call for speakers 2010

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Institute Courses - Lightfair International

call for speakers 2010

How to Submit

1. Review outlined topics and tracks

2. Don’t see your topic? Submit under YOUR IDEA

3. Go to www.lightfair.com

4. Review rules and requirements

5. Gather information needed to complete

submission (course details, bio, references,

co-presenter info, etc.)

6. Submit your information!

YOUR IDEA!

Level: Any

Audience: Any

Is there a special topic of interest you’d like to present

but don’t see listed here?

Submit according to type and length:

• 2-day course • 2 seminars (Part 1 & 2)

• 1-day course

• seminar

• 3-hour workshop

Be sure to provide a title for the course as well as the

course level, track and type of audience. “Advanced”

courses require a pre-requisite list.

DAYLIGHTING INSTITUTE ®

2-Day Course

Monday, May 10 - Tuesday, May 11, 2010

DAYLIGHTING FUNDAMENTALS

Suggested Level: 1

Audience: Architects, Lighting & Interior Designers,

Electrical & Mechanical Engineers, Facility

Managers, Specifiers, Contractors

This two-day beginners course should provide a

fundamental understanding of daylighting strategies

and related issues (e.g., solar heat gain and glare).

The course should including information about the

nature and benefits of daylight, daylight sources,

solar angles and sunpaths, shading principles, basic

photometry and daylight metrics, daylight availability,

daylight delivery methods (e.g., sidelighting and

toplighting), fenestration systems (i.e., glazing, framing

and shading components), daylight quality issues and

approaches to resolving them, integration with electric

lighting, photo-responsive controls, daylight design and

analysis methods and tools (i.e., scale and computer

modeling) and relevant metrics, codes, standards and

rating systems.

DAYLIGHTING INSTITUTE ® WORKSHOPS

3 Hours

Monday, May 10 - Tuesday, May 11, 2010

Physiological & Psychological effects of Daylight

Suggested Level: 2

Audience: Architects, Lighting & Interior Designers,

Electrical Engineers

This workshop should provide a basic understanding

of the effects of daylight and darkness on human

physiology and psychology, such as circadian rhythms,

health, well being, comfort, and productivity.

Climate Responsive Design: The Sun and Sky as

the Light Source

Suggested Level: 1 to 2

Audience: Architects, Lighting & Interior Designers,

Electrical Engineers

Effective daylighting design requires a clear

understanding of a project’s specific climatic

conditions. This workshop will provide the participants

with the tools to assess the sky and the sun as a

source of illumination, in conjunction with available

climatic data to develop design priorities and

implications. The topics will include daylight availability,

distribution, color temperature, CRI, luminous efficacy,

solar geometry, characteristics and classification,

standardization of sky luminance distributions

(e.g., CIE clear, overcast, partly cloudy), patterns of

direct solar radiation, and impact on side and top

lighting applications.

Sidelighting & Toplighting

Suggested Level: 2

Audience: Architects, Lighting & Interior Designers,

Electrical Engineers

This workshop should focus on methods for

introducing daylight in building interiors from the

top and/or sides. It should include consideration of

applicability to different building types and space use

(e.g., big box, multi-story office). It should also include

the effects of different parameters (e.g., room geometry

and surfaces, aperture size and location, glazing

selection, glare control and mitigation) on daylight

distribution and view.

Building envelope

Suggested Level: 2

Audience: Architects, Lighting & Interior Designers,

Electrical Engineers

The building envelope is a multi-layered element

that requires close coordination between the project’s

specific needs and building system. This workshop

will provide information about key considerations,

interactions, and analysis concerning the daylighting

and thermal implications of the building’s interior

and exterior envelope, as well as advanced sun

control strategies and technologies. Primary

envelope components covered in this workshop will

include: interior and exterior shading systems, static

architectural elements, high-performance glazing and

dynamic fenestration. The workshop may also include

specification writing for shading, glazing and

related components.

Simulating Daylight - An Overview of Physical

and Digital Modeling

Suggested Level: 2

Audience: Architects, Lighting & Interior Designers,

Electrical Engineers

This workshop will provide an overview of daylight

simulation techniques. Presenter(s) will discuss the

use of physical and digital models to predict the

daylight performance of buildings. The strengths

and weaknesses of various modeling techniques will

be illustrated by examples of test results and analysis

of completed projects.

Daylight computer-based simulation tools

and practices

Suggested Level: 3

Audience: Architects, Lighting & Interior Designers,

Electrical Engineers

Daylighting software is not one size fits all. This workshop

will provide in-depth knowledge about a state-of-the-art

computer based daylighting analysis and simulation tools

with advanced daylighting modeling capabilities (e.g.,

Radiance, AGi32). The workshop should include modeling

capabilities, advantages, disadvantages, as well as

simulation practices that include more than one software

tool, and the progress with the tools in the last two years

(e.g., Ecotect, Daysim, SPOT as front ends to Radiance).

The workshop may include hands-on experience by

providing software for use on participants’ computers.

Daylight Metrics

Suggested Level: 3

Audience: Architects, Lighting & Interior Designers,

Electrical Engineers

What are the emerging metrics for quantifying

daylight performance? This workshop will discuss the

range of metrics for evaluating daylight illuminance,

glare thresholds, energy savings, and climate

specific daylight performance. The workshop will

include related measurements and/or computations,

description of methods and tools, coordination with

current metrics, and discussion on validity and

applicability. It will also look at how to expand the

reach of these new metrics.

Photo-responsive Controls

Suggested Level: 2 to 3

Audience: Architects, Lighting & Interior Designers,

Electrical & Mechanical Engineers, Facility

Managers, Specifiers, Contractors

Energy efficiency through daylighting can only be

realized when electric lights are dimmed or switched

off. This workshop should provide information about

daylight harvesting control strategies and technologies,

focusing on current approaches, main issues and

emerging technologies (e.g., auto calibration/

commissioning, use of multiple sensors), including

use of open and closed loop photo sensing, photo

sensor characteristics, control algorithms, installation

and commissioning.

Lighting Design for Daylighted Spaces

(Beyond Controls)

Suggested Level: 2 to 3

Audience: Architects, Lighting & Interior Designers,

Electrical Engineers

Are there fundamental differences in lighting design

goals and strategies for daylight illuminated spaces?

What is the roll of task, ambient and accent light when

daylight is the dominant source of illumination during

substantial periods of time? Indirect vs. direct? How

does designing for dark adaptation and the night time

visual environment impact the project’s design? This

workshop or possible seminar will seek to explore these

and related questions.

Automated Shading Systems (Commissioning,

Integration, Architectural Issues)

Suggested Level: 2 to 3

Audience: Architects, Lighting & Interior Designers,

Electrical & Mechanical Engineers, Facility

Managers, Specifiers, Contractors

Daylighting designs commonly fail to meet expected

performance goals due to the continuous deployment

of manual blinds and shades to control glare. Dynamic

shading systems can provide glare control and

light re-direction when required, while retracting to

maximize daylight distribution when glare or direct sun

is not present. This workshop will provide an overview

of dynamic shading systems and automation strategies

to deliver occupant visual comfort while maintaining

persistent daylight performance.

FORMATIVE ROLE OF DAYLIGHT IN BUILDING PLANNING

Suggested Level: 2 to 3

Audience: Architects, Lighting & Interior Designers,

Facility Managers, Specifiers

Daylighting is fundamentally an issue of building

form and organization. This workshop will cover:

the inclusion of daylighting performance goals in

building programming, building site assessment,

and the geometric and space planning implications

of daylighting and view requirements. Examples of

innovative daylighting design and building system

integration will be illustrated through case studies

of common building typologies.


DEADLINE FOR SUBMITTAL ON WWW.LIGHTFAIR.COM: OCTOBER 2, 2009

LIGHTFAIR INSTITUTE ®

3-Hour Workshops, 6-hour (1-day) or 2-day courses

Monday, May 10 - Tuesday, May 11, 2010

The Human Benefits of Good Lighting

Suggested Level: 1

Audience: All

This workshop will explore the latest research into

lighting’s impact on physiological and psychological

health and well-being. A range of case studies will

depict the application of this research to actual lighting

installations. Topics touching such diverse subject

matter as Seasonal Affective Disorder, seeing and the

aging eye, employee productivity, health and satisfaction

in the work environment and light therapy techniques

may be addressed.

Energy Code Update, Interpretation and Execution

(Title 24 and Its Impact on Design Standards)

(ASHRAE 189.1 and 90.1)

Suggested Level: 2

Audience: Lighting Designers, Engineers, Architects,

Interior Designers

This workshop should cover any or all of the latest

energy laws and codes (IECC, ASHRAE/IESNA 189.1,

Title 24, and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1, EPACT, EISA)

and provide compliant examples. This energy code

workshop will include current interpretation and

execution of the code(s), and discuss its/their impact

on future lighting designs.

Sustainability / LEED ® / Environmental Design

Suggested Level: 2

Audience: Lighting Designers, Engineers,

Architects, Educators

This workshop will offer an in-depth look at a cross

section of environmentally sensitive lighting design

practices and issues including the latest energy saving

lighting design techniques and sources, resource

sensitive lighting product choices, cradle to cradle

manufacturing programs, and the impact of light on

various ecological systems across the globe. It should

include a detailed update regarding various LEED ® rating

system points that are relative to the lighting designer.

The relationship between the USGBC, ASHRAE

and the IESNA will be described, as well as the credit

interpretation process. Presenters are encouraged to

consider introducing environmental programs beyond

LEED ® that encompass evaluation metrics on the

practice of lighting design.

Installing Hardware (3 OR 6 HOURS)

Suggested Level: 2

Audience: Contractors, Engineers, Architects,

Lighting Designers

This “hands on” course is aimed at participants who

won’t mind getting their hands dirty. The presenter

should provide a basic overview of the installation

process for luminaires as well as line and low-voltage

and wiring control systems. A portion of the workshop

will consist of wiring sample lighting fixtures and

controls. Presenter(s) will be required to provide

equipment that will allow attendees to visit various

work stations and mock up schemes such as dimming,

occupant sensing and daylighting. Potentially a

one-day workshop.

Using HDR Imaging for Lighting Assessment

Suggested Level: 3

Audience: Lighting Designers, Engineers,

Researchers, Educators

This workshop should demonstrate the potential,

limitations and examples of the High Dynamic Range

(HDR) photography technique as a luminance data

and acquisition tool for assessing the performance of

lighting systems. Ideally, the workshop will be hands-on,

with identification and demonstration of both hardware

(camera types) and software compatibility and image

capture and analysis within the workshop venue and a

comparison to design criteria.

Emergency Lighting

Suggested Level: 2

Audience: Engineers, Architects, Lighting Designers,

Contractors, Manufacturers

This workshop should cover standards, codes,

equipment and proper design of emergency lighting

systems. The presenter(s) should incorporate a

discussion of current life safety and occupational safety

codes, system maintenance and testing, and proper

application of equipment. The presentation should give

attendees a hands-on experience with examples of the

latest in available technologies and equipment.

Landscape Lighting Workshop

Suggested Level: All

Audience: Architects, Landscape Architects and

Contractors, Lighting & Interior Designers, Electrical

Engineers, Electrical Contractors

An in-depth presentation covering the “how-to” of

lighting for exterior environments from parks and

public facilities, building grounds and campuses, to

private residential landscapes and other site lighting

projects. This seminar will address design criteria, as

well as the new developments in landscape lighting

equipment while covering energy consumption and

environmental concerns.

Photoshop Workshop - Creating Effective

Lighting Presentations

Suggested Level: 1

Audience: Architects, Lighting & Interior Designers,

Electrical Engineers

This software workshop is geared toward experienced

users of Adobe Photoshop ® who would like to expand

their skills in producing more professional presentation

materials for the illustration of design ideas. Advanced

techniques of managing layers, visual effects,

transparency, cross fades, etc., will also be covered with

specific applications in creating presentation materials.

Photometry as It Relates to Luminaire Design

Suggested Level: 1

Audience: All

This workshop will present the process of luminaire

design from concept and development through

prototyping and manufacturing. Speaker should

establish an understanding of fundamental photometry

including a review of photometry in general, and

in-depth instruction on using typical photometric reports.

Sustainability & Lighting Quality

Suggested Level: 2

Audience: Lighting Designers, Architects, Landscape

Architects, Interior Designers, Engineers, Contractors

This workshop should cover techniques and ideas of

lighting design that strive to maintain the highest quality

of lighting while meeting project energy, sustainability,

and environmental goals, as well as legislated mandates.

Lighting Fundamentals for Building Professionals

Suggested Level: 1

Audience: Architects, Interior Designers, Students

What are the basics of lighting design terminology,

lighting technology and lighting theory? How do light color

and distribution affect the way a space is perceived?

What are the criteria that a lighting professional uses

in selecting luminaires and sources? The presenter will

address these questions and enable attendees to better

communicate with other members of the design team,

owners and developers, contractors, and manufacturers’

representatives to bring about a successful project.

Electrical Basics for Lighting Design

Suggested Level: 1

Audience: Lighting & Interior Designers,

Distributors, Contractors

The presenter will provide a basic understanding of

electricity, electrical circuiting, switching, control zones/

dimming, and electrical loads for lighting. The presenter

will also explain how the lighting design affects the

electrical system and the documentation for a project.

Practical examples and simple mock-ups should be

worked into the class.

Wiring & Programming Controls (Hands-on)

Suggested Level: 2

Audience: Lighting & Interior Designers, Electrical

Engineers, Electrical Contractors

This “hands-on” course is aimed at users who won’t

mind getting their hands dirty. The presenter should

provide a basic overview of line and low-voltage wiring,

as well as wireless control systems as applied to various

types of lighting controls. The majority of the workshop

will consist of attendees wiring up mockups of sample

lighting control installations. Presenter(s) will be required

to provide the hardware that will allow attendees to

visit various work stations and mock up schemes such

as dimming, occupant and/or vacancy sensing, and

daylighting (open/closed loop). Content should include

state-of-the-art time clocks and manual overrides.

Color & Light

Suggested Level: 1

Audience: All

This workshop should develop a sound fundamental

basis for evaluating the impact and use of colored light,

as well as its interaction with surface colors, both from a

design perspective and a human perception perspective.

The workshop should include a variety of demonstrated

color experiences.

Photographing Lighting Projects

Suggested Level: 2

Audience: All

The focus of this workshop will be on equipment,

tricks and techniques for digital photography of lighting

installations, including a discussion of the application

of HDR technology, to compose and capture images.

Ideally, it would be hands-on, with identification and

demonstration of both hardware and software.

Las Vegas Lighting Case Study & Tour / Theatrical /

Stage Lighting / Live Vegas Show & Tour!

Suggested Level: 2

Audience: All

This workshop will present the basics of theatrical lighting

layout and control for those new to the lighting industry

and those interested in broadening their practice through

an understanding of theatrical techniques and equipment.

Ideally, this would be a hands-on workshop presented

in a local theater and culminating in attendance at the

current show. The proposer should indicate if they are

able to arrange a venue to accommodate the workshop.

Discussion during the tour should include client

requirements, project challenges, design process and

complete design resolutions.

COURSE LEVELS

1 = Basic (content appropriate to those with limited lighting

experience)

2 = Intermediate (content appropriate to those with moderate

technical and/or design knowledge)

3 = Advanced (content appropriate for those with advanced

technical or design knowledge)

ALL = Content of a nature appropriate to all audiences


call for speakers 2010

Everything You Always Wanted to Know

About Running a Lighting Design Firm

But Were Afraid to Ask

Suggested Level: 2 or 3

Audience: Lighting Designers, Architects, Landscape

Architects, Interior Designers, Engineers, Contractors

This workshop will cover the “business of running your

business”. The course will cover the range of important

topics from start-up to exit strategies, for current and

future entrepreneurs—such as marketing, accounting,

legal affairs, human resources, contracts, insurance,

and even outsourcing. The course could be a panel

discussion and should address the concerns of small,

mid-size, and large firms.

Master of All Trades (2-day)

Suggested Level: 2 or 3

Audience: Lighting Designers, Architects, Landscape

Architects, Interior Designers, Engineers, Contractors

Where else can you learn everything about lighting in

two days? This course will be divided into segments

that each feature experts in specific areas of practice of

lighting design. Each expert will share their individual

experiences and specific technical solutions. Areas

of expertise include: corporate, hospitality, retail,

entertainment, healthcare, residential, institutional, and

daylighting. Each expert will present design philosophies

and key strategies in a visually-immersive format.

Speakers only need to apply for their specialty.

What’s Going On? Hot Topics and Debates

in Lighting Today

Suggested Level: 2 or 3

Audience: Lighting Designers, Architects, Landscape

Architects, Interior Designers, Engineers, Contractors

The goal of the workshop is to disseminate information

that all designers should know about current discussions

that will impact future design. This course could be

taught by an individual presenter or panel, but must

coalesce key information from across the field of

lighting design. The speaker(s) will present both sides

of the debate with specific references to researchers

and resources for further study. Examples of the types

of debates include: Does blue light at night disrupt

circadian rhythms? Does shift work cause cancer and is

this related to lighting? Is visual acuity affected by source

spectrum? Attendees will learn about these emerging

design issues, new directions in codes and regulations,

research, competing philosophies, and technology

pitfalls. This course could be described as the potential

cliff notes for designers lacking time or access to

research critical information.

History of Lighting Design (Technology & Standards)

Suggested Level: 1 to 3

Audience: All

This workshop will review past lighting design

approaches, recommendations of light levels, and

technologies to provide a backdrop for many of the

current practices. A portion of the workshop will consist

of highlighting some of the practices printed in various

handbooks and reference manuals. Ideally, presenter(s)

will provide examples of good design practices that may

have been “lost” over time.

Solid State Lighting (1-day)

(LED Performance Guidelines)

Suggested Level: 2 or 3

Audience: Lighting & Interior Designers, Electrical

Engineers, Electrical Contractors and Distributors,

Manufacturers’ Representatives

This whole day workshop should address the current status

of solid state lighting technology - explaining the elements

of LED lighting systems and their best applications.

Presenter(s) should provide an in-depth exploration of

performance characteristics of LED arrays, light engines,

optics, power supplies, and luminaires for white and mixed

color sources. Retrofit LED lamp solutions should also

be addressed. Current examples/case studies of recently

installed projects should be reviewed to highlight the best

applications for this technology.

Ill Effects of Technology Retrofits

Suggested Level: 2 or 3

Audience: Lighting & Interior Designers, Electrical

Engineers, Electrical Contractors and Distributors,

Manufacturers’ Representatives

This workshop will explore the challenges of upgrading

existing spaces - from light sources to fixtures and

controls. Examples of projects should be reviewed to

highlight the unintended consequences that can arise

and how to achieve the best results. Presenter(s)

should elaborate on the process to ensure that the

space’s quality of lighting and functional requirements

are not compromised when a change is made to a

space. Considerations may include dimming, power

factor, RFI, and harmonics.

Introduction to Control Systems & Components

Suggested Level: 1

Audience: Lighting & Interior Designers, Electrical

Engineers, Electrical Contractors and Distributors,

Manufacturers’ Representatives

This workshop is targeted as a user-friendly review of

lighting control equipment and controls strategies. The

presenter(s) should address the use of controls for

aesthetics, as well as for energy savings and demand

response. The workshop should be broken into two major

components: hardware and control strategies. The lighting

control hardware covered should include switches,

dimmers, ballasts, relays, time clocks, occupancy/

vacancy sensors, and photocells. Control strategies

using this equipment should be reviewed, including how

each space should have a clearly defined sequence of

operation when multiple strategies are incorporated.

Data Management Software

Suggested Level: 2 to 3

Audience: Architects, Lighting & Interior Designers,

Electrical & Mechanical Engineers

Digital data management and internal and external file

sharing is a growing challenge for design firms striving

for efficient and accurate work flow. This software

workshop should cover the effective data management

strategies through various software programs. Workshop

can present an array of software solutions or go into

depth in one. It may include best practices from other

design industries with similar challenges. This workshop

should focus on software tips and tricks that enable the

mid-level user to enhance productivity.

Lighting Analysis Software

Suggested Level: 2 to 3

Audience: Architects, Lighting & Interior Designers,

Electrical & Mechanical Engineers & Manufacturer

Representatives

This software workshop should explore the calculation

and visualization capabilities of one or more lighting

analysis software packages and their ability to

comprehensively address lighting design considerations.

It should cover how to build a project in the program

using specific tools available in that software. It is

preferable that the underlying algorithms and their

implications to the results are discussed. Cross-checking

measures taken to ensure the accuracy of the results

should be presented. This workshop should focus on

software tips and tricks that enable the mid-level user to

enhance productivity.

Presentation Software

Suggested Level: 2 to 3

Audience: Architects, Lighting & Interior Designers

This software workshop for intermediate to advanced

level users should demonstrate specific techniques and

uses of programs to achieve cutting edge presentations.

Workshop should demonstrate how the software applies

to various scale projects from master planning to interior

room renderings. This workshop should focus on

software tips and tricks that enable the mid-level user to

enhance productivity.

Production Software

Suggested Level: 2

Audience: Architects, Lighting & Interior Designers

Electrical & Mechanical Engineers

AutoCAD, Revit, 3-D Studio, Adobe Acrobat are all used

extensively in delivering design concepts. This software

workshop should focus on software tips and tricks that

enable the mid-level user to immediately increase their

speed and effectiveness in lighting design specific

workflow and tasks.

YOUR IDEA!

Level: Any

Audience: Any

Is there a special topic of interest you’d like to present

but don’t see listed here?

Submit according to type and length:

• 2-day course • 2 seminars (Part 1 & 2)

• 1-day course

• seminar

• 3-hour workshop

Be sure to provide a title for the course as well as the

course level, track and type of audience. “Advanced”

courses require a pre-requisite list.

Select your topics or

submit YOUR IDEA at

www.lightfair.com

PHOTO CREDITS:

DESIGNERS: MARK MAJOR, IALD, CLAUDIA CLEMENTS, PHILIP

ROSE, COLIN BALL / COMPANY: SPEIRS & MAJOR ASSOCIATES /

PHOTOGRAPHY: FU XING

DESIGNERS: GERD PFARRÉ, IALD / COMPANY: PFARRÉ

LIGHTING DESIGN / PHOTOGRAPHY: ZOOEY BRAUN, STUTTGART

DESIGNERS: MARK MAJOR, IALD, JAMES NEWTON, CLEMENTINE

RODGERS / COMPANY: SPEIRS & MAJOR ASSOCIATES /

PHOTOGRAPHY: JAMES NEWTON

DESIGNERS: KAI PIIPPO, CLARA FRAENKEL / COMPANY:

LJUSARKITEKUR P&Ö AB / PHOTOGRAPHY: PATRIK GUNNAR

HELIN

DESIGNERS: DR. YUN WEIMIN, MR. QI HAO, MR. LEE YINGYUAN,

MR. WANG DELIN / COMPANY: GRANDAR LIGHTSCAPE CO LTD /

PHOTOGRAPHY: MR. DUAN HONGJUN

DESIGNERS: MARK MAJOR, IALD, JAMES NEWTON,

CLEMENTINE RODGERS / COMPANY: SPEIRS & MAJOR

ASSOCIATES / PHOTOGRAPHY: JAMES NEWTON

DESIGNERS: MARK MAJOR, IALD, CLAUDIA CLEMENTS,

PHILIP ROSE, COLIN BALL / COMPANY: SPEIRS & MAJOR

ASSOCIATES / PHOTOGRAPHY: FU XING

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