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LFI 2013 Conference Seminars - Lightfair International

Seminars

90 MINUTES

Tuesday, April 23 – Thursday, April 25, 2013

36 seminars in 15 tracks

Choose from a variety of courses and create a learning

experience that will complement your visit to the

LIGHTFAIR Exhibit Hall.

ANY ONE SEMINAR

$95 per Seminar Advance Pricing

$115 per Seminar after March 28, 2013

Price is per Seminar and includes 3 days of Exhibit

Hall access.

3-DAY CONFERENCE PACKAGE (TUES – THURS)

$595 Advance Pricing / $645 After March 28, 2013

Package includes LFI Innovation Awards ® , Seminars,

Workshops and Exhibit Hall access. Does not include

Lunch & Learn.

STUDENT 3-DAY CONFERENCE PACKAGE (TUES – THURS)

$150 Advance Pricing / $180 After March 28, 2013

Package includes LFI Innovation Awards ® , any 8

Seminars and Exhibit Hall access. Does not include

Lunch & Learn. VALID STUDENT ID REQUIRED.

5-DAY FULL CONFERENCE PACKAGE (SUN – THURS)

$1,095 Advance Pricing / $1,295 After March 28, 2013

Select one 2-day Institute course, two 1-day courses or a

combination of a 1-day and two Workshops to fill two days

for Sunday and Monday. Plus, choose a combination of

Seminars / Workshops for Tuesday – Thursday. Package

includes LFI Innovation Awards ® , Institute Luncheons and

Exhibit Hall access. Does not include Lunch & Learn.

Refer to page 19 for Course Level and Credit information.

Please arrive 15 – 30 minutes prior to start time to allow for entry process.

Handouts will be provided for 1-day and 2-day courses. Workshop handouts

can be downloaded one week before the conference; they will not be

provided on-site.

PHOTO CREDITS: CHANDLER CITY HALL EXTERIOR LIGHTING, CHANDLER, AZ USA

LIGHTING DESIGN BY SMITHGROUP JJR | © TIMMERMAN PHOTOGRAPHY


TUESDAY, APRIL 23

2:00pm – 3:30pm

L13S01

FIVE CONTROLLABLE PROPERTIES:

RESURRECTING A 20TH CENTURY

ASSESSMENT TOOL FOR SSL LIGHTING

NAOMI MILLER, FIES, FIALD, LC

Senior Lighting Engineer, Department of Energy

SCOTT ROSENFELD, LC, IESNA

Lighting Designer, Smithsonian American Art Museum

LEDs have revolutionized the tools available to

lighting designers, but provided new challenges in

matching luminaires to a particular application. The

seminar will teach how to assess lighting applications

using the controllable qualities of light: Intensity,

Color, Distribution, Movement and Angle.

LEVEL: 1-2

L13S02

CHALLENGES OF WEATHER-BASED

ANNUAL DAYLIGHT SIMULATIONS

ON REAL PROJECTS

JACK BAILEY

Partner, ONELUXstudio

PIERRE-FELIX BRETON

Product Designer, Autodesk

This session will identify various challenges

associated with annual / weather-based daylight

simulation. From the data collection step, validation

of weather data to the development of custom tools

to integrate window shades into annual simulation

you will learn about important steps that are required

to be made to successfully predict how a building

performs with regard to daylighting over a year.

LEVEL: 1-2

L13S03

THE COMMISSIONING PROCESS

FOR LIGHTING AND CONTROL SYSTEMS

GARY MESHBERG, LC, LEED AP, IES

Director of Sales, Osram Encelium

The seminar provides an understanding of The

Commissioning Process as outlined in ASHRAE

Guideline 0-2005 and IES-DG-29-2011, focusing on

how the Process applies to lighting and control systems.

LEVEL: 2

L13S04

TOOLS AND RESOURCES FOR

CHOOSING WISE INVESTMENTS IN LIGHTING

PAUL VRABEL, LC, IES

Vice President, ICF International

DAMON WOOD, LC, IES

Specification Sales Manager, Acuity Brands Lighting

This presentation makes a powerful case for owners

to resist the temptation of selecting lighting systems

based on first cost or simple payback. Using new

analysis tools and information resources, specifiers

and owners can now easily perform life-cycle cost

analyses to determine the best economic value,

based on IES Recommended Practice 31.

LEVEL: 1

L13S05

EL BALANCE ENTRE UN DISEÑO DE

ILUMINACIÓN CREATIVO Y LAS SOLUCIONES

TÉCNICAS NEW! Seminar in Spanish

LUCRECIA BLANCO, IALD, LEED GA, CSBA

Lighting Designer, Blanca Lighting Consulting

VICTOR PALACIO

Ideas en Luz

¿Diseñador de iluminación o ingeniero en iluminación?

¿Es necesario tener una división? La creatividad y el

rigor técnico no son excluyentes, por el contrario se

complementan y agregan valor mutuamente. En este

curso se propone un método para balancear la

creatividad en el diseño con las demandas técnicas y

normativas para crear soluciones luminosas únicas

realizables y perdurables.

LEVEL: 2

4:30pm – 6:00pm

L13S06

LIGHTING 101: FUNDAMENTALS

OF LIGHTING FOR ARCHITECTS AND

INTERIOR DESIGNERS

ARDRA PAIGE ZINKON, IALD, MIES

Director of Lighting Design, Tec Studio

Strengthen your knowledge of lighting fundamentals

including new trends, technology and lighting

legislation. Traditional and LED sources, lighting color,

footcandles and lighting quality will be discussed.

Case studies that illustrate the need for thoughtful

lighting that considers human factors, economics, art

and architecture will be reviewed. A refreshed toolkit

of lighting basics.

LEVEL: 1-2

L13S07

LIGHTING SOMMELIERS: PAIRING

INTEGRATED SOLID-STATE LAMPS

AND DIMMERS IN EXISTING SPACES

GREGG ADAMS, LC, LEED AP BD+C

Principal, Clanton & Associates, Inc.

ERIC LIND, IES

VP Global Specifications, Lutron Electronics Co., Inc.

How close are screw-base LED lamps to finally

matching the gold standard of incandescent dimming?

This course will look inside LED lighting technology

and examine the challenges associated with integrated

solid-state lamp and dimmer interactions.

LEVEL: 2

L13S08

LIGHTING FOR THE 21ST

CENTURY OFFICE

WILSON DAU, LC, LEED AP

Principal, Dau Design and Consulting Inc.

GARY J. WOODALL, IES, IALD, LC, LEED AP BD+C

Senior Designer, Gary Steffy Lighting Design Inc.

Lighting the office is as important as ever, and

updated guidelines and criteria are available to help

designers. This timely presentation lays out the latest

information, examines how it can be applied and

investigates impacts of current trends.

LEVEL: 1-2

L13S09

THE RIGHT TO CREATE,

AND THE REWARD OF IT

ROGIER VAN DER HEIDE

VP & Chief Design Officer, Philips Lighting

An inspiring seminar of open innovation, and how

lighting manufacturers can unleash the creative

freedom of lighting designers by involving them and

others in the product creation process.

LEVEL: All

L13S10

THE ART AND SCIENCE OF

SOLAR LIGHTING

AMELIA AMON, IDSA

Solar Designer, Alt.Technica

Can solar outdoor lighting be beautiful? This session

will introduce innovative solar and overall system

advancements that allow designers more artistry and

flexibility when specifying solar lighting. Other

advantages such as reductions in energy use,

maintenance costs, installation time and trenching

disruptions, along with potential for LEED credits,

will also be covered.

LEVEL: 1

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24

8:30am – 10:00am

L13S11

ENERGY LIGHTING UPGRADES

FROM AUDIT THROUGH IMPLEMENTATION:

CASE STUDIES IN PHILADELPHIA

MARY ALCARAZ, PE, LC, CEM, LEED AP, IES

Principal, EwingCole

FREDDA LIPPES, RA, LEED AP

Project Director, City of Philadelphia Mayors Office

of Sustainability

MARGO PIETRAS BARNES, LEED AP, CBCP, EIT

Senior Project Manager, University of Pennsylvania

Case studies in energy lighting upgrades highlight

three buildings in University of Pennsylvania’s

lighting conversion master plan showing various

approaches in implementing control of lighting in

existing buildings.

LEVEL: 2

L13S12

WHAT PART OF MY BUILDINGS

ARE 'DAYLIT'?

CHRISTOPH REINHART, PhD, IBPSA

Associate Professor, MIT

This presentation introduces three complimentary

approaches for determining which parts of a building

are ‘daylit’. The approaches are simulation-based

daylight autonomy calculations as recommended by

the IESNA Daylighting Metrics committee, user

evaluations of real daylit spaces and a new ‘rules of

thumb’ based workflow for schematic design.

LEVEL: 1

WWW.LIGHTFAIR.COM 25


SEMINAR SCHEDULE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24

(CONTINUED)

8:30am – 10:00am (continued)

L13S13

LUXURIOUS LUMINOSITY: SHEDDING

LIGHT ON HOSPITALITY ILLUMINATION

EMLYN ALTMAN, LC, IES

Director of Lighting, RDG Planning & Design

Lighting plays an integral role in the hospitality

experience, and this seminar is an introduction to the

newly published DG-25-12 “Design Guide for Hotel

Lighting” by the Illuminating Engineering Society.

LEVEL: All

L13S14

LIGHT-EMITTING PLASMA:

A CASE STUDY OF A NEW HIGH-MAST

LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY

DAVID DOUGLASS, LC, LEED AP

Project Manager, Heschong Mahone Group, Inc.

DAVID LEWBIN

Project Manager, Lighting, Pacific Gas & Electric Co.

TONY McGETTIGAN

Chief Executive Officer, LUXIM

Speakers will present results from a case study of a

retrofit high-mast installation of Light Emitting

Plasma at the Port of Oakland. Study outcomes

including energy savings and light quality impacts

will be discussed. Speakers will also discuss how

LEP technology works, in comparison to other

lighting technologies.

LEVEL: 1

10:30am – 12:00pm

L13S15

ERNST AND YOUNG LLP,

RELIGHTING CLASS A OFFICE SPACE

AT 5 TIMES SQUARE, NYC

FRANK AUSTIN, LC, GA

Vice President, Energy Services, Philips Lightolier

Energy Services Group

STEPHEN MARGULIES

Partner, One Lux Studio

JIM SCHWARTZ, CORENET

Founder, JAS Consulting

MEG SMITH, LC, LEED AP

Senior Project Manager, Application Solutions,

Philips Lighting

The re-lighting of Ernst and Young's 5 Times Square

offices had to meet energy reduction targets, improve

lighting quality and maintain aesthetic standards.

Re-lighting secured an Energy Star Rating and one

million dollars in annual savings.

LEVEL: 1-2

L13S16

INTEGRATED FENESTRATION AND

LIGHTING SYSTEMS: HOW TECHNOLOGY

DEVELOPMENT AND BUILDING CODES

ARE SHAPING THE FUTURE

PEKKA HAKKARAINEN, MA, PhD, MIES

Vice President, Lutron Electronics

HELEN SANDERS, PhD

Vice President, Technical Business Development,

SAGE Electronics

Learn how high performance buildings must be

designed to dynamically respond to daylight to

achieve optimum energy efficiency. Technology

development’s role and trends in building code

requirements will be covered as well as future

building designs.

LEVEL: 2

L13S17

FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION:

HOW CHANGING LIBRARY PRACTICES

ARE ECHOED IN DESIGN CHOICES

ARDRA PAIGE ZINKON, IALD, MIES

Director of Lighting Design, Tec Studio

The changing dynamic of public library collections

requires designers to rethink how we light library

spaces. This session will delve into how the library's

new functions alter design by using a recently

completed case study.

LEVEL: 2

L13S18

S/P RATIOS AND MESOPIC LIGHTING:

THE INFLUENCE OF SPECTRUM ON

TARGET VALUES AND RESULTS

DAWN DE GRAZIO, IES, LC

Director of Customer Education, Lighting Analysts, Inc.

This seminar will cover the basics of the science

behind mesopic lighting and how to incorporate the

new calculation method into your exterior lighting

designs using AGi32 lighting analysis software. We

will also show how to display source CCT in AGi32

and the caveats and limitations associated with doing

so in any software.

LEVEL: 1-2

2:00pm – 3:30pm

L13S19

WHEN COMPUTER RENDERINGS

FALL SHORT: MOCK-UPS TO ASSESS

AND COMMUNICATE LIGHTING DESIGNS

RANDY BURKETT, FIALD, IES, LC

President & Design Principal, Randy Burkett

Lighting Design, Inc.

This session will examine the role that mock-ups

and physical modeling can play in the lighting

design process. Despite the emergence and recent

dominance of computer based lighting design

software, the mock-up remains one of the most

tangible, insightful analysis and presentation tools

in the designer's arsenal.

LEVEL: 2

L13S20

AN ECOLOGY OF LIGHT:

TEN STEPS TO DAYLIGHTING SUCCESS

CHRISTOPHER MEEK, AIA, IES, IALD

Research Associate Professor, University of Washington

KEVIN VAN DEN WYMELENBERG, IES, PhD

Assistant Professor / Director, University of Idaho

Integrated Design Lab

This seminar will detail ten crucial steps toward

daylighting success that designers can immediately

employ in their practice. These concepts cover both

technologies and process activities that are drawn

from over a decade of university-based daylighting

design assistance.

LEVEL: 2

L13S21

INTEGRATING LEDs AND LIGHTING

CONTROLS FOR INCREASED ENERGY AND

COST SAVINGS IN COMMERCIAL INTERIORS

DONALD MILLSTEIN

Regional General Manager, Honeywell Lighting Solutions

Facility Professionals will learn how easy it is to

integrate digital-based LED lighting with lighting

controls, building automation and energy monitoring

systems to optimize energy savings and comply with

LEED, EPAct 2005 tax deductions and other

energy-efficiency measures.

LEVEL: 1-2

26 LIGHTFAIR ® International 2013


SEMINAR SCHEDULE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24

(CONTINUED)

2:00pm – 3:30pm (continued)

L13S22

EXTERIOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

NANCY CLANTON, PE, FIES, IALD, LC, LEED FELLOW

President, Clanton & Associates, Inc.

JESSICA GARCIA, EI

Lighting Engineer, Clanton & Associates, Inc.

Exterior lighting controls provide another layer of energy

savings potential. This session outlines the architectures

of these systems and each of their capabilities.

Constraints and benefits of control systems will be

discussed along with where best to implement control

systems. Adaptive standards will also be addressed.

LEVEL: 2

L13S23

ILLUMINATING THE FUTURE OF

LIGHTING: CRISIS AND REVOLUTION

MARK LIEN, LC, CLEP, CLEMC, HBDP, LEED BD+C, IES

Director, Lighting Solutions Center, Hubbell Lighting

The future of architectural lighting will impact us on

many levels. Driven by unprecedented energy costs

and sustainability concerns an industry revolution

shifted to a frantic obsession with LEDs. Trends and

new technologies poised for adoption in the next

decade will be revealed. Risks can be minimized and

opportunities embraced.

LEVEL: 2-3

4:30pm – 6:00pm

L13S24

COMMUNICATING LIGHT:

SKETCHING, RENDERING AND REALITY

CJ BROCKWAY, LC

Lighting Designer, NBBJ Studio 9 Lighting Design

CARLOS INCLAN, IALD

Lighting Designer, NBBJ Studio 9 Lighting Design

The course will explore hand to computer generated

renderings and how to effectively communicate

lighting concepts without overpromising.

LEVEL: 2

L13S25

SCALING LIGHTING AND SHADING

CONTROLS: OPPORTUNITY, CHALLENGES

AND LESSONS LEARNED

LUIS FERNANDES, PhD

Scientific Engineering Associate, Lawrence Berkeley

National Laboratory

JASON KOMAN, MPP

Program Manager / Fellow, Department of Energy,

Commercial Buildings Program

ELEANOR LEE

Staff Scientist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

RICHARD YANCEY, AIA, LEED AP

Executive Director, Gren Light New York, Inc.

Introduction of the opportunities and challenges to

deploying lighting and shading controls in all buildings,

from municipal to national level. Presenters will review

technical and policy approaches to scaling for depth and

breadth, as well as results and lessons learned from a

post-occupancy evaluation in a high-rise office building.

LEVEL: 2

L13S26

LIGHTING AS A CRIME PREVENTION

STRATEGY

ART HUSHEN

President, National Institute of Crime Prevention

GREG ORTT, LC, MIES, CPTED

Solutions Specialist, Hubbell Lighting

Through the combination of light and CPTED "Crime

Prevention Through Environmental Design," presenters

will demonstrate advantages of integration of these

two practices for a safer nighttime environment.

LEVEL: 2-3

L13S27

THE BURDEN MUSEUM: A CASE

STUDY OF SPECIFYING LEDs AND

COMPATIBLE DIMMING

NAOMI MILLER, FIES, FIALD, LC

Senior Lighting Engineer, Pacific NW National Lab

JANET LENNOX MOYER

Principal, Jan Moyer Design

This presentation is based on an upcoming DOE /

NYSERDA GATEWAY demonstration project at the

Burden Museum in upstate NY, and describes the

step-by-step process from product selections to bid

documents, submittals, final installation,

commissioning and use by the client. LED drivers

and dimming systems may not play well together,

and it is incumbent upon the design professional to

learn how to specify products and minimize the

risks of incompatibility and poor performance. The

lighting designer is challenged to find LED lamps

and luminaires that do the needed work in terms of

light output, distribution, physical appearance and

color properties, and then must pair the LED(s) with

compatible dimming systems.

LEVEL: 2-3

L13S28

THE VISUALLY-OPTIMIZED,

EMPOWERED PATIENT ROOM:

APPROACHES TO TRANSFORMING THE LIGHTING

ENVIRONMENT FOR HEALTHCARE FACILITIES

DAVID ALLISON, FAIA, ACHA

Professor / Director, Clemson University

KARYN GAYLE

Vice President, Healthcare, Acuity Brands Lighting

Hospital patient rooms have historically utilized

institutional, harsh ambient and task lighting. Today,

Healthcare drivers that focus on optimizing clinical

effectiveness, patient outcomes and safety, demand

a more sophisticated look at lighting in these spaces.

LEVEL: All

THURSDAY, APRIL 25

8:30am – 10:00am

L13S29

FROM HAND SKETCH TO SLIDE SHOW:

HOW TO PRESENT LIGHTING DESIGN

MORE EFFECTIVELY

PEIHENG TSAI

Lighting Designer / Principal, PHT, Lighting Design

This course introduces the various techniques for

illustrating lighting design concepts. Both traditional

and digital methods will be demonstrated as a means

of conveying the lighting effects in architectural spaces.

The audience will learn a systematic and effective

presentation technique.

LEVEL: 1

L13S30

REACHING THE NEXT EVOLUTION

OF LIGHTING

BRAD KOERNER

Director of Experience Design, Philips Lighting

LEDs, OLEDs, interactive controls, networking

technologies, parametric design and digital fabrication

are converging on the lighting industry. In this session, we

will envision how connecting these radical technologies

via open standards will allow designers and suppliers

to deliver innovative architectural lighting.

LEVEL: 2-3

L13S31

EVALUATING HUMAN VISUAL

PREFERENCE AND PERFORMANCE

IN AN OFFICE ENVIRONMENT USING

LUMINANCE-BASED METRICS

KEVIN VAN DEN WYMELENBERG, IES, PhD

Assistant Professor / Director, University of Idaho

Integrated Design Lab

The seminar examines several luminance-based

metrics to support improved integrated lighting

design recommendations, computational analysis

methods and lighting control technologies to improve

occupant satisfaction and increase energy savings

over illuminance-based methods.

LEVEL: 2-3

L13S32

ADVANCED LIGHTING CONTROL

STRATEGIES: WINNERS AND LOSERS

DAVE BISBEE, CEM

Project Manager II, Sacramento Municipal Utility

District (SMUD)

CONNIE SAMLA, PE, LC

Lighting Specialist, SMUD

State-of-the-art lighting controls are certainly not for

everyone: there are winners and losers. Lessons

learned from various pilot projects reveal where the

energy saving opportunities lie, what to watch out for,

and objective opinions on what needs to happen to

gain widespread implementation.

LEVEL: 2

28 LIGHTFAIR ® International 2013


THURSDAY, APRIL 25

(CONTINUED)

10:30am – 12:00pm

L13S33

LIGHTING AND HUMAN HEALTH

JOAN E. ROBERTS, PhD

Professor of Chemistry, Fordham University

The spectral content of natural light changes from

morning through afternoon and evening and, with

these changes, the physiology of the human body is

dramatically altered. Inadequate and inappropriate

lighting increases the risk for disease, while correct

lighting has a positive effect on human health.

LEVEL: All

L13S34

DESIGN OF ELECTRIC LIGHTING

CONTROLS FOR DAYLIGHTING

DAVID WEIGAND, LC, LEED AP

Senior Sales Rep, Encelium Technologies ULC,

Osram Sylvania

For daylighting to save energy, daylight-responsive

lighting controls are needed. This workshop provides

in-depth information about strategies, approaches,

design, application, technologies and commissioning,

with students engaged in problem-solving using

real-world examples.

LEVEL: 2-3

L13S35

TOWARDS GRID CONNECTED

LIGHTING SYSTEMS

KEITH GRAEBER

Director of Engineering, California Lighting

Technology Center

SILA KILICCOTE

Program Manager, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab

FRANCIS RUBINSTEIN

Staff Scientist, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab

Smart Grid efforts are geared towards creating

connected buildings and flexible demand. There are

many opportunities for lighting systems to interact

with the electricity grid. This course will explain how

to connect lighting systems to the electricity grid,

standard methods of connection and summary of

results from various deployments.

LEVEL: 2

L13S36

ARE WE THERE YET? USING NEMA

SSL-7A TO IMPROVE LED DIMMING

ETHAN BIERY

Design & Development Leader, Lutron Electronics

MICHAEL POPLAWSKI, IES, IEEE

Principal Engineer, Underwriters Laboratories

Attempts to dim commercially available LED sources

with phase-control dimmers continue to show less

than desirable results. This presentation will review a

recently released industry standard that aims to

improve LED dimming experiences, and it will offer

advice on how to take advantage of this standard

during the design and commissioning process.

LEVEL: 2

WWW.LIGHTFAIR.COM 29

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