jerry Pinkney. CH AA

McLerran, Alice. Roxaboxen. Il. Barbara Cooney.

Mitchell, Margaree. Uncle Jed's Barbershop. Il. James Ransome. 1993AA

Mochizuki, Ken. Baseball Saved Us. AsA

Pinkney, Andrea Davis. Ella Fitzgerald: The Tale of a Vocal Virtuosa. Il. Brian Pinkney. AA 2002

Polacco, Patricia. Keeping Quilt. 1988

Polacco, Patricia. Pink and Say. 1994

Poole, Josephine. Joan of Arc. Il. Angela Barrett. 1998

Priceman, Marjorie. Hot Air. 2005 [CH]

Rappaport, Doreen. Freedom Ship il. Curtis James. 2006 [AA]

Rappaport, Doreen. Martin’s Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. ; il. Bryan Collier. 2001 [AA]

Ringgold, Faith. Tar Beach. 1991 CH

Ringgold, Faith. Aunt Harriet's Underground Railroad... AA

Rumford, James. Traveling Man: The Journey of Ibn Battuta, 1325-1354. AsA

Ryan, Pam Muñoz. When Marian Sang. Il. Brian Selznick. 2002 AA

Rylant, Cynthia. When I Was Young in the Mountains. Il. Diane Goode. 1982 CH

Say, Allan. Grandfather's Journey. 1993 CL AsA

Say, Allan. Tea with Milk. 1999 AsA

Shange, Ntozake. ellington was not a street. il. Kadir Nelson. 2005 [AA]

Sheldon, Dyan. Under the Moon. Il. Gary Blythe. 1994

Sis, Peter. A Small Tall Tale From The Far Far North

Sis, Peter. Starry Messenger.

Sis, Peter. Tibet: Through the Red Box 1998 [CH]

Smucker, Anna. No Star Nights. Il. S. Johnson.

Stanley, Diane. Joan of Arc. 1998

Stevenson, James. Don't You Know There's a War On?

Stevenson, James. Fun/No Fun

Stewart, Sarah. Gardener. Il. David Small. 1997 CH

Thayer, Ernest. Casey at the Bat. Il. C. Bing. 2000 CH

Tunnell, Michael. Mailing May Il. Ted Rand. 1997

Turkle, Brinton. Thy Friend, Obadiah. CH

Turkle, Brinton. Adventures of Obadiah.

Turkle, Brinton. Obadiah the Bold.

Turner, Ann. Katie's Trunk.

9


Turner, Pamela. Hachiko: The True Story of a Loyal Dog; il. Yan Nascimbene. 2004

U'Ren, Andrea. Mary Smith 2003

Weatherford, Carole Boston. Moses: When Harriet Tubman Led Her People to Freedom il by Kadir Nelson AA CH 2006

Wheeler, Lisa. Mammoths on the Move. Il. Kurt Cyrus. 2006

Winter, Jonah. Frida 2002 LA

Wojciechowski, Susan. The Christmas Miracle of Jonathan Toomey. il. P. J. Lynch. [GM]

Woodson, Jacqueline. Coming On Home Soon; il. E. B. Lewis. 2004 AA CH

Woodson, Jacqueline. Show Way. il. Hudson Talbott. 2005 AA NH

Yee, Paul. Roses Sing on New Snow.AsA

Yolen, Jane. Encounter. 1992

Professional Resources:

Calkins, Lucy. Units of Study for Teaching Reading, Grades 3-5.Tackling Complex Texts /Historical Fiction in Book Clubs Volume 2

Calkins, Lucy and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project. A Curricular Plan for The Reading Workshop, Grade 5.

Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2011

Readworks.org

10


WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT

Instructional Module

Unit 6 – Module 1 of 3

Content Area: Reader’s Workshop

Unit of Study: Unit 6 Interpretation Text Sets Mid February- March

Number of Lessons in Module 1: approximately 7 Grade Level: 5

Module: Considering the Implications of Stories

Content Understandings:

* In this unit of study, you will sharpen your students’ analytical skills even further, teaching them to study texts deeply to grow big ideas

as they read.

* Early on in the unit, you’ll teach your readers that just as their books are about more than one idea, ideas live in more than one book—

we call those ideas themes.

* Students will be revisiting familiar texts, thinking about the ideas these texts suggest. You’ll teach students to reconsider and “reread”

prior events and texts. You’ll teach them that stories are never about just one idea.

* Teach all your students how to return to critical moments in their lives and learn more from those moments.

* Students will have an opportunity to revisit moments in their lives and then to revisit favorite texts.

*Analytical thinkers develop ideas about events and experiences.

* Teach students that moments in our lives are open to interpretation and you and your students reconsider real-life moments for the

ideas or life-lessons they suggest.

*Teach your students that powerful readers revise our ideas as we keep reading.

Essential Question(s):

* The Common Core State Standards suggest are the “applications” of more complex thinking—the ability to analyze any experience.

Therefore, how will my students analyze a text to relate to their experiences?

* What does this character learn?

* What can the character teach?

*What am I thinking about?

*What could I learn from this?

*What is the theme?

*How are the themes related?

1


NYS Common Core

Standards to be Met

RL.5.1. Quote accurately from a

text when explaining what the text

says explicitly and when drawing

inferences from the text.

RL.5.2. Determine a theme of a

story, drama, or poem from details

in the text, including how

characters in a story or drama

respond to challenges or how the

speaker in a poem reflects upon a

topic; summarize the text.

RL.5.3. Compare and contrast two

or more characters, settings, or

events in a story or drama, drawing

on specific details in the text (e.g.,

how characters interact).

RL.5.9. Compare and contrast

stories in the same genre (e.g.,

mysteries and adventure stories)

on their approaches to similar

themes and topics.

RI.5.2. Determine two or more main

ideas of a text and explain how

they are supported by key details;

summarize the text.

RI.5.3. Explain the relationships or

interactions between two or more

individuals, events, ideas, or

concepts in a historical, scientific,

or technical text based on specific

information in the text.

RI.5.5. Compare and contrast the

overall structure (e.g., chronology,

comparison, cause/effect,

problem/solution) of events, ideas,

concepts, or information in two or

more texts.

RF.5.3. Know and apply gradelevel

phonics and word analysis

skills in decoding words.

RF.5.4. Read with sufficient

accuracy and fluency to support

Concept Understandings

and Academic Vocabulary

*theme

*lessons

*textual evidence

Instructional Suggestions

* Make it easier to tackle this

unit by having copies available

of your prior read-aloud texts

and texts the children have

read. You may want to keep

them in a bin.

* During the reading workshop,

members of a book club will

read books together—say, for

example, four students will read

Hatchet. Within a week of the

start of this unit, you’ll be

encouraging readers to make

connections between the one

book that they are reading—in

this instance, Hatchet—and

other books the class has read.

How is Hatchet like

(and unlike) My Side of the

Mountain? How is it like (and

unlike) The Lion, the Witch, and

the Wardrobe?

* Readers will create their own

text sets by looking across

books they’ve read and plan to

read and finding ones that

address similar themes.

* If you have not done much

reading aloud and your class

does not have a shared

repertoire of texts, then begin

reading aloud now.

* First, you may teach a lesson

that begins in your life and then

moves to familiar stories.

* You’ll tell your readers that

good readers don’t read just to

find out what characters do or

Suggested Assessments/

Evidence

* You’ll know your students are

ready for this teaching if, as you

look over their Post its and listen

to their partner conversations,

you see that they are regularly

inferring about the characters in

their stories and are

synthesizing the narrative

elements in the stories they

read.

*Reading Benchmark T/U

*As readers talk to each other,

teach them to listen carefully not

for if they agree with an idea but

if the author of that idea justifies

it well—that is, do your readers

assemble textual evidence for

their arguments?

*Collect their jottings about their

interpretations about books they

have revisited.

*Have the students write about

the lessons they have learned

from reading a text.

2


comprehension.

a. Read grade‐level text with

purpose and understanding.

b. Read grade‐level prose and

poetry orally with accuracy,

appropriate rate, and expression.

c. Use context to confirm or

self‐correct word recognition and

understanding, rereading as

necessary.

what happens in stories.

Powerful readers also realize

that the stories we read are

about ideas—they literally teach

us how to live.

* Invite your students to first

consider how, in their own lives,

there have been experiences

that have taught life lessons.

* You’ll probably want to model

on a real-life story that seems

significant in your

own life—

* Have your readers revisit the

narratives they’ve written in their

writer’s notebooks and analyze

them for ideas or life-lessons

they see in them.

* Then they can turn to the

stories they’ve read and talk

with a partner or club members,

sharing their ideas about stories

they’ve read this year so far.

* Coach into how kids support

their ideas with evidence, and

teach them to listen closely to

each other and to add on to the

ideas that are brought up, so

that they build a cornucopia of

ideas together.

* You may have students do this

same work on the television

programs they watch or the

books they are reading on their

own or the events that happen

in their days. You want to

encourage that there are

lessons to learn.

*In your next lesson, you may

turn your readers to pivotal

moments in stories, showing

them how to pay attention to

3


moments in stories when

characters experience strong

emotions and/or make critical

choices.

* Probably, you’ll demonstrate

this work on a read-aloud text

that is familiar to your kids, so

your students will probably also

want to return to favorite texts.

There is value in giving students

opportunities to reread texts,

and here they’ll have a chance

to revisit favorites, thumbing

through the pages for

remembered moments,

reconsidering those more

analytically, jotting down ideas

those parts suggest, and then

arguing and defending those

ideas with their partners and

club members.

* You may want to chart the

students’ responses at this point

about the lessons they are

gathering from the books.

*Students will begin to see that

just as stories are about more

than one idea, an idea may also

appear in more than one story.

This, you may explain to them if

they do not know already, is the

notion of theme—an idea that

appears in more than one story.

*It may also be helpful to chart

some phrases readers

sometimes use when they are

talking about interpretations,

such as:

When I first read this story, I

thought it was just about . . . but

now that I think deeper about it,

I realize that really, it is also

4


about. . . .

Often people . . . but this story

shows that it’s possible people

should. . . .

I used to think . . . but now after

reading this I think . . . because.

. . .

I learned from (the character,

the event) that in life, it can be

important to. . . .

This story teaches us not only

about . . . but also about. . . .

* You’ll want to teach your

readers that we don’t wait until

we’re done with a book to begin

constructing ideas and

designing reading plans to

investigate these ideas. You

may want to go to your current

read-aloud text and talk about

some of the ideas the text is

suggesting so far.

*Teach your readers to jot these

down, to substantiate them by

giving a little boxes-and-bullets

speech to club members, and to

be ready to read on, gathering

evidence for these ideas. Then

give them an opportunity to do

the same work in their own

books. Remind them that good

books are about more than one

idea as well, so teach them to

follow more than one idea as

they go forward.

Suggested Module Resources:

Revisit texts from previous units to talk about the lessons the character and the students have learned.

5


Professional Resources: Calkins, Lucy and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project. A Curricular Plan for The Reading

Workshop, Grade 5. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2011

6


WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT

Instructional Module

Unit 6 – Module 2 of 3

Content Area: Reader’s Workshop

Unit of Study: Unit 6 Interpretation Text Sets Mid February- March

Number of Lessons in Module 2: approximately 7 Grade Level: 5

Module: Themes may be the same across books, but they’re usually developed differently

Content Understandings:

* Teach students the Common Core State Standards work of analyzing how a text makes a theme visible—how that theme is developed,

where and how you see it becoming more visible in the text, and how that development is undoubtedly different in different texts.

*The students will investigate what’s different about stories that have the same theme.

*The students will learn to study the setting because it can sometimes change the events in a story while the theme remains the same.

*The students will learn how to study the settings of stories that share themes. They will discover that are usually different, and that

differences have implications for how the theme develops in the story, there are usually differences also in the characters—in their

backgrounds, their perspectives and points of views, and their traits.

*The students will learn that readers draw conclusions about characters’ traits from how they respond to trouble and how to compare

those traits with their own.

*The students will learn that often characters, like our ideas, are revisable—we can at any moment choose to try to respond differently, to

be different. Our own selves are a constant process of revision.

*The students will have increased their repertoire of reading practices, and you’ll show them how to access that repertoire with fluency

and delight.

*The students will be able to as a reader take on all the parts of the story as it comes in, now with increased alertness and expertise and

thus increased responsiveness.

*The students will learn that as the books we read get more complicated, things are not always what they seem. Characters that

appeared trustworthy may not be, and thus their relationship to themes and lessons they demonstrate will shift.

Essential Question(s):

*How can the setting change the differences among characters?

*How can the student zone in to interpret the text on a more meaningful level?

*How can students learn from a character’s actions?

*What character traits does the character portray that are similar to my own?

1


* What is this story beginning to be about? How do the character’s actions change the outcome?

NYS Common Core

Standards to be Met

RL.5.1. Quote accurately from a

text when explaining what the text

says explicitly and when drawing

inferences from the text.

RL.5.2. Determine a theme of a

story, drama, or poem from details

in the text, including how

characters in a story or drama

respond to challenges or how the

speaker in a poem reflects upon a

topic; summarize the text.

RL.5.3. Compare and contrast two

or more characters, settings, or

events in a story or drama, drawing

on specific details in the text (e.g.,

how characters interact).

RL.5.9. Compare and contrast

stories in the same genre (e.g.,

mysteries and adventure stories)

on their approaches to similar

themes and topics.

RI.5.1. Quote accurately from a text

when explaining what the text says

explicitly and when drawing

inferences from the text.

RI.5.2. Determine two or more main

ideas of a text and explain how

they are supported by key details;

summarize the text.

RI.5.3. Explain the relationships or

interactions between two or

more individuals, events, ideas, or

concepts in a historical, scientific,

or technical text based on specific

information in the text.

RI.5.5. Compare and contrast the

overall structure (e.g., chronology,

comparison, cause/effect,

problem/solution) of events, ideas,

concepts, or information in two or

more texts.

Concept Understandings

and Academic Vocabulary

* theme

* character traits

*interpretation

*meaning

*explicit details

Instructional Suggestions

* You’ll praise your readers for

noticing how themes live in

more than one text, and you’ll

study the classroom charts that

document these themes intently,

perhaps holding up some of

your read-aloud texts as you

demonstrate. “You know,” you

may say, “I’m realizing that

while some of these stories

have the same theme, there are

also a lot of differences in these

stories.

* Your readers, now, will

continue to read the books they

are choosing for their clubs, if

you wish. You may use texts

you used during your read aloud

or texts the students have read.

They’ll analyze and talk about

those books in the context of

other books they’ve read before,

putting ones alongside each

other that they think are related

and learning now to analyze the

nuances in how these stories

are different as well as similar.

*You may want to refer to your

similar them chart from the last

module.

* If your students need more

support with finding places in

their texts where characters

demonstrate how they help

develop a theme in similar and

different ways, point them to the

moments in their narratives

Suggested Assessments/

Evidence

*You may want to check their

reading logs and see if they

have selected any books with a

common theme.

*Collect the students’ jottings

during mini lessons or their

“Reader’s Notebook” to check

for understanding.

*You may want to have the

student’s write an interpretative

essay during “Writer’s

Workshop” to incorporate their

understanding.

*Graphic organizers may be

used to determine the

similarities and differences

among characters or

themselves.

2


RF.5.3. Know and apply gradelevel

phonics and word analysis

skills in decoding words.

Use combined knowledge of all

letter-sound

correspondences, syllabication

patterns, and morphology (e.g.,

roots and affixes) to read

accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic

words in context and out of context.

RF.5.4. Read with sufficient

accuracy and fluency to support

comprehension.

a. Read grade‐level text with

purpose and understanding.

b. Read grade‐level prose and

poetry orally with accuracy,

appropriate rate, and expression.

c. Use context to confirm or

self‐correct word recognition and

understanding, rereading as

necessary.

when characters face trouble,

and coach them to analyze how

characters respond to trouble.

*You may choose to do “Book

Clubs” or have students use

previously read texts. Then,

encourage your students to read

more about a particular theme.

Suggested Module Resources:

Oliver Button Is a Sissy and The Other Side

Revisit texts from previous units or use the suggested list from the Historical Fiction Unit.

Professional Resources:

Calkins, Lucy and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project. A Curricular Plan for The Reading Workshop, Grade 5.

Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2011

Readworks.org

3


4


WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT

Instructional Module

Unit 6 – Module 3 of 3

Content Area: Reader’s Workshop

Unit of Study: Unit 6 Interpretation Text Sets Mid February- March

Number of Lessons in Module 3: approximately 7 Grade Level: 5

Module: Symbolism and Literary Devices and Their Relationship to the Meanings and Themes of

Stories

Content Understandings:

*The students will investigate and articulate symbolism.

*Refrain from telling your students what symbols mean, and instead issue an invitation to explore symbolism.

*The students will begin to notice first the grand and obvious symbols. Then, encourage deeper meaning into objects.

* The students will begin to realize that in good stories, details matter.

*The students will learn the notion that titles can be symbolic as well. Sometimes it is at the end of the story, and sometimes earlier in the

story, when we’ll come upon a line, or a scene, that seems to directly refer back to the title.

*The students will increase their flexibility and skill with analytical thinking and synthesis in complex texts.

*The students will learn about literary devices, such as foreshadowing, repetition, and perspective, and how these devices help an author

develop and complicate themes.

*The students will learn that analyzing foreshadowing well means that readers must synthesize across many pages of texts and that

they must be comfortable holding on to some unexplained questions as they read, having faith that later, the answers will be revealed.

*The students will learn about another literary device that is worth teaching not just in poetry but in reading and analyzing literature is

repetition. Teach your readers, for instance, that it’s not just objects that may be repeated in a text. Sometimes it is lines, and sometimes

there are parallel scenes, or moments—when things are almost the same but perhaps slightly different.

*The students will learn teach you that readers analyze characters’ perspectives and points of view as a way to find deeper meanings in

texts.

Essential Question(s):

* What are the significance of objects and moments in the story? Do they have a hidden meaning?

*How is the title symbolic to the story? What do you think it represents?

*What does that item or character’s actions have to do with the story?

*Why did he author repeat that phrase, line, or moment? What is the significance?

*How does the story go because of the way the narrator is telling it?

1


NYS Common Core

Standards to be Met

RF.5.3. Know and apply gradelevel

phonics and word analysis

skills in decoding words.

a. Use combined knowledge of all

letter-sound

correspondences, syllabication

patterns, and morphology (e.g.,

roots and affixes) to read

accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic

words in context and out of context.

RF.5.4. Read with sufficient

accuracy and fluency to support

comprehension.

a. Read grade‐level text with

purpose and understanding.

b. Read grade‐level prose and

poetry orally with accuracy,

appropriate rate, and expression.

c. Use context to confirm or

self‐correct word recognition and

understanding, rereading as

necessary.

RL.5.1. Quote accurately from a

text when explaining what the text

says explicitly and when drawing

inferences from the text.

RL.5.2. Determine a theme of a

story, drama, or poem from details

in the text, including how

characters in a story or drama

respond to challenges or how the

speaker in a poem reflects upon a

topic; summarize the text.

RL.5.3. Compare and contrast two

or more characters, settings, or

events in a story or drama, drawing

on specific details in the text (e.g.,

how characters interact).

RL.5.4. Determine the meaning of

Concept Understandings

and Academic Vocabulary

*symbolism

*metaphoric

*foreshadowing

*repetition

*perspective

*mood

*literary devices

Instructional Suggestions

*Review or read The Other Side to

model. It is more than a wooden

fence, that it is a metaphoric

fence, is an absolute epiphany

to readers who haven’t

investigated the history of the

color line in this country.

* Read The Paper Bag Princess to

illustrate everyone has dragons and

the dragons that any of us face

in our lives.

*Eventually, move from these

obvious, explicit symbols to

ones that may be less obvious

and more metaphoric—the hat

that symbolizes gang

acceptance in Eve Bunting’s

Your Move, the chess game in

that same story, the dog in

Because of Winn-Dixie—each of

these objects is laden with

potential meaning.

*Have students jot, sketch or

draw their interpretations of the

symbolism in each book.

*Encourage your students by

asking, “I’m just wondering

about …..”

* Invite your readers to consider

what “The Other Side,” and “Fly

Away Home,” and “Tiger Rising”

mean in the context of the

stories. Invite them to consider

why it’s Because of Winn-Dixie

and not simply Winn-Dixie. You

may use other titles the children

Suggested Assessments/

Evidence

* Show them how to use their

pencils and notebooks to

articulate their ideas about

symbols. Expect sketches and

excitement. Collect these

sketches or drawings to check

understanding.

*Some prompts to check

understanding might include:

One idea this book suggests is.

. . .

One example that shows (this

idea) is . . . because. . . .

Another example that shows

(this idea) is . . . because. . . .

This makes me realize/think

that. . . .

Or

I used to think this book was

about . . . because. . . .

Now I think this book is about . .

. because. . . .

This makes me realize/think

that. . . .

Or

These two books are similar

because they both teach that. . .

.

On the one hand, though, in the

first book. . . .

On the other hand, in the

second book. . . .

This makes me realize/think

that. . . .

2


words and phrases as they are

used in a text, including figurative

language such as metaphors and

similes.

RI.5.1. Quote accurately from a

text when explaining what the text

says explicitly and when drawing

inferences from the text.

RI.5.3. Explain the relationships or

interactions between two or

more individuals, events, ideas, or

concepts in a historical, scientific,

or technical text based on specific

information in the text.

RI.5.6. Analyze multiple accounts

of the same event or topic, noting

important similarities and

differences in the point of view they

represent.

have read or you have used

during your read alouds. Have

them jot down the potential

meanings behind the titles.

*If you are using “Book Clubs,”

your book clubs will hopefully

encourage conversations and

arguing and defending what the

titles of books they have read

might mean. Usually titles have

metaphoric significance, often

deeply related to possible

meanings of the story—what the

story may be about.

*To teach foreshadowing, you

may want to read the entire

passage or book and then

return to where the object or hint

first occurred.

* Edward’s Eyes also

demonstrates the significance of

foreshadowing beautifully.

Even before you begin the story,

you’re pretty sure there’s

something special about

Edward. And you’re pretty sure

that he’s dead. There are two

aspects of understanding

foreshadowing that help readers

navigate more complex texts.

One aspect is that it teaches a

discipline of rapid, on-the-run

rereading.

* Number the Stars, for instance,

the moment comes in the text

when that actual line appears—

more than once. An alert reader

realizes that there is probably

significance in that repetition.

*In Fly Away Home, for instance,

the narrator speaks repeatedly

about the blue clothes they

* “How do two or three different

books advance the same theme

differently?” These

conversations will help when

you have readers rehearsing

and writing multiple fast-draft

compare-and contrast essays

on books that seem to address

similar themes.

*By this time of year, students

should be choosing books

wisely, using their pens to jot

and keep track of characters

and events in their stories, and

monitoring their comprehension

and stamina independently.

*Fountas and Pinnell

Benchmark Assessments

3


wear—the blue shirts, the blue

jeans, the blue bags. The

character is, clearly, not just

wearing blue clothes, he is blue.

But it’s the repetition that alerts

us to the character’s mood—.

*This unit is a good match for

your students if they have

learned to read between the

lines and infer about characters’

emotions and traits, if they pay

attention to the settings

in their stories, and if they use

strategies they know to figure

out unfamiliar words and difficult

parts of their texts as they read.

*“Today I want to teach you that

readers analyze characters’

perspectives and points of view

as a way to find deeper

meanings in texts. One way

they might do this is to think

about the significance of

characters’ perspectives on the

possible meanings of a story.

Readers might ask themselves,

‘How does the story go because

this character is telling it? Would

it go differently if a different

character was telling the story?’”

Suggested Module Resources:

The Other Side

Tiger Rising

Because of Winn-Dixie

Fly Away Home

Edward’s Eyes

4


Number the Stars

Most often tagged foreshadowing


































Grandfather's Journey by Allen Say (5 times)

The Table Where Rich People Sit (Aladdin Picture Books) by Byrd Baylor (4 times)

The Mitten by Jan Brett (4 times)

The Wall: Growing Up Behind the Iron Curtain by Peter Sís (3 times)

Strega Nona by Tomie dePaola (3 times)

Comet's Nine Lives by Jan Brett (3 times)

Mossy by Jan Brett (2 times)

Scaredy Squirrel by Melanie Watt (2 times)

Mrs. McTats and Her Houseful of Cats by Alyssa Satin Capucilli (2 times)

Lon Po Po by Ed Young (2 times)

Alexander and the Wind-Up Mouse by Leo Lionni (2 times)

Miss Rumphius by Barbara Cooney (2 times)

The Sign of the Beaver by Elizabeth George Speare (2 times)

Holes by Louis Sachar (2 times)

The Somnibus: Book I (A Paranormal Thriller) by Craig McGray (1 times)

Lost Melody: A Novel by Lori Copeland (1 times)

The Wild, Wild Inside: A View from Mommy's Tummy! by Kate Feiffer (1 times)

Linger by Maggie Stiefvater (1 times)

Dying to Meet You (43 Old Cemetery Road) by Kate Klise (1 times)

Sneezy Louise (Picture Book) by Irene Breznak (1 times)

Piggybook by Anthony Browne (1 times)

Egg Drop by Mini Grey (1 times)

The House in the Night by Susan Marie Swanson (1 times)

The Three Snow Bears by Jan Brett (1 times)

Goldilocks and the Three Bears [adapted - Jan Brett] by Jan Brett (1 times)

Magical Library Lessons by Lynne Farrell Stover (1 times)

Mee-An and the Magic Serpent by Baba Wague Diakite (1 times)

Monkey and Me by Emily Gravett (1 times)

Chronicle of a Death Foretold by Gabriel García Márquez (1 times)

If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Joffe Numeroff (1 times)

The Secret-Keeper by Kate Coombs (1 times)

The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick (1 times)

Moon Over Tennessee: A Boy's Civil War Journal by Craig Crist-Evans (1 times)

5


The Memory String by Eve Bunting (1 times)

Jingle Dancer by Cynthia Leitich Smith (1 times)

Mirette and Bellini Cross Niagara Falls (Mirette) by Emily Arnold McCully (1 times)

Passage to Freedom: The Sugihara Story by Ken Mochizuki (1 times)

John, Paul, George & Ben by Lane Smith (1 times)

The Case of the Twin Teddy Bears by Carolyn Keene (1 times)

Terrible Things: An Allegory of the Holocaust by Eve Bunting (1 times)

Writing for Story: Craft Secrets of Dramatic Nonfiction by Jon Franklin (1 times)

Has Man a Future? by Bertrand Russell (1 times)

Pandora by Robert Burleigh (1 times)

Scorpions by Walter Dean Myers (1 times)

Something From Nothing by Phoebe Gilman (1 times)

Strega Nona's Magic Lessons by Tomie dePaola (1 times)

How Many Days to America?: A Thanksgiving Story by Eve Bunting (1 times)

Keeper of the Doves by Betsy Byars (1 times)

Artist of Life (Bruce Lee Library) by Bruce Lee (1 times)

Paul Revere's Ride by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1 times)

Fiction Writer's Brainstormer by James V. Smith (1 times)

The Biggest Bear by Lynd Ward (1 times)

Wringer by Jerry Spinelli (1 times)

On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World's Weather by Marilyn Singer (1 times)

Frog and Toad All Year by Arnold Lobel (1 times)

The Shadow of Christ in the Law of Moses by Vern S. Poythress (1 times)

Rosie's Walk by Pat Hutchins (1 times)

The Spider and the Fly by Mary Howitt (1 times)

I Heard the Owl Call My Name by Margaret Craven (1 times)

An Occurence at Owl Creek Bridge by Ambrose Bierce (1 times)

Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? by Bill Martin, Jr. (1 times)

If You Take a Mouse to the Movies by Laura Numeroff (1 times)

Enduring Love by Ian McEwan (1 times)

Is Your Mama a Llama? (board book) by Deborah Guarino (1 times)

If You Give a Moose a Muffin by Laura Joffe Numeroff (1 times)

Pictures of Hollis Woods by Patricia Reilly Giff (1 times)

Mystic River by Dennis Lehane (1 times)

A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway (1 times)

6


From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E. L. Konigsburg (1 times)

Love That Dog by Sharon Creech (1 times)

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck (1 times)

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (1 times)

Inkheart by Cornelia Funke (1 times)

Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo (1 times)

Books that teach literary devices

Alliteration

Author Title

Kellogg, Steven Chicken Little

Lobel, Anita Allison’s Zinnia

Steig Shrek!

Dialogue

Author Title

Duke, Kate Aunt Isabel Tells a Good One

Flashback

Author Title

Cooney, Barbara Miss Rumphius

Nobel, Trinka The Day Jimmy’s Boa Ate the Wash

Say, Allen Grandfather’s Journey

Turner Dakota Dugout

Van Allsburg, Chris The Wreck of the Zephyr

Foreshadowing

Author Title

Aylesworth Full Belly Bowl

Bottner Bootsie Barker Bites

Bunting, Eve Can You Do This Old Badger

Flournoy, Balerie Patchwork Quilt

Martin Knots on a Counting Rope

Say, Allen Grandfather’s Journey

Steig Sylvester and the Magic Pebble

Van Allsburg, Chris The Stranger

Yolen Owl Moon

Inference

Author Title

Ball Jeremy’s Tail

Bottner Bootsie Barker Bites

7


Brinkloe, Julie Fireflies

Bunting, Eve Fly Away Home

Bunting, Eve How Many Days to America

McCully, Emily Mirette on the High Wire

Steig Dr. DeSoto

Turner Dakota Dugout

Van Allsburg, Chris The Garden of Abdul Gaszai

Wyrth,Sharon Dennis Something Beautiful

Professional Resources:

Calkins, Lucy and Colleagues from The Reading and Writing Project. A Curricular Plan for The Reading Workshop, Grade 5.

Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2011

8

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