Graduate Curriculum Committee - zicklin : school of business - CUNY

zicklin.baruch.cuny.edu

Graduate Curriculum Committee - zicklin : school of business - CUNY

ZICKLIN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

RECOMMENDATION TO GRADUATE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE

Department of Marketing and International Business, November 17, 2010

PART A:

Academic Matters, Section AII: New Courses

New course to be offered by the Department of Marketing and International Business

AII.10.1

IBS 9600: International Business Fundamentals

In a rapidly globalizing world, future managers and other business professionals must possess a deep understanding of how

international factors influence modern business decision-making. They must also possess the requisite problem solving skills to

understand and function in this global environment. The course aims to provide students with a broad overview of concepts and

principles of international business and how business people can use this knowledge to obtain strategic advantage in the marketplace.

1.5 hours, 1.5 credits. Prerequisite: None

EXPLANATION: MBA students will have to take this course, IBS 9600, as part of the required MBA core curriculum as revised. The

course will be offered at least once a semester. The course will be offered at least once a semester and is expected to enroll

approximately 65 students.

Approved by the Department of Marketing and International Business Faculty, November 2, 2010. Syllabus/Course Information sheet

attached.


IBS 9600 – International Business Fundamentals

1.5 Credits

Clifford Wymbs

Clifford.Wymbs@baruch.cuny.edu

Office: VC 12-284

646 – 312 – 3299 (P)

646 – 312 – 3271 (F)

646 – 312 – 3270 (Sec.)

Class Meeting: Tuesday

Room 10-150

Office Hours: Tues./Thur.

Rm. 12-284

Teaching Assistant: None

Overview of the Course and Learning Goals

The objectives of the course are to introduce future managers and specialists to how international

factors influence modern business decision-making and to provide the requisite problem-solving

skills in the global environment. The primary objective of this course is to provide the students

with a broad overview of concepts, principles and applications of international business.

Specifically, the course will have particular emphasis on:

‣ Globalization

‣ Cultural and government influences

‣ International Trade and investment theory

‣ Importing/exporting

‣ International entrepreneurship

‣ Global finance and currency movements

‣ Ethical decision-making in an international context

‣ Strategic alliances and other forms of management control

‣ International business’ impact on functional business areas

MBA Learning Goals:

This course will directly address two MBA identified learning goals.

Global Awareness: Students will be sensitive to differences in perspective, institutions,

and practices among business people from different countries and cultures, so they may

operate effectively in a global economy that puts a premium on global business

relationships.

Knowledge Integration: Students will have a working knowledge of how different

functional areas in business are applied in a holistic, analytical, and integrative manner to

create and implement effective solutions to business problems.

Ethical Awareness: Students will be sensitive to ethical issues in business, understand the

importance of behavior and their responsibilities as business people to uphold ethical

principles in their dealings.

Communication: Students will be effective oral and written communicators as leadership

and teamwork in business is dependent on developing shared meaning and commitment to

action fostered through communication.


Course Learning Goals:






Students will be able to identify, describe and explain relevant global business factors

(economic, political and social) and apply them to solve business problems and spot

related opportunities. This learning goal will be evaluated through examinations and

classroom discussions.

Students will be able to analyze and interpret how global business factors and currency

movements influence a firm’s foreign investment and trade behaviors. This learning goal

will be evaluated through student-analyzed cases that will be presented orally by students

and summarized in a report.

Students will be able to recognize, understand and illustrate how the relevant global

business factors affect specific management actions, ethical behaviors and strategies within

a particular country’s business environment. This learning goal will be evaluated through

examinations, classroom discussion and case analyses.

Students will be able to recognize sensitive ethical issues when they analysis cross-cultural

business cases and develop solutions that uphold ethical principles.

Students will improve their oral communication skills in class discussions and their written

skills in a case analysis assignment.

Prerequisites

There are no prerequisites or specific software knowledge required for this introductory course in

international business.

Course Materials

‣ Textbook: Fundamental of International Business, second edition. Czinkota, M.

Ronkainen, I. & Moffett, M. Wessex . http://www.wessex21c.com (required)

‣ Reading Packet: Cases and articles (required)

‣ Newspapers & Magazines : Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, Harvard Business

Review, McKinsey Quarterly, Business Week, The Economist, (recommended)

Course Communication

On Blackboard the following items will be posted:

‣ Lecture notes

‣ Links to journal articles for class discussion

‣ Study questions for each class

Students are expected visit Blackboard before each class and be able to answer the study

questions.

Grading Policy

1. Class Participation/Individual Assignments 20%

2. First Exam 30%


3. Team Exercises 20%

4. Final Exam (Case Analysis) 30%

A description of each activity follows:

1. Class Participation

Class participation is an important way of sharing your thoughts with class members to enhance

group learning. It also serves as a valuable training forum for business because there you will be

required to respond to unanticipated questions. There is no magical way of acquiring this skill.

You must overcome your individual level of anxiety via practice. Your logical, concise analysis

should make distinct, positive and useful contributions to the class. Remember, there is no one

right answer, but views which cannot be logically supported will be deemed to be poor answers. If

the need arises, I reserve the right to curtail or defer discussion. Student will be asked to discuss,

materials they have read in business journals and newspapers, e.g., Wall Street Journal, New York

Times, Financial Times, The Economist, on-line, Business Week, Fortune, etc., which relate to the

overall international business topic, preferable the one for that day’s class.

2. First Exam

The first exam will cover key factors that affect international business, i.e., material related to the

first three learning goals: Classes 1- 8. You can have one page of notes (individually

prepared) and you must hand them in with the exam.

3. Team Exercise

Team Case Presentation

Each student team (approximately 3-4 students) will perform an analysis of case questions from

one case. Written answers to the case are required to be turned in before the case is discussed.

Each team will then present summary answers to the class. These answers will be limited to two

overheads per question and take no more than 15 minutes in total for all the questions.

4. Final Exam

The final exam will be a case analysis and draw upon material learn for the entire course. The

exam will be open notes and book.

Academic Integrity

Academic dishonesty is unacceptable and will not be tolerated. Cheating, forgery, plagiarism and

collusion in dishonest acts undermine the college’s educational mission and the students’ personal

and intellectual growth. Baruch students are expected to bear individual responsibility for their

work and to uphold the ideal of academic integrity. Any student who attempts to compromise or

devalue the academic process will be sanctioned.

Additional information can be found at:

http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/academic/academic_honesty.html.


Tentative Course Schedule (Subject to Change)

Date Topic Required Readings Homework and/or study

questions

1 (8/31)

Course

Overview/

Globalization

2 (9/5) Culture

3 (9/7) Politics and Law

Fundamentals of

International Business

Chapter 1 Pages 2- 18

Globalization and its

discontents Rik

Kirkland. The McKinsey

Quarterly, 2009

Fundamentals of

International Business

Chapter 2 Pages 22- 46

Japan's frustrations in

China. Brain Salsberg.

The McKinsey

Quarterly. New York.

2009. ISs. 4; p27.

Fundamentals of

International Business

Chapter 4 Pages 73- 93

The Hidden Risks in

Emerging Markets. By:

Henisz, Witold J.; Zelner,

Bennet A.. Harvard

Business Review,

Apr2010, Vol. 88 Issue

1. Is it beneficial for

nations to become

dependent on one

another? Prepare

your argument for

and against in a

debate format.

2. China has joined the

WTO in 2001. How

has membership

affected China world

trade market and its

domestic market?

3. Does increased

international business

means increased risk?

1. What is the selfreference

criterion

and how can it be

taken into account to

reduce cultural bias?

2. Comment on the

assumption, “if

people are serious

about doing business

with you, they will

speak English?”

3. Discuss ways to

mitigate culture

problems in

international

business.

(Additional Questions)


4 (9/12)

5 (9/14)

Global Trade

and Investment

Import/Export

and Global

Entrepreneurshi

p

4, p88-95, 8p,

Fundamentals of

International Business,

Global

Trade

Environment, Chapter 3

Pages 48-73; Trade and

Investment Theory,

Chapter 6 Pages 126-

153; International

Activity of the Nation,

Chapter 7 Pages 154-174.

Fundamentals of

International Business,

Exporting and Global

Expansion, Chapter 10,

Pages 224-254

The

Global

Entrepreneur Isenberg,

Daniel J. Harvard

Business Review,

Dec2008, Vol. 86 Issue

12, p107-111

Fundamentals of

International Business,

Foreign Exchange and

Global Financial

Markets, Chapter 8,

Pages 76-99

(Additional Questions)

(Additional Questions)

6 (9/19)

Foreign

Exchange and

Global Financial

Markets

Global investment

strategies for China's

financial institutions.

Joe Ngai, Yi Wnag, The

McKinsey Quarterly,

New York, 2008, Iss. 3;

pg. 14

(Additional Questions)

7 (9/21)

MNE, Strategic

Alliances and

Fundamentals of

(Additional Questions)


Other

Organizational

Forms

International Business,

Managing Globally,

Chapter 13, Pages 304-

359

8 (9/26) Case Analysis

Competition and

collaboration in

General Electric's

Global Research

Group. Bernie Ferrari.

The McKinsey

Quarterly. New York.

2010, Iss. 3; pg. 105

Looking for

Opportunity in

Adversity: Iqbal

Quadir

and

Grameenphone (A)

Chakravorti, Bhaskar,

and David Lane July

2010 Harvard

Business School Case

Case

Questions

distributed

Analysis

will

9 (9/28) Mid-term Exam Exam

10 (10/5)

Marketing and

Strategy

11 (10/10) Case Analysis

Finding Your Strategy

in the New landscape.

By: Ghemawat, Pankaj.

Harvard Business

Review, Mar2010, Vol.

88 Issue 3, p54-60,

Rethinking Marketing.

By: Rust, Roland T.;

Moorman, Christine;

Bhalla, Gaurav. Harvard

Business Review,

Jan/Feb2010, Vol. 88

Issue 1/2, p94-101

Publicis Groupe

2009: Toward a

Digital

Transformation

(Additional Questions)

Case Analysis questions will

be distributed with each

group being responsible for

several questions. (written


12 (10/12)

13 (10/17)

14 (10/19)

Finance

Accounting

and

Supply Chain

and the Internet

VF Case

Analysis

continued /

Wrap-up

/Discuss Final

Exam

Kanter, Rosabeth

and Matthew Bird,

October 2009

Harvard Business

School Case

The Finance Function

in a Global

Corporation Desai,

Mihir A.. Harvard

Business Review, Jul-

Aug2008, Vol. 86 Issue

7/8, p108-112, 5p,

Goldman Sachs: The

10,000 Women

Initiative Marquis,

Christopher, V

Kasturi Rangan and

Catherine Ross July

2009 Harvard

Business School Case

The Internet of Things

Michael Chui, Markus

Loffler, Roger Roberts.

The McKinsey

Quarterly. New York,

2010, Iss. 2. Page 70

VF Brands: Global

Supply Chain

Strategy Pisano, Gary

and Pamela Adams

December 2009

Harvard Business

School Case

VF Brands: Global

Supply Chain (con’t)

and lead discussion)

Case Analysis questions will

be distributed with each

group being responsible for

several questions. (written

and lead discussion)

Case Analysis questions will

be distributed with each

group being responsible for

several questions. (written

and lead discussion)


ZICKLIN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

RECOMMENDATION TO GRADUATE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE

Department of Management, April 2, 2010

PART A: Academic Matters, Section AI: Changes in a Degree Program

AI.10.1 Master of Business Administration in Management (Concentration in Sustainable Business) (HEGIS: 0506.00;

Program Code: 01922): Changes in elective courses in concentration

FROM: Courses in Concentration (12 credits)

Required

Credits

BUS 9700 Sustainable Business: Perspectives, Theories and Practices 3

Choose two courses from:

MGT 9620 Globalization and the Multinational Corporation 3

MGT 9870 International Comparative Management 3

MGT 9969 Social Entrepreneurship: Concepts and Cases 3

MGT 9970 Entrepreneurship and Community Development 3

LAW 9120 Sustainability: Law and Policy 3

Choose one course from:

COM 9625 Corporate Culture and Sustainability 3

LAW 9120 Sustainability: Law and Policy 3

MKT 9752 Sustainable Marketing 3

MKT 9716 Consumer Behavior 3

MGT 9400 Human Resources Management 3

MGT 9620 Globalization and the Multinational Corporation 3

MGT 9870 International Comparative Management 3

continued


AI.10.1 Master of Business Administration in Management (Concentration in Sustainable Business) (HEGIS: 0506.00;

Program Code: 01922: Changes in elective courses in concentration

Credits

MGT 9960 (formerly MGT 9860) Entrepreneurial Strategy and Cases 3

MGT 9961 (formerly MGT 9862) Analysis of Entrepreneurial Experiences 3

MGT 9962 (formerly MGT 9867) Managing the Family Business 3

MGT 9963 (formerly MGT 9865) Researching and Developing Entrepreneurial Ventures 3

MGT 9969 Social Entrepreneurship: Concepts and Cases 3

MGT 9970 Entrepreneurship and Community Development 3

MGT 9979 Seminar in Entrepreneurship: Principles of a Sustainable Business 3

PAF 9141 Community Development: History, Present, and Future 3

PAF 9143 “Greening” and Growing Cities: Sustainability and Public Policy Options 3

PAF 9150 Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector 3

PAF 9151 The Administration of Not-for-Profit and Voluntary Organizations 3

TO: Courses in Concentration (12 credits)

Required courses:

BUS 9700 Sustainable Business: Perspectives, Theories, and Practices 3

Choose two courses from:

CIS 9771 Special Topics in Information Technologies (Topic: Green IT) 3

ECO 9711 Environmental Economics and Sustainable Development 3

LAW 9120 Sustainability: Law and Policy 3

MGT 9380 Environmentally Sustainable Behavior in Organizations 3

MGT 9740 Sustainability in Supply Chains and Operations 3

MGT 9969 Social Entrepreneurship: Concepts and Cases 3

MKT 9752 Sustainable Marketing 3

continued


AI.10.1 Master of Business Administration in Management/Sustainable Business: Changes in elective courses in

concentration

Choose one course from:

Credits

CIS 9771 Special Topics in Information Technologies (Topic: Green IT) 3

COM 9625 Corporate Culture and Sustainability 3

ECO 9711 Environmental Economics and Sustainable Development 3

LAW 9120 Sustainability: Law and Policy 3

MGT 9620 Globalization and the Multinational Corporation 3

MGT 9380 Environmentally Sustainable Behavior in Organizations 3

MGT 9740 Sustainability in Supply Chains and Operations 3

MGT 9870 International Comparative Management 3

MGT 9969 Social Entrepreneurship: Concepts and Cases 3

MKT 9716 Consumer Behavior 3

MKT 9752 Sustainable Marketing 3

PAF 9143 “Greening” and Growing Cities: Sustainability & Public Policy 3

.

RATIONALE: Now that courses are being developed specifically for the new concentration in Sustainable Business, it is time to focus

the concentration more clearly on those courses. Courses that have been developed specifically for the concentration have now been

added in this sheet. Hence, the section “Choose two courses from” is now populated entirely by those courses that have been

developed with the learning goals of the concentration in focus. Courses that are related to the concentration but not so clearly

focused have been included in the “Choose one course from” section, and courses that are less related have been omitted entirely.

It must be remembered that the major in Management with a concentration in Sustainable Business is expressly designed as a second

major. Certain courses that are either pre-requisites or co-requisites of courses on this list are not included for that reason. For

example, MGT 9960 (Entrepreneurial Strategy and Cases) is a co-requisite for MGT 9969 (Social Entrepreneurship: Concepts and

continued


AI.10.1 Master of Business Administration in Management/Sustainable Business: Changes in elective courses in

concentration

Cases), a course listed here. This listing assumes that a student interested in pursuing Sustainable Business from the perspective of the

entrepreneur will be taking courses outside this major that focus more clearly on Entrepreneurship. This list of courses focuses

primarily on the Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) perspective of Sustainable Business.

The proposed changes are as follows:

New Courses Added:

CIS 9771

ECON 9711

MGT 9380

MGT 9740

Special Topics in Information Technologies (Topic: Green IT)

Environmental Economics and Sustainable Development

Environmentally Sustainable Behavior in Organizations

Sustainability in Supply Chains and Operations

Course added to “Choose two courses from” section:

MKT 9752 Sustainable Marketing

Courses Deleted from “Choose two courses from” section and retained in “Choose one course from” section:

MGT 9620 Globalization and the Multinational Corporation

MGT 9870 International Comparative Management

Courses Deleted:

MGT 9400

MGT 9960

MGT 9961

MGT 9962

MGT 9963

MGT 9970

Human Resources Management

Entrepreneurial Strategy and Cases

Entrepreneurial and Small Business Experiences

Managing the Family Business

Researching & Developing Entrepreneurial Ventures

Entrepreneurship and Community Development

continued


AI.10.1 Master of Business Administration in Management/Sustainable Business: Changes in elective courses in

Concentration

MGT 9979

PAF 9141

PAF 9150

PAF 9151

Seminar in Entrepreneurship: Principles of a Sustainable Business

Community Development: History, Present and Future

Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector

The Administration of Not-for-Profit and Voluntary Organizations

Approved by the Department of Management, February 10, 2011.

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