UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS - Study Brisbane

studybrisbane.com.au
  • No tags were found...

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS - Study Brisbane

UNDERGRADUATE

PROSPECTUS

2010

for International students


CHOOSE UQ AND BE PART OF OUR

CENTENARY CELEBRATIONS IN 2010

In 2010 UQ will celebrate its centenary. Study with us and

join in making history. Throughout the year we will host

numerous events, welcoming new students and reuniting

alumni members, celebrating our past achievements and

looking to the future. It is the people, from all walks of

life and all parts of the globe, that have shaped UQ in its

first 100 years. Join us and be one of the people who will

shape UQ into our second century and beyond.

International staff and students have played an enormous role in

shaping our global focus.

UQ’s reach is international, and we are privileged to have many

distinguished friends and collaborators throughout Australia and

the globe. It is through these networks that we have developed

and maintained our reputation as a truly world-class, internationally

recognised university.

Our vibrant campus life, exceptional study opportunities,

inspirational students and staff, commitment to community

engagement, groundbreaking discoveries and culture of excellence

have produced graduates who are leaders in their fi eld. Building

on the best of UQ’s tradition, the University will continue to deliver

undergraduate and postgraduate education that is both relevant

to the times and anticipates changes in Australian and global

requirements for knowledge and professional skills.

As the fi rst university in Queensland we have a heritage to be proud of.

If the fi rst 100 years are anything to go by, the future is bright.

Academic Calendar 2010

SEMESTER 1

Orientation

Semester 1 begins

Mid-semester break

Semester 1 resumes

Revision period

Examination period

Semester 1 ends

Mid-year break

Graduation week

SEMESTER 2

Mid-year Orientation

Semester 2 begins

Mid-semester break

Semester 2 resumes

Revision period

Examination period

Semester 2 ends

Graduation weeks

SUMMER SEMESTER

Summer Semester

22-26 February

1 March

5-9 April

12 April

6-11 June

12-26 June

26 June

26 June-26 July

19-23 July

19-23 July

26 July

27 September

-1 October

4 October

31 October

-5 November

6-20 November

20 November

6-24 December

29 November

-12 February 2011

PUBLIC HOLIDAYS

New Year’s Day 1 January

Australia Day

26 January

Good Friday

2 April

Easter Monday 5 April

Anzac Day

26 April

Labour Day

3 May

Queen’s Birthday 14 June

Exhibition Day 11 August

Christmas Day 25 December

Boxing Day

26 December

University facts and figures

STUDENTS AND STAFF

Domestic students 30,459

International students 7496

Teaching and research staff 2407

CAMPUS DISTANCE FROM BRISBANE CBD

UQ St Lucia

7 km

UQ Ipswich

50 km

UQ Gatton

85 km

UQ Herston

3 km


WELCOME

The University of Queensland (UQ) offers exceptional opportunities

and an experience that will last a lifetime.

As part of your UQ experience you will have access to Australia’s most awarded

teachers and world-class facilities. You will also be able to choose from one of the

most comprehensive ranges of study programs available in Australia.

University study should be one of the most rewarding and exciting times in your

life,so select a program that will stimulate your curiosity and place you on the path

to a successful career. At UQ we challenge and encourage your thinking, providing

dedicated support, accessible teachers and a range of extra-curricular opportunities.

UQ’s bachelor programs provide the knowledge and skills for work in specialist

areas and open up pathways to further study. Our dual degree programs allow you to

complete two degrees in less time than it would take to complete one degree and then

study for a second. At UQ you will learn from teachers who have driven cutting-edge

research that is globally acknowledged.

By choosing to study at UQ – at St Lucia, Ipswich, Gatton, Herston or one of our

other locations – you will be able to engage in a safe and vibrant environment with

the most active campus life of any Queensland university. UQ is a multicultural

community of 38,000 students, with almost 7500 international students enrolled

from over 120 countries.

Students graduating from UQ are in demand throughout Australia and the world,

and have some of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the country.

I invite you to explore this prospectus, and I hope to welcome you to UQ in 2010,

our centenary.

Professor Paul Greenfi eld AO

VICE-CHANCELLOR AND PRESIDENT

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010 1


CONTENTS

WHY CHOOSE UQ? 3

THE UQ EXPERIENCE 7

Brisbane and Queensland 8

Brisbane 8

Brisbane – facts and fi gures 8

Queensland 9

Campuses 10

– UQ St Lucia 10

– UQ Ipswich 11

– UQ Gatton 12

– UQ Herston 13

– Other teaching and research sites 14

Key facilities 16

– Library 16

– Information technology 16

– Teaching facilities 17

– Student Centres 17

Support 18

– Academic and English language support 18

– Getting Started and Orientation 18

– Diversity 19

– Personal safety 19

– UQ Union 19

– Student Services 19

Recreation 20

– Sport and fi tness 20

– Entertainment 20

– Cultural activities 21

– Student clubs and societies 21

Vital services 22

– Healthcare 22

– Childcare and Childcare centres (table) 22

– Worship and religion 22

– Food, shopping and commercial services 23

Accommodation 24

– Airport reception and temporary accommodation 24

– Accommodation options 24

– Residential colleges (table) 26

STUDY OPTIONS AT UQ 27

Undergraduate study 28

– Teaching and learning styles 28

– Assessment 28

– About undergraduate programs 29

Further study at UQ 30

– Postgraduate programs 30

– Pathways to and through UQ 30

Foundation year 31

– Foundation year programs (table) 31

English language studies 32

– ICTE-UQ English language training courses (table) 32

Other study opportunities 34

Study Abroad 34

– Exchange to UQ 34

– Exchange from UQ – UQ Abroad 34

– Short-term study 35

– Learn a language at UQ 35

Terminology 36

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 37

Areas of Study (Index Table) 38

Agriculture, Animals, Food & Environment 40

Business, Economics, Tourism & Law 46

Engineering, Architecture & Planning 52

Health 58

Humanities, Social Science, Education & Arts 66

Science & Information Technology 76

FINANCIAL INFORMATION 83

Tuition fees 84

– Tuition fee calculation 84

– Tuition fees – Bachelor programs (table) 84

– Tuition fees – dual programs (table) 85

– Fee refund information 86

Living costs 87

– Statutory expenses 87

– General expenses 87

– Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC) 88

– Students supporting dependants 88

– Employment options 89

– Expenses guide (table) 89

Scholarships 90

– UQ scholarships for international students 90

– Scholarships by study area 90

– Australian Government scholarships 90

– Other scholarship opportunities 90

ADMISSION INFORMATION 91

Entry requirements 92

– Undergraduate entry requirements at a glance 92

– Academic entry requirements 92

– Admission prerequisites (table) 92

– Minimum Australian Year 12 equivalent studies (table) 93

– Minimum entry scores (table) 93

– English language profi ciency requirements 94

– English – Queensland Year 12 equivalents (table) 95

– English – alternative tests and scores (table) 95

Application procedures 96

– How to apply 96

– Visas 96

– Application details 96

– Application process (table) 97

FURTHER INFORMATION 98

Helpful online links 98

UQ online 99

UQ partners 100

Application forms

insert

– Undergraduate (blue) insert

Study Abroad (green) insert

– English language studies (purple) insert

– Foundation year (beige) insert

Maps

inside back cover

– Throughout this publication, information panels provide Web and

contact details for further information.

– All prices are quoted in Australian dollars (AUD$).

– Defi nitions of some common University terms are provided in

UQ Terminology on page 36.

2

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

CRICOS PROVIDER NUMBER 00025B


WHY

CHOOSE

UQ?

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010 3


WHY CHOOSE UQ?

The University of Queensland enjoys a long tradition of success

– here are some excellent reasons to make UQ your university in 2010.

GLOBAL REPUTATION

When you choose UQ you are choosing

a truly world-class university.

UQ is:

– consistently ranked alongside the best

universities in the world, and in 2008

was ranked one of the top 50 universities

in the world according to the World

University Rankings, (compiled by the

United Kingdom’s Times Higher Education

Supplement-QS)

– developing world’s-best practice and quality

through strong research and development

initiatives, excellent academic programs

and affi liations with other internationally

renowned universities

– a founding member of the leading Australian

universities’ Group of Eight (Go8), which

collectively enrols a third of all university

students in Australia, conducts 70 percent

of all university research in Australia, and

boasts a full-time employment rate almost

fi ve percent higher than other Australian

universities

– one of the only Australian members of the

select international network of researchintensive

universities, Universitas 21

– ranked among the top 20 universities in

the Asia Pacifi c and the top 150 worldwide

by the 2008 Academic Rankings of World

Universities study conducted by Shanghai

Jiao Tong University

– one of Australia’s best universities, according

to the independent analysis by The Good

Universities Guide, and the only Queensland

university to be awarded the maximum fi ve-star

rating for research grants and research intensity.

Group of Eight

www.go8.edu.au

Universitas 21

www.universitas21.com

Students at UQ St Lucia

4

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


WHY CHOOSE UQ?

The magnificent Great Court at the St Lucia campus

EXCELLENT TEACHERS

UQ’s award-winning teachers employ

innovative methods to meet the academic

and professional needs of students.

We have won more national teaching awards

than any other university in the country. In

2008, UQ was presented with two more

Australian Teaching and Learning Council

Awards for Teaching Excellence, and Awards

for Programs that Enhance Learning.

UQ has:

– more than 2400 highly qualifi ed academic

staff, many of whom are recognised

internationally as leaders in their fi eld

– a student-centred approach to learning,

enhanced by fl exible options, a strong online

program and innovative teaching modes

– teachers with a 100 percent success rate

in the Australian Teaching and Learning

Council’s Citations for Outstanding

Contributions, which recognise teaching

excellence in higher education.

UQ Teaching and Learning

www.uq.edu.au/teaching-learning

QUALITY PROGRAMS

UQ offers one of the most comprehensive

ranges of world-class programs in Australia.

The University boasts:

– seven faculties

– 33 schools

– 350 degree programs, including dual

degrees, supported by innovative and

engaging courses (subjects)

– world-class English language programs and

a foundation bridging program as alternative

academic pathways into UQ (see pages

28-29)

– career-focused programs that are relevant to

industry and give graduates the competitive

advantage in the job market

– practical study options, such as industry

placements, fi eld trips and exchange

opportunities (see pages 31-33).

Programs and courses

www.uq.edu.au/study

English language studies

www.icte.uq.edu.au

International Education Services (foundation year)

www.foundationyear.com

EXCITING CAMPUS

LIFESTYLE

There is more to life than study at UQ

As well as being a great place to study, UQ is a

great place to meet new people, enjoy a range

of sporting and cultural activities, and relax in a

diverse and welcoming environment.

We offer:

– 150 social clubs, including 33 sports clubs

– world-class sporting facilities (see page 20)

– cultural activities, including concerts,

museums and art collections (see page 21)

– beautiful grounds in which students can

relax, eat, drink and shop at each of our four

main campuses – UQ St Lucia, UQ Ipswich,

UQ Gatton and UQ Herston (see page 23).

UQ SPORT

www.uqsport.uq.edu.au

UQ Experience

www.uq.edu.au/experience

FIRST-CLASS SERVICES

UQ provides excellent academic and

personal support services.

The University’s most recent Student

Experience Survey confi rmed high levels of

student satisfaction with the University and

the academic facilities available to students,

thanks to:

– the UQ Library, Queensland’s largest

academic library, with extended opening

hours and more than 1400 computers (see

page 16)

– Student Centres on each campus providing

assistance with a range of administrative

matters (see page 17)

– a range of free and confi dential personal

support services (see page 19)

– free IT support services, which are available

to assist students throughout their studies

(see page 16).

– the University’s Health Services (UHS), an

accredited general practice, which delivers

high quality healthcare to The University of

Queensland community.

UQ Library

www.library.uq.edu.au

Student Services

ww.uq.edu.au/student-services

VALUABLE ONGOING

CONNECTION

UQ encourages graduates to keep in touch

through the alumni networks.

We love to hear success stories from

our graduates, and maintaining excellent

relationships with past students is mutually

benefi cial.

Whether you studied here for a semester on

exchange or completed a full degree, we are

proud to call you one of our alumni.

Graduates can stay in touch with their

discipline and colleagues through a variety of

events and activities organised by UQ Alumni

groups throughout the world.

As a member of the UQ Alumni community

you will enjoy a lifetime of experiences, with

opportunities to maintain and renew friendships

and engage in social, educational and

intellectual activities within the UQ community.

UQ Alumni

www.alumni.uq.edu.au

DEDICATED STUDENT

SUPPORT

UQ provides excellent support for

international students.

We aim to make every student’s arrival in

Australia as smooth as possible, by providing:

– fi rst-class services prior to arriving, during

and after graduating from UQ

– free airport pick-up for new students

– International Student Advisors and support

services for all UQ students (see pages 19

and 24)

– academic and English language support

programs offered at no additional cost (see

page 18)

– information through UQ’s Accommodation

Services to assist students in fi nding a home

that fi ts their individual needs.

Accommodation Services

www.accommodation.uq.edu.au

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

5


WHY CHOOSE UQ?

2006 Australian of the Year, and director of Diamantina Institute for Cancer, Immunology and Metabolic Medicine

UQ’s Professor Ian Frazer

“I believe my UQ degree will definitely

assist me in securing a job as it is indeed

a unique university which prepares

you aptly with a strong foundation in

your studies. I have access to lecturers

who are active researchers as well,

and there has been plenty of support

from lecturers and peer-assisted study

sessions to complement my learning.”

LEADING RESEARCH

UQ is one of the top three research

universities in Australia.

UQ researchers constantly push the

boundaries to achieve world-acclaimed

breakthroughs. We are leaders in industry

collaboration and research funding for

Australian universities.

As a UQ student, you will have the

opportunity to study with some of the world’s

best researchers.

Recently celebrated research achievements

at UQ include:

– the world’s fi rst cervical cancer vaccine,

co-founded by Professor Ian Frazer, which

will save the lives of millions of women

around the world

– nanotechnologist Professor Max Lu’s listing

by Phoenix Weekly in 2006 as one of the top

50 most infl uential Chinese in the world.

UQ has created more world-class research

institutes than any other Australian university

(see pages 14-15) and has one of the highest

participation levels of any academic institution

in Australia in the Cooperative Research

Centres (CRC) Program.

OUTSTANDING

CAREER PROSPECTS

UQ graduates enjoy one of the highest rates

of employment in Australia.

UQ qualifi cations are highly regarded by

Australian and international employers, and our

graduates are in demand throughout the world.

UQ was recently ranked 38th out of all the

world’s universities for graduate employability

by the 2008 Employer Review, a survey

of 2000 international employers, which

contributes to the Times Higher Education-QS

survey analysis.

In the 2008 Australian Graduate Survey,

conducted by Graduate Careers Australia,

UQ’s full-time employment rate averaged 86.6

percent over a four-year period, compared to

the national average of 85.2 percent (based on

25-year-olds fi nding work within four months of

graduating).

Our prestigious alumni network includes

leaders in fi elds such as business, government,

the judiciary, the arts and academia. Notable

graduates include:

– Professor Peter Doherty, 1996 Nobel

Laureate for Medicine and 1997 Australian of

the Year

– Her Excellency Quentin Bryce, AC, current

Governor General of Australia

– The Honourable Anna Bligh, current Premier

of Queensland

– Dr Nick Earls, acclaimed Australian author

– Bill Hayden, AC, KSJ, a former Governor-

General of Australia (1989-96)

– Geoffrey Rush, Academy Award winner

– Dr Lee Boon Yang, Singapore’s Minister for

Information, Communications and the Arts

– Loh Hoon Sun, the fi rst president of

Australia’s Certifi ed Practising Accountants

Singapore base

– Dr Andrew Liveris, President and Chief

Executive Offi cer of the $40 billion US-based

The Dow Chemical Company.

ERNEST HOCK LYNN TEE, MALAYSIA

(BACHELOR OF BIOTECHNOLOGY STUDENT)

UQ Research

www.uq.edu.au/research

6

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

CRICOS PROVIDER NUMBER 00025B


THE UQ

EXPERIENCE

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010 7


BRISBANE

AND QUEENSLAND

Brisbane is one of the fastest-growing cities in the Western world.

The surrounding area is known for its relaxed lifestyle and access

to world-renowned natural attractions.

“I like the laid-back feeling and the

openness of Australia – especially

Brisbane. I’ve been to all the major cities

in Australia, and found that moving to

Brisbane was definitely the best decision.

It is a major city, with all the facilities

of a modern metropolis, but still feels

distinctively local and laid-back. I will

always feel at home in Brisbane.”

TORBJORN AKSDAL, NORWAY

(BACHELOR OF ECONOMICS STUDENT)

BRISBANE

Brisbane is the capital of Queensland,

Australia’s “Smart State”, and is widely known

as one of the country’s most liveable cities.

Brisbane is Australia’s fastest-growing capital

city, and with a population of more than 1.8

million, it offers a safe, friendly, multicultural

environment.

Brisbane is considered one of the major

business hubs in Australia with easy access to

the Asia Pacifi c region. Most major Australian

and international companies have an offi ce

in Brisbane. Many electronics companies

also take advantage of the strategic port and

airports by choosing to have distribution hubs

in the city.

The inner city is characterised by the

Brisbane River, parklands, museums, art

galleries, a casino, malls, shopping districts

and a host of cosmopolitan restaurants and

cafés.

The golden beaches and amusement parks

of the Gold Coast are under an hour’s drive

south. The beautiful Sunshine Coast beaches

lie a short drive to the north, along with

National Parks, rainforests and attractions such

as Australia Zoo.

Brisbane’s reputation as a friendly, modern

city makes it a popular tourist destination.

Brisbane City Council

www.brisbane.qld.gov.au

Our Brisbane

www.ourbrisbane.com

Things to do in Brisbane

www.thingstodo.com/au/queensland

Brisbane – facts and figures

Brisbane

– Capital city of the State of Queensland,

Australia.

Population

– 1,820,375 (Brisbane city and surrounding

areas).

– 4,308,864 (Queensland).

Brisbane is Australia’s third largest city

after Sydney and Melbourne.

Time Zone

– GMT/UTC + 10 hours.

Language

– English.

– Australia is a multicultural country so it is

normal to hear people speaking a variety

of languages.

Currency

– Australian Dollar (AUD$).

Climate

– Subtropical.

– Summer – December to February; Autumn –

March to May; Winter – June to August;

Spring – September to November.

– Summer maximum average temperatures

are around 29° celsius (84° Fahrenheit).

– The average maximum daytime temperature in

winter is around 21° celsius (70° Fahrenheit).

– People are advised to wear hats, cool

clothing that protects from the sun and

maximum UV-protection (30+) sunscreen

during summer.

– A long-sleeved jacket and warm clothes will

be necessary during the early morning and

evening in winter.

Source: Population statistics: Queensland Govt,

Office of Economic and Statistical Research, 2008.

Brisbane city

Comparative cost of living

Brisbane, Australia 86.8

Perth, Australia 88.5

Melbourne, Australia 94.2

Sydney, Australia 104.1

New York City, USA 100

Tokyo 127

Source: Mercer Cost of Living Survey,

Worldwide Rankings 2008

8

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


THE UQ EXPERIENCE

QUEENSLAND

Queensland is the engine room for

economic growth in Australia. Strong

business investment generates tens of

thousands of new jobs every year.

In 2008 Queensland’s employment growth was

higher than any other state in Australia.

Through its “Smart State” initiative, the

Queensland Government has invested more

than $3 billion in research and development

and innovation. The characteristics of

Queensland’s “Smart State” economy include

a highly educated and skilled population;

advancing productivity; a culture of creativity

and innovation; and opportunities spread

throughout Queensland communities.

Queensland’s economy has enjoyed a boom

in the tourism and mining industries over the

past 20 years. A sizeable infl ux of interstate and

overseas migrants, large amounts of federal

government investment, increased mining of

vast mineral deposits and an ever expanding

aerospace sector ensure that the State will

remain Australia’s fastest growing economy in

the foreseeable future.

Queensland attracts more than half of all

international tourists to Australia. Its tropical

coastal strip includes sandy beaches, coral

islands and plenty of sunshine.

In the far north, the Daintree Rainforest sweeps

down to the sea. As the oldest rainforest on

Earth, it nurtures spectacular wildlife. The Great

Barrier Reef is one of the “Natural Wonders

of the World”. As the largest World Heritage

Area, it stretches more than 2000 kilometres

alongside the coast, and is home to around

1500 species of fi sh and 350 types of coral.

West of Queensland’s Great Dividing

Range are mine sites and huge cattle and

sheep properties. The unique red and brown

landscapes of Queensland’s outback span

around 800,000 square kilometres. Closer

to Brisbane, some of the largest sand dunes

in the world attract travellers to Stradbroke,

Moreton and Fraser Islands.

South Bank Parklands, Brisbane

UQ’s Dr Steve Salisbury digging for fossils in outback Queensland

Study Queensland

www.studyqueensland.qld.edu.au

Tourism Queensland

www.tq.com.au

Heron Island, where the UQ Heron Island Research Station is situated

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

9


CAMPUSES

UQ’s four main campuses are renowned as among the most beautiful and

well equipped in Australia. UQ has about 50 sites throughout Queensland,

in hospitals and tropical islands, and even has its own experimental mine.

UQ ST LUCIA

UQ’s St Lucia campus is renowned as one

of Australia’s most attractive campuses and

is just a 10-minute drive from Brisbane’s

vibrant city heart (see page 8).

Bounded by the Brisbane River on three sides,

the 114-hectare site provides a perfect study,

research and living environment. UQ St Lucia

unites the vitality of a modern campus with the

tradition of an established university.

The gracious sandstone buildings, parklands

and lakes encompass world-class teaching and

research facilities. These include Queensland’s

biggest multimedia library plus state-of-the-art

laboratories and lecture theatres.

Students fi nd everything they need on

campus, including excellent sporting venues,

shops, banks, a post offi ce, restaurants and

refectories.

Transport

UQ St Lucia can be reached by bus, CityCat

ferry, bike and car from the surrounding

suburbs and the city.

The Eleanor Schonell pedestrian and bus

bridge links UQ to the southern suburbs.

Parking is in high demand and students

are encouraged to consider other transport

alternatives. Parking on campus costs from

$3 per day.

UQ

www.uq.edu.au

UQ Traffic and parking

www.uq.edu.au/parking

Phone +61 7 3365 1016

Public transport

www.transinfo.qld.gov.au

Phone +61 13 12 30

Ashgrove

Herston

KELVIN GROVE RD

Toowong

JUBILEE TCE

Red Hill

MILTON RD

WATERWORKS RD

Paddington

CORONATION DR

HERSTON RD

INNER CITY BYPASS

Spring Hill

South Brisbane

ANN ST

UQ Herston

Fortitude

Valley

BRISBANE

CITY

Kangaroo

Point

BRISBANE RIVER

SWANN RD

2km

Taringa

SIR FRED SCHONEL DR

St Lucia

HAWKEN DR

Highgate Hill

Fairfield

ANNERLEY RD

Dutton

Park

PEDESTRIAN

& BUS BRIDGE

IPSWICH RD

PACIFIC MWY

Woolloongabba

Greenslopes

Distance and travelling time

DISTANCE FROM

UQ ST LUCIA TO

KILOMETRES

MINUTES

DRIVE

UQ Gatton 90 65

UQ Ipswich 44 36

UQ Herston 10 20

Gold Coast 87 60

Sunshine Coast 105 75

Brisbane CBD 7 10

UQ’s expansive St Lucia campus

10

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


THE UQ EXPERIENCE

UQ IPSWICH

UQ Ipswich offers students a uniquely

personalised learning environment that

is based on UQ’s tradition of teaching

excellence and graduate outcomes.

UQ Ipswich is the University’s newest campus,

having opened for teaching in February 1999.

Students enjoy the personalised learning

environment, and the ease of access to

teaching staff and facilities in their learning.

With small class sizes and a community spirit, it

is up close and personal education.

Students benefi t from a purpose-designed

teaching space utilising the latest technology

in teaching, course delivery and research

infrastructure. The campus boasts a wealth of

dedicated, state-of-the-art learning facilities.

These include Building 8, which merges

traditional library and student services with

innovative technology to advance learning and

research. UQ Ipswich’s student/computer ratio

places it at the forefront of Australian tertiary

education.

Students enjoy a range of support,

amenity, and recreational services, including

a bookshop, cafés, a multipurpose court

for playing tennis, basketball and netball, a

sporting oval and a cardio-gymnasium.

Students also have access to a range of

campus-specifi c scholarships and prizes to

provide fi nancial assistance with their study.

These scholarships range from $500 to $5000

on an annual basis (see page 90).

A range of accommodation options is

available for students wanting to live in the

region (see page 25).

Students outside the award-winning UQ Ipswich Library

Ipswich city

Home to 155,000 residents, Ipswich is known

as Australia’s heritage city and is part of one of

the fastest-growing regions in Australia.

In 2007, Ipswich won the international award

for Liveable Communities for cities with a

population of 75,000 to 200,000.

City facilities include an inner-city mall, art

galleries, parks and gardens, a cultural centre,

restaurants and coffee shops, supermarkets,

banks, doctors’ surgeries, hospitals, an

IT-based public library, golf courses and

showgrounds.

Transport

A University-operated bus service runs four

times each weekday during semester from

the St Lucia campus to UQ Ipswich, then UQ

Gatton and return. Train and bus timetables

for travel to the campus are coordinated.

Passengers can buy combined rail/bus tickets

enabling travel on both Queensland Rail and

the local bus service, which has a stop at

the Ipswich campus. Parking on campus is

available for $1.30 per day.

UQ Ipswich

www.uq.edu.au/ipswich

Ipswich City Council

www.ipswich.qld.gov.au

Ipswich Tourism

www.ipswichtourism.com.au

The heritage-listed Building 4, UQ Ipswich

Distance and travelling time

DISTANCE FROM

UQ IPSWICH TO

KILOMETRES

MINUTES

DRIVE

UQ St Lucia 44 36

UQ Gatton 55 40

UQ Herston 47 40

Gold Coast 95 60

Sunshine Coast 150 105

Brisbane CBD 44 35

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

11


CAMPUSES

The heritage-listed Foundation Building at UQ Gatton

UQ GATTON

UQ Gatton delivers excellence in agricultural

and natural resource sciences.

UQ Gatton offers a relaxed, friendly atmosphere

and students enjoy the benefi ts of being close

to the major centres of Brisbane, Ipswich and

Toowoomba. Just under an hour’s drive west

of Brisbane, the campus offers a unique blend

of modern teaching facilities, state-of-the-art

laboratories and historic buildings.

UQ Gatton students gain a more

personalised education as part of a large

university with international standing.

The campus is home to the $33 million

Centre for Advanced Animal Science and

operates commercial production units to

support teaching, research and hands-on

training. The programs offered in the areas

of agribusiness and economics, agriculture

and horticulture, animals and equine studies,

environment, food, forestry, natural resources

and veterinary science are internationally

recognised as among the best of their types in

Australia.

UQ Gatton students can take advantage

of a range of medical, welfare, counselling

and learning support services, and numerous

sporting and recreational activities. Campus

amenities include a post offi ce, childcare

centre, bookshops, cafés, banking facilities and

a licensed club.

Campus-specifi c scholarships, valued at up

to $5000, are available for UQ Gatton students.

On campus accommodation is also available

for students (see page 25).

Lockyer Valley Shire

Gatton is a thriving town of 6000 people in

the Lockyer Valley. It is just fi ve kilometres

from UQ Gatton and 90 kilometres west of

Brisbane. Toowoomba, a city of 90,000 people

and regional capital of the Darling Downs, is a

30-minute drive away.

The picturesque landscape includes rich

farming land and tourist attractions. The

town offers many services and facilities.

These include supermarkets and shops,

accommodation, visitor’s information centre,

a hospital and other medical services, a civic

centre, restaurants, banks, public library,

recreational facilities, a showground, golf

course and football club.

Transport

During semester, the University-operated

express bus service runs four times each

weekday, from UQ St Lucia to UQ Ipswich,

then UQ Gatton and return.

The campus is also serviced by express

coaches running between Brisbane and

Toowoomba, and a bus/rail service linking

Gatton and Brisbane.

There is ample, free, on-campus parking for

students all year.

UQ Gatton

www.uq.edu.au/gatton

Gatton Shire

www.gatton.qld.gov.au

Distance and travelling time

DISTANCE FROM

UQ GATTON TO

KILOMETRES

MINUTES

DRIVE

UQ St Lucia 90 65

UQ Ipswich 55 40

UQ Herston 92 65

Gold Coast 170 90

Toowoomba 40 30

Brisbane CBD 90 60

Veterinary Technology student Nikki Ingle at UQ Gatton

12

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


THE UQ EXPERIENCE

UQ HERSTON

Herston is UQ’s major clinical health

teaching and research location. The campus

is close to Brisbane’s CBD and is located

alongside the Royal Children’s Hospital and

Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital.

UQ Herston is home to the School of Medicine,

the School of Population Health and the

Faculty of Health Sciences offi ce. The

co-location of UQ Herston with a major tertiary

hospital demonstrates UQ’s commitment to

working closely with health professionals and

researchers in Queensland to deliver innovative

and contemporary education programs. (Health

Science schools and facilities are also located at

St Lucia, Ipswich and at other major hospitals.)

Students benefi t from this close proximity

to the Herston hospital precinct, which also

includes major research centres, including

the UQ Centre for Clinical Research and the

Queensland Institute of Medical Research.

Student services are provided directly

through the campus’s schools.

The Herston Health Sciences Library is one

of 14 branches of the UQ Library. It provides

excellent resources and services to support

the teaching, learning and research needs of

students and both UQ and hospital staff.

UQ Herston is also the site for the following

centres:

– Centre for Military and Veterans Health

– Centre for Online Health

– Australian Centre for International and

Tropical Health and Nutrition (ACITHN)

– Centre for Indigenous Health.

Transport

UQ Herston can be accessed by public

transport. A bus stops outside the nearby Royal

Children’s Hospital and the campus can also be

reached via train to Brunswick Street station and

a short walk. Visit www.transinfo.qld.gov.au

for more information. Parking is available

on-campus from $3 per day (correct as of

2009, fees may increase in 2010).

UQ Herston

www.uq.edu.au/services/herston

School of Medicine

www.som.uq.edu.au

School of Population Health

www.sph.uq.edu.au

Faculty of Health Sciences

www.uq.edu.au/health

Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital

www.health.qld.gov.au/rbwh

2km

Ashgrove

Toowong

Taringa

SWANN RD

JUBILEE TCE

Red Hill

MILTON RD

CORONATION DR

HAWKEN DR

WATERWORKS RD

Paddington

St Lucia

KELVIN GROVE RD

SIR FRED SCHONEL DR

Herston

HERSTON RD

INNER CITY BYPASS

Spring Hill

South Brisbane

Highgate Hill

ANN ST

BRISBANE

CITY

Dutton

Park

Fairfield

UQ Herston

Fortitude

Valley

ANNERLEY RD

PEDESTRIAN

& BUS BRIDGE

IPSWICH RD

Kangaroo

Point

PACIFIC MWY

BRISBANE RIVER

Woolloongabba

Greenslopes

Distance and travelling time

DISTANCE FROM

UQ HERSTON TO

KILOMETRES

MINUTES

DRIVE

UQ St Lucia 10 20

UQ Gatton 92 65

UQ Ipswich 47 40

Gold Coast 80 55

Sunshine Coast 100 70

Brisbane CBD 3 5

Mayne Medical School, UQ Herston

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

13


OTHER TEACHING

AND RESEARCH SITES

UQ has a strong culture of innovation and excellence in research.

UQ’s facilities throughout Queensland include:

– marine research stations at North Stradbroke

Island, Heron Island and Low Isles

– seismograph stations at Mount Nebo and

Charters Towers

– numerous veterinary science teaching and

research centres including the Centre for

Advanced Animal Science at the Gatton

campus

– the $66 million UQ Centre for Clinical

Research at the Herston campus

– the UQ Business School Downtown in

Brisbane’s Central Business District (CBD).

MAJOR RESEARCH

INSTITUTES

UQ supports a broad and comprehensive

research profile, while investing strategically

in selected areas where it has developed

critical mass and internationally recognised

strengths.

UQ’s existing research strengths have

evolved into six internationally signifi cant,

interdisciplinary research institutes, many of

which offer study opportunities for students.

By combining modern infrastructure with a

culture that champions research excellence,

UQ’s institutes have attracted a community of

more than 1500 scientists, social scientists and

engineers from Australia and around the world.

Australian Institute for Bioengineering

and Nanotechnology (AIBN)

The $70 million AIBN Building at UQ St Lucia is

Australia’s fi rst purpose-built facility for research

that combines the biological, chemical and

physical sciences. The world-class researchers

at the institute aim to improve human health

and quality of life, and are researching areas

such as tissue regeneration and improved

methods of drug manufacture and delivery.

Heron Island Research Station

The Diamantina Institute Cancer,

Immunology and Metabolic Medicine

The Diamantina Institute brings together

clinicians, clinical researchers and scientists

working on some of today’s most important

health problems, including cancer, diabetes

Australian Institute for Bioengineering

and Nanotechnology (AIBN)

Institute for Molecular Bioscience at the Queensland

Bioscience Precinct, UQ St Lucia

14

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


THE UQ EXPERIENCE

Dr Clare Underwood (left) and Dr Tim Silk in the Queensland Brain Institute

and arthritis. The Institute is headed by 2006

Australian of the Year and cervical cancer

vaccine pioneer, Professor Ian Frazer. The aim of

the Institute is to develop a better understanding

of the molecular and cellular basis of disease

and to translate that understanding into

practical outcomes for patients.

Institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB)

Researchers at the IMB investigate genes,

proteins and small molecules in interdisciplinary

teams in order to understand disease and

develop new pharmaceuticals, therapies and

diagnostics. In addition to biomedical research,

IMB also has scientists studying bioinformatics,

green energy and environmentally friendly pest

control.

Institute for Social Science Research

(ISSR)

UQ’s goal of addressing important societal

problems with world-class research was

signifi cantly advanced through the opening

of the ISSR in 2007. The Institute for Social

Science Research highlights the signifi cant

research strengths in areas of contemporary

social relevance across the University.

Queensland Brain Institute (QBI)

Researchers at QBI are focusing their efforts

on discovering the fundamental molecular

and physiological regulation of brain function.

It is believed that such an understanding will

bring new generic approaches to rectify a large

spectrum of mental and neurological illnesses,

including dementia, motor neuron disease,

multiple sclerosis, depression, schizophrenia,

drug addiction and stroke. The Institute’s $63

million state-of-the-art research facility at UQ St

Lucia houses more than 200 scientists.

From front: Alise Poh, Dr Ian Vella and Lea Worton in the Diamantina Institute for Cancer, Immunology and Metabolic Medicine

Sustainable Minerals Institute (SMI)

Australia’s mining industry is dealing with the

concept of growth that makes economic sense

and is environmentally and socially responsible.

Increasingly, the industry is turning to the SMI

for new and unique ways of addressing these

responsibilities. The SMI’s success stems from

its practical applications of research at an

operational level.

AIBN

www.aibn.uq.edu.au

Diamantina

www.di.uq.edu.au

IMB

www.imb.uq.edu.au

ISSR

www.uq.edu.au/issr

QBI

www.qbi.uq.edu.au

SMI

www.smi.uq.edu.au

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

15


KEY FACILITIES

UQ’s state-of-the-art Library, unsurpassed information

technology support, superior teaching facilities and Student

Centres are key to unlocking your learning potential.

“There are library staff always available

to help if you do not know something

or if you have some questions. Also,

the fact that you can borrow a laptop

for presentations or for working on

assignments is very useful.”

LYDIA SCHNEIDER, GERMANY

(STUDY ABROAD STUDENT)

LIBRARY

The award-winning UQ Library’s mission

is to enrich world-class scholarship. It is

the largest research library in Queensland,

providing excellent facilities, services and

assistance, both online and in-person.

Library features include:

– 14 branches covering the four main

campuses, the major teaching hospitals and

the Dental School

– millions of books, tens of thousands of print and

electronic journals, eBooks and multimedia, and

hundreds of networked databases

– an extensive online Quick Reference

Collection, microfi lm, manuscripts and

pictorial materials

– 24-hour-a-day online access to the Library’s

catalogue and online collections

– long opening hours

– around 1500 computers for student use

– Internet access

– facilities for laptops, including access to the

UQconnect Wireless Network

– laptops available for loan

– photocopying and printing facilities

– generous borrowing privileges

– Ask a Librarian chat service for online

assistance

– Ask I.T. service providing free computing

support, advice and training for students

– tours and free information skills training

classes to help students access and use

Library resources

– access to signifi cant archive collections.

University Library

www.library.uq.edu.au

Email universitylibrarian@library.uq.edu.au

Phone +61 7 3346 4312

Ask a Librarian

www.library.uq.edu.au/asklib

INFORMATION

TECHNOLOGY

UQ has always been a leader in technology

among Australian universities, providing

students state-of-the-art IT and online

services. In 2008 UQ was one of the first

Australian universities to introduce ‘email

for life’ services for students and alumni.

All UQ students are provided with a free

UQconnect Internet account that has a

generous download quota, and is accessible

on- and off-campus.

Current students also receive an UQconnect

Email+ for Life account, which includes an

email address that can be used even when the

students fi nish studying at UQ, and a suite of

services such as online storage.

UQ’s on-campus Internet access, available

at all UQ campuses, is one of the fastest

and most advanced information networks

in the world, connecting more than 18,000

computers. It is provided by UQ’s Information

Technology Services (ITS). UQSchoolsNet,

which connects Queensland secondary

schools to the University’s network and to each

other, is also a UQ initiative.

The UQconnect Wireless Network is also

available across the four main campuses,

allowing students to access the Internet from

laptops at their convenience.

Other online services for students include:

– discounted full service Internet account

rates through UQconnect, UQ’s own Internet

Service Provider (ISP)

– discounted hardware and software through

UQconnect Portable Computing

– my.UQ, a personalised portal to online

student services which can be used to

check email and personal student records,

study resources and calendars.

First-year Engineering Learning Centre

16

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


THE UQ EXPERIENCE

Student Centre, UQ St Lucia

– online enrolment, lecture and tutorial notes,

discussion groups and class timetables

through mySI-net

– free computing help and training from Ask I.T.

– a HelpDesk providing telephone and online

IT support seven days a week

– access to lecture recordings 24 hours a day,

seven days a week.

Information Technology Services (ITS)

www.its.uq.edu.au

UQconnect

www.uqconnect.net

www.emailforlife.uqconnect.net

National Dial-up number 0198 307 170

Ask I.T.

http://askit.uq.edu.au

Email help@askit.uq.edu.au

Phone +61 7 3365 8811

TEACHING FACILITIES

The University provides teaching space,

teaching aids and facilities to suit a wide

range of teaching styles.

The four major campuses include more

than 180 teaching rooms. These range from

collaborative teaching and learning spaces

to seminar rooms and traditional lecture

theatres. Computer laboratories, rooms and

practical training areas cater for specialised

needs. Large lecture theatres are fi tted with a

range of modern teaching technology tools.

Video-conferencing is also available in selected

rooms.

The University’s innovative Collaborative

Teaching and Learning Centres (CTLC) add

new dimensions to available teaching spaces

at the St Lucia and Gatton campuses. The

Centres are equipped with state-of-the-art

audiovisual teaching equipment and consist

of a series of spaces that allow for group

work, teaching, photocopying, printing and

recreation.

UQ anticipates and responds to student

learning and research needs, producing

positive graduate outcomes and providing the

information infrastructure necessary for leadingedge

research activities.

Facilities

www.uq.edu.au/facilities

Bachelor of Communication student Brooke Cunningham (left) and Bachelor of Contemporary Studies student Vicky

Souvanthong studying in the UQ Ipswich Library

STUDENT CENTRES

Student Centres on each UQ campus are

the central locations for assistance with a

range of administrative matters.

UQ’s Student Centres are the fi rst point of

contact for all student matters and inquiries.

If further specialist advice is needed, students

will be directed to an appropriate area.

Student Centres provide information on

domestic and international student issues, plus

forms and service for:

– academic records

– admission procedures

– enrolment procedures

– examinations and assessment

– fees

– graduation

– grievance procedures

– ID cards

– mySI-net (online enrolment system)

– prizes and scholarships

– public transport

– short-term loans

– traffi c and parking

– UQ Abroad.

Student Centres

www.uq.edu.au/student-centre

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

17


SUPPORT

UQ understands the extra support needed by

international students far from home, family and friends.

Support services help you settle in and enjoy your stay.

“UQ offers a great study environment,

with a number of support services

for international students, such

as the welcoming events and the

accommodation services. This makes it

a lot easier for you to settle in and to get

used to your new environment and find

new friends.”

MARTINA LINNENLUECKE, GERMANY

(PHD CANDIDATE)

Students at UQ St Lucia

ACADEMIC AND

ENGLISH LANGUAGE

SUPPORT

Each semester, all new international students

are encouraged to attend the following

programs which are offered at no additional

charge.

Jump Start: Academic Preparation

Program (APP)

The Jump Start APP runs across four days in

the week prior to Orientation (in each semester)

and is designed to assist new international

students, at both the undergraduate and

postgraduate level, to adjust to Australian

academic expectations. Students are offered

core and optional sessions on topics including

writing, studying, library skills, research

matters, examinations, note taking, time

management, effective reading, referencing,

science writing and problem solving.

Student Services

www.uq.edu.au/student-services

Email relax@uq.edu.au

Phone +61 7 3365 1704

English language support

English language support courses are available

through UQ’s Institute of Continuing & TESOL

Education (ICTE-UQ). Course content is

designed to provide students with the English

language and related academic skills required

for successful study at undergraduate,

postgraduate and research levels.

English for Specific Purposes: Academic

Communication Skills (ESP:ACS)

ESP: ACS is a full-time three-week course

offered three weeks prior to Orientation each

semester. Course content includes English

language and study skills and an orientation to

Australia. This course is offered at no additional

charge to students with a full offer to The

University of Queensland.

English for Academic Communication (EAC)

EAC is an eight-week part-time course offered

throughout each semester for students who

require assistance with their English language

and study skills. Students choose from writing,

speaking, listening and reading class options.

This course is offered at no additional charge

to students enrolled at The University of

Queensland.

More information on ICTE-UQ courses

is available on page 32. ESP:ACS and

EAC registration forms are available online

at www.icte.uq.edu.au/englishcourses/

englishsupportprograms.htm

ICTE-UQ

www.icte.uq.edu.au

Email tesol.enrol@icte.uq.edu.au

Phone +61 7 3346 6770

Fax +61 7 3346 6771

CRICOS Provider Number 00091C

GETTING STARTED

AND ORIENTATION

A compulsory Getting Started session and

an Orientation for international students

take place before classes begin.

Getting Started

Students will fi nd attending a Getting Started

session within a few days of arrival very useful.

The session is designed for someone new to

Brisbane and covers:

– city, locality and campus maps

– how to enrol

– getting student ID cards

– “O Week” (the University-wide orientation

week) activities

– banking in Australia

– making contact with other students

– public transport and student concessions.

Compulsory Orientation

The International Student Welcome is a

compulsory session that gives students an

overview of:

18

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


THE UQ EXPERIENCE

– services and support systems available at UQ

– UQ’s special resources and facilities

– legislative obligations for student visas.

Following the offi cial welcome, separate

Orientation sessions are held for full degree,

and study abroad and exchange students.

These sessions offer more specifi c information

and advice on issues such as enrolment, the

Library, learning assistance, living and travelling

in Australia.

“O Week”

“O Week” is a University-wide celebration

for all students who are beginning their

studies at UQ. Held in the week before the

start of Semesters 1 and 2, it is an excellent

opportunity to meet people and make friends

soon after arrival in Brisbane. There are special

sessions for international students on fi nding

part-time work, safety, support for families of

international students (see page 89) and the

Australian health system.

Other highlights include campus tours,

advice and information about specifi c programs

and courses and entertainment activities.

Getting Started sessions and mini

orientations are held throughout the year for

international students who arrive after the start

of lecture periods.

Getting Started

www.uq.edu.au/student-services

See the Workshop & Seminar program for your

intended campus

Orientation

www.uq.edu.au/orientation

DIVERSITY

The respect for cultural and religious

diversity at UQ creates a positive and

respectful environment.

University policy condemns racism, prejudice or

vilifi cation on the bases of race, religion or ethnicity.

UQ’s policies related to racism,

discrimination, harassment and bullying, and

the Student Grievance Procedures are available

online via myAdvisor or on request from any

Student Centre.

myAdvisor

www.uq.edu.au/myadvisor

Student Centre

www.uq.edu.au/student-centre

PERSONAL SAFETY

The University maintains high levels of

personal safety for all students on campus.

Brisbane has long been considered a safe city

that provides its residents with a laid-back and

relaxed lifestyle. To keep our students safe and

comfortable, UQ has developed the UniSafe

program, which offers free services after dark,

including:

– the UniSafe Escort service, offered at

St Lucia, Ipswich and Gatton, where students

and staff can ask to be accompanied while

walking to on-campus locations

– a Safety Bus service at UQ St Lucia (the

largest of the three campuses),which links

main buildings, colleges, carparks and public

transport stops.

UQ campuses are well-lit, have security callpoints

in strategic locations, and are patrolled

24-hours-a-day. An emergency phone number

is effective all hours for an immediate security

response.

UniSafe

www.uq.edu.au/unisafe

UQ UNION

All international students have access to all

services provided by the UQ Union (UQU).

The UQ Union organises a variety of activities

and events that add to the vitality of campus

life (see page 20).

It aims to provide representation for students on

University and educational bodies, and with social

welfare, recreational and commercial services.

Students have an opportunity to join any of

the Union-affi liated clubs and societies, or can

even start their own clubs (see page 21).

UQ Union

www.uqu.uq.edu.au

Phone +61 7 3377 2200

STUDENT SERVICES

UQ provides free, accessible and integrated

professional support services in several key

areas.

The staff at Student Services are committed

to helping students while they study at UQ.

The range of free and confi dential services and

facilities available at each campus includes

group seminars and workshops, individual

sessions and online resources, accommodation

guides and budgeting and fi nance tips.

Student Services coordinate the Mates@UQ

program, which encourages social and

academic networks between Australian and

international students, and is a great way to

improve your English conversation skills.

Whether you are 17 or 70, from overseas

or outside of Brisbane, homesickness,

loneliness and the stress of study can have a

negative impact on your wellbeing and lifestyle.

Mates@UQ aims to help all students enjoy a

wide-ranging experience at UQ, academically

and personally, through a variety of programs

that encourage interaction and communication,

and enhance the quality of life of all concerned.

Student Services

www.uq.edu.au/student-services

International Student Advisors

International Student Advisors provide a range

of services and assistance for international

students from before arrival through to

departure, including spouse and family

information, such as childcare and schooling of

dependants.

Student Services run the Getting Started

sessions, and the Graduation and Beyond

sessions in students’ fi nal semester of

study and can help with issues such as

homesickness and culture shock. Information

about the cost of living in Australia and how to

manage on a limited income is also available.

Careers advising

UQ provides a wide range of career assistance

for students. Career Plan Consultations give

students information on vacation, graduate

and volunteer work, careers, internships and

Career Development Learning (CDL) strategies

such as job search skills. CDL seminars and

workshops are also available.

The Careers unit also provides UQ

Careerhub, an exclusive online jobs board

for UQ students and graduates. The system

gives information on a wide variety of careers,

industry links, internships, vacation, graduate,

and volunteer work, employer seminars,

events, and CDL workshops. It displays

graduate employment from more than 3000

employers.

Student counselling

Student counsellors are available to assist

students with a wide range of issues, including

dealing with crises, relationship problems,

cross-cultural communication and adjusting to

university life.

Disability support

The University is committed to accessibility

in teaching, learning and the physical

environment. Students with a disability should

contact a Disability Advisor the year before they

intend to commence studies at UQ. This allows

the nature of the disability and the proposed

program to be considered, and gives time

for materials and other requirements to be

prepared.

Disability Advisor

www.uq.edu.au/student-services (see Disability

Program)

Phone +61 7 3365 1704

Learning assistance

Learning advisors help students understand

academic expectations and develop skills to

achieve to the best of their abilities at university.

Learning assistance and academic study skills

workshops run across the 13-week semester.

The workshops are cycled to take into account

student learning differences. The sessions

address writing, reading, studying, exam

preparation, time management and many other

areas. Many of these workshops are also held

within lectures and tutorials.

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

19


RECREATION

Your UQ experience can be both socially and academically

rewarding, with access to the latest sport and fi tness facilities

as well as opportunities to enjoy stimulating cultural activities.

“Whether you are a professional athlete

or just want to keep fit and have a

good time, the facilities here at UQ are

amazing and cater for all levels. And

it’s not just about sport, there’s also live

music and cultural activities. With so

much to do, you can’t not have fun.”

ANTHONY MARTIN, BACHELOR OF

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT STUDENT

SPORT AND FITNESS

UQ SPORT offers a wide range of sporting

and recreational activities and first-class

sporting facilities.

All international students are automatically

members of UQ SPORT.

UQ SPORT manages the extensive

sporting facilities across UQ’s four campuses.

UQ St Lucia offers:

– an international-standard athletics centre and

running track, 21 fl ood-lit tennis courts, an

Olympic-standard swimming pool, a beach

volleyball court and three netball courts

– the three-level Sport and Fitness Centre

which includes a gymnasium, cardio studio,

group fi tness classes, squash courts, martial

arts gymnasium and indoor sports pavilion

– social sporting competitions and sporting

events on campus such as triathlons, fun

runs and the prestigious Great Court Race

– opportunities to take part in adventure

activities such as horse-riding,

sea-kayaking, surfi ng and island discoveries

run by professional instructors

– a range of short recreational courses in dance,

holistic health, martial arts and sports-coaching

– eight ovals for cricket, hockey, softball,

ultimate disc and most football codes.

UQ Ipswich offers a workout room with cardio

equipment and free weights, a multi-purpose

court and a large playing fi eld. UQ Gatton has

a fully-equipped weights gymnasium, indoor

basketball court, squash courts, tennis courts,

cricket oval, and a rugby fi eld. A range of

cardio equipment and free weights is available

at UQ Herston.

All facilities are open to students, staff and

the general community.

UQ SPORT

www.uqsport.uq.edu.au

Phone +61 7 3365 6612

ENTERTAINMENT

The UQ Union’s Activities Area organises

events that add to the vibrant campus life.

Activities include theatre, dances, concerts,

movies, debates, barbecues and Market Days.

Students can join any of the Union-affi liated

clubs and societies, or can even start their own

clubs (see page 21).

UQ Union

www.uqunion.uq.edu.au

Phone +61 7 3377 2200

“O Week” activities

20

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


THE UQ EXPERIENCE

CULTURAL

ACTIVITIES

Students can stimulate their senses by

taking part in the varied cultural pursuits

available on-campus at UQ.

Music

The School of Music presents regular

performances by students, staff and guest

artists. A free Lunchtime Concert is held

every Thursday at 12.30pm during semester

in the Nickson Room at the School of Music

on the St Lucia campus. Popular monthly

Sunday concerts are held at Customs House,

the University’s city-based cultural and

heritage centre, with free admission. Special

performances are also held at the UQ Centre

at the St Lucia campus and the Queensland

Performing Arts Centre (QPAC) at South Bank,

Brisbane.

UQ SPORT athletics track

UQ School of Music Concert Diary

www.music.uq.edu.au

Concert Officer

Email concerts@uq.edu.au

Phone +61 7 3365 3503

Museums

The University is home to many signifi cant

museum collections, including the Anatomy

Museum, Antiquities Museum, UQ Art Museum

(The James and Mary Emelia Mayne Centre),

Customs House Art Gallery, as well as the Fryer

Memorial Library special collections and the

Insect Collection.

Things to do

www.uq.edu.au/about/things-to-do

STUDENT CLUBS

AND SOCIETIES

Students can try different activities and

participate in social events by joining clubs

and societies at UQ.

Many clubs and societies have been formed by

people with a wide range of interests, hobbies

and backgrounds and contribute to the

diversity of UQ campus life. Clubs range from

academic-based groups such as Justice and

the Law, to groups for international students

such as the Russian Student Association and

social interest groups such as Dance (UQ).

The University of Queensland Art Museum

Clubs and societies

www.uqunion.uq.edu.au

Email clubs.union@uq.edu.au

Phone +61 7 3377 2211

Students joining clubs and societies at “O Week”

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

21


VITAL SERVICES

You will fi nd many of the services you need for day-to-day life right on campus.

HEALTHCARE

UQ provides a comprehensive health

service to help students with medical or

personal problems.

The University Health Service offers confi dential

consultations by appointment to all students.

Most medical costs for international students

provided by the University Health Service are

covered by Overseas Student Health Cover

(OSHC) (see page 88). More information about

healthcare in Australia and OSHC is provided

during Orientation.

A dental clinic is located at UQ St Lucia and

offers a student discount.

University Health Service

www.uq.edu.au/healthservice

CHILDCARE

Students should contact an International

Student Advisor for advice on childcare

options.

Childcare, kindergarten and after-school facilities

(all independently operated) are available to UQ

students on or near all campuses. All centres

have long waiting lists. Please note that no free

childcare options are available. Centres may be

contacted directly (refer to the table, right).

You can fi nd a list of childcare centres

across Queensland at www.communities.qld.

gov.au/childcare/search

For students with school-aged children, see

pages 88-89 for more information.

Childcare centres

CENTRE AGE WEB/EMAIL PHONE

UQ ST LUCIA

Campus Kindergarten 2.5 - 4 yrs Web www.campuskindergarten.org.au

Email campus.kindergarten@uq.edu.au

+61 7 3365 3894

Margaret Cribb

Childcare Centre

2 mths - 5 yrs Email margaret.cribb@uq.net.au +61 7 3365 1509

Munro Centre 6 wks - 3 yrs Email munrocentre@uqconnect.net +61 7 3365 2840

Playhouse Childcare Centre 0 - 5 yrs Web www.uqu.uq.edu.au/

businessservices/childcare

Email playhouse@uq.edu.au

+61 7 3377 2231

UQ IPSWICH

Ipswich Day Care Centre 15 mths - 5 yrs Email ipswichdaycare@optusnet.com.au +61 7 3812 3147

North Ipswich Child Care 6 wks - 5 yrs +61 7 3281 0351

Centre

Raceview Community Early

Childhood Centre

UQ GATTON

6 wks - 6 yrs Email raceviewcecc@cofcqld.com.au +61 7 3288 8772

Gatton Child Care Centre 6 wks - 12 yrs Email hardiman@gatton.qld.gov.au +61 7 5462 2946

Gatton Early Learning and 6 wks - 5 yrs Email gattonlpc@peppermail.net.au +61 7 5462 4455

Pre-school Centre

The above table is not a comprehensive list of all childcare centres available.

Childcare general inquiries

www.uq.edu.au/study/childcare

Email relax@uq.edu.au

Phone +61 7 3365 1704

WORSHIP AND

RELIGION

Many faiths are practised and respected in

Australia.

Brisbane has facilities and places of worship for

Buddhist, Christian, Hindu, Islamic, Jewish and

other major faith groups. Chaplains from different

faith communities within the UQ Multi-Faith

Chaplaincy Service are available to assist students

with pastoral care matters relating to their spiritual

and academic life. More information is provided

at the Getting Started session following arrival.

Munro Childcare Centre staff and children

UQ Multi-Faith Chaplaincy Service

www.uq.edu.au/chaplaincy

UQ St Lucia phone +61 7 3365 6439

UQ Ipswich phone +61 7 3381 1463

UQ Gatton phone +61 7 5460 1146

22

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


THE UQ EXPERIENCE

Students taking a break at the Red Room

FOOD, SHOPPING

AND COMMERCIAL

SERVICES

On all UQ campuses, students will find a

range of venues in which to eat, drink, meet

friends and shop.

Food

Queensland is a thriving multicultural

community, and this is refl ected in UQ’s wide

variety of on-campus food outlets.

International Student Advisors can help

students with special dietary requirements

to locate suitable food, including kosher and

organic produce. Muslim students are given

an information booklet outlining the grocery

stores, butchers and restaurants in Southeast

Queensland selling halal food in the Getting

Started session.

UQ St Lucia students can easily fi nd light

snacks, hot meals, Asian noodles, vegetarian

dishes, pizza, kebabs, burgers, barbeques,

sushi, sandwiches, cakes and hot lunches at

the many food outlets on campus. The campus

has three refectories (cafeterias), and the main

refectory uses only halal meat.

A student bar, refectory and café operate

at UQ Ipswich, Club Med Café operates at

UQ Herston, and a dining hall and café are

available at UQ Gatton.

Shopping and banking

UQ St Lucia has numerous shops, banks,

automatic teller or banking machines (ATM), as

well as a post offi ce, optometrist, print shop,

hairdresser, theatre and travel agent.

UQ Ipswich offers an ATM and a documentbinding

service.

At UQ Gatton, students have access to an

ATM, bookshop and post offi ce.

Banks

UQ St Lucia

ANZ

www.anz.com.au

Commonwealth Bank

www.commbank.com.au

Uni Credit Union Ltd

www.unicu.com.au

UQ Ipswich

The Bendigo Bank has an ATM on campus.

www.bendigobank.com.au/public

UQ Gatton

The Commonwealth Bank has an ATM on campus.

www.commbank.com.au

Bookshops

Most students will be required to purchase

textbooks and other equipment for their studies.

There are options for students to minimise costs.

For example, books suggested for reference

only can be found in the University libraries.

Second-hand books and other equipment,

such as laboratory coats, can be bought at the

Secondhand Bookshop at UQ St Lucia or the

UQ Gatton bookshop.

The bookshops at the St Lucia, Ipswich

and Gatton campuses stock new textbooks,

stationery and other materials. The Herston

Medical Bookshop is a specialist bookshop

owned by the UQ Union catering for health

professionals and students in all medical

disciplines.

UQ bookshops

www.bookshop.uq.edu.au

UQ St Lucia phone +61 7 3365 8585

UQ Ipswich phone +61 7 3381 1240

UQ Gatton phone +61 7 5460 1451

UQ Herston Medical Bookshop

Phone +61 7 3365 5275

Secondhand Bookshop

Phone +61 7 3377 2243

“The St Lucia campus is almost like a

small town with everything you need

such as shops, banks and cafés. All

campuses provide vital everyday

services such as health services and

childcare, which make student life so

much easier.”

NAUREEN ALAM, AUSTRALIA

(BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING STUDENT)

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

23


ACCOMMODATION

UQ can help you fi nd a suitable place to live, and give

you ongoing accommodation assistance and advice.

AIRPORT RECEPTION

AND TEMPORARY

ACCOMMODATION

University representatives will meet all

newly arrived international students at the

domestic or international airports.

This service is only available to students

commencing their fi rst semester, and bookings

must be made at least fi ve days in advance

via the Accommodation Services website.

Temporary accommodation can be arranged if

required and Accommodation Services will help

students fi nd more permanent accommodation

on arrival.

Accommodation Services

www.accommodation.uq.edu.au

Brisbane Airport

www.brisbaneairport.com.au

Airtrain

www.airtrain.com.au

Public transport

www.transinfo.qld.gov.au

ACCOMMODATION

OPTIONS

UQ St Lucia

Students attending UQ St Lucia can choose

from on-campus residential colleges,

off-campus student housing or rental

houses and units.

On-campus residential colleges

More than 2350 students live on-campus in 10

residential colleges at UQ St Lucia. Colleges

generally provide individual bedrooms (usually

with shared bathrooms), meals, laundry facilities,

and common social and recreation spaces.

They may also offer academic tutorials, pastoral

care and religious observance. Cromwell

College (Campus Lodge) and International

House provide self-catered accommodation for

postgraduate and mature-aged students.

All colleges accept applications regardless of

students’ religious affi liations or views, although

some give priority to students committed to the

college ethos.

On-campus accommodation is in high

demand. Students should apply directly

to the appropriate college as soon as

they have received their UQ offer to avoid

disappointment. Application forms are

available directly from colleges or via the

Accommodation Services website. Applicants

are advised to consider a second option in

case college accommodation is not available.

For details, refer to the table on page 26.

Off-campus student housing

Independent providers offer a variety of housing

custom-built for students. Some follow a

residential, college-style arrangement, while

self-catering houses and unit complexes are

also available. Applications for this style of

housing should be submitted online directly to

the provider. Contact Accommodation Services

for advice.

Off-campus rental housing

Share houses and apartments are the most

common form of student housing, allowing

students to save on costs and develop

friendships. Houses are generally shared

by three or more students, with weekly rent

ranging from about AUD$90 to AUD$160 per

person. Apartments are usually smaller and

are shared by two or more people depending

on apartment size and personal preferences.

Weekly rent ranges from about AUD$135 to

AUD$200 per person.

A UQ Rentals Online website lists vacant

rental accommodation for UQ students (see

page 25). However, it is strongly advised

that rental housing only be arranged once

students have arrived in Brisbane. Most

students interested in rental accommodation

will book airport reception and temporary

accommodation (see left), then look for longterm

rental housing during their fi rst few days

in Brisbane.

Please note:

– houses and units (also called fl ats or

apartments) are usually rented (leased) for

six or 12-month periods

– initial costs can be high – payment of

two weeks rent in advance, plus a bond

equivalent to four weeks rent

– security deposits for gas, electricity and

phone connections may be required

– houses are generally rented unfurnished

– furnished or part-furnished houses and

apartments are available, but rent is higher

– students must budget for food, household

items and ongoing utility costs such as gas,

electricity and telephone (see page 89).

A typical on-campus student room

24

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


THE UQ EXPERIENCE

Residential college students

“Within a month of living here I

was already comfortable with my

surroundings and UQ was most helpful

in finding accommodation”

DAYANGKU SITI NORHAZWANA PG HJ ZAINAL ABIDIN,

BACHELOR OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE STUDENT,

BRUNEI

The Gatton Halls of Residence

St John’s College

UQ Ipswich

Students studying at UQ Ipswich can live in

student accommodation close to campus

or rent houses or units in surrounding

suburbs. On-campus residential college

accommodation is not available.

Off-campus student housing

Two independent providers offer student

accommodation adjacent to campus. One

features a complex of fi ve-bedroom, fully

furnished, self-catering units where students

rent a single bedroom and share facilities with

four other fl atmates. The other has single, study

bedrooms with shared dining and recreational

facilities. Students can choose from fully catered,

partially catered or self catered options. A third

independent provider offers students self-catering

accommodation in an apartment complex

located in central Ipswich, still within easy

walking distance of campus. Students should

apply online in advance. More information about

off-campus student housing is available at the

Accommodation Services website.

Off-campus rental housing

Please refer to the off-campus rental housing

section for UQ St Lucia on opposite page 24 or

the table on page 26.

UQ Gatton

There are a variety of accommodation

options for students at UQ Gatton,

including on-campus colleges and houses,

off-campus student accommodation or

rental accommodation in townships nearby.

On-campus residential colleges

Three Halls of Residence accommodate

up to 350 students at UQ Gatton and are

non-denominational. The Halls provide a

caring environment with academic support

plus cultural, social and sporting activities.

Senior students and staff help with study,

social and personal welfare matters. Students

have an excellent chance of obtaining oncampus

accommodation but need to contact

Hall staff to confi rm places before arrival.

Accommodation is offered on an academic

year basis (excluding vacation periods) with

fees due in advance. All meals are included; or

senior students can elect to stay in one of the

self-catered blocks. Please contact the Halls of

Residence to apply.

For details, refer to the table on page 26.

On-campus houses

Accommodation Services manages a number

of houses located at UQ Gatton. Students

may apply either for a room in a fully furnished

share house (facilities to be shared with up to

three other students), a furnished house or

an unfurnished house, subject to availability.

Students should apply in advance by

contacting Accommodation Services.

Off-campus rental housing

Please refer to the off-campus rental housing

section for UQ St Lucia on page 24.

Accommodation Services

www.accommodation.uq.edu.au

Email info@accommodation.uq.edu.au

Phone +61 7 3365 3419

UQ Rentals Online

www.uq.edu.au/rentalsonline

A UQ Accommodation Guide is available

from the Student Recruitment Team

Email student.recruitment@uq.edu.au

Phone +61 7 3346 9649

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

25


ACCOMMODATION

OFF-CAMPUS

STUDENT HOUSING

Applications for off-campus student

housing should be submitted directly to

the provider. Refer to the table below for

some popular student housing providers,

or alternatively contact Accommodation

Services for further advice.

RESIDENTIAL

COLLEGES

More information on college fees is

available online from Accommodation

Services or directly from colleges.

Accommodation Services

www.accommodation.uq.edu.au

Email info@accommodation.uq.edu.au

Phone +61 7 3365 3419

UQ ST LUCIA

Altitude Apartments

Rent $210-$520 per unit per week

Location Taringa (approx. 4km to UQ St Lucia)

Website www.altitudeapartments.com.au

Phone +61 7 3721 8300

Raymont Lodge Residential College

Rent $11,696.50 per academic year

Location Auchenflower (approx. 5km to UQ St Lucia)

Website www.raymont.com.au

Phone +61 7 3377 9903

Southbank Campus Apartments

Rent $140-$265 per person per week

Location South Brisbane (approx. 7km to UQ St Lucia)

Website www.southbankcampus.com.au

Phone +61 7 3013 6999

Toowong Student Residence

Rent $195-$220 per person per week

Location Toowong (approx. 3km to UQ St Lucia)

Website www.toowongstudentresidence.info

Phone +61 7 3371 1966

UniLodge

Rent $229-$341 per unit per week

Location Brisbane (approx. 8km to UQ St Lucia)

Website www.unilodge.com.au

Phone +61 7 3295 3500

Campus Living Villages, Kelvin Grove

Rent $204-$303 per person per week

Location Cnr Victoria Park Road and Blamey

Street, Kelvin Grove (approx. 7km to UQ St Lucia)

Website www.clv-kelvingrove.com.au

Phone +61 7 9270 1600

UQ IPSWICH

Brisbane Prestige Property Developments

Affiliation Non-denominational

Rent $150-$165 per room per week

Location Ipswich (approx. 1km to UQ Ipswich)

Website www.bppd.com.au/accommodation.html

Phone +61 411 66 88 77

Cumquat Student Accommodation

Affiliation Non-denominational

Rent From $148 per room per week

Location Ipswich (less than 1km to UQ Ipswich)

Website www.cumquatstudentaccom.com.au

Phone +61 7 3812 7284

Unilink Village Apartments

Affiliation Non-denominational

Rent approx. $105-$140 per week

Location Ipswich (less than 1km to UQ Ipswich)

Website www.unilinkvillage.com

Phone +61 7 3281 9080

UQ ST LUCIA

Cromwell College

Affiliation Uniting Church of Australia

Fee Standard room $12,617 (35 weeks, catered)

Self-catered $5850-$6240 per semester (28 weeks)

Web www.cromwell.uq.edu.au

Phone +61 7 3377 1300

Duchesne College (women only)

Affiliation Roman Catholic Church

Fee $12,580 (34 weeks, catered)

Web www.uq.edu.au/duchesne

Phone +61 7 3377 2333

Emmanuel College

Affiliation Uniting and Presbyterian Churches

Fee $15,075-$16,000 (private phone and Internet

connection included) (34 weeks)

Web www.emmanuel.uq.edu.au

Phone +61 7 3871 9100

Grace College (women only)

Affiliation Uniting and Presbyterian Churches

Fee $10,150 standard room, $11,900 ensuite room

(35 weeks including“O Week”)

Web www.uq.edu.au/grace

Phone +61 7 3842 4000

International House

Affiliation Non-denominational

Fee $12,000-$13,700 (40 weeks)

Web www.inthouse.uq.edu.au/ih

Phone +61 7 3721 2480

Kings College (men only)

Affiliation Uniting Church of Australia

Fee $13,925 standard room, $15,325 shared ensuite

room, $16,590 private ensuite room (34 weeks)

Web www.kings.uq.edu.au

Phone +61 7 3871 9600

St John’s College

Affiliation Anglican Church

Fee $12,009 (36 weeks)

Web www.uq.edu.au/stjohns

Phone +61 7 3842 6600

St Leo’s College (men only)

Affiliation Roman Catholic Church

Fee $14,800 standard room (34 weeks)

Web www.stleos.uq.edu.au

Phone +61 7 3878 0661

Union College

Affiliation Non-denominational

Fee $13,000 (38 weeks)

Web www.uq.edu.au/union

Phone +61 7 3377 1500

Women’s College (women only)

Affiliation Non-denominational

Fee $11,922 (34 weeks)

Web www.uq.edu.au/womens

Phone +61 7 3377 4500

UQ GATTON

Gatton Halls of Residence

Affiliation Non-denominational

Fee Standard room: $7200 (32-week package)

$7700 (38-week package)

Self-catered: $4972 (32-week package)

$5472 (38-week package)

Web www.uq.edu.au/halls

Phone +61 7 5460 1215

Some colleges have their own gym facilities

All colleges have their own dining facilities

Note:

– The fees listed are 2009 prices and should only be

used as a guide. All fees are in Australian Dollars.

Fees for 2010 are likely to increase, and will be

available towards the end of 2009. Additional

mandatory expenses such as security deposits

and student club fees have not been included.

Please check with individual colleges and housing

providers for a comprehensive list of fees and

payment schedule.

26

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

CRICOS PROVIDER NUMBER 00025B


STUDY

OPTIONS

AT UQ

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010 27


UNDERGRADUATE

STUDY

UQ’s many undergraduate programs are taught using a vast array of

teaching methods with a strong emphasis on written and verbal expression.

The multimedia computer laboratory at UQ Ipswich

TEACHING AND

LEARNING STYLES

Courses taught at UQ use a range of

teaching methods including lectures,

tutorials, laboratory practicals, fieldwork,

group discussions, flexible delivery, and

online teaching.

Emphasis is placed on understanding and

applying concepts and theories and being

able to critically examine different arguments

and viewpoints. Students are encouraged to

actively participate in class discussions and

to ask questions if they do not understand. It

is not considered bad manners for students

to express personal viewpoints. In fact, many

lecturers deliberately provoke discussion and

argument to encourage thought and debate.

In order to meet assignment and

examination requirements, students are

expected to spend as much time on library

research and independent study as they do

attending lectures and tutorials.

Individual assistance and group workshops

are offered throughout the semester by Student

Services for students wishing to develop their

learning, assignment writing, researching,

examination, and time-management skills.

Student Services

www.uq.edu.au/student-services

ASSESSMENT

Assessment methods vary according to the

course.

These methods can include written assignments,

mid-semester and end-of-semester

examinations, individual and group projects,

research reports, and laboratory practical reports.

Individual course assessment requirements are

set out in course profi les (outlines) available

online for students at the start of semester and

are typically described to students in the fi rst

lecture. Continued progression of study depends

on students’ academic results and is considered

by each faculty at the end of each semester.

There is a strong emphasis on written

expression in most forms of assessment.

Good verbal and writing skills are prerequisites

of successful study, and are developed

throughout the duration of study at UQ.

Academic performance is usually graded

according to a seven-point scale:

7 – High Distinction

6 – Distinction

5 – Credit

4 – Pass

3 – Fail

2 – Fail

1 – Fail

Students can fi nd out more about the

University’s assessment processes at

Orientation (see page 18).

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) Professor Deborah Terry with students

28

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


STUDY OPTIONS AT UQ

Students outside the new state-of-the-art General Purpose North 4 building – UQ St Lucia

UNDERGRADUATE

PROGRAMS

Bachelor degrees

Bachelor degrees usually require between three

and fi ve years of full-time study. They provide

systematic introductions to specifi c fi elds of

study. Students develop depth of content

knowledge; understanding of underlying

principles and concepts; and problem-solving

and analytical skills.

Programs can contain compulsory courses,

elective courses, or courses that form part of

specifi c majors.

Majors

A major, extended major or dual major is an

area of specialised study within a program,

for example, history. It may be a formal

requirement to undertake a major while

completing a program – the sequence of study

leading to the award of a bachelors degree.

Course (subject)

A course is a distinct unit of study within

a program. Each course is identifi ed by its

alphanumeric code, a title and a fi xed unit

value. Courses are normally completed in one

or two semesters.

Each program usually consists of two

types of courses – compulsory and elective,

descriptions of which can be found in the

terminology section on page 36.

Honours programs

To be considered for honours, additional study

is required for students undertaking a threeyear

bachelor degree. For four- or fi ve-year

bachelor degrees, honours is awarded based on

academic performance during the program.

Honours is awarded at different levels

(Honours I, Honours IIA, Honours IIB or

Honours III). Honours IIA or better is usually

the minimum requirement for entry into a PhD

program, and Honours II or better is usually

the minimum entry requirement for a Research

Masters (MPhil) program.

Dual programs

Dual programs enable students to study for

two degrees at the same time. A dual program

gives students the fl exibility to study several

areas of interest at once. The additional

knowledge and skills gained give students

a competitive edge in the workplace, and

signifi cantly broaden career possibilities. Dual

programs can also be completed more quickly

than two separate degrees. See pages 85-86

for more information.

Commencement

Semester 1 in Australia generally begins in

late February, and Semester 2 in late July.

Programs with earlier commencement dates

are noted in the Programs information on

pages 37-83. Please see the 2010 Academic

Calendar on the inside front cover for

commencement dates.

New international students are advised to

arrive one week before the English for Specifi c

Purposes: Academic Communication Skills

(ESP: ACS) program or Academic Preparation

Program (APP) if they plan to attend either of

these programs. They should arrive at least

two weeks before Orientation (see page 18),

in order to get over jet lag, attend the Getting

Started session (see page 18), and settle

into housing. After a student is settled, he or

she will be able to get maximum benefi t from

the varied Orientation information and social

activities.

Full-time study

A standard load is eight units (#8) per semester.

To ensure program completion within visa

duration, the University strongly recommends

that all students undertake a load of #8 units

(typically four courses) each semester.

Undergraduate study

www.uq.edu.au/study

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

29


FURTHER

STUDY AT UQ

POSTGRADUATE

PROGRAMS

After completing undergraduate degrees,

students can pursue study opportunities

across a range of disciplines.

Graduate programs on offer at UQ include

coursework programs; graduate certifi cates,

graduate diplomas, coursework masters and

research higher degrees; research masters

(MPhil) and PhDs.

UQ postgraduate qualifi cations can

provide students with specialised knowledge;

give them a signifi cant advantage in the

employment market; enable them to upgrade

their qualifi cations; enhance their promotion

potential; or pave the way for a career in

academia.

Postgraduate study

www.uq.edu.au/study

PATHWAYS TO AND THROUGH UQ

Queensland Year 12

(high school equivalent)

see page 93

English language studies

see pages 32-33

Undergraduate program

(associate degree/bachelor/dual program)

see pages 37-82

Foundation year

(bridging program)

see page 31

Undergraduate honours

(coursework and research)

Graduate certificate

Graduate diploma

Research Masters

(Master of Philosophy [MPhil])

Coursework masters

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Professional doctorate

The International Water Centre masters students (from

left) Lien Tran (Vietnam), Shafaq Masud (Pakistan) and

Maria Belen Andrade (Ecuador) by the lake, UQ St Lucia

30

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


STUDY OPTIONS AT UQ

FOUNDATION YEAR

You can bridge the gap between school and tertiary study

with the UQ foundation year program.

FOUNDATION YEAR

The University of Queensland recognises

the Certificate IV in University Preparation

as the foundation year for international

students for entry into the first year of all

undergraduate programs.

As the education provider offering this exclusive

program, International Education Services (IES)

enrols students from more than 40 countries.

The foundation year provides a bridge

between secondary (high school/Year 12)

studies and undergraduate study. The program

is designed in collaboration with UQ faculties.

Those students who achieve specifi ed

standards receive a Certifi cate IV in University

Preparation and are guaranteed an offer in

the University’s corresponding undergraduate

programs.

The foundation year provides academic

preparation for entry into all undergraduate

programs through two compulsory and three

elective subjects. Each academic course will

increase confi dence in communication and

build a technical vocabulary. Intensive English

language instruction designed specifi cally for

international students is also provided. The

average class size is 20 students and the

high level of individual attention fulfi ls both the

academic and social needs of students.

All foundation year students who move

into undergraduate programs are part of an

active alumni, which encourages international

friendships and networking. Ongoing support

services are available throughout foundation

and undergraduate studies, including:

– airport reception

– Orientation program

– accommodation placement service

– student counselling and career advice

– a self-access centre and access to the

University Library

– access to computers and high-speed

Internet connection plus free email accounts

– visits to University faculties to discuss

program structures and related issues

– remedial tutoring for students experiencing

diffi culties with their studies, and

– extensive student activities and a recreation

program.

Foundation year programs

PROGRAM DATES FOR UNDERGRADUATE COURSES STARTING IN: FEES (AUD$)*

Standard

Express

February to December

June to July

May to December

September to June

Minimum entry requirements

Applicants must have completed the equivalent

of Australian Year 11 or “O” Levels and must

meet minimum English language requirements.

In addition to the Standard Program,

students can choose from two other programs

designed to meet specifi c needs. Students

who can demonstrate ability above normal

entry requirements can fast-track their studies

and enrol in the Express Program. It covers the

same content and assessment as the Standard

Program.

The Extended Program includes additional

English language instruction delivered by the

February of the following year

July of the same year

February of the following year

July of the same year

January to December February of the following year

Extended

June to June

July of the same year

* The fees listed are 2009 fees and are subject to change without notification.

Please refer to the website www.foundationyear.com for the most current fee schedule.

Small class sizes in foundation year programs

$17,755

$15,690

$19,480

University’s Institute of Continuing & TESOL

Education (ICTE-UQ).

Entry criteria are specifi ed online at

www.foundationyear.com or in the foundation

year brochure available directly from IES.

A Certifi cate IV in University Preparation

application form (beige) is included at the back

of this prospectus.

International Education Services (foundation year)

www.foundationyear.com

Email info@fdn.uq.edu.au

Phone +61 7 3832 7699

IES CRICOS Provider Number 01697J

ICTE CRICOS Provider Number 00091C

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

31


ENGLISH

LANGUAGE STUDIES

UQ offers a number of English language courses to help you on your way to

successful university study, during your university program or to advance your

career prospects at home or abroad.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE

STUDIES

Students wishing to improve their English

language and related academic study skills

can undertake intensive English language

and academic communication courses at

the University’s Institute of Continuing &

TESOL Education (ICTE-UQ). Courses can

be taken as either a stand-alone option or

prior to a UQ degree program.

ICTE-UQ also offers English language support

to UQ international students before and during

their degree studies at no additional cost.

About ICTE-UQ

ICTE-UQ courses are delivered in a multi-million

dollar, purpose-built premises on the UQ St

Lucia campus with state-of-the-art audio-visual

and computing facilities, Learning Centre and

multi-media laboratories.

ICTE-UQ has a large and diverse student

population with an average sessional enrolment

of more than 550 students from over 40

countries and an average of 14-15 students

per class.

ICTE-UQ language teachers are qualifi ed,

supportive and experienced and have diverse

educational and teaching backgrounds.

Student services include airport reception,

homestay accommodation as well as a range

of cultural, tourist and sporting activities.

ICTE-UQ is government-registered and

accredited by the National ELT Accreditation

Scheme (NEAS) and is an approved

International English Language Testing System

(IELTS) and Cambridge ESOL Teaching

Knowledge Test (TKT) administration centre for

Brisbane.

English teacher training, customised

professional development and short-course

academic group programs are also available

on request.

ICTE-UQ English language training courses

COURSE LEVELS CAMPUS ENTRY REQUIREMENTS DURATION

General English (GE)

English for Academic Purposes (EAP) – specialised

language and academic study skills needed for tertiary study.

English for Specific Purposes: Bridging English Program

(ESP:BEP) – an English language pathway to UQ degree

studies. Students who successfully meet all ESP:BEP exit

requirements do not need to sit an IELTS test to gain entry to

their UQ degree.

English for International Business Communication

(EIBC) – communication skills for careers or futher studies in

international business and related areas.

Advanced English Communication Skills (AECS)

– challenges advanced learners to further develop fluency

and communication skills, particularly speaking and listening.

7 levels

(elementary

to advanced)

St Lucia None 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30,

35, 40, 45 weeks

I St Lucia IELTS 5 (no score less than 5.0) 5 weeks (January only),

10 or 20 weeks

II St Lucia IELTS 5.5 (no score less than 5.5) 5 weeks (January only),

10 or 20 weeks

II Ipswich IELTS 5.5 (no score less than 5.5) 5 weeks (January only)

or 10 weeks (May)

Advanced St Lucia For UQ programs requiring IELTS 6.5

(W6) / IBTOEFL 90 (W21): IELTS 6.0

(no score less than 5.5) / IBTOEFL 83

(no score less than 19)

For UQ programs requiring IELTS 7.0

(W6): IELTS 6.5 (no score less than 6.0)

2009 TUITION FEE

(AUD$)*

$345 per week

$345 per week

$345 per week

$345 per week

10 weeks $3800 (ten week

course)

I St Lucia IELTS 5 (5 in speaking and writing) 5, 10, 15 or 20 weeks $345 per week

II St Lucia IELTS 5.5 (5.5 in speaking and writing) 5, 10, 15 or 20 weeks $345 per week

Advanced St Lucia IIELTS 5.5 (6 in speaking and listening,

5 in reading and writing)

5, 10 weeks $345 per week

English for Specific Purposes: Teaching of English to

Speakers of Other Languages (ESP:TESOL)

– for non-native English speakers who are either interested

in learning more about TESOL or who are practising English

teachers.

English for Specific Purposes: Tourism & Hospitality

(ESP:T&H) – develops English language skills for work in

tourism, travel and hospitality industries.

I St Lucia IELTS 5 (5 in speaking and writing) 5 weeks $360 per week

(plus TKT test fee

AUD$ 72 per module)

II St Lucia IELTS 5.5 (5.5 in speaking and writing 5 weeks $360 per week

(plus TKT test fee

AUD$ 72 per module)

I St Lucia IELTS 5 (5 in speaking and writing 5 weeks $360 per week

II St Lucia IELTS 5.5 (5.5 in speaking and writing) 5 weeks $360 per week

* a non-refundable enrolment fee of AUD$190 applies to all enrolments. 2009 fees provided as a guide only. 2010 fees will be available from ICTE-UQ from mid-2009

32

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


STUDY OPTIONS AT UQ

English language pathways

to UQ degree programs

To qualify for admission to UQ degree programs

students must meet minimum English language

profi ciency requirements.These requirements are

detailed on pages 94-95.

Students who do not meet the minimum

English profi ciency requirements for their UQ

degree may be issued with a Package Offer

consisting of a period of English language

study at ICTE-UQ and their principal UQ

program (package offers will only be issued

where the only outstanding requirement for UQ

admission is English).

Eligible students may apply for a Package

Offer that includes the ESP:BEP. Students who

successfully meet all ESP:BEP exit requirements

do not need to sit an IELTS test to gain entry

to their UQ degree. ESP:BEP English entry and

course completion requirements are detailed in

the table to the right.

An alternative pathway to the ESP:BEP

is a Package Offer consisting of GE or EAP

study. Students who undertake this pathway

are required to take an IELTS (or TOEFL) test

at the completion of their ICTE-UQ program

to demonstrate that they meet the English

language profi ciency requirements for UQ

degree program entry.

ESP:BEP English language entry and exit requirements for UQ degree program entry

UQ DEGREE PROGRAM ENGLISH

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

REQUIREMENT

IELTS 6.5

(minimum 6.0 in writing)

OR

IBTOEFL 90

(minimum 21 in writing)

ICTE-UQ students

ESP:BEP ENGLISH LANGUAGE

ENTRY REQUIREMENT

IELTS 6.0

(no sub-bandscore less than 5.5)

OR

IBTOEFL 83

(no skill score less than 19)

ESP:BEP EXIT REQUIREMENTS

FOR UQ DEGREE PROGRAM

ENTRY

ESP:BEP completion with

minimum overall grade of 4

(minimum Satisfactory

Achievement in all 4 skills) and

minimum 80% attendance

For more information on ESP:BEP entry and exit requirements for UQ degree programs with an

English language profi ciency requirement other than IELTS 6.5 (min 6.0 in writing) / IBTOEFL 90

(min 21 in writing) visit: www.icte.uq.edu.au/englishcourses/bridgingenglishprogram.htm

ICTE-UQ course dates

Homestay and airport reception fees*

2010 SESSION DATES

GE, EIBC, AECS,

ESP:TESOL, ESP:T&H

EAP

ESP:BEP

11 January – 12 February 5 weeks 5 weeks

22 February – 26 March 5 weeks 10 weeks

29 March – 30 April 5 weeks 10 weeks 10 weeks

10 May – 11 June 5 weeks 10 weeks

(6 April - 11 June)

15 June – 16 July 5 weeks 10 weeks

26 July – 27 August 5 weeks 10 weeks

30 August – 1 October 5 weeks 10 weeks

11 October – 12 November 5 weeks 10 weeks 10 weeks

15 November – 17 December 5 weeks 10 weeks `

Public holidays: 26 January, 2 April, 5 April, 26 April, 3 May, 14 June, 11 August, 25-26 December, 1 January

The deadline for confirmation and payment for all the above courses including the ESP:BEP is 6 weeks prior to the

program commencement date. ICTE-UQ can not guarantee that places will be available after this date.

English support courses for UQ International students

(no additional cost to student)

COURSE

English for Specific Purposes: Academic

Communication Skills (ESP:ACS) – delivered prior

to Orientation each semester to provide students with

specialist academic study and communication skills

English for Academic Communication (EAC) –

support classes provided throughout the semester

for students who require assistance with their English

communication and academic study skills

CAMPUS

St Lucia

St Lucia

(Ipswich &

Gatton subject to

demand)

ENTRY

REQUIREMENTS

Confirmed

unconditional

acceptance into a UQ

degree program

Confirmed enrolment

in a UQ degree

program

DURATION

3 weeks

(full-time)

8 weeks

(24 hours total

tuition on a

part-time basis)

HOMESTAY

Placement fee

AUD$210

Weekly fee

AUD$210

Instalment fee

AUD$50

Airport Reception (Brisbane

AUD$99

International/Domestic Airport)

* fees listed are for 2009. Homestay and airport

reception fees for 2010 will be available from ICTE-

UQ from mid-2009

OSHC Fees

ICTE-UQ students coming to Australia on

a student visa are required to purchase

Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC). More

information about OSHC and fees is available

on page 88 or from www.icte.uq.edu.au

An English language studies enrolment

form (purple) is included at the back of this

prospectus.

Institute of Continuing & TESOL Education

(ICTE-UQ)

www.icte.uq.edu.au

Email tesol.enrol@icte.uq.edu.au

Phone + 61 7 3346 6770

ICTE-UQ CRICOS Provider No 00091C

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

33


OTHER STUDY

OPPORTUNITIES

Exchange studies at UQ, short-term study opportunities and a comprehensive range

of language courses offer different perspectives on your fi eld of study and create new

career and academic possibilities.

“I received a scholarship from UQ

Abroad as well as from the Chinese

Scholarship Council to study in China

for one year. This was truly special,

especially being a foreigner in Australia

and receiving scholarships to further

enhance my Chinese knowledge make

me a really proud UQ student.”

ANJA THOMAS, GERMANY

(BACHELOR OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT/

BACHELOR OF ARTS)

STUDY ABROAD

International students currently enrolled

at accredited overseas universities may

be eligible to study at The University of

Queensland for one or two semesters under

the Study Abroad program.

Credit gained at UQ is in most cases transferable

to a student’s degree at their home university.

Study Abroad tuition fees are AUD$9500

per semester regardless of the number of

courses taken. A standard full-time study

load for one semester at UQ is eight units

(which usually equates to four courses).

Please visit www.uq.edu.au/studyabroad

for further information.

Eligibility criteria

Academic eligibility

– completion of at least one full-time year of

study at an accredited university

– current enrolment at an accredited university

– average to above-average results in

university studies to date

– meet specifi c course prerequisites for

admission into certain courses

English language requirements

– meet the English language profi ciency

requirements (see pages 94-95)

EXCHANGE TO UQ

International students currently enrolled

at accredited overseas universities may

be eligible to study at The University of

Queensland for one or two semesters if

their university has an exchange agreement

with UQ.

See page 100 for a list of overseas universities

that hold exchange agreements with UQ.

Credit gained at UQ is usually transferred

towards a student’s degree at his or her home

university.

Eligibility criteria

Academic eligibility

– completion of at least one full-time year of

study at an accredited university

– current enrolment at an accredited university

– nomination by the student’s home university

– meet specifi c course prerequisites for

admission into certain courses

– average to above-average results in

university studies to date

English language requirements

– meet the English language profi ciency

requirements (see pages 94-95)

Students pay tuition fees to their home university.

For more information about exchange

programs with The University of Queensland,

students should contact the International

Exchange Offi ce at their home university.

Study Abroad and Student Exchange Office

www.uq.edu.au/studyabroad

www.uq.edu.au/studyabroad/contact-us

UQ Abroad student Jillian Mellor outside the Louvre Museum in Paris

EXCHANGE FROM UQ

– UQ ABROAD

The UQ Abroad program offers students

enrolled at UQ the exciting experience of

studying overseas for up to one year on

exchange, while gaining credit toward their

UQ degree.

The program is an ideal way to combine

study and travel. In addition to the adventure

of discovering a new culture fi rst-hand, or

improving foreign language skills, students

broaden their career and academic

34

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


STUDY OPTIONS AT UQ

opportunities and gain a different perspective

on their studies. Studying overseas is a

rewarding experience, and helps students build

self-confi dence, increase self-awareness and

establish a worldwide network of friends.

The University of Queensland has exchange

agreements with more than 130 universities

in 30 countries (see page 100). Under the

exchange, tuition fees at the host university

are waived. Students continue to be enrolled

and pay fees at UQ and are responsible for

their own airfares, accommodation, personal

insurance and living costs.

UQ offers a number of scholarships to both

international and Australian students going on

exchange. Scholarships are worth between

AUD$1000 and AUD$5000 each.

UQ Abroad

www.uq.edu.au/uqabroad

www.uq.edu.au/uqabroad/contact-us

SHORT-TERM STUDY

UQ offers short-term study options for

those not currently enrolled in a university

program, such as students filling the ‘gap

year’ between high school and university,

or professionals wanting to enhance their

educational qualifications.

Under this scheme, students do not receive a

degree from UQ, but may gain credit towards

future university studies in a full degree program.

Broad study areas available include arts

(humanities), sciences, social sciences, and

business. Students can study a maximum of

four courses per semester, and receive an

academic transcript after the completion of

their semester or year of study.

Students are required to meet program entry

requirements, and will be made offers based

on one semester or one year of study in that

program. The fi nal choice of courses is subject

to approval by relevant faculties.

Detailed course information, entry

requirements and application forms are

available at wwww.uq.edu.au/study

International Recruitment Manager

www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Phone +61 3 8676 7004

(From left) Master of Commerce (Applied Finance) student Tomas Felipe Pineda Vasquez (Colombia); dual degree

Bachelor of Business Management / Bachelor of Arts student Anja Thomas (Germany); Arts / Social Science student

Maria Jose Tamayo y Ortiz (Mexico); Master of Commerce student Ivar Kvalsvik (Norway); and Master of Arts student

Nahyun Kwon (South Korea)

LEARN A LANGUAGE

AT UQ

The Institute of Modern Languages (IML)

is a centre in UQ’s Faculty of Arts at the

St Lucia campus. It offers courses in

more than 30 languages from Arabic to

Vietnamese at beginner to advanced levels.

International students who want to make

the most of this opportunity to learn another

language are welcome to enrol.

IML’s fl exible time schedule and dedicated

tutors ensure that students not only gain

valuable language skills but also receive an

exciting cultural experience.

IML language courses use a communicative

approach to teaching and learning. All four

skill areas are covered: listening, speaking,

reading and writing for application in authentic

situations.

There are no formal entry requirements for

IML courses and courses are not accredited to

UQ programs.

Translation, interpreting and cross-cultural

briefi ngs on Australian culture and language are

also available on a fee-for-service basis.

Institute of Modern Languages

www.iml.uq.edu.au

Email iml@uq.edu.au

Phone +61 7 3365 6490

English language students at UQ

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

35


TERMINOLOGY

Defi nitions of some common University terms.

Advanced standing

See “Credit”.

Alumni

Whether you studied here for a semester on

exchange or completed a full degree, when you

enrol at the University, you automatically become a

part of the UQ alumni community.

Australian student

A student who is an Australian citizen or permanent

resident, or a New Zealand citizen.

Bachelor degree

A qualification awarded for the first level of study

undertaken at university, typically requiring three

to five years of study, depending on the Bachelor

degree studied (see also “Undergraduate program”).

Campus

The location/s where the program is conducted.

UQ has four main campuses: St Lucia, Ipswich,

Gatton and Herston. Some programs are taught at

other locations, or across more than one campus.

Census date

The date set by the University by which all enrolment

fees must be finalised. The census dates are 31

March for Semester 1, and 31 August for Semester 2.

The census date for Summer Semester is set annually

based on the start date.

Compulsory courses

Courses which must be studied to complete the

requirements of a program.

Course (formerly known as subject)

A component of study within a program, similar to a

subject at school.

Credit

1. A student receives credit towards a degree

when a course which is part of the program

requirements is passed.

2. Students changing programs (within UQ or from

another university) may apply for credit, a value

assigned for study completed in one program,

towards the new program. See “Credit transfer”.

Credit transfer (or transfer credit)

Credit transfer may be granted when students

change from one program to another, if the rules of

the new program allow. For assistance, consult the

faculty administering the new program.

CRICOS code

The Commonwealth Register of Institutions and

Courses for Overseas Students (CRICOS) code

indicates a registered program offered to international

students studying in Australia on a student visa.

Domestic student

See “Australian student”.

Dual program

Two UQ degree programs undertaken at the same

time. (At other institutions, dual programs may be

known as dual degrees, parallel degrees, combined

degrees or double degrees.) See the dual program

table on pages 85-86 for more information.

Elective

A course that students may choose from a set of

options. Some UQ programs allow elective courses

to be taken from outside the main focus of the

program or from other UQ programs.

Entry scores

Undergraduate students are assigned an entry

score based on high school studies or other postsecondary

studies. Students who complete high

school studies in Queensland are assigned an

Overall Position (OP). Year 12 students in other

Australian states are assigned an Interstate Transfer

Index (ITI). All other students are assigned a rank.

Once a student has completed a full year of study at

UQ, their OP or ITI is converted to a rank based on

Grade Point Average (GPA). See “GPA”.

Exchange from UQ (UQ Abroad)

A program where students enrolled at UQ may be

eligible to study in another country under UQ’s

student exchange program, UQ Abroad.

See page 34.

Exchange to UQ

A program where students at approved overseas

universities study at UQ for a semester or two as

part of their home university degree. See page 34.

External student

External students studying by distance education

are not required to attend any on-campus classes,

although attendance at residential schools may be

required in some cases. Material is dispatched to

students by mail or via the Internet. International

students can only study external programs from

offshore.

Faculty

A major organisational unit within UQ, with

responsibility for academic programs. Faculties may

have a number of sub-faculty academic units called

schools. The head of a faculty is called an Executive

Dean.

Grade Point Average (GPA)

The average grade of the results obtained by a

student, weighted by the unit value of each course

in which the student enrolled. GPA is determined

on a semester basis and ranges from 1 (lowest) to

7 (highest).

Graduate entry

Indicates options available for programs that are

only open to students who have completed a

degree.

Graduation

The formal acknowledgement of the completion

of a program. Graduation ceremonies are held to

present students with their awards and celebrate the

completion of their program.

Honours

To be considered for honours, additional study

is required for students undertaking a three-year

bachelor degree. For four- or five-year bachelor

degrees, honours is awarded based on academic

performance during the program.

Intensive

A method of flexible delivery study mode where

students attend for short periods (ie. one to two

weeks on-campus).

Internal students

Students who attend classes on-campus during

semester.

International student

A student who is not an Australian citizen or

permanent resident, nor a New Zealand citizen, and

is enrolled or proposes to enrol at an institution in

Australia. Temporary residents of Australia are also

classified as international students.

Major

A major, extended major or dual major is an area

of specialised study within a program, for example,

history. A major, extended major or dual major may

be a formal requirement in a program.

Overall Position (OP)

Overall Positions, or OPs, provide a State-wide

rank order of students (on a 1 to 25 scale, 1 being

the highest) based on students’ achievement in

Authority subjects studied for the Queensland

Senior Certificate. A student’s OP shows how well

that student has performed in their senior studies

when compared with the performances of all other

OP-eligible students in Queensland.

Postgraduate programs

Programs studied after graduating from

undergraduate degrees include graduate certificates,

graduate diplomas, masters and doctorates.

Prerequisites (for entry into a program)

Prerequisites are courses that students must have

previously passed in order to enrol in a particular

course. They provide students with the appropriate

foundation knowledge in order to progress to the

next course.

Professional memberships

Memberships of organisations in a particular field

providing advice, information and networking

opportunities which students may be eligible to join.

Program (formerly known as course)

A sequence of study leading to the award of a

qualification such as a bachelors degree, graduate

diploma or certificate.

Program code

A unique identifying number assigned by the

University to a program.

Program duration

Refer to “Workloads”.

QTAC

The Queensland Tertiary Admissions Centre (QTAC)

is the central admissions body for all Queensland

undergraduate programs.

Quota

Some programs have limited places available. See

page 93 for programs that have a quota.

Scholarship

A sum of money or other aid granted to a student,

based on merit or need, to help the student pursue

their studies.

School

The core, sub-faculty academic unit, responsible for

teaching, research and interaction with professional

organisations. Course coordinators and lecturers

generally work in schools.

Semester

The University teaching year is divided into three

semesters: Semester 1, Semester 2 and Summer

Semester. Most programs only require students to

be enrolled in Semesters 1 and 2 each year.

Study Abroad

A program where students enrolled at an overseas

university study at UQ for one or two semesters as

part of their home university degrees. See page 34.

Undergraduate programs

Usually refers to first-time university programs

including diplomas and bachelors degrees.

Unit

Units (#) represent the value of individual courses

that contribute to the total unit requirement of an

academic program. A standard study load is 8 units

per semester.

Visa duration

Refer to “Workloads”.

Workloads

International students are required to complete

their studies within the minimum duration of the

program (student visa duration). To achieve this, the

University strongly recommends that all students

undertake a load of #8 units (typically four courses)

each semester.

UQ terminology

www.uq.edu.au/study/terminology.html

36

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

CRICOS PROVIDER NUMBER 00025B


ACADEMIC

PROGRAMS

UQ offers a wide range of world-class programs

– discover the program that suits you best.

Agriculture, Animals, Food & Environment 40

Business, Economics, Tourism & Law 46

Engineering, Architecture & Planning 52

Health 58

Humanities, Social Science, Education & Arts 66

Science & Information Technology 76

37

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

37


AREAS

OF STUDY

The index table below will guide you to information

about specialist study areas (programs and majors)

in the academic programs pages.

PhD candidate Phillippa Diedrichs

PROGRAM / MAJOR

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

studies

SEE PAGE

Accounting 48, 50

Advertising and public relations 48

Agribusiness 48

Agricultural science 42

Ancient history 68

Ancient history/history 68

Animal and plant biosecurity 43

Animal production 42

Animal science 43

Animal welfare and inspection 42

Anthropology 68

Applied science 42, 43

Aquaculture and marine biotechnology 80

Archaeology 68

Architectural design 54

Art history 68, 71

Arts 68

Asian studies 68

Biochemistry and molecular biology 81

Bioinformatics 78, 79, 81

Biomedical science 78, 81

Biophysics 81

Biotechnology 78

Business 48

Business economics 49

Business and industry 50

Business information systems 50

Business management 49

Chemical and biological engineering 54

Chemical and metallurgical engineering 55

Chemical biotechnology 78

Chemical engineering 54

Chemical sciences 81

Chemistry 81

Chinese 68

Civil engineering 55

Classical languages 68

Coastal management 80

68

PROGRAM / MAJOR

SEE PAGE

Commerce 50

Commercial recreation and sport 51

Communication 71

Communication and cultural studies 68

Communication management 48

Communication, media and culture 71

Comparative literary and cultural studies 68

Composition 74

Composition and musicology 74

Computational science 81

Computer science 81

Computer systems engineering 55

Computer systems and networks 79

Conservation management 43

Creative arts 71

Criminal justice 75

Criminology 68

Dental science 60

Dental studies 60

Development 75

Development biology 78

Drama 68, 71

Drug design and development 78

Earth resources 79

Ecology 79, 81

Economics 50, 68

Education (human movement studies) 61

Education (middle years of schooling) 72

Education (primary) 72

Education (secondary) 73

Electrical engineering 55

Electrical and aerospace engineering 55

Electrical and biomedical engineering 55

Electronic business (eBusiness) 49

Engineering 54

– Chemical 54

– Chemical and biological 54

– Chemical and metallurgical 55

– Civil 55

– Computer systems 55

PROGRAM / MAJOR

SEE PAGE

– Electrical 55

– Electrical and aerospace 55

– Electrical and biomedical 55

– Environmental 55

– Materials 56

– Mechanical 56

– Mechanical and aerospace 56

– Mechatronic 56

– Mining 56

– Software 56

– Software systems and aerospace 56

English 68, 71

English language and communication 69

English literature 69, 71

Enterprise information systems 79

Environmental engineering 55

Environmental management 44

Environmental science 79

Equine science 43

Equine studies 42

Event management 48, 51

Exercise science 61

Film and television studies 69, 71

Finance 50

Food industry management 48

Food science and nutrition 43

Food technology 45

French 69

Games modelling 79

Genetics 81

Geographical sciences 81

Geography 69

Geological sciences 82

German 69

Health and society 75

Health informatics 79

Health promotion and population health 60

Health sciences 60

Health services management 61

History 69

38

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

UQ Bachelor of Marine Studies student Tyffen Read

(right) in waters off the Heron Island Research Station

Bachelor of Music / Bachelor of Arts student Kieren Brown

(From left) Zoe Chalk, Kate Eagar, and Bachelor of

Midwifery students Leisha Reu and Cassia Drever-Smith

PhD student Wai Yie Leong with supervisor Dr John Homer

Animal Studies student Jennifer Hornery and Applied

Science student Brendan James Geraghty at UQ Gatton

PROGRAM / MAJOR

SEE PAGE

Hospitality management 48

Hotel management 51

Human-computer interaction 79

Human genetics 78

Human movement studies 61

Human resources 49

Human services 73

Immunology and infectious disease 78

Indigenous health 61

Indonesian 69

Information security 79

Information technology 69, 79

Integrated resource management 43

International business 49

International hotel and tourism

51

management

International relations 69

International trade and finance 50

Islamic studies 69

Japanese 69

Journalism 73

Journalism and mass communication 69

Korean 69

Laws 51

Linguistics 69

Logic and philosophy of science 69

Marine biology and ecology 80

Marine geology and coastal processes 80

Marine resources 42

Marine science 82

Marine studies 80

Marketing 49

Mass communication 71

Materials engineering 56

Mathematics 69, 82

Mechanical and aerospace engineering 56

Mechanical engineering 56

Mechatronic engineering 56

Media studies 70, 72

Medicine and surgery 61

PROGRAM / MAJOR

SEE PAGE

Microbial biotechnology 78

Microbiology 82

Midwifery 62

Mining engineering 56

Molecular and cellular biology 78

Molecular and microbial science 79

Multimedia design 80

Music 70, 72, 74

Music performance 74

Musicology 74

Nanotechnology 78

Natural resource science 79

Natural resources and environment 50

Natural systems and wildlife 44

Neuroscience 78

Nursing 62

Nutrition 61

Occupational health and safey science 63

Occupational therapy 63

Online business 48

Oral health 64

Organisational communication 71

Parks and wildlife management 43

Peace and conflict studies 70

Performance and musicology 74

Pharmacology and toxicology 78

Pharmacy 64

Philosophy 70

Physical activity 49

Physics 82

Physiology 78

Physiotherapy 65

Plant biotechnology 78

Plant science 82

Plant studies 42

Plants 43

Political science 70

Popular music 70, 72

Process technology 78

Production animal science 43

PROGRAM / MAJOR

SEE PAGE

Psychological science 74

Psychology 70, 82

Public policy 70

Public relations 71

Quantitative methods 50

Real estate and development 49

Regional and rural business

44

management

Regional and town planning 57

Rural management 44

Russian 70

Science 81

Scientific computing 80

Social and public policy 75

Social science 75

Social work 75

Sociology 70

Software design 80

Software engineering 56

Software information systems 80

Software systems and aerospace 56

engineering

Spanish 70

Speech pathology 65

Sport and leisure management 48

Sports studies 70

Statistics 82

Studies in Religion 70

Sustainable development 44

Sustainable enterprise management 49

Tourism management 51

Travel and tourism management 49

Veterinary science 45

Veterinary technology 44

Wilderness reserves and wildlife 42

Wildlife management 44

Wildlife science 44

Women’s studies 70

Writing 70, 72

Zoology 82

CRICOS PROVIDER NUMBER 00025B

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

39


Rahul Gala is using his passion for agriculture and

CAREER technology to AREAS become an agri-entrepreneur in his

hometown in India.

Using the knowledge that he learnt from his Bachelor

of Applied Science, specialising in Horticulture he has

transformed the methods of agriculture in the arid region

of Kutch.

Rahul is the director of Jalbindu Agri Tech which grows

quality dates and mangoes by using an innovative

computer aided technology.

Each day, he logs on to his computer in the morning, feeds

in the data and the rest is taken care of by the system.

“I can feed data for a week’s schedule and my system does

it for the farm right from the irrigation to fertigation,”

says Rahul.

Rahul supplies dates and mangoes to seven superspecialty

stores in Mumbai.

It doesn’t stop there for Rahul as he goes global,

exporting his “Golden Dates” to Europe and Dubai.

“Agriculture is going to create huge opportunities in India.

The need is dynamism and professionalism,” says Rahul.

RAHUL GALA,

BACHELOR OF APPLIED SCIENCE

DIRECTOR, JALBINDU ARI TECH, INDIA

UQ graduates with qualifications in these fields are in high

demand from public and private sector employers in areas

such as:

– agribusiness

– agronomy and horticultural

consulting

– animal breeding and

production

– animal welfare

– banking and fi nance

– commodity trading

– crop and pasture production

– economics

– ecotourism

– environmental management

and rehabilitation

– environmental science

– farming

– food and fi bre production

– food processing and service

– food science and technology

– genetics

– industry organisations and

agripolitics

– land management

– livestock management

– marine management

– natural resource

management

– parks and recreational facility

management

– policy and administration

– research and development

– veterinary science

– veterinary technology

– wildlife and nature

conservation.

40


AGRICULTURE,

ANIMALS, FOOD

& ENVIRONMENT

Why choose UQ for studies in

agriculture, animals, food and environment?

With strengths in disciplines associated

with agriculture, animals, veterinary science,

food and environment, UQ is internationally

recognised as Australia’s premier education

and research centre in these fields.

From campuses at Gatton and St Lucia in

sub-tropical, southeast Queensland, UQ

offers a wide range of study programs that

can be tailored to your career aspirations.

Complementing these studies, students

undertake related work with government

and private sector employers, providing

industry experience and valuable networking

opportunities. Further opportunities exist

for students to undertake overseas work

experience, study tours and exchange

programs at international universities.

UQ has a distinguished reputation for the

excellence of its graduates. They are people

with the right mix of technical knowledge,

practical experience and ability to succeed in

their chosen fi elds. Many students secure jobs

prior to graduation and many of our graduates

have progressed to positions of leadership in

Australia and around the world.

UQ is renowned as one of the country’s

leading teaching institutions, and our teachers

have won more national awards for higher

education teaching than any other institution.

UQ is committed to providing the best

education and research resources in the

agriculture, animals, food and environment

sectors. As evidence of this dedication, UQ

has invested $30 million enhancing those

resources, including:

– a 1000-hectare commercial farm (dry-land

and irrigated) including broad-acre crops,

fruit, vegetables, fl owers, a feedlot, piggery,

poultry, high-tech dairy, deer, sheep and

goat herds

– a seven-hectare wildlife study centre

– Small Animal Clinic and Veterinary Teaching

Hospital with high-tech X-ray, ultrasound,

CT-scanning, scintigraphy, intensive care,

cardiology, ophthalmic surgery and intensive

care facilities

– pastoral veterinary centre and affi liated

veterinary practices

– modern food-processing plant and new

food-technology laboratories

– Australian stockhorse stud with

comprehensive stables, yards, equitation

areas and equine-breeding complex

complete with embryo-transfer laboratory

– state-of-the-art laboratories for chemistry,

microbiology, genetic engineering, nutrition,

physiology and performance evaluation

research

– nursery, greenhouses and tissue-culture

facilities

– a wind tunnel for conducting spray

application and irrigation system research

– post-harvest facilities including a packing

shed and cold rooms, and

– modern plant and machinery.

These facilities are being further bolstered

with the multi-million dollar relocation of UQ’s

School of Veterinary Science to the Gatton

campus and the recent opening of the $33

million Centre for Advanced Animal Science at

UQ Gatton in partnership with Queensland’s

Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries.

If you want to change the world and become

a leader in world-class science and technology

pursue a career in agriculture, animals, food

or the environment at the Faculty of Natural

Resources, Agriculture and Veterinary Science.

Faculty of Natural Resources, Agriculture and

Veterinary Science

www.uq.edu.au/nravs

Degrees in this discipline

– Agricultural Science 42

– Applied Science 43

– Environmental Management 44

– Food Technology 45

– Veterinary Science 45

Associate degree in this discipline

– Applied Science 42

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

41


Eligibility for visa

International students must undertake

programs on campus at UQ on a full-time basis

to be eligible to apply for an Australian student

visa. See page 96 for more information.

BACHELOR OF

AGRICULTURAL

SCIENCE

Location St Lucia, Gatton

Commencement semester 1, 2

Duration 4 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12 (or

equivalent) English, Chemistry and Mathematics B

Honours Available as part of the standard program

Program outline

The Bachelor of Agricultural Science is the most

comprehensive of UQ’s range of agricultural

programs, providing students with more opportunity

to develop general or specialised expertise. The

four-year program provides students with a sound

knowledge of scientifi c, technological, management,

economic, environmental and social principles

associated with agriculture.

The fi rst two-and-a-half years of study provides

students with a solid grounding in the basic principles

common to all agricultural industries and a taste of

possible areas of elective study.

The sixth semester consists of a six-month

internship in an agricultural production enterprise,

agribusiness or research institution. This placement

allows you to apply what you have learnt so

far, build upon your knowledge to gain valuable

industry experience and develop contacts for future

employment at the same time. The remainder of the

program allows you to pursue your own interests

through an individual research project and elective

courses.

If you want to build a successful career in the

agricultural industries in fi elds like research and

development, production, management or service

industries such as rural fi nance this program is for

you.

Career opportunities

Agricultural Science graduates from UQ are held

in high regard with employers; many securing jobs

within the industry prior to graduating. The main

advantage of studying an Agricultural Science

degree at UQ is the diversity of opportunities

it provides, not only through the vast choice of

electives, but also through the valuable contacts

made during the vocational placement you will

undertake during your program.

Professional memberships

Graduates are eligible for membership of the:

– Australian Institute of Agricultural Science and

Technology

– Australian Society of Animal Production

– Nutrition Society of Australia.

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN

APPLIED SCIENCE

Location Gatton

Commencement semester 1, 2

Duration 2 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12

(or equivalent)

Program outline

Applied Science is the science of applying

knowledge from one or more natural scientifi c fi elds

to practical problems. The study of Applied Science

at The University of Queensland will provide you

with not only a broad understanding of a variety

of scientifi c principles but also the skill to apply

your knowledge to solve problems and provide

solutions to a variety of situations, a vital skill sought

by employers and therefore a particular advantage

when entering the workforce.

Why study an associate degree?

– An associate degree is a two-year program which

provides full articulation into a Bachelor Degree

program in a directly related area of study.

– The associate degree program may offer the

opportunity to gain prerequisite subjects at a

university level (ie. Mathematics, Chemistry and

Biology) required for entry into a degree program.

– An associate degree qualifi cation provides a

broad-based point of entry to employment, in

particular in a range of associate professional

occupations.

Placement courses

30 working days of approved industry practice work

experience is a requirement for graduation and

gives you an opportunity to gain valuable practical

experience in a real workplace setting.

Supplementary information

It is an expectation that students will have private

access to a computer and the Internet.

Majors

Animal Production

Animal production is a specialised animal science

that combines some aspects of business

management. The study of Animal Production

involves gaining an understanding of the

physiological elements underlying the commercial

production of beef and dairy cattle, poultry, pigs,

sheep and goats.

Animal Welfare and Inspection

Animal welfare involves protecting the fi ve freedoms

of animal care: freedom from hunger and thirst;

freedom from discomfort; freedom from pain, injury

or disease; freedom to express normal behaviour

and freedom from fear and distress. Professionals

who work in the area of animal welfare aim to

ensure that these fi ve freedoms are protected

regardless of whether the animals are on farm, in

transit, at market and bound for slaughter.

Equine Studies

Equine studies is a specialised animal science that

combines some aspects of business management.

Like other animal production industries, the equine

industry requires animals that are produced and

grown effi ciently. Those who work in the equine

industries must produce animals which are also able

to attain some level of athletic performance, remain

sound and interact in a cooperative manner with

humans. As a result, modern equine management

demands a depth of scientifi c knowledge and skills

with an intensive and individual focus.

Marine Resources

Marine Resources encompasses both organic and

inorganic resources, including land and water and

ice, located in, on or under the world’s oceans.

Marine Resources also includes wildlife inhabiting

water on a permanent, temporary or seasonal basis.

Plant Studies

Plant Studies provides a foundation for

understanding how plants grow and how they

can be managed in agricultural or horticultural

production systems. Courses cover the principles

and practices of plant production as well as plant

health and soil management. Plant Studies can

lead to level three (degree) studies in Agronomy

(crops and pastures) and Horticultural Production

(fruit, vegetable, nursery crops) as well as Lifestyle

Horticulture (urban landscapes and environmental

horticulture).

Wilderness Reserves and Wildlife

People working in wilderness reserves and wildlife,

depending on their area of specialisation may be

involved in the management of national parks,

marine parks, conservation areas, nature reserves,

recreation areas or other protected areas and

natural resources. In their day-to-day work they

may assist with educating visitors, patrolling parks,

and waterways for law enforcement, undertaking

surveys and monitoring on the condition of

natural and culturally signifi cant features, and

ensuring the protection of endangered animals

and plants, assist in research projects and wildlife

management projects. They may also be involved

in supervising and coordination of fi re management,

weed eradication and pest-control programs, and

undertaking park maintenance activities including

campgrounds and walking tracks.

Career opportunities

Applied Science graduates from UQ enjoy very

high regard with employers; many securing jobs

within the industry prior to graduating. The main

advantage of studying an Applied Science Associate

Degree at UQ is the diversity of opportunities it

provides through the valuable contacts made during

the vocational placement you will undertake during

your program and the ability to gain credit towards

a degree.

Depending on the area of specialisation,

graduates fi nd employment in a variety of fi elds

including (but not limited to):

– agribusiness fi rms

– agricultural production

– agricultural production

– assistants in horse studs

– biosecurity offi cers (stock inspectors) with

government agencies (such as the Queensland

Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries)

– conservation (landcare)

– consultant

– environmental offi cer

– equestrian journalists

– food processing

– government (technician)

– horse handlers

– horticultural production

– landcare coordinator

– marine resource organisations

– nature guide

– nurseries and fl oriculture

– park ranger

– quarantine offi cers and in stock and station agent

roles

– riding instructors

– sawmill quality control

– strappers or stable hands

42

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


AGRICULTURE, ANIMALS, FOOD & ENVIRONMENT

– technical offi cer

– technical sales people with stockfeed and

saddlery fi rms

– technicians in government departments

– timber-harvesting operations

– tourism and ecotourism

– veterinarian assistants and senior grooms in

competition stables.

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

APPLIED SCIENCE

Location St Lucia, Gatton

Commencement semester 1, 2

Duration 3 years full-time

Admission requirements BAppSc (Food Science

and Nutrition): Queensland Year 12 (or equivalent)

English, Chemistry and Mathematics B. BAppSc

(Integrated Resource Management): Queensland

Year 12 (or equivalent) English and Mathematics A, B

or C. BAppSc other majors: Queensland Year 12 (or

equivalent) English

Honours Available as an additional year of study

Program outline

Applied Science is the science of applying

knowledge from one or more natural scientifi c fi elds

to practical problems. The study of Applied Science

at The University of Queensland will provide you

with not only a broad understanding of a variety of

scientifi c principles but also the skill to apply your

knowledge to solve problems and provide solutions

to a variety of situations – vital skills sought by

employers and therefore a particular advantage

when entering the workforce.

The Bachelor of Applied Science will provide you

with a broad background in basic sciences. The

degree offers a fl exible three-year program with a

diverse range of specialisations, depending on your

career aspirations making it possible to enter into a

wide range of industries.

You are able to tailor your study by selecting

either one extended major (see information below) or

alternatively you could choose two single majors to

combine two areas of interest. Single majors include:

Animal Science, Animal and Plant Biosecurity,

Conservation Management, Integrated Resource

Management, Plant Production, Regional and Rural

Business Management, Tropical Forest Management

and Wildlife Management.

Placement courses

30 working days of approved industry practice work

experience is a requirement for graduation and

gives you an opportunity to gain valuable practical

experience in a real workplace setting.

Supplementary information

It is an expectation that students will have private

access to a computer and the internet.

Students are not admitted to the Veterinary

Technology extended major until the fourth semester

of the Bachelor of Applied Science. There is a quota

of 30 students admitted to the fourth semester.

Students undertaking the Equine Science extended

major will at some stage require their own equitation

horse. Agistment is available on campus.

Majors

Animal and Plant Biosecurity (Gatton)

Safeguarding Australia’s animal and plant resources

through adequate security and quarantine is the

basis for the Animal and Plant Biosecurity major.

Students interested in working within biosecurity

and quarantine roles such as the Australian

Quarantine and Inspection Service (AQIS) or

Customs are able to complete the three-year

Bachelor of Applied Science with a major in Animal

and Plant Biosecurity. Students can further enhance

their career options by combining their studies with

business, animals or plants, depending on their area

of interest.

Animal Science (Gatton)

Animal Science is concerned with the scientifi c

and business aspects of the production of beef

cattle, dairy cattle, horses, poultry, sheep and/

or pigs. Animal Scientists research and distribute

newly discovered information regarding the biology

and management of production animals. Animal

scientists also work to apply their knowledge to

benefi t the general public through the effi cient,

humane and environmentally responsible use of

animals for food, companionship and recreation.

Conservation Management (Gatton)

The Conservation and Park Management major

focuses on protected area management within a

conservation framework. It provides key skills and

perspectives needed to achieve conservation goals

within parks and protected areas as well as manage

the interface between protected areas and the

broader landscape.

Equine Science (Gatton)

Equine Science is a specialised area of animal

science which uses the horse as the model to study

areas such as nutrition, reproduction, exercise

physiology, health and rehabilitation as well as

welfare and behaviour. This knowledge is then

applied to improve the management, performance

and welfare of both the leisure horse and the equine

athlete. Equine Science also includes areas of study

which explore the interaction of horse and rider.

Food Science and Nutrition (St Lucia)

Food Science and Nutrition covers all aspects of

the food system from farm to fork. The food system

is not only concerned with on-farm production, offfarm

food processing, and distribution of produce

for sale, but also the selection and consumption

of the food by the consumer including the effects

of food on their health. Food science covers the

physical nature and chemical composition of food

to enable us to understand how and why food

behaves under different conditions of processing

and storage. We use this information to improve

the safety and quality of food as well as extend

the range of products available. The science of

nutrition studies the effects of dietary nutrients on

growth, development, health and well-being in the

population. It also examines the psychological,

sociological and cultural factors which infl uence

food choice, with a particular focus on the

consequences for health.

Integrated Resource Management (St Lucia)

Integrated Resource Management is a new cuttingedge

fi eld that deals with the management of two

or more natural resources in the same general area.

It focuses especially on the complex interactions

between environment, economics and people in

fi nding solutions to the many resource issues facing

our world. We live in a most exciting world and are

faced with complex resource management issues

central to Australia and the world’s future such as

water management, climate change, persistent

poverty in the world, economic globalisation,

environmental degradation, and social and political

confl ict. This new fi eld of study will introduce you to

the need in industry for integrating natural resource

science with economics and people/social issues

in fi nding sustainable solutions to the complex

problems facing our world. There are many facets

to integrated resource management, varying from

natural systems to economic systems and people’s

interactions with all these. You don’t have to make

a decision on what sector of resource management

you are most interested in at the time of enrolment

(eg. resource economics, environmental tourism,

mining, tropical forestry, land and water, coastal

environments, conservation, and others). This is only

done from your second year of study, after you have

been introduced and exposed to the many facets of

this fi eld during the fi rst year-and-a-half of study.

Parks and Wildlife Management (Gatton)

People working in Parks and Wildlife Management,

depending one their area of specialisation, may

be involved in the management of national parks,

marine parks, conservation areas, nature reserves,

recreation areas or other protected areas and

natural resources. In their day-to-day work they

may assist with educating visitors, patrolling parks

and waterways for law enforcement, undertaking

surveys and monitoring on the condition of

natural and culturally signifi cant features, ensure

the protection of endangered animals and

plants, assist in research projects and wildlife

management projects, supervise and coordinate

fi re management, weed eradication and pestcontrol

programs, and undertake park maintenance

activities including campgrounds and walking

tracks. This program targets students interested

in natural resource management. Courses provide

a balance between the conservation strategies for

our natural environments (including marine) and

wildlife management. Graduates have the skills

and perspectives necessary to address complex

conservation issues within the context of socioeconomic-political

expectations.

Plants (Gatton)

The Plants major incorporates the study of both

Agronomy and Horticulture. Agronomy deals

with the science and technologies involved in the

cultivation of plants for sustainable agricultural

systems, crop production and pastures. Horticulture

covers fruit, vegetable, nursery and fl oricultural

crops. ‘Lifestyle horticulture’ encompasses the use

of plants to enhance our lives and covers plants

in urban landscapes, trees (arboriculture), turf

and resort facilities and various recreational and

therapeutic benefi ts. The broader objectives of the

Plants major is enhanced food security and general

economic development, while conserving the

natural environment.

Production Animal Science (Gatton)

Production Animal Science is about the sciences

(such as animal behaviour, microbiology, anatomy

and physiology, biochemistry, health, genetics and

reproduction) underpinning animal production.

Students learn to how to use the latest technologies

and business principles, and how to apply these in

animal husbandry programs to ensure profi table and

sustainable animal production.

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

43


Regional and Rural Business Management

(Gatton)

An understanding of the business environment

is essential for graduates seeking employment in

animal and plant production enterprises and in the

agribusiness community. Principles of business

management, economics, marketing and human

resource management of rural enterprises are

introduced within a systems framework.

Rural Management (Gatton)

Rural Management focuses on agricultural business

management, specifi cally focusing on striking

a balance between science, technology and

management. An understanding of the business

environment is essential for graduates seeking

employment in animal and plant production

enterprises and in the agribusiness community.

Principles of business management, economics and

marketing relating to rural enterprises are introduced

within a systems framework. Rural managers are

also involved in the support of businesses for this

important industry including fi nance, insurance,

marketing, extension and consulting.

Veterinary Technology (Gatton)

The veterinary technologist is an integral member

of the veterinary health care team who has been

educated in the care and handling of companion

and production animals, the basic principles

of normal and abnormal life processes, and

in routine laboratory and clinical procedures

including veterinary radiography, clinical pathology

and veterinary surgical and anaesthetic support

procedures. In clinical practice, veterinary

technologists work under the supervision of a

veterinarian. While a veterinary technologist can

assist in performing a wide variety of tasks, they

cannot diagnose, prescribe or perform surgery.

Veterinary technologists are also utilised in

government agencies where they complement the

role of the veterinarian. A veterinary technology

degree equips graduates with the attributes of

critical thinking, problem solving and independent

learning which prepare them for supervisory, and

management positions.

Wildlife Management (Gatton)

Students gain the ability to implement and evaluate

wildlife management programs for free ranging

wildlife. Courses offer a strong scientifi c knowledge

of wildlife anatomy and physiology, breeding,

reproduction, nutrition, design and implementation

of fi eld studies, data management and analysis,

welfare and behaviour. With excellent wildlife

trapping, identifi cation and handling skills, graduates

can be expected to make major contributions

to wildlife and vertebrate pest management in

Australia.

Wildlife Science (Gatton)

Wildlife Science focuses on the biology and

management, including the ecology and

conservation of wild animals. Wildlife scientists

study native and exotic birds, mammals, reptiles

and amphibians in natural or created environments,

their biodiversity and human-wildlife interactions.

Career opportunities

Applied Science graduates from UQ enjoy very high

regard with employers; many securing jobs within

the industry prior to graduating. The main advantage

of studying an Applied Science degree at UQ is

the diversity of opportunities it provides through

the valuable contacts made during the vocational

placement you will undertake during your program.

Depending on their area of specialisation (or

extended major/majors) Applied Science graduates

fi nd employment in a variety of fi elds.

Professional memberships

Depending on the major completed, graduates of

the BAppSc may be eligible for membership of:

– Australian Association of Breeding and Genetics

– The Australasian Wildlife Management Society

– The Australian Institute of Agricultural and

Resource Economics

– The Australian Institute of Agricultural Science

and Technology

– The Australian Institute of Food Science and

Technology

– The Australian Institute of Horticulture

– The Australian Mammal Society

– The Australian Rangeland Society

– The Australian Society for Horticultural Science

– The Australian Society of Animal Production

– The Ecological Society of Australia

– The Environment Institute of Australia

– The Equine Science Association

– The Nutrition Society of Australia

– The Royal Australian Institute of Parks and

Recreation.

– The Wildlife Society.

Dual degree programs

– Agribusiness

– Business

– Business Management

– Economics

– Social Science

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

ENVIRONMENTAL

MANAGEMENT

Location St Lucia, Gatton

Commencement semester 1, 2

Duration 4 years full-time

Admission requirements Natural Systems and

Wildlife: Queensland Year 12 (or equivalent)

English – (Mathematics B, Biological Science and/

or Chemistry are recommended). Sustainable

Development: Queensland Year 12 (or equivalent)

English. (Agricultural Science, Biological Science and/

or Geography are recommended).

Honours Available as part of the standard program

Program outline

Environmental Management is the integration of

economics and ecology to utilise and conserve

natural systems, and includes any measures taken

for the protection, conservation and preservation of

the environment, heritage and natural resources.

Environmental managers consider the scientifi c,

technical, economic, social and management

aspects of the environment to produce strategies to

manage environmental resources, and to maintain

the usefulness of that environment for inhabitation by

humans and other species. By studying this degree

you will be equipping yourself with the scientifi c,

technical, fi nancial, social and managerial information

necessary to analyse problems and produce

innovative environmental management solutions.

Placement courses

All students undertake a 16-week industrial

placement within Australia or overseas.

Supplementary information

Natural Systems and Wildlife is available at St

Lucia campus and at Gatton campus. Sustainable

Development is available at St Lucia campus. It is an

expectation that students will have private access to

a computer and the Internet.

Majors

Natural Systems and Wildlife (St Lucia, Gatton)

Students undertaking the Natural Systems and

Wildlife major are taught to use scientifi c, social,

economic and managerial information in natural

systems and wildlife conservation and management.

This plan combines fundamental biological studies

with multidisciplinary skills in environmental

management, decision-making, problem solving

and policy analysis. The fi nal year develops the

ability to manage complex problems including

human interactions, that threaten the survival of

natural systems. Students undertake a four-week

fi eld trip to western and northern Queensland to

study the ecology and management of arid zones,

the wet tropics, terrestrial and marine tropical

environments. Students undertake a 16-week

integrated industry study in a related work situation

where they complete an approved project on natural

systems and wildlife management. Honours may

be undertaken as part of the fourth year of the

program.

Sustainable Development (St Lucia)

The fi eld of Sustainable Development is a continuing

focal area for environmental management and

is projected to continue to grow in national and

international importance. The underlying philosophy

is to reduce the effects of industry and other

activities on the environment and implement

ways to reduce or eliminate existing and potential

environmental concerns. This means designing

and incorporating environmental solutions into

better cities, industries, farms, mines and tourism

and so on at the individual enterprise level through

to state and national programs and policies. The

fi eld requires people able to create innovative

and cost-effective projects to achieve sustainable

development and to assist fi rms and governments

to set and meet necessary environmental standards.

Career opportunities

Graduates fi nd employment in: state and

federal government departments, universities,

private industry including tourism, industrial

organisations, or commercial consultancies dealing

with environmental planning and management,

environmental tourism, monitoring, impact

assessment. Students who perform well at honours

level may choose a research-related career path by

entering a higher degree program.

Graduates of the Bachelor of Environmental

Management (Natural Systems and Wildlife) generally

fi nd employment in the private or public sector in

environmental management and compliance, land

care, mine rehabilitation, environmental tourism

and as park rangers, managers and environmental

offi cers with local government.

Professional memberships

Graduates are eligible for membership of the:

– Australian Institute of Agricultural Science and

Technology

– Environmental Institute of Australia

– Soil and Water Conservation Association of

Australia.

44

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


AGRICULTURE, ANIMALS, FOOD & ENVIRONMENT

Dual degree programs

– Laws

A list of fi rst year courses is given below:

– Analysis of Scientifi c Data

– Australian Political Institutions

– Basic Mathematics

– Ecological Economics

– Environment and Society

– Geographical Information and Analysis

– Human Settlements

– Introduction to Environmental Management

– Introduction to Planning

– Introduction to Remote Sensing and GIS

– Introductory Chemistry

– Knowledge Management in Natural and Agrifood

Systems

– Planet Earth: The Big Picture

– Principles and Practices of Interpretation

– Principles of Architecture

– The Anthropology of Aboriginal Australia: An

Introduction.

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

FOOD TECHNOLOGY

Location St Lucia

Commencement semester 1, 2

Duration 4 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12 (or

equivalent) English, Chemistry and Mathematics B

Honours Available as part of the standard program

Program outline

Food Technology is the application of food

science to the selection, preservation, processing,

packaging, distribution, and use of safe, nutritious,

and wholesome food.

Food scientists and food technologists study

the physical, microbiological, and chemical makeup

of food. Depending on their area of specialisation,

food technologists may develop ways to process,

preserve, package, or store food, according

to industry and government specifi cations and

regulations.

Placement courses

There is 20-week (one semester) placement in the

food industry in the third year, where students gain a

taste of working in a food company, and experience

food technology in action. Students often gain their

fi rst job, after graduation, with the food company

where they spent their industry placement.

Supplementary information

It is expected that students will have private access

to a computer and the Internet

Career opportunities

The food industry is a fast-paced and

technologically advanced fi eld. There are many

and varied employment opportunities in the food

industry. The sector is currently experiencing a skill

shortage meaning that graduates are often offered a

position/s prior to graduation.

Graduates from this program fi nd employment in

a variety of areas throughout the supply chain which

includes (but is not limited to) areas such as:

– food microbiologist

– food standards offi cer

– food technologist

– process and product development

– production management

– quality assurance

– research and development

– technical sales.

Professional memberships

Graduates are eligible for membership of the:

– Australian Institute of Food Science and

Technology

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

VETERINARY

SCIENCE

Location Gatton

Commencement semester 1

Duration 5 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12 (or

equivalent) English, Chemistry, Mathematics B PLUS

either Physics or Biology. For applicants who need to

provide evidence of English profi ciency, please note

that this program requires a higher level of English

language profi ciency than the UQ minimum. IELTS

overall 7; writing 6; speaking 7 is required. TOEFL

test results are not accepted.

Honours Available as part of the standard program

Application closing date 30 August 2009

Program outline

Veterinary science is the application of medical,

diagnostic, and therapeutic principles to companion,

domestic, exotic, wildlife, and production animals.

Veterinary science is vital to the study and protection

of animal production practices, herd health and

monitoring spread of widespread disease. It

requires the acquisition and application of scientifi c

knowledge in multiple disciplines and uses technical

skills towards disease prevention in both domestic

and wild animals.

Human health is protected by veterinary science

working closely with many medical professionals

by the careful monitoring of livestock health as well

as its unique training in epidemiology and emerging

zoonotic diseases worldwide.

Veterinarians assist in ensuring the quality,

quantity, and security of food supplies by working to

maintain the health of livestock. Veterinary scientists

are very important in chemical, biological, and

pharmacological research.

Placement courses

– Students are required to undertake eight (8)

weeks of vacation work (in their own time) by the

end of their third year of study.

– Fourth year students undertake eight (8) weeks

of clinical practical work.

– Final year students undertake three (3) weeks of

specialist practice.

Supplementary information

The School of Veterinary Science is relocating to

the Gatton Campus, with classes expected to start

at Gatton at the beginning of the 2010 academic

year. Students must pass all courses listed for any

given semester to be able to progress to the next

semester. Students who are enrolled in the Bachelor

of Veterinary Science program and withdraw from

the program having completed the requirements

of the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology degree, may

be awarded that degree. It is an expectation that

students will have private access to a computer and

the internet

Career opportunities

Graduates from the Bachelor of Veterinary Science

are employed as veterinary professionals in a

number of areas including (but not limited to):

– advisors to industry (especially pharmaceutical

and biotechnology companies)

– consultants on aspects of animal production and

disease control

– consultants with federal and state governments

dealing with the control of animal disease and the

effi ciency of animal production

– educators and/or researchers with universities

and governments

– urban and rural private practitioners in Australia

and abroad.

Professional memberships

Graduates are entitled to practise throughout

Australia and in all countries with a reciprocal

accreditation (upon payment of the subscript to the

relevant veterinary board).

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

45


Bachelor of Business graduate Elicia Lee says it was

exposure to an executive point of view of the hotel

industry that enabled her to land a job with one of the

world’s luxury hotel companies.

Elicia graduated in 2008 after majoring in Hospitality

Management and now works as a Catering Sales

Executive at the Fairmont Hotel in Singapore.

Elicia took the course Hotel Management Technology

Applications as part of her program, which she said

not only covered the important role of technology in the

hotel industry but also brought the concepts across to

real-life scenarios.

As part of the course Elicia competed in the Holiday Inn

Hotel Technology Competition that required students

to form their own companies and pitch to a panel of

industry representatives on their technology ideas for a

virtual hotel.

“Through the competition I learnt to view this industry

not as a student but from a general manager’s point of

view; experiencing the real-life sales presentation with

different hoteliers’ general managers as the audience,”

Elicia said.

“Through courses like this UQ equipped me with the

knowledge of every department of a hotel and provided

me with the opportunities to interact with international

hotel brands’ general managers and understand their

key decision factors when it comes to recommendations

and proposals.”

ELICIA LEE

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS

CATERING SALES EXECUTIVE, FAIRMONT HOTEL, SINGAPORE

46


BUSINESS,

ECONOMICS,

TOURISM & LAW

Why choose UQ for studies in

business, economics, tourism and law?

UQ offers you internationally recognised

programs in the fields of business,

economics, law and tourism that have

enabled our graduates to pursue

careers with some of the world’s leading

companies.

UQ graduates can be found throughout

the world in the offi ces of major investment

banks, business consultancy fi rms, global

organisations such as the World Bank, leading

law fi rms and major hotel chains, where their

knowledge and problem solving skills are highly

valued.

UQ combines programs in business,

economics, law and tourism that are informed

by the latest industry knowledge with a

supporting environment that will give you

access to specifi c academic advice, Peer

Assisted Study Sessions, a Faculty Resources

Centre and 24/7 computer labs.

You will also able to access an Employment

Services Unit that provides recruitment

and employment advice. The Unit acts as

a link between students and employers

and facilitates career related events, career

planning workshops and employer visits. An

International Employment Services Offi cer will

be able to assist you with work experience and

employment information specifi c to your home

country.

You will also have access to an extra level

of support through the Faculty of Business,

Economics and Law’s International Relations

Unit. This team is responsible for oversight of

services relating to international students and

staff are available to help you settle in to UQ.

Degrees in this discipline

– Agribusiness 48

– Business 48

– Business Management 49

– Commerce 50

– Economics 50

– International Hotel and

Tourism Management 51

– Laws 51

UQ graduates with qualifications in these fields are in high

demand from public and private sector employers in areas

such as:

– accounting and auditing

– advertising and public

relations

– banking and fi nance

– business management

– commerce

– consulting

– convention and conference

management

– corporate communications

– economics and economic

theory, history and policy

– electronic business and

commerce

– employer and industry

associations

– event management

– hospitality management

– human resource

management

– industrial relations

– infrastructure development

and planning

– international business

– investment and trade

– law

– leisure and recreation

management

– market research

– marketing

– negotiation and advocacy

– occupational health and

safety

– operations management

– organisational

communication and

development

– real estate and development

– recruitment consultancy

– stockbroking

– trade unions

– travel and tourism

Faculty of Business, Economics and Law

www.bel.uq.edu.au

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

47


Eligibility for visa

International students must undertake

programs on campus at UQ on a full-time basis

to be eligible to apply for an Australian student

visa. See page 96 for more information.

BACHELOR OF

AGRIBUSINESS

Location Gatton

Commencement semester 1, 2

Duration 3 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12 (or

equivalent) English

Honours Available as an extra year of study

Program outline

The Bachelor of Agribusiness program is aimed

at those wishing to establish a business career in

the food and fi bre industries. The program offers

the ideal preparation for management positions

with business, producing graduates who are

consumer focused, commercially aware, innovative,

internationally orientated and technically competent.

The program will provide you with an appreciation

of the business principles that drive food and fi bre

industries, both nationally and internationally. You

will learn about marketing, fi nance and managing

people and technology along the value chain that

links producers with consumers. You will study

business courses such as accounting, economics,

human resource management, marketing research

and marketing in an agribusiness context. Through

a wide range of elective courses you can further

tailor your studies to your preferred career path.

Placement courses

Thirty working days of approved industry practice

work experience in at least two positions in

agribusiness before the end of the program (and

prior to commencing AGRC3000) is required.

Supplementary information

The highlight of this program is the overseas

marketing project you may undertake in your fi nal

year of study. You, together with a small group of

your colleagues, will be engaged as a consultant

by an agribusiness fi rm to undertake market

research in an overseas country, usually Asia. The

project will provide you with a unique educational

experience in a foreign country and is highly valued

by potential employers. In recent years, students

have undertaken projects in China, Japan, Thailand,

Vietnam, Dubai and Singapore.

This program boasts an exceptional employment

rate for graduates, with many being offered positions

prior to graduation.

It is an expectation that students will have private

access to a computer and the Internet.

Career opportunities

The UQ Agribusiness program is designed for

students who aspire to be the business leaders

and managers of the future. This program will equip

you with the necessary knowledge, skills and selfconfi

dence to assist in effective and successful

management, within constantly changing and highly

competitive environments. Our graduates establish

careers in the private and public sector, both within

Australia and overseas.

Agribusiness graduates fi nd employment in a

variety of fi elds including (but not limited to):

– agribusiness management

– banking, fi nance and insurance

– commodity trading

– exporting

– government agencies

– policy development and analysis within

agricultural and regional agencies

– sales and marketing

– supply chain management/value chain

management.

Professional memberships

Graduates are eligible for membership of the:

– Agribusiness Association of Australia and

New Zealand.

Dual degree programs

– Applied Science

Additional cost

This program may include an overseas marketing

project in the fi nal year of study. Additional costs

may be payable for this project.

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

BUSINESS

Location Ipswich, Gatton

Commencement semester 1, 2

Duration 3 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12 (or

equivalent) English, Mathematics A or B or C.

Honours There currently is no honours program for

the Bachelor of Business. Students may undertake

honours in Commerce, Business Management

or International Hotel and Tourism Management

providing all entry criteria is met.

Program outline

The Bachelor of Business offers students an

opportunity to combine business knowledge and

skills with a variety of specifi c study areas including

accounting, online business, the management of

events, food industries, hospitality, travel and tourism,

sport and leisure ventures, and sustainable enterprises.

It also provides for students who want a broad general

business degree. The program challenges students

to think and operate independently and equips them

with the knowledge, skills and confi dence essential

for working successfully in today’s competitive global

business environment.

The Bachelor of Business ensures a meaningful

learning experience via a mix of learning modes that

allow fl exibility in a collaborative learning environment.

Depending on choice of major, students may engage

with industry through projects, placement, and/or work

experience options during the program.

Supplementary information

International students commencing this program with

prior tertiary education may be eligible for advanced

standing/credit transfer. Contact the Faculty of

Business, Economics and Law (www.bel.uq.edu.au)

for further information.

Majors

Accounting (Ipswich)

Students develop the knowledge and skills

necessary for competent practice in the accounting

profession. Graduates with an accounting major

can expect to fi nd employment in areas ranging

from personal fi nance and superannuation

to corporate reporting, auditing, taxation and

insolvency. Students completing the Bachelor

of Business with an accounting major meet the

academic requirements for associate membership

of Certifi ed Practicing Accountants Australia (CPA

Australia) and enrolment in the CPA program and

the academic requirements for enrolment in the

Chartered Accountants (CA) program of the Institute

of Chartered Accountants in Australia (ICAA).

Advertising and Public Relations (Ipswich)

This major is concerned with the processes of how

to undertake advertising in its myriad forms for a

business, the art of advertising as a principal form

of communication for the business to its customers

and stakeholders, the relationship of advertising to

consumer culture, and the importance of advertising

in conjunction with public relations to the identity and

public image of corporations. Courses cover content

knowledge in these areas and also skills and personal

capabilities necessary for advertising graduates to be

effective practitioners within organisations.

Communication Management (Ipswich)

This major enhances understanding of concepts such

as interpersonal communication, confl ict resolution

and negotiation, patterns of communication including

intercultural communication, and the nature and role

of communication for the effective functioning of

organisations.

Event Management (Ipswich)

This major focuses on the rapidly growing area of

events, which plays a signifi cant role in business

and economic development, both nationally

and internationally. Students study the history,

signifi cance, impacts and role of festivals and other

events, event operations, event sponsorship and

fundraising, business events, artistic and cultural

events and sporting events, among others. The Event

Management major explores theoretical frameworks

for understanding the nature, characteristics and

role of events and offers students a comprehensive,

professional understanding of all aspects of event

management. Graduates fi nd employment in both

the public and private sector in event development,

coordination and management of the range of events

including arts and cultural festivals; sporting events;

community events; private events and business events.

Food Industry Management (Gatton)

The fi eld of Food Industry Management aims to

produce graduates with a specialist understanding

of business management in the food processing,

food service and food retailing industries. Students

will build their knowledge of food production and

marketing systems on a core of business courses.

They will also be able to choose electives that

focus more deeply on the food industry, or on

agribusiness, agrifood production systems, or

sustainable enterprise management.

Hospitality Management (Ipswich)

This major focuses on the diverse hospitality

industry, which encompasses hotel, restaurant

and resort management and more. This major

delves into international hotel operations

management, technological applications in

hospitality management and large-scale services

management as well as small business operations.

Students gain an in-depth understanding of hotel

operations management, technological applications,

international hotel operations and services

management for the hospitality industry. Graduates

work in hotel, motel, club and casino management;

restaurant, bar and catering management; sales and

marketing in the hospitality industry; operations and

human resource management; tertiary and technical

education and consultancy.

Online Business (Ipswich)

This major provides students with a strong

knowledge and understanding of fundamental online

business principles. Students learn to apply such

principles to contemporary business practices and

processes. Courses explore the online business

environment and its relevance to the current

business operations environment, for example,

dealing online with trading partners, customers

and suppliers. Online business graduates fi nd

employment in web design and development, online

marketing and advertising, online retail/services,

e-risk assurance services, management consulting,

and public sector departments and agencies.

Sport and Leisure Management (Ipswich)

Sport and leisure management is an expansive

and eclectic fi eld that encompasses many sectors,

including sport and fi tness, adventure and outdoor

tourism, wilderness and natural park recreation,

facility management and community recreation.

Students examine the role of sport and leisure

in contemporary society. Various leisure industry

operations and contemporary leisure management

issues are explored, in the context of current industry

operations providing a deeper understanding of the

relationship between work and leisure experiences.

48

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


BUSINESS, ECONOMICS, TOURISM & LAW

Graduates work in federal, state and local

government recreation departments; communitybased

agencies; community recreation, sport and

aquatic centres; amusement centres; commercial

venues; tourist resorts and not-for-profi t agencies.

Sustainable Enterprise Management (Gatton)

Some of the greatest challenges facing Australian

and international businesses fall into the category

of Sustainable Enterprise Management (SEM).

Challenges such as increasing fossil fuel and food

prices, climate change and diminishing natural

resources are evolving in a complex environment

where staying internationally competitive requires

great skill and expertise. But there are also immense

opportunities and with SEM comes exciting solutions

such as new markets for environmentally sustainable

products, improved business development

techniques and better relationships between business

and society. The SEM program aims to produce

graduates with an understanding of how businesses

can be competitive and profi table while at the

same time demonstrating environmental and social

responsibility. Students will build their knowledge of

environmental management, corporate governance

and responsibility, fi nance and environmental markets

(including carbon trading), clean technology (eg.

renewable energy) and systems thinking, on a

core of business courses. They will also be able to

choose electives that focus on business, production,

environmental or social issues. The SEM program

is supported by UQ’s Sustainable Management

Alliance in Research and Teaching (SMART) program.

SMART is a collaborative partnership initiated by

UQ to bring together some of Queensland’s leading

business people, with the ultimate goal of informing

and enhancing innovative research and industry

guided teaching in the fi eld of sustainable enterprise

management. SMART’s partners include companies

such as Billabong, RACQ, Freedom Fuels and

Queensland Rail. SMART also offers SEM students

the opportunity to participate in paid internships. More

information on SMART visit www.uq.edu.au/smart

Travel and Tourism Management (Ipswich)

Students explore the tourism and travel industry

from both a national and international perspective,

gaining an understanding of the operation

and functions of the key sectors of the world’s

biggest industry. This major examines tourism

visitor behaviour, marketing and transportation;

the travel industry; the development of tourism

and tourism experiences in the Asia Pacifi c Rim;

concepts of sustainability; and tourism impact on

the environment. Courses consider issues relating

to tourism planning, together with cross-cultural

issues, and their impact on tourist groups and

organisations. Students are able to focus on either

tourism or travel management. Graduates fi nd

employment in the travel or tourism industries, or

in a range of supporting sectors. These include

air and land transport; tourist resorts, cruise ships

and attractions; accommodation; federal and

state government bodies; tourism departments;

government tour operations; businesses supporting

tourism enterprises (including retail, marketing,

fi nancial and consultancy fi rms); travel agencies

and tour operators; cruise shipping companies;

retail travel and travel wholesalers; airlines; coach

companies and car hire companies; management

consultancies; and tourist bureaus.

Professional memberships

Students may be eligible to become members

of a number of professional associations either

during their studies or upon the completion of their

program and depending on the major chosen.

These include:

– Australian and New Zealand Association of

Leisure Studies

– Australian Hotels Association

– Certifi ed Practising Accountants Australia

(CPA Australia)

– Chartered Secretaries Australia Limited (CSA)

– Council for Australian University Tourism and

Hospitality Educators (CAUTHE)

– Festivals and Events Association (FEA)

– Financial Services Institute of Australasia (FINSIA)

– Institute of Hospitality

– International Centre of Excellence in Tourism and

Hospitality Education (THE-ICE)

– International Council on Hotel, Restaurant and

Institutional Education (I-CHRIE)

– Meetings and Events Australia (MEA)

– Meetings Professionals International (MPI)

– Pacifi c-Asia Travel Association (PATA)

– Sport Management Association for Australia and

New Zealand

– Taxation Institute of Australia

– The Australian Council for Health, Physical

Education and Recreation

– The Institute of Chartered Accountants in

Australia (ICAA).

Dual degree programs

– Applied Science

– Arts

– Laws

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

BUSINESS

MANAGEMENT

Location St Lucia

Commencement semester 1, 2

Duration 3 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12

(or equivalent) English, Mathematics B.

Honours Available as an extra year of study

Program outline

This program is designed for students who aspire

to be business leaders and managers of the

future. Graduates are equipped with the necessary

knowledge, skills and self-confi dence to assist

in effective and successful management, within

constantly changing and highly competitive national

and international business environments.

Students complete compulsory core courses and

can choose a major. A range of electives are also

available, including advanced business management

courses.

Supplementary information

International students commencing this program with

prior tertiary education may be eligible for advanced

standing/credit transfer. Contact the Faculty of

Business, Economics and Law (www.bel.uq.edu.au)

for further information.

Majors

Business Economics

The business economics major equips students with

the skills to apply economic analysis effectively in

business management contexts. Courses are highly

relevant to those planning a career in corporate

strategy, marketing, purchasing, production

management, fi nancial planning, capital budgeting

and human resource management. A range of

career opportunities are available for graduates in

public and private sector corporations; banking

and fi nancial services, consultancy companies, and

government departments.

eBusiness

This major provides students with a strong

knowledge and understanding of fundamental

e-business management principles. Students

learn to apply such principles to contemporary

business practices. Courses explore the eBusiness

environment and its relevance to the general business

environment. Electronic business graduates fi nd

employment in Web design and development, online

marketing and advertising, online retail/services,

public sector departments and agencies.

Human Resources

The Human Resources (HR) major focuses on all

aspects of people management. Courses cover

managing people; employment relations (which

provides students with a broad understanding of

the nature of Australian and international industrial

relations); developing teams; selection and

recruitment; organisational change; interpersonal

communication; confl ict resolution; training and

development; managing staff in the multinational

enterprise; negotiating employment agreements;

and leadership. Graduates work as professional

HR managers in the public and private sectors;

in professional practices such as law fi rms; trade

unions; employer associations; state and federal

government departments; HR management

consultancies; industrial relations; negotiation and

advocacy; and occupational health and safety. A

major in HR is advantageous for all employees who

work as line managers in all industries.

International Business

This major provides an understanding of the prominent

issues in international business management.

Courses examine international trade and investment;

international marketing; international human resource

management; and the management of operations

in fi rms engaged in international business, fi nance

and strategy. Students focus on the challenges

encountered by Australian organisations conducting

business in regions such as Asia, the European Union

and the Americas. Graduates work in a wide range of

private businesses looking to expand operations or

trading networks overseas. Career opportunities also

exist in state and federal government agencies and

industry or trade associations.

Marketing

The endeavour of marketing is to direct an

organisation’s activities towards the needs of its

external customers by encouraging exchanges of

products, services or ideas so that both customers

and organisational goals are satisfi ed. Students

develop an understanding of the key concepts

underlying marketing practices, while acquiring the

skills necessary to embark on professional marketing

careers. Graduates work in marketing positions in

medium to large sized businesses; sales and retailing;

marketing consultancies; and market research.

Physical Activity

This major provides students with knowledge and

skills in areas of physical activity, sport and exercise

science and how business management skills may

be incorporated into these areas.

Real Estate and Development

This major examines the professional organisations

and institutions involved in the property industry,

leading graduates to challenging careers within

the industry. Students develop their knowledge of

business and land economic principles, and can

apply these principles to the real world. Courses

explore property law fi nance and investment;

asset management; town planning; and property

valuation. Advanced software and computer

programs are used to solve business problems

relating to land development and management.

Graduates fi nd employment in property investment,

development, management and valuation.

Professional memberships

Students may be eligible to become members

of a number of professional associations either

during their studies or upon the completion of their

program and depending on the major chosen.

These include the:

– Australian Human Resources Institute

– Australian Institute of Management

– Australian Institute of Valuers and Land

Economists

– Australian Marketing Institute

– Economic Society of Australia

– Industrial Relations Society

– Market Research Society of Australia

– Meeting Industry Association of Australia (MIAA)

– Real Estate Institute of Queensland.

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

49


Dual degree programs

– Applied Science

– Arts

– Commerce

– Economics

– Education (Secondary)

– Engineering

– Human Movement Studies

– Information Technology

– Journalism

– Laws

– Science

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

COMMERCE

Location St Lucia

Commencement semester 1, 2

Duration 3 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12 (or

equivalent) English, Mathematics B.

Honours Available as an extra year of study

Program outline

The Bachelor of Commerce program prepares

students for careers in general management,

banking, fi nancial management, and accounting and

information systems. Graduates are also equipped

to work as public accountants in commercial or

government administration, or in private practice.

Courses focus on accounting, fi nancial planning,

decision-making and control in organisations.

Students examine the fundamental principles of

commerce and the business environment, and learn

how to apply business principles to contemporary

business practices.

Supplementary information

International students commencing this program

with prior tertiary education may be eligible for

advanced standing/credit transfer. Contact the

Faculty of Business, Economics and Law

(www.bel.uq.edu.au) for further information.

Majors

Accounting

Courses allow students to develop the skills

necessary to practice in the accounting profession.

Students complete the Accounting major and use

their electives to study the necessary prerequisites

for associate membership of the key Australian

accounting professional bodies, Certifi ed Practicing

Accountants (CPA) Australia and the Institute of

Chartered Accountants in Australia (ICAA).

Business Information Systems

This major is designed for students who wish

to obtain education and in-depth training in the

analysis, design, implementation and maintenance

of computer systems. Courses facilitate the

development of information systems skills in a

business environment. Students also gain the

skills to design, develop and manage computer

applications involving accounting data.

Finance

Students undertake courses in fi nancial

management, portfolio management, and corporate

fi nance principles including risk assessment and

business statistics.

Career opportunities

Graduates work in a range of fi elds including:

– fi nancial institutions, stockbroking fi rms and

merchant banks as security, economic,

investment and business analysts

– private sector multinational corporations or local

fi rms as professional accountants, economists or

managers

– public sector government departments and

agencies (local, state and commonwealth)

concerned with economic policy or public

accounting/fi nancial auditing

– public utilities fi elds of transport, communications

and power supply

– specialist organisations industry associations,

management consultancies, market research

and advertising organisations, trade unions, and

stockbroking and investment advisory services.

Professional memberships

Students may be eligible to become members

of a number of professional associations either

during their studies or upon the completion of their

program and depending on the major chosen.

These include:

– Association of Certifi ed Chartered Accountants

– Certifi ed Practicing Accountants (CPA) Australia

– Financial Services Institute of Australasia (FINSIA)

– The Chartered Secretaries Australia Limited

– The Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia

– Taxation Institute of Australia.

Dual degree programs

– Arts

– Business Management

– Economics

– Education (Secondary)

– Engineering

– Information Technology

– Laws

– Science

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

ECONOMICS

Location St Lucia

Commencement semester 1, 2

Duration 3 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12

(or equivalent) English, Mathematics B.

Honours Available as an extra year of study

Program outline

The study of economics is central to an

understanding of business, markets, trade,

government policies, international issues,

globalisation, health, development, and the

environment. This program is for students intending

to become analysts, advisors, and economists in

the public and private sectors and leads to careers

in business, fi nance, international development,

health, human resource management, marketing,

management and research.

The UQ School of Economics is the State’s

largest, most experienced and infl uential economics

school. Graduates are equipped to work on

important policy and decision challenges in business

and government. The program focuses on the

resource alLocation and decision-making. Students

can pursue individual interests and professional

specialisations through a wide choice of courses.

Study areas available include business economics,

economic history, econometrics, environmental

and resource economics, fi nancial markets,

labour economics, health economics; international

trade and development, macroeconomics, and

microeconomics.

Supplementary information

International students commencing this program

with prior tertiary education may be eligible for

advanced standing/credit transfer. Contact the

Faculty of Business, Economics and Law

(www.bel.uq.edu.au) for further information.

Majors

Business and Industry

This major concentrates on economic decision

making in the business sector. It covers issues such

as managerial economics, industrial and labour

economics, the regulatory environment and benefi t/

cost analysis techniques. Students develop critical

skills and understanding applicable to businesses

across all sectors and industries. Businesses

and industries participating in the rapid pace of

international economic integration constantly seek

to improve their competitiveness and effi ciency.

Graduates will be equipped to play a central role in

any business-oriented enterprise.

International Trade and Finance

This major focuses on the economics and fi nancial

systems, mechanisms and emerging issues in an

increasingly globalised economy. The key factors and

impacts associated with this international phenomenon

are studied, along with the management and policy

responses of governments and business. Students

develop an understanding of the complex nature of

economics in the international environment and its

close relationship with fi nancial management fi rms.

Natural Resources and Environment

With the growing awareness at the international,

regional, national and local levels of the ecological

and economic importance of our diverse natural

resources, effective and effi cient use of these

assets is a signifi cant social and political issue. This

specialisation provides the tools of economic analysis

for application to problems associated with the

allocation of renewable and non-renewable natural

resources, including fi sh/marine; forests; agricultural

and recreational land; river systems; local and global

environments; energy and minerals. Students who

complete this specialisation will have gained the

analytical abilities to apply to challenges facing

business, government and the community at large

and the understanding of the key issues and tradeoffs

we face in a world of increasing competition,

globalisation and natural resource depletion.

Quantitative Methods

With a strong mathematical and modelling focus,

students are provided with the critical scientifi c

techniques to successfully measure, analyse,

project and model a diverse set of economic factors

and scenarios. Graduates are equipped to facilitate

better management decision-making, by providing

economic analysis that is scientifi cally based,

verifi able and objective. Students select courses

including econometrics, benefi t/cost analysis,

advanced mathematical economics, business and

economic decision techniques, and experimental

economics.

Career opportunities

Graduates work in a range of fi elds including

international consulting, infrastructure development

and planning, environmental management,

international fi nance, investment and trade, natural

resource and agricultural economics, public health,

treasury and statistics. Employment opportunities

exist in the following:

– education – universities and secondary schools

– fi nancial institutions, stockbroking fi rms and

merchant banks

– international organisations (such as the Asian

Development Bank, World Bank, International

Monetary Fund and the World Health Organisation)

providing policy advice and expertise for economic

development and infrastructure projects

– private sector multinational corporations and

local fi rms

– public sector government departments and

agencies (local, state and federal) in economic

policy, regulation, fi nance or public accounting

– public utilities in the fi elds of transport,

communications and power supply

– specialists/consultants in training and

management development, business law,

industrial relations, or information technology

– specialist organisations such as industry

associations, management consultancies, market

research/advertising organisations, and trade

unions.

50

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


BUSINESS, ECONOMICS, TOURISM & LAW

Professional memberships

Students may be eligible to become members

of a number of professional associations either

during their studies or upon the completion of their

program and depending on the major chosen.

These include:

– Australasia Institute of Banking and Finance

– Australian Computer Society

– Australian Institute of Management

– Australian Marketing Institute

– Market Research Society

– The Australian Human Resources Institute

– The Economic Society of Australia.

Dual degree programs

– Applied Science

– Arts

– Business Management

– Commerce

– Engineering

– Information Technology

– Laws

– Science

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

INTERNATIONAL

HOTEL AND TOURISM

MANAGEMENT

Location St Lucia

Commencement semester 1, 2

Duration 3 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12

(or equivalent) English, Mathematics A, B or C.

Honours Available as an extra year of study

Program outline

Graduates of the prestigious Bachelor of International

Hotel and Tourism Management (BIHTM) are in

strong demand by employers both in Australia

and overseas. The BIHTM contains a range of

compulsory professional courses, such as Asia

Pacifi c Cultures and Tourism, International Hotel

Management and International Gaming Management.

Students are also instructed in fundamental business

principles, to ensure that graduates have a solid

grounding in areas such as management, marketing,

human resources and fi nance.

Supplementary information

International students commencing this program

with prior tertiary education may be eligible for

advanced standing/credit transfer. Contact the

Faculty of Business, Economics and Law

(www.bel.uq.edu.au) for further information.

Majors

Commercial Recreation and Sport

Traditional tourism and hospitality offerings are

increasingly being confronted with the changing

nature of consumer demand. Research suggests

that the visitor experience is becoming more

important to the consumer than the actual

destination. In such a changing business

environment, leisure attractions, commercial

recreation services and sports events are

increasingly being used by the tourism and

hospitality sectors to enhance the visitor experience.

The relatively recent focus on the use of sports

tourism and commercial recreation to leverage other

benefi ts for the tourism and hospitality industry is

a clear case in point that the sector is fast moving

towards an experience economy. As such, the

major in Commercial Recreation and Sport, is

designed to introduce students to the diverse range

of management issues and processes related to the

operation of commercial recreation services, sport

operations and leisure attractions in the current

global tourism environment. Opportunities exist

for students to undertake workplace shadowing

programs in industry, a fi eld studies based course

and a number of international exchange programs.

Event Management

Globally, business, sporting, cultural and other

events play a signifi cant role in society and make

a considerable contribution to the economic

development of a region. The event management

major prepares students to enter the event sector

by providing a suite of interrelated courses that

identify and explore key factors in the successful

development, operation and management of events.

Students will develop a broad understanding of

event management processes and strategies while

developing specifi c workplace skills which are

relevant within a variety of professional contexts

such as tourism and hospitality. Opportunities exist

for students to undertake workplace shadowing

programs in industry, a fi eld studies based course

and there are a number of international exchange

programs available.

Hotel Management

Hospitality is both an industry in its own right and a

very signifi cant sector of the wider tourism industry.

This major provides a suite of courses that cover the

essential skills and knowledge to enter this sector.

Hotel and resort management, food and catering

management, gaming management and service

delivery are all examined. Students will develop

a broad understanding of hotel management

processes and strategies while developing specifi c

workplace skills that are relevant within a variety

of professional contexts. Opportunities exist for

students to undertake workplace shadowing

programs in industry, a fi eld studies based course

and a number of international exchange programs.

Tourism Management

Tourism is Queensland’s, and indeed one of the

world’s, most important industries and this major

focuses on this industry by providing a suite of

courses that cover the essential skills and knowledge

required to enter the profession. Tourism destination

marketing, planning and policy, visitor behaviour,

travel and tourism management, sustainability and

ecotourism policy, and physical, economic and social

tourism impacts are all examined. Opportunities exist

for students to undertake workplace-shadowing

programs in industry, a fi eld-studies-based course

and a number of international exchange programs.

Career opportunities

Graduates can expect to fi nd employment in:

– conferences and conventions centres

– hospitality training and consultancy fi rms

– hotels and resorts

– institutional hospitality management

– performing and visual arts complexes

– private event enterprises

– state, regional and local tourism organisations

– tourism and hotel consultancies

– other various aspects of the tourism industry.

Professional memberships

Students may be eligible to become members

of a number of professional associations either

during their studies or upon the completion of their

program and depending on the major chosen.

These include:

– Australian and New Zealand Association of

Leisure Studies

– Australian Institute of Travel and Tourism (AITT)

– Council for Australian University Tourism and

Hospitality Educators (CAUTHE)

– Festivals and Events Association (FEA)

– Institute of Hospitality

– Meetings and Events Australia (MEA)

– Meetings Professionals International (MPI)

– Pacifi c-Asia Travel Association (PATA)

– Sport Management Association for Australia and

New Zealand

– The Australian Council for Health, Physical

Education and Recreation

– World Leisure.

Dual degree programs

– Arts

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

LAWS

Location St Lucia

Commencement semester 1

Duration 4 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12

(or equivalent) English.

Honours Available as part of the standard program

Program outline

The LLB is designed to provide you with a

comprehensive and deep understanding of legal

principles and institutions that is distinguished by its

rigour, depth and conceptual sophistication.

Your education in the law will include not only a

thorough understanding of the concepts, principles,

policies and values that underpin and permeate

the law both in Australia and in other jurisdictions,

but will also see you develop a critical and

refl ective attitude to the law, and more generally, a

capacity for sustained critical analysis, thought and

argument.

The LLB fulfi ls the academic requirements

for admission as a legal practitioner throughout

Australia. If you are a student from Singapore or

Malaysia you may use the LLB to directly fulfi l the

academic qualifi cations required for admission to

the legal profession in your home country. If you are

a student from another country, then once admitted

in Australia, you may only need to complete limited

conversion modules to also be eligible for admission

in your home country.

Supplementary information

International students commencing this program with

prior tertiary education may be eligible for advanced

standing/credit transfer. Contact the Faculty of

Business, Economics and Law (www.bel.uq.edu.au)

for further information.

Career opportunities

UQ law graduates enjoy exceptional success in the

employment market. Most law graduates enter into

private practice as a barrister or solicitor. Others

work as corporate lawyers for large fi rms, legal

offi cers in the public service, community lawyers or

in any one of a wide range of positions in that areas

of accounting, education, foreign affairs, industrial

relations, management, politics or taxation.

Professional memberships

The Bachelor of Laws fulfi ls the academic

requirements for admission to the legal profession.

Dual degree programs

– Arts

– Business

– Business Management

– Commerce

– Economics

– Environmental Management

– Information Technology

– Journalism

– Science

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

51


Gala Carla Munguia Delgado came from Mexico to

study a Bachelor of Engineering (Chemical) at UQ

based on a friend’s recommendation of Australia as a

great place to live.

“Engineering is very versatile and that’s what I like

about it, and chemical engineering can be applied to

everything that needs to be produced,” says Gala.

“you can work as a chemical engineer in any industry.”

Before her final exams were over, Gala had a job offer

with the engineering company Hatch, in Brisbane.

“My role is as a process engineer in the Non-Ferrous

Business Unit and my responsibilities vary depending

on the project and they could vary from process

calculations, report writing, research to flow sheet

development,” she said.

She says the hands-on aspect of her degree helped

her make sense of the theory, and that there is strong

demand for graduates in her field.

When asked about the advice she would give others

considering studying at UQ, Gala says it is an

opportunity that you will never forget.

GALA CARLA

BACHELOR OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

PROCESS ENGINEER, HATCH

52


ENGINEERING,

ARCHITECTURE

& PLANNING

Why choose UQ for studies in

engineering, architecture and planning?

Academic staff in the areas of Engineering,

Architecture and Planning are professionals

in their fields and involved in leading

research. As a result, teaching material is

current, supported by world-class research

and relevant to the needs of industry.

UQ offers the largest choice of engineering

programs in Queensland, with 16 major areas

of specialisation.

In the Bachelor of Engineering (BE) program,

you can broaden your studies or become

involved with new and emerging disciplines by

electing to add a minor to the major fi eld you

have chosen. Studying a minor takes advantage

of the electives options within the BE program.

Study in most of the minors would generally

not need to commence until the second year of

your studies, except in the case of Biomedical

Engineering where you may opt to enrol in

biology electives in the fi rst year of your studies.

Currently, minors are available in: Biomedical

Engineering; Chemical Engineering; Extractive

Metallurgy; Geomechanics; Materials

Engineering; Mechanical Engineering; Mineral

Process Engineering; Mining Engineering; and

Telecommunications Engineering.

UQ is unique in Australia in combining the

disciplines of geography and Geographic

Information Science (GIS) with urban and

regional planning. It is also one of Australiaís

leading institutions for architectural education

and research, with a program designed to meet

the changing demands of the profession.

UQ’s facilities and special features include:

– the Centre for Hypersonics, the worldís

largest university-based hypersonics group

– student access to 14 branches of the UQ

Library, including the dedicated Dorothy Hill

Physical Sciences and Engineering Library

– an experimental mine located close to

UQ St Lucia

– architecture facilities including fl exible

exhibition space, computer teaching

laboratories and design studio facilities

– fi eld and survey equipment including Global

Positioning Systems (GPS)

– extensive GIS software, and

– formal industry programs involving work

experience and employment opportunities to

complement University studies.

Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and

Information Technology

www.eait.uq.edu.au

Degrees in this discipline

– Architectural Design 54

– Engineering 54

– Regional and Town Planning 57

Graduates in the disciplines of Engineering, Architecture and

Planning contribute to all areas of industry and society, and

employment prospects are excellent. Careers are available in

a range of private companies and government organisations

in areas such as:

– architecture

– biomedical and

pharmaceutical development

– commercial development

– computing and

telecommunications

– construction and housing

– consulting

– engineering

– environment reserves and

tourist centres

– manufacturing

– minerals processing

– mining

– power generation and

transmission

– product design and

development

– public utilities

– research

– satellite and spacecraft

technology

– software development

– statutory bodies

– town planning and regional

development

– transport.

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

53


Eligibility for visa

International students must undertake

programs on campus at UQ on a full-time basis

to be eligible to apply for an Australian student

visa. See page 96 for more information.

BACHELOR OF

ARCHITECTURAL

DESIGN

Location St Lucia

Commencement semester 1

Duration 3 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12

(or equivalent) English

Honours Available as an extra year of study

Program outline

The Bachelor of Architectural Design (BArchDes)

is the fi rst stage of obtaining a professional

qualifi cation in architecture. The BArchDes provides

the basis on which students can progress to the

professional Master of Architecture. Architecture

is a dynamic and demanding profession, making

a positive contribution to the shaping of our built

environment and our culture. The essential skill of

an architect is the ability to design buildings and

spaces with an inherent concern for human living

and working environments.

Supplementary information

In addition to design, key areas of the program are

environmental design, architectural technology,

architectural communication and computing,

people/environment studies, history and theory.

Career opportunities

Graduates have employment opportunities with

architects and in allied design professions, in a

private offi ce, government department, statutory

body, local authority, commercial development

company, or research organisation.

Professional memberships

Students may become eligible for membership of

the Australian Institute of Architects during their

studies or on completion of their program.

Additional cost

Drawing board and equipment approximately

AUD$600-700; consumables, paper, pens etc

approximately AUD$100-200; books, technical

notes etc approximately AUD$150+.

Refer to the Program Guide for New Students

(www.epsa.uq.edu.au) for details.

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

ENGINEERING

Location St Lucia

Commencement semester 1, 2

Duration 4 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12 (or

equivalent) English, Mathematics B, plus one of

Physics or Chemistry. Both Chemistry and Physics

are recommended

Honours Available as part of the standard program

Program outline

The University of Queensland offers the largest

choice of engineering programs in Queensland,

with a large number of distinct majors and double

majors. The fl exible curriculum equips students

to work in both established and newly emerging

areas of engineering. Students develop their

understanding by applying basic science and

engineering principles to engineering problems of

commercial importance. In addition to technical

expertise, the program emphasises essential

workplace skills such as communication, teamwork,

project management, problem solving and lifelong

learning.

The range of options available through majors,

dual and extended majors, minors or dual degrees,

gives students the fl exibility to pursue fi elds of study

to the depth or breadth of knowledge required. Dual

majors and minors are a set of courses that take

advantage of elective provisions within the program,

thereby not lengthening the program duration.

Extended majors offer a more concentrated program

of study, while minors offer study in an area of

engineering study additional to but complementary

with the major. These study alternatives give

students a competitive advantage in achieving their

career aspirations. Most engineering majors can

be undertaken as extended majors or with a dual

degree. With the majority of majors, students can

also choose an additional minor (options are detailed

in the individual majors outlines).

The UQ engineering degree is widely accredited

and respected and this degree equips students to

work both in Australia and overseas.

Placement courses

Completion of 60 days of Engineering Professional

Practice to satisfy the requirements of Engineers

Australia.

Supplementary information

Credit for previous tertiary studies: Australian and

international students are invited to apply to the

Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Information

Technology for credit towards the Bachelor of

Engineering. Applicants should submit their offi cial

academic record and offi cial course descriptions for

studies completed at other universities. Depending

on the level and relevance of previous study,

students may be granted up to fi ve semesters

credit, and should seek faculty advice on what

options are available.

Most classes are scheduled between 8.00am and

6.00pm, Monday to Friday.

Majors

Chemical Engineering

Chemical engineering is the design, management

and optimisation of processes that turn raw

materials into valuable products, using the

latest knowledge of biology, chemistry, physics

and mathematics, integrated with engineering

principles and economic consideration. Chemical

engineers ensure economic viability, and a

minimum loss of materials and consumption of

energy, while maintaining safety and environmental

standards. This major also applies knowledge

within team-based project work. Students tackle

real world issues sourced from industries and the

latest research. A minor is available in materials

engineering. Chemical engineering is a rapidly

changing profession with engineers working at the

cutting edge of fi elds such as molecular biology,

nano-materials and chemistry, mathematics and

information technology. They work in a range of

industries, government departments and private

consultancies, within environmental protection,

management and safety; natural resource utilisation

and the energy sector; chemical, petroleum and

petrochemical industries; biochemical, biomedical

and pharmaceuticals industries; computer-aided

process and control engineering; advanced

materials design and manufacture; minerals

processing and related industries; food processing

and product design and development.

Chemical and Biological Engineering

Engineering combines quantitative analysis and

synthesis to elucidate system design principles.

Through the genomics revolution engineers can

now begin to tackle biological problems using the

same ‘measure, model, and manipulate’ approach

they have applied to physics and chemistry. Indeed,

applying this system approach is widely recognised

as essential not only for the development of

innovative biotechnologies but also to yield

fundamental scientifi c understanding of biological

systems. As our ability to modify and control

biological systems increases, biological processes

will replace chemical and mechanical processes

due to their inherent advantages of renewable

resources, mild operation conditions and minimal

waste problems. Early signs of the change are seen

not only in the high-value pharmaceutical industry,

but also in the production of bulk chemicals

like lysine by fermentation and in bioleaching of

copper and gold from mineral ore. Advances

in our understanding of and ability to mimic

biological systems are also inspiring completely

new approaches such as nanotechnology and

tissue engineering, which will form the foundation

of new industries of the 21st century. In this double

major, biological engineering is taught together with

chemical engineering. Graduates are accredited

as chemical engineers having completed every

compulsory course. Graduates provide traditional

chemical engineering industries an understanding

of the opportunities offered by biotechnology and

provide emerging biotechnology companies the

power of the ‘measure, model, and manipulate’

engineering approach. Graduates are also well

prepared for graduate studies in biological

engineering and medicine.

54

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURE & PLANNING

Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering

Metallurgical engineers play a key role in ensuring

the sustainability of our modern society. Everything

in our material world, even our major energy

sources, are derived from minerals or recycled

materials. It is the role of the metallurgical engineer

to develop, design and operate processes that

transform these low value raw materials into

useful high value mineral and metal products.

The double major in chemical and metallurgical

engineering provides the best of both worlds - a

broad education in chemical engineering combined

with more specialist metallurgy courses. The

program for the double major has been designed for

maximum commonality with the chemical engineers

program, particularly in years one and two of the

program. Elective courses in chemical engineering

can be counted towards the double major. The

compulsory metallurgy courses included in the

program provides students with the experience

and skills that employers in the minerals and

manufacturing industries seek. These courses

include both the physical and chemical processing

techniques, process modelling, process design and

economics, individual research. The combination of

courses within the double major program provides

maximum fl exibility in job choice with a head start

for those who want a career in the minerals and

manufacturing industries.

Civil Engineering

Civil engineers provide for people’s needs, and are

expert in the planning, design, construction and

maintenance of facilities that contribute to modern

life. They understand the way in which natural

phenomena behave, including water and wind,

and how buildings of all kinds are able to resist

loads. They work with buildings, bridges, roads,

harbours, dams, airports, coastal protection, water

supply and public health. Civil engineers apply their

theoretical knowledge to produce effi cient and

economic facilities that are aesthetically pleasing

and satisfy society’s needs. They have an aptitude

for mathematics and physics and a desire to

meet environmental and technological challenges.

Students can study in the areas of structural

engineering, hydraulic engineering, transportation

engineering, geomechanics, hydrology and

public health engineering, or management,

construction and economics. Civil engineers

provide expert fi nancial and technical advice,

and plan and coordinate projects from concepts

through to completion. They fi nd employment

within private industry; for consulting engineering

fi rms, construction and mining companies, and

research establishments. Within the public sector

civil engineers are employed by state and federal

government departments, city councils, and regional

shires responsible for railways, roads, harbours,

housing and construction. Students may undertake

a minor in mining engineering or geomechanics. It is

recommended that international students entering

the third year of the program with two years of credit

should commence in Semester 1. Those who want

to commence in Semester 2 should contact the

School of Engineering for assistance.

Computer Systems Engineering

Electrical engineering is concerned with the

design, construction, operation and maintenance

of electronics and electrical energy infrastructure,

including power generation and distribution,

electrical installations in major building and mining

projects, telecommunications infrastructure,

aerospace and defence systems, medical imaging

systems, industrial and scientifi c instrumentation

and control. This major prepares students to

work in innovative environments, designing

cutting-edge products for the information and

communication industries. Strong emphasis

is given to practical hands-on experience with

high technology equipment. Team and individual

projects are a strong focus of the program, an

approach valued by employers. Students can

also include a minor in biomedical engineering

or telecommunications engineering. Computer

systems engineers typically work in one of the

following fi elds: telecommunications; signal

and image processing; robotics and intelligent

systems; computer systems engineering; electrical

power generation, transmission and distribution;

biomedical engineering including biomedical

imaging and signal processing for biomedical

applications. Career opportunities are found in

the telecommunications and microwave industry,

mining and transport sector, power generation and

transmission industries and in the government and

defence sector. Many UQ graduates are forming

their own companies quite early in their careers

and in a 2006 nationwide survey by APESMA,

electrical engineering commanded the highest mean

commencing salary of all engineering disciplines in

Australia.

Electrical Engineering

Electrical engineering is concerned with electrical

and electronic devices and systems. Electrical

engineers work with equipment ranging from heavy

power generators to tiny computer chips. Their

work contributes to almost every sector of society:

for example, home theatre entertainment systems,

mobile phones, digital cameras and television to

enhance our lifestyle, medical imaging systems

for improved healthcare, electrical appliances for

homes, scientifi c instruments for laboratories, lasers

for reliable high speed communication, handheld

multimedia devices to provide information on the

move, and satellite systems for remote sensing

of the environment and reliable mobile and fi xed

energy systems to power all of these. This major

prepares students to design cutting-edge products

for the information and communication industries.

Strong emphasis is given to practical hands-on

experience with high technology equipment.

Students can include a minor in biomedical

engineering, telecommunications engineering or

software engineering. Electrical engineers usually

work in one of six speciality areas: power generation

and transmission; electronics; computers;

communication systems; instrumentation and

measurement; and automatic controls. Career

opportunities are found in the telecommunications

industry, mining and transport sector, computer

industry, or in power generation and transmission

industries. They are also employed by electronics

companies, both large and small. Many of our

graduates are forming their own companies quite

early in their careers.

Electrical and Aerospace Engineering

Electrical and Aerospace Engineering combines

a full single major in Electrical Engineering with

additional specialist study and specialist project

work in the aerospace and aviation industry.

Electrical engineers design, build, operate and

maintain much of our electronics and energy

infrastructure - things like the Internet, home

theatre entertainment systems, mobile phones,

digital cameras and television, medical imaging

systems; electrical appliances for homes; scientifi c

instruments for laboratories; lasers for reliable

high speed communication; satellite systems for

remote sensing of the environment; and reliable

mobile and fi xed energy systems to power all of

these. In addition to this, avionics and aerospace

students are specifi cally equipped with extra skills

to design the electronics in modern aircraft and

airport systems. This dual major prepares students

to design cutting-edge electronics products for the

aviation industry, and also with all the skills to service

other parts of the information and communication

industries. Strong emphasis is given to practical,

hands-on experience with high technology

equipment. Students are equipped to work as

electrical and electronics engineers in the aerospace

industries - airlines, defence, airports, and aircraft

manufacture. Students are also equipped to work in

traditional electrical engineering.

Electrical and Biomedical Engineering

New discoveries and developments in biology and

medicine have led to the rapid change and growth

of biotechnology research and industry. Biomedical

engineering bridges the gap between technology,

medicine and biology. It integrates physical,

chemical, mathematical and computational sciences

and engineering principles with the ultimate aim

of improving health care. The degree commences

with a broad foundation of preparatory courses in

engineering, mathematics, biology and physics,

followed by more advanced coursework and

laboratory training, combining engineering analysis

and design techniques with biology and physiology

of cells and organisations. The program is projectfocused

including a full-year project in fourth year

to develop individual design and research skills,

an approach valued by employers. Graduates of

biomedical engineering may be involved in the

design, construction and development of health

and monitoring devices and computers, diagnostic

systems and therapeutic systems. They may also

work with models of physiological function and

prosthetics and implants. Employment opportunities

include hospitals, biotechnology, companies,

medical equipment manufacturers, research

institutes and government health departments.

Environmental Engineering

Environmental engineering has developed as a

distinct stream of the engineering profession, and is

a multifaceted, challenging and dynamic profession.

Environmental engineers consider the environment

at the design stage of project development.

They predict the effect of human activities on the

environment, use their design skills to minimise

environmental impact, and promote sustainable

development. The challenge for graduates is to

create innovative solutions to problems. As the basis

for a sustainable future, these solutions must satisfy

strict new legislation, be cost effective in the longer

term and be acceptable to the public. This major

combines a knowledge of process engineering,

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

55


design methods, ecological processes and life

sciences with economics and communication

skills. It involves the study of engineering principles,

economics, law, social impact, occupational health,

toxicology and the sciences of biology, chemistry

and ecology. A key focus is cleaner production

through the minimisation, control and treatment

of wastes associated with modern society. There

is also an emphasis on the consideration of

environmental, ecological and social issues within

the design, operation and management of industrial

processes. Environmental Engineering is available

as an extended major only. Environmental engineers

work with consulting engineers and processing

companies both in Australia and overseas.

Graduates are also employed by government

departments and agencies.

Materials Engineering

Materials engineering is concerned with the

selection, processing and development of materials

to design and make products. Materials – metals,

alloys, ceramics, polymers and composites –

give manufactured products their functional and

aesthetic qualities. Materials engineers apply their

knowledge of materials behaviour to optimise

processing and improve the properties of products.

They are also involved in controlling the service

behaviour of materials; improving the performance

of machines and structures. Major technological

advances in recent years have extended career

opportunities, with developments in light weight

composites; high temperature materials; surface

treatments; and materials with special electrical,

optical and magnetic properties. This major covers

core engineering science, materials design, and

properties and use of materials in manufactured

articles. It is not available as a double major, but can

be taken with a minor in mechanical engineering,

extractive metallurgy or chemical engineering.

Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineers design and manufacture

power plants, machinery and equipment for

industry, and are expert in producing energy and

converting it to other forms. They work closely

with industrial engineers and managers in many

fi elds to design innovative machinery and systems

that yield economies in production. They may

design turbines, earthmoving machinery, food

processors, air-conditioning and refrigeration

systems, artifi cial hearts and limbs, and engines

for aircrafts or automobiles. The demand for

mechanical engineers is increasingly broad, as

new industries emerge, and old industries take

advantage of automation developments and new

sources of energy. This major offers core courses

in design, mathematics, modelling, computing,

management and engineering science. Electives in

later years allow students to pursue individual career

options. Principal study topics are fl uid mechanics;

thermodynamics and heat transfer; solid mechanics;

manufacturing; energy systems; dynamics and

control. Students may also undertake a minor

in materials engineering. Minors are available in

materials engineering, minerals process engineering

or mining engineering. Mechanical engineers work

in a range of areas, from very large mining, refi ning,

construction and manufacturing companies to

small or self-owned companies. Graduates are also

employed by government departments, private

building services, and consulting engineering

companies.

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering is based on

the Mechanical Engineering program. Students can

then choose to take specialised courses primarily

in either the aeronautical or space area. Aerospace

engineering is concerned with the design,

manufacture and operation of aircraft, launch

vehicles, satellites, spacecraft and ground support

facilities. It is a particularly challenging discipline

because of the need for light weight and extremely

reliable designs. This requires students to make use

of cutting-edge technology and design methods.

Aerospace engineering projects tend to be

multidisciplinary in nature because of the scientifi c

content of many of the payloads and the complex

thermo-physical aspects involved in operations such

as hypervelocity atmospheric fl ight. All workers in

this fi eld must be adept at incorporating technology

from outside their immediate specialty. Graduates

will be qualifi ed as mechanical engineers and will

have an understanding of key issues in the fi eld of

aerospace engineering. Mechanical and Aerospace

Engineering is available in the dual major only.

Mechatronic Engineering

Mechatronic engineering is one of the most dynamic

branches of engineering, and has far-reaching

applications to every sector of society. Mechatronic

engineers integrate precision mechanical

engineering with electronics, computer systems,

and advanced controls, to design and construct

products and processes. Microscale sensor and

actuator technologies are developed and applied to

create intelligent consumer products. Mechatronic

engineers are in great demand as industries seek

to apply evolutionary advances in computers,

electronics, sensors, and actuators to improve

their products, processes and services. This major

provides a broad-based education in the basic

principles of electrical, mechanical and computer

engineering. A broad range of electives cover

areas including engineering analysis and design;

engineering mechanics; dynamics and automatic

control; signals and communication; electrical

hardware and computer software. Students may

also undertake a minor in biomedical engineering.

Graduates have the knowledge and skills to design

and build advanced products such as robots and

machine tools; scientifi c instrumentation; and high

performance automatic suspension and braking

systems. Mechatronic engineers are employed by

product developers and manufacturers, the mining

industry, the aerospace and defence sectors, in

self-owned companies and by government and

industry research groups. Graduates are in demand

wherever there is potential for improvement in the

integration of computer and electrical hardware with

mechanical systems.

Mining Engineering

Mining engineering is the extraction of valuable

ores from the ground for processing and utilisation.

It involves all phases of mining operations: from

exploration and discovery, through feasibility,

development, production, processing and

marketing, to fi nal land restoration and rehabilitation.

Responsibility for the development and production

phases of a mine requires a broad knowledge of

all mining operations and skills in leadership and

industrial relations.

This major integrates theory and practical

application and involves mathematics, basic, earth

and engineering sciences. Minors are available in

minerals process engineering and geomechanics.

The unique University Experimental Mine facility,

located near the St Lucia campus, is used for

practical work in ventilation, earth sciences,

surveying, production engineering and safety.

Graduates are employed by mining companies,

initially at the mining centres where minerals are

extracted. With experience, mining engineers

progress to senior managers or technical specialists,

mine inspectors and advisers to government bodies.

Many are employed by international companies,

and gain overseas experience. Mining engineers

are also employed by civil engineering companies

to supervise tunnelling and open-cut operations for

railways, roads, hydroelectric and sewerage works.

Software Engineering

Software engineering is the systematic approach

to the development, operation, maintenance and

retirement of software; the controlling element of

computer-based systems. As society becomes

ever more dependent on computers, one of the

biggest challenges is the creation of new software

necessary to make computers useful. Software

engineering deals with the challenges associated

with large-scale, high quality software: size and

complexity, cooperation between developers,

clients and users, and evolution of software over

time to maintain its value. Software engineers

use principles of computer science, engineering,

design, management, psychology, sociology and

other disciplines to design and manage large

software systems. Team and individual projects

are a focus of this plan, an approach valued by

employers. Software engineers work in large multinational

companies, state and federal government

departments and agencies, and in many small,

specialised and emerging companies. Career

opportunities for software engineers are excellent

and will remain so for the foreseeable future.

Students interested in careers in the aerospace

and aviation industry can now combine a full single

major in Software Engineering with additional

specialist study and project work in aerospace and

aviation. Refer to separate Software Systems and

Aerospace plan entry.

Software Systems and Aerospace Engineering

Software Systems and Aerospace Engineering

combines a full single major in Software Engineering

with additional specialist study and specialist

project work in the aerospace and aviation industry.

Software engineering is the systematic approach

to the development, operation, maintenance and

retirement of software; the controlling element of

computer-based systems. Software engineering

deals with the challenges associated with largescale,

high quality software. Software engineers

use principles of computer science, engineering,

design, management, psychology, sociology and

other disciplines to design and manage large

systems. In the aerospace industry, systems such

as aircraft are a mixture of electronics, software

and mechanical devices that need to operate at

exceptional levels of safety and reliability. This

plan includes a strong component of systems

engineering which allows designers to describe

56

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURE & PLANNING

and understand such complex systems. This

program specifi cally equips students to work as

software engineers and systems engineers in the

aerospace industries - airlines, defence, airports,

aircraft manufacture. The growth in Queensland’s

aviation and aerospace industries continues to

outpace the rest of Australia and graduates’ skills

will be transferable overseas. Graduates are also

equipped to work as software engineers employed

in large multinational companies, state and federal

government departments and agencies, and in

many small, specialised consulting companies.

Career opportunities

The UQ engineering degree is highly regarded and

employment prospects are excellent. Engineers fi nd

employment, as consultants, in the government and

in many areas of business and industry. Detailed

information about employment opportunities for

different engineering specialisations is found in the

Engineering Prospectus.

Professional memberships

Graduate and student memberships of:

– Association of Professional Engineers, Scientists

and Managers Australia (APESMA)

– Engineers Australia

Other memberships apply for specifi c engineering

majors, including:

– Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy

(AusIMM) – Chemical & Metallurgical, Mining

– Australian Computer Society – Computer

Systems and Software.

– The Institution of Chemical Engineers

(IChemE) – Chemical, Chemical & Metallurgical,

Environmental.

Dual degree programs

– Arts

– Biotechnology

– Business Management

– Commerce

– Economics

– Information Technology

– Science

Additional cost

The Senior First Aid certifi cate costs approximately

AUD$120. Students who undertake vacation

work, fi eldwork or work experience will be required

to fund their own travel and living expenses.

Civil engineering students will need to purchase

safety boots (AS2210) (up to AUD$140), hard hat

(AS1801) (AUD$15) and undertake a site safety

induction program (AUD$45 with group, or AUD$90

individual). (Note: AS = Australian Standard).

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

REGIONAL AND TOWN

PLANNING

Location St Lucia

Commencement semester 1

Duration 4 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12

(or equivalent) English.

Honours Available as part of the standard program

Program outline

Regional and town planning assists communities,

companies and governments plan for and create

better human settlements. Thus, it integrates the

environmental, economic and social aspects of the

built environment from the scale of the individual site

up to regional scale. Regional and town planners

can provide advice on aspects of land-use planning,

urban design, transport and infrastructure planning,

use and extension of information technology,

heritage and conservation, resource management,

environmental monitoring, planning law and

practice, commercial and industrial development,

and policy making and implementation. Planners

from the BRTP work in Queensland and other parts

of Australia as well as in developed and developing

countries.

Planners can fi nd themselves working on strategic,

long range plans as well as on the assessment

of specifi c land development applications. This

work can be with communities in developing

long range visions, with state governments in

regional or strategic planning, with environmental

managers in protecting precious environmental

resources, with international development agencies,

or with developers and local councils on specifi c

applications. Because of this range of activities, the

education of regional and town planners includes

material from a wide range of disciplines.

The program itself emphasises the application

of planning theory and the development of design

and problem-solving skills through project work.

This project work varies in complexity from simple,

small-scale projects to comprehensive development

schemes, often in ‘real-life’ situations in conjunction

with local authorities and community organisations.

The degree features a core of planning courses,

supported by input from other disciplines such

as demography, economics, environmental

management, geography and law. Students also

have the opportunity to choose a number of elective

courses. A few examples of core planning courses

are: environment and society; planning theory;

environmental planning; planning practice; real estate

development planning; and environmental impact

assessment. In the fi nal year students also have a

choice between writing an independent research

thesis or taking further courses.

Career opportunities

Graduates are employed by a range of local, state

and federal government departments and agencies,

private consultancy fi rms, large land developers,

community organisations, international agencies,

and fi nance and investment houses concerned with

property markets. Often planners work as members

of multi disciplinary teams. Thus there are work

opportunities in:

– commercial and industrial development

– development planning

– environmental monitoring and management

– heritage and conservation

– land-use planning

– planning law and practice

– policy making and implementation

– regional planning and development

– resource management

– statutory or strategic planning

– tourism

– transport and infrastructure planning

– urban design

– use and extension of information technology

– working with, or employing, engineering and

architectural teams.

Professional memberships

Graduates are eligible for membership of the

Planning Institute of Australia.

Additional cost

Some courses may incur additional costs (eg. fi eld

trips).

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

57


Bachelor of Applied Science (Human Movement Studies-

CAREER Exercise Science) AREAS graduate April Bennetts born in

Alachua, Florida, in the United States of America, was

attracted to UQ by its reputation.

“It [UQ] gave me a well recognised degree and a theoretical

background to work in the real world,” she said.

UQ had everything she wanted in a university, and studying

in Australia gave her a different perspective on life.

Months before she had graduated she was offered a

full-time job as a Wellness Coordinator at Brisbane

City Council. She is now working as a Program Officer

for the Council’s 10,000 Steps initiative. The program

encourages people to use a step-counting pedometer to

track their daily physical activity levels and improve

their general wellbeing.

“My career aspirations are to have my own company in

the health and wellness industry,” she said.

She lists as among the highlights of her time at UQ the

constant application and use of health promotion courses

in the “real world”, as well as the knowledgeable lecturers

in the field of exercise science and health promotion.

APRIL BENNETS

BACHELOR OF APPLIED SCIENCE

(HUMAN MOVEMENT STUDIES – EXERCISE SCIENCE)

PROGRAM OFFICER, 10,000 STEPS, BRISBANE CITY COUNCIL

Career opportunities in health continue to evolve, ensuring

a constant demand for graduates. Excellent employment

opportunities are available in the public and private sectors

and include:

– audiology facilities

– biotechnology industry

– consultation services

– dental and oral health

sectors

– drug development and

research

– exercise/sports science

facilities

– health research sector

– hospitals

– international aid agencies

– medicine

– nursing homes

– nutrition and dietetics sector

– non-government health and

welfare organisations (for

example, National Heart

Foundation)

– government and community

health services and clinics

– pharmacies

– public health planning,

research and promotion

units

– psychiatric clinics and

hostels

– rehabilitation units (medical,

vocations, psychiatric)

– schools

– sports development or

coaching facilities.

58


HEALTH

Why choose UQ for studies in health?

UQ has a well-recognised reputation,

in Australia and around the world, for

producing top quality health graduates.

Here are some of the reasons to choose

Health at UQ in 2010.

Outstanding career prospects

A national and international shortage of

health professionals means job prospects

in healthcare have never been better. With a

UQ health degree you will be highly regarded

by employers. UQ health graduates enjoy an

employment rate of close to 100 percent, and

many become leaders in their fi eld. At UQ you

will study alongside Queensland’s top students

and other high achieving students from around

Australia and the world.

Excellent teachers

Award-winning teachers continue to develop

innovative, outcome-driven methods to prepare

the next generation of health professionals.

UQ health educators have received prestigious

national teaching awards for the last three

years, contributing to UQ’s title as the most

awarded university in Australia for teaching.

Many of our health educators are leading

practitioners who choose to combine teaching

with professional practice and important

research.

Experienced, job-ready graduates

All undergraduate health students undertake

clinical (working with patients) or industry

placements in a wide variety of healthcare

organisations. At UQ, health students:

– learn evidence-based health practice

– experience a problem-based learning

approach, applying their knowledge to

real-life health scenarios

– benefi t from a close, long-term relationship

with major private and public healthcare

facilities, where they gain extensive

experience

– can gain clinical experience in the

University’s own professionally-supervised

and equipped therapy clinics.

Leading research and learning

Health students benefi t directly from a

high-impact research environment. At UQ:

– many researchers have made internationally

recognised discoveries in their fi eld

– many leading researchers, such as cervical

cancer vaccine co-creator, Professor Ian

Frazer, also teach students

– students benefi t from learning in this

cutting-edge environment

– health researchers are working across all

major fi elds of health.

Teamwork preparation

Health at UQ is a leader in interprofessional

education, which prepares graduates to work

effectively with other health professionals.

An Australian-fi rst initiative at UQ involves

students from different health disciplines in

teamwork projects. First year health students

are introduced to teamwork by competing in

a fun Healthcare Team Challenge event, which

UQ held for the fi rst time in 2008.

Health@UQ

www.uq.edu.au/study/health

Degrees in this discipline

– Dental Science 60

– Dental Studies 60

– Health Sciences 60

– Human Movement Studies 61

– Medicine/Surgery

(Graduate Entry) 61

– Midwifery 62

– Nursing 62

– Occupational Health and

Safety Science 63

– Occupational Therapy 63

– Oral Health 64

– Pharmacy 64

– Physiotherapy 65

– Speech Pathology 65

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

59


Eligibility for visa

International students must undertake

programs on campus at UQ on a full-time basis

to be eligible to apply for an Australian student

visa. See page 96 for more information.

BACHELOR OF

DENTAL SCIENCE

Location Dental School, St Lucia

Commencement semester 1

Duration 5 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12 (or

equivalent) English, Mathematics B, and one subject

from Biological Science, Chemistry or Physics

(Chemistry recommended). International applicants

are required to sit the International Student

Admissions Test (ISAT). For information on ISAT,

see the Australian Council for Educational Research

(ACER) webpage (www.acer.edu.au/isat). For

applicants who need to provide evidence of English

profi ciency, please note that this program requires a

higher level of English language profi ciency than the

UQ minimum. IELTS overall 7; speaking 7; and writing

6 is required. TOEFL test results are not accepted.

Honours Available as part of the standard program

Application closing date 31 May 2009, 30

September 2009 (Please note there will be two

application assessment intakes for this program)

Program outline

The University of Queensland Dental School has

been graduating dentists since 1937. It is the

oldest and most established dental school in

Queensland and has been located at Turbot Street,

Brisbane since 1941. The BDSc program has

been accredited by the Australian Dental Council

and provides students with the opportunity to

spend the fi nal year in State Government dental

clinics throughout Queensland, enabling them to

extend and further develop their clinical skills and

experience before graduation.

The program provides students with the

knowledge, skills and attitudes they require to become

competent practitioners of dentistry. These include the

application of scientifi c principles to the prevention,

diagnosis and treatment of oral diseases and

abnormalities. Students are introduced to oral health

and dental practice in fi rst year and also undertake

courses in oral biology and biological sciences. The

remaining four years of the program involve three years

of applied dental science and one year of extramural

clinical practice (37 weeks). Clinical work commences

in second year and is broadened in the third and

fourth years of study. Each student is assigned

patients and is then responsible for the dental care of

these patients. Clinical work in areas such as general

practice dentistry, orthodontics, paediatric dentistry,

periodontics and prosthodontics is undertaken at the

Dental School. Students gain experience in the areas

of oral medicine and oral and maxillofacial surgery in

Brisbane teaching hospitals. The fi nal year of study

provides external clinical experience. Students will

be rotated to a variety of State Government health

clinics throughout Queensland, including rural, school,

hospital and community clinics.

Placement courses

The fi nal year of the BDSc program involves 37

weeks (two semesters) of clinical placement in State

Government health clinics throughout Queensland,

including rural, school, hospital and community

clinics. These clinics are located in districts such

as Ipswich, Gold Coast, Logan, Redcliffe, Kawana,

Nambour, Caboolture, Mackay, Maryborough,

Bundaberg, Rockhampton, Charters Towers, Cairns

and Townsville. Students are allocated to one

metropolitan placement and one rural placement

during the year. Travel reimbursement is provided to

students for one return fare per semester. However,

students will incur varying accommodation costs

depending upon clinical placement and location.

Supplementary information

The Dental Board of Queensland policy prevents

dentists carrying blood-borne viruses from

undertaking invasive procedures, the defi nition of

which includes most aspects of clinical dentistry.

Students are therefore required to provide

serological evidence of their status with respect

to blood-borne transmissible viruses (Hepatitis

B, Hepatitis C and HIV). Carriers of blood-borne

transmissible viruses will not be permitted to be

enrolled in the BDSc program. Students will also be

required to undertake Tuberculosis (TB) screening.

Students are required to have a current Blue Card

(Working with Children Check) before commencing

clinical work and clinical placements. For information

on obtaining a Blue Card, contact the School of

Dentistry (www.uq.edu.au/dentistry).

Students are required to complete a nationally

accredited Senior First Aid Certifi cate prior to

commencement of Semester 2 in their fi rst

year. Students are also required to complete a

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) competency

recertifi cation course prior to the commencement

of years three and four of the program and to

complete a Senior First Aid Recertifi cation prior to the

commencement of year fi ve.

Career opportunities

Qualifi ed dentists have the choice of various

employment fi elds, such as:

– defence forces – graduates may enter the Navy,

Army or Air Force as dental offi cers on short

service or permanent basis

– government public health – in Queensland, there

are salaried positions available in government

and school dental clinics

– private practice – once registered with the

appropriate Dental Board, dentists can enter

private practice on their own behalf. Alternatively,

they may work as an assistant with an

established practitioner, join a partnership or

work as a locum tenens.

Professional memberships

Graduates may be elgible for membership of the

Australian Dental Association.

Additional cost

Senior First Aid Certifi cate (approximately AUD$155)

required before Semester 2 of year one, annual

CPR re-certifi cation (approximately AUD$50)

before commencing years three and four, First Aid

re-certifi cation (approximately AUD$115) before

commencing year fi ve. Learn-a-Prep block (AUD$60),

dental instruments kit (year one) (AUD$600). Laptop

computer (AUD$1500-$2000) for integrated patient/

student management system (years two to four).

Incidental course materials (AUD$150).

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

DENTAL STUDIES

Location Dental School, St Lucia

Commencement semester 1

Duration 1 year full-time

Admission requirements Minimum completion of

third year studies in BDSc program

Program outline

This program involves one year of full-time

research for dental students who have completed

at least year three of the Bachelor of Dental

Science. During the year, the student is required to

complete a substantial research project in a fi eld

of interest carried out under supervision, as well as

undertake supporting courses recommended by

the supervisor. Students must complete a research

report in the form of a minor thesis.

Supplementary information

May be undertaken after third year BDSc studies or

BDSc graduation.

A student reaching the required academic

standard may be awarded the BDentSt degree with

distinction.

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

HEALTH SCIENCES

Location Ipswich, St Lucia

Commencement semester 1, 2

Duration 3 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12 (or

equivalent) English and one of Biological Science,

Chemistry or Physics.

Honours Available as an additional year of study

Program outline

The Bachelor of Health Sciences provides a broad

overview of healthcare and is especially suited to

students who intend to enrol in a postgraduate

professional degree (eg. medicine, management,

public health) or who wish to enter the non-clinical

health workforce (for example, health promotion,

health management) planning and delivering effi cient

quality healthcare.

Students seeking a clinical career may initially

enrol in the Bachelor of Health Sciences and then,

following graduation, pursue a clinical postgraduate

or graduate entry degree of choice dependent upon

academic performance. Alternately students, with

high academic performance, may seek to transfer

into a clinical undergraduate program while enrolled

in the Bachelor of Health Sciences.

Those students seeking non-clinical careers in

healthcare will fi nd employment in the broad areas

of health promotion or health services management

and will be at the front-line in improving healthcare

delivery through their roles as health promotion

offi cers, indigenous health promotion offi cers,

health managers and health researchers. As with

most three-year university degrees, employment

prospects and remuneration will be enhanced with

the addition of at least one further year of study in

the non-clinical area of choice.

For students within the Year 12 Provisional Entry

quota for Medicine, the dual degree Bachelor of

Health Sciences/Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor

of Surgery is available. This program provides

graduate medical practitioners with a solid grounding

in preventive health and is considered one of the

preferred pathways to a medical career.

Some elective courses are only available at the St

Lucia campus.

Placement courses

HLTH3001 Practicum in Health Sciences

Depending on the nature of the practicum,

students may require a Blue Card (Working with

Children Check).

Majors

Health Promotion and Population Health

(Ipswich, St Lucia)

Students undertaking the Health Promotion and

Population Health major will examine how health

services (for example, aged care) and programs (for

example, anti-smoking campaigns) are designed

and delivered, their effectiveness, and how they

are evaluated and modifi ed to improve service and

program outcomes to facilitate community health

and prevent disease and disability. Population health

and health promotion graduates aim to improve

the health of the entire population and to reduce

health inequities among population groups. Students

undertaking this major will examine the roles human

behaviour plays in the incidence, prevention and

60

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


HEALTH

progression of illness, effective strategies to promote

a healthy lifestyle through nutrition and physical

activity while additionally gaining knowledge of health

economics and its use in health care decision-making

and health policy. Industry work placements will

provide hands-on experience in the evaluation and

implementation of health services, programs and

policy and ensure that all Health Sciences students

are job-ready following graduation. Population health

and health promotion practitioners work as health

promotion practitioners and educators, community

health offi cers, policy offi cers, program evaluators,

project offi cers and consultants. Typically, work may

be found in both public and private sectors including

state and federal health departments, population

health units, community health centres, divisions

of general practice, non-governmental health

organisations, and international health agencies.

Students interested in seeking further knowledge and

skills in this area may complete an extra honours year

and/or seek enrolment in a postgraduate professional

degree program is areas such as public health,

community services or business.

Health Services Management

(Ipswich, St Lucia)

As future health care managers, students will learn

how to plan, manage and evaluate health services

to ensure the goals for quality of care, costs, ethical

issues, equity and legislation are met. Students

will gain in-depth knowledge of these issues and

the skills to analyse critically situations during their

program. Students undertaking the major may

study economics and fi nancial management, health

care planning and evaluation, human resource

management, management theory and information

technology. Students also undertake health

industry work placements designed to convert the

knowledge they have gained during their studies

into practice, provide experience and make them

job-ready. Health administrators typically work in

government and non-government organisations

ensuring that high quality health services and

programs are delivered to the community. Examples

of the work they do include managing the fi nancial

or human resource aspects of service provision

within a public or private hospital; establishing,

maintaining and evaluating community health

programs, such as new immunisation programs;

managing private health insurance companies; and,

working with clinical teams to develop information

technology initiatives such as e-health. Students

interested in seeking further knowledge and skills in

this area may complete an extra honours year and/

or seek enrolment in a postgraduate professional

degree program is areas such as public health,

information technology or business.

Indigenous Health (Ipswich, St Lucia)

The Indigenous Health major provides in-depth

knowledge and skills related to key aspects of public

health practice applied to Indigenous populations:

health promotion; social science, policy and services.

Units of study are devoted to some of the specifi c

health issues that are important to Aboriginal and

Torres Strait Islander communities: nutrition, alcohol

and substance use, and communicable disease

control. These can be expanded upon with further

elective study. The major also offers the opportunity for

individual experience within an Aboriginal and Torres

Strait Islander organisation. The Indigenous Health

major will equip a graduate to work within Indigenous

organisations, and also in a range of mainstream

settings where their motivation and awareness

of issues and practice will promote improved

engagement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

people. The major will enhance readiness for remote

community work. Students interested in seeking

further knowledge and skills in this area may complete

an extra honours year and/or seek enrolment in a

postgraduate professional degree program is areas

such as public health or community services.

Nutrition (Ipswich, St Lucia)

Human nutrition is a global term which concerns

the way that foods and nutrients are acquired and

used. It includes studies in biomedical science,

biochemistry, nutrition, behavioural sciences and

food sciences. The Nutrition major in the Bachelor

of Health Sciences also includes supporting studies

in health systems, public health and indigenous

health. This will enable graduates to work as

community nutritionists, encouraging the population

to achieve healthier eating and reducing the burden

of diet-related disease. Other careers are in the area

of health promotion, project offi cer or community

health. The degree provides the basis for further

studies in public health, health management or

research. The Bachelor of Health Sciences with a

major in nutrition is the recommended pathway to

the Master of Dietetics Studies and satisfi es all the

prerequisite courses required for that program.

Career opportunities

Graduates may work in both the public and private

healthcare sector dealing with health issues as

varied as anti-smoking campaigns, communicable

disease, drug and alcohol use, indigenous health,

chronic disease and women’s health. The addition

of a postgraduate professional degree program

(for example, medicine, public health) enhances

vocational outcomes, including remuneration and

responsibility, upon graduation. Completion of an

honours year and a PhD program may lead to an

academic career in the university sector.

Dual degree programs

Medicine/Surgery

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

HUMAN MOVEMENT

STUDIES

Location St Lucia

Commencement semester 1

Duration 4 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12

(or equivalent) English and one of Biological

Science, Chemistry or Physics

Honours Available as part of the standard program

Program outline

This degree has two majors or areas of specialisation

– one in Exercise Science and one in Education.

Placement courses

– Education Major: Third Year Practicum consists of

four weeks of practice. Students are required to

observe a primary program for fi ve days, participate

as staff members at a secondary school for at least

10 days and spend 40 hours in other approved

educational settings. Fourth Year Practicum is a

course that immerses the student in the life of a

school for 10 weeks, particularly the responsibilities

of the Health and Physical Education (HPE)

Department. The student actively participates as a

staff member for a total of 50 days, teaching a full

load by week fi ve in HPE and Junior Science.

– Exercise Science Major: Minimum of 500 hours

of fi eld experience related to exercise science in

community, clinical, corporate, fi tness, health or sport

setting. Offered in 1st, 2nd and Summer Semester.

Majors

Education

For students wishing to qualify as specialist teachers

of physical education, health education and science.

Students in this degree complete a suite of basic

biological, social, health and movement science

courses in the fi rst year and half is equivalent

to those undertaken by students specialising in

exercise science. Professional teaching courses are

then incorporated in the third and fourth years, in

conjunction with practicums in primary, secondary

and special schools as well as outdoor education

and coaching.

Exercise Science

Designed to prepare graduates for work as exercise

scientists prescribing and managing exercise in

health and fi tness centres and hospitals, and acting

as consultants to community, cardiac rehabilitation

and corporate fi tness programs. The fi rst year-anda-half

of the degree provides a broad grounding

in key biological, social and health sciences, as

well as core knowledge in the human movement

studies fi elds of exercise physiology, biomechanics,

motor control, functional anatomy, sport and

exercise psychology, communication, and sociocultural

studies. The latter years of the program

concentrate on the development of specialist skills

and knowledge in the prescription and management

of exercise, with extensive practical and professional

experience within the health and fi tness industry.

Supplementary information

Students who work with children as part of a

required placement course, must have a current

Blue Card (Working with Children Check) before

they begin their placement. Contact the School

of Human Movement Studies for information on

obtaining a Blue Card. For more information about

the School of Human Movement Studies visit

www.hms.uq.edu.au

Career opportunities

Graduates in Human Movement Studies (Exercise

Science) can work as:

– exercise physiologists in health and fi tness

centres and hospitals

– exercise consultants in community and corporate

rehabilitation and fi tness programs

– health promotion offi cers

– strength and conditioning specialists for sporting

teams.

Graduates in Human Movement Studies (Education)

can work as:

– academics

– coaches in schools or sporting organisations

– education offi cers in health promotion agencies

– health and physical education teachers in primary

and secondary schools

– outdoor educators.

Professional memberships

Graduates may be eligible for membership of the:

– Australian Association for Exercise and Sport

Science

– Australian Council for Health, Physical Education

and Recreation

– Queensland College of Teachers.

Dual degree programs

– Business Management

Additional cost

Senior First Aid Certifi cate required before entering

third year: cost approximately AUD$140.

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

MEDICINE/SURGERY

(GRADUATE ENTRY)

Location St Lucia, Herston, Royal Brisbane,

Princess Alexandra, Mater, Ipswich, Sunshine

Coast, Northside and Rural Clinical Schools.

Students may also opt to complete a clinical rotation

overseas.

Commencement semester 1

Duration 4 years full-time

Admission requirements There are two entry

pathways into the MBBS program:

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

61


1. School Leaver Entry

International students must apply to QTAC and UQ

International for the MBBS Year 12 School Leaver

Entry while in their fi nal year of secondary school.

Students who receive an offer may enrol in one of

the six-year dual programs, the Bachelor of Arts/

MBBS, the Bachelor of Health Sciences/MBBS,

or the Bachelor of Science/MBBS. All students

must achieve a grade point average of 5.00 out

of 7.00 in the fi rst two years of the dual program

prior to commencing the MBBS component of the

dual program. Criteria for selection are: OP1 (or

equivalent) and performance in the Undergraduate

Medicine and Health Sciences Admissions Test

(UMAT) OR International Student Admissions Test

(ISAT). UMAT is held in July each year; refer to

http://umatweb.acer.edu.au for further information.

2. Graduate Entry

Applications from graduates of all disciplines are

welcomed. The selection criteria are: A grade point

average (GPA) of at least 5.00 in the most recently

completed key degree (bachelors degree, honours,

masters or PhD); Graduate Australian Medical Schools

Admissions Test (GAMSAT) or the MCAT. GAMSAT is

held in March each year with registrations for the test

closing in late January/early February. The GAMSAT

Information Booklet and Graduate Australian Medical

School Admissions Guide are published annually

by the GAMSAT Offi ce at the Australian Council for

Educational Research (ACER). Refer to www.gamsat.

acer.edu.au for further information.

The MBBS program requires a higher level of

English language profi ciency than the UQ minimum.

IELTS overall 7; writing 6; speaking 7 is required.

TOEFL test results are not accepted.

Honours Available as part of the standard program

Program outline

This program produces highly skilled doctors capable

of meeting future challenges in a wide variety of

careers. The curriculum has been designed with an

emphasis on problem-based learning and group work.

Students work cooperatively on a carefully planned

series of patient-centred problems, each designed to

highlight principles and issues in health and disease.

Early patient contact and clinical training develop high

levels of clinical skills and medical knowledge.

The program’s key features include: the

simultaneous learning of basic, clinical, biological

and social sciences; the improved teaching

of communication skills; the use of learning

approaches that encourage lifelong learning

skills; the incorporation of ethics and professional

development as an integral part of the program;

and the incorporation of information technology and

computing skills to ensure that graduates are able

to utilise technological advances to improve their

learning skills and knowledge acquisition.

Placement courses

All MBBS students are required to have a Blue Card

(The Working with Children Check) issued by the

Commission for Children and Young People and

Child Guardian. Further information can be obtained

from the following website: www.bluecard.qld.gov.au

Students in years three and four of the program

undertake clinical rotations within the School’s clinical

divisions (including Rural clinical division). Students

are liable for additional costs associated with

attending clinical placements.

Career opportunities

Medical practitioners may work in private practice;

public health; academia/teaching; research;

aid organisations; the defence forces; and/or a

combination of these areas. Some of the specialties/

fi elds available to graduates are:

– academic medicine

– accident and emergency

– anaesthesia

– dermatology

– general practice

– intensive care

– medical administration

– medicine (general medicine, cardiology etc)

– obstetrics and gynaecology

– occupational medicine

– ophthalmology

– paediatrics

– pathology/histopathology/microbiology

(haematology)

– psychiatry

– public health medicine

– radiology

– rehabilitation medicine

– sexual health

– sports medicine

– surgery (general surgery, neurosurgery etc).

Professional memberships

Graduates may be eligible for:

– General registration with the Queensland Medical

Board: graduates required to satisfactorily complete

a year as an intern with an approved hospital.

– Specialist registration: graduates required

to complete further study and training as a

senior Resident Medical Offi cer (RMO) and

Registrar at approved hospitals. A higher

professional qualifi cation, such as a Fellowship or

Membership of a Royal College, is required.

Dual degree programs

– Arts

– Health Sciences

– Science

Additional cost

Senior First Aid Certifi cate (including CPR)

approximately AUD$140, immunisation requirements,

travel and living expenses for all clinical rotations

(including the Rural Clinical Division).

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

MIDWIFERY

Location Ipswich and partner teaching hospitals

Commencement semester 1

Duration 3 years full-time

Optional accelerated offering of 2.5 years available

by taking an 8-unit clinical practice course in the

summer and the fi nal semester in semester 1;

enabling graduation in July.

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12

(or equivalent) English and one of Biological

Sciences, Chemistry or Physics. For applicants

who need to provide evidence of English profi ciency,

please note that this program requires a higher

level of English language profi ciency than the UQ

minimum. IELTS overall 7; writing 6; speaking 7 is

required. TOEFL test results are not accepted.

Honours Available as an extra year of study

Application closing date 30 September 2009

Program outline

The program is a three-year degree specifi cally

designed to develop graduate midwives who

will: direct their own learning and apply clinical

reasoning skills in their midwifery practice; be able

to work in continuity-of-care models according to

the international defi nition of the midwife; be able

to work effectively in multidisciplinary teams to

promote quality outcomes of care for each woman

and baby; provide high quality care through safe

and effective midwifery practice according to the

Australian Nursing and Midwifery Council (ANMC)

and the Australian College of Midwives Incorporated

(ACMI) competency standards; and possess the

qualities, skills, knowledge and abilities expected of

a UQ graduate.

The program is underpinned by an innovative,

problem-based learning curriculum model which

has been informed in international best practice and

industry experts and responds to current national and

global population health challenges. In the fi rst two

years of the program, lectures and problem-based

learning are incorporated with clinical experiences

in selected partner teaching hospitals and health

districts. In the fi nal year of the program, students

undertake extensive preceptored clinical placement

providing them with exposure to an area of specialty

midwifery practice and the opportunity to consolidate

and refi ne their skills in order to facilitate a smooth

transition to graduate practice.

Placement courses

In order to undertake clinical practice it is a

requirement that a Senior First Aid Certifi cate is

maintained as current throughout the duration

of the program with resuscitation re-certifi cation

required every 12 months to maintain current status.

Students are required to comply with the School

of Nursing and Midwifery Infectious Diseases and

Immunisation Guidelines and provide serological

evidence of their status with respect to blood-borne

transmissible viruses (Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and

HIV). Carriers of blood-borne viruses would be

unable to complete the clinical practice components

of the program and thus not be eligible to apply

for endorsement as a midwife. Students are also

required to have a current Blue Card (Working with

Children Check) prior to clinical placement. For

further information on these requirements contact

the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

Supplementary information

Clinical placements commence in the fi rst few weeks

in fi rst year. Students are ‘buddied’ with midwives for

clinical learning throughout the program.

In each year of the program students are required

to complete 10 ‘follow throughs’ of women through

their pregnancy, birth and postpartum periods.

For the fi nal year of the program, students are

required to undertake extensive clinical practice. This

may preclude students from undertaking outside

employment during the fi nal two semesters.

Students seeking accommodation may wish to

consider living in one of the colleges at St Lucia as a

shuttle bus to the Ipswich campus is available.

Career opportunities

Midwives work in a variety of public or private health

care settings, maternity and neonatal care settings,

academia/teaching, research, rural and remote health,

aid organisations, and/or a combination of these areas.

Professional memberships

Graduates may be eligible for membership of the

Australian College of Midwives.

Dual degree programs

– Nursing

Additional cost

Senior First Aid Certifi cate (including CPR):

approximately AUD$140, clinical practice uniform:

shirts are approximately AUD$45 each and can be

purchased from the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

Immunisations (refer to the School’s website at

www,nursing.uq.edu.au). Some additional expenses

may be incurred in relation to chosen placement in

year three, such as a rural location.

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

NURSING

Location Ipswich and partner teaching hospitals

Commencement semester 1

Duration 3 years full-time

An optional accelerated offering of 2.5 years is

available by taking a semester-long clinical practice

course in the summer semester and semester 1 of

the fi nal year; enabling graduation in July.

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12 (or

equivalent) English and one of Biological Sciences,

Chemistry or Physics. For applicants who need to

provide evidence of English profi ciency, please note

that this program requires a higher level of English

62

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


HEALTH

language profi ciency than the UQ minimum. IELTS

overall 7; writing 6; speaking 7 is required. TOEFL

test results are not accepted.

Honours Available as an extra year of study

Application closing date 30 September 2009

Program outline

This program is a three-year degree specifi cally

designed to develop graduate nurses who will: direct

their own learning and apply clinical reasoning skills

in their nursing practice; be able to work effectively

in multidisciplinary teams to promote quality health

outcomes for clients in their care; provide high quality

care through safe and effective nursing practice

according to the Australian Nursing and Midwifery

Council (ANMC) National Competency Standards for

the Registered Nurse and possess the qualities, skills,

knowledge and abilities expected of a University of

Queensland graduate.

The program is underpinned by an innovative,

problem-based learning curriculum model which has

been informed by industry experts and responds

to current national and global population health

challenges. In the fi rst 2 years of the program lectures

and problem-based learning are incorporated with

clinical experiences in selected partner teaching

hospitals and health districts. In the fi nal year of the

program, students undertake extensive preceptored

clinical placement providing them with exposure to an

area of specialty nursing practice and the opportunity

to consolidate and refi ne their skills in order to

facilitate a smooth transition to graduate practice.

Placement courses

In order to undertake clinical practice it is a

requirement that a Senior First Aid Certifi cate is

maintained as current throughout the duration of the

program, with resuscitation re-certifi cation required

every 12 months to maintain current status. Students

are required to comply with the School of Nursing

and Midwifery Infectious Diseases and Immunisation

Guidelines and provide serological evidence of their

status with respect to blood-borne transmissible

viruses (Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and HIV). Students

are also required to have a current Blue Card (Working

with Children Check) prior to clinical placement. For

further information on these requirements contact

the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

Supplementary information

Clinical placements commence in the fi rst few weeks

in fi rst year. Students are ‘buddied’ with registered

nurses for clinical learning throughout the program.

For the fi nal year of the program, students are

required to undertake extensive clinical practice. This

may preclude students from undertaking outside

employment during the fi nal two semesters.

Overseas educated professional nurses who

have successfully completed a tertiary nursing

program of at least three years duration, who have

recent relevant clinical experience and who meet

requirements for English language profi ciency

will be granted up to two years of credit. In order

to upgrade their qualifi cation to degree level and

to become eligible for registration as a nurse in

Australia, these nurses will be required to complete

one year of study to qualify for graduation from the

Bachelor of Nursing program. For further details,

see the School of Nursing and Midwifery wesite

(www.nursing.uq.edu.au).

Students seeking accommodation may wish to

consider living in one of the colleges at St Lucia as a

shuttle bus to Ipswich campus is available.

Career opportunities

Registered nurses work in a variety of public or

private health care settings, academia/teaching,

research, aid organisations, the defence forces and/

or a combination of these areas. Some of the career

pathways/specialties available to graduates are:

– aged care

– cardiac nursing

– community nursing

– critical care

– day surgery nursing

– domiciliary nursing

– drug and alcohol

– emergency care

– indigenous health

– infectious disease

– medical/surgical nursing

– mental health nursing

– midwifery

– neonatal nursing

– neuroscience nursing

– nurse academic

– nurse educator

– nurse manager

– nurse practitioner

– oncology

– orthopaedics

– paediatrics and child health

– perioperative

– public health

– rehabilitation

– rural and remote area

– school based youth health nursing

– sexual health nursing

– transplant nursing.

Professional memberships

Graduates may be eligible for membership of the

Royal College of Nursing Australia

Dual degree programs

– Midwifery

Additional cost

Senior First Aid Certifi cate (approximately

AUD$140), clinical practice uniform: shirts are

approximately AUD$45 each and can be purchased

from the School of Nursing and Midwifery;

Immunisations (refer to School’s website

www.nursing.uq.edu.au) Some additional expenses

may be incurred in relation to elective choices in

year three, for example Rural and Remote Nursing.

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

OCCUPATIONAL

HEALTH AND SAFETY

SCIENCE

Location St Lucia (year 1), Ipswich (years 2-4)

Commencement semester 1

Duration 4 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12

(or equivalent) English and Chemistry

Honours Available as part of the standard program

Program outline

This program will have its fi rst intake in 2010.

The curriculum is based on sound foundations

in science, with the fi rst year predominately science

courses, but including an introduction to the

discipline of occupational health and safety. The

subsequent three years of the program focus on

specifi c aspects of occupational health and safety. This

program is unique as it addresses psychosocial and

mental health issues within the workplace as well as the

long recognised chemical, physical, mechanical and

biological hazards. The fi nal semester of the program

is a series of industry placements - either with a single

industry partner or up to four separate industry partners.

There is currently a shortage of well-qualifi ed

occupational health and safety professionals,

particularly those with an undergraduate degree

based on a sound background in the physical,

behavioural, psychosocial and life sciences.

Placement courses

There are four courses (#8) of industry placements

required in the fi nal semester of the program.

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): +61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

OCCUPATIONAL

THERAPY

Location St Lucia

Commencement semester 1

Duration 4 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12 (or

equivalent) English and one of Biological Science,

Chemistry or Physics. For applicants who need to

provide evidence of English profi ciency, please note

that this program requires a higher level of English

language profi ciency than the UQ minimum. IELTS

overall 7; writing 6; speaking 7 is required. TOEFL

test results are not accepted.

Honours Available as part of the standard program

Program outline

Occupational therapists are health professionals

trained to assist people of all ages overcome

factors which limit their ability to function in certain

‘occupational roles’. These limiting factors may have

been caused by injury or illness; psychological or

emotional diffi culties; developmental delay; or the

effects of ageing. Occupational therapists consider

individual strengths, disabilities, goals, and social

and environmental resources, then work to optimise

clients’ functioning ability and quality of life.

The fi rst year of this program combines studies in

theoretical and practical occupational therapy, with

biological and behavioural sciences. In second year,

students develop this knowledge and apply theory

to practical problems of occupational therapy.

Third-year students focus on occupational therapy

techniques, with clinical practice in teaching units

in hospitals and community health agencies. The

fi nal year extends clinical experience and examines

professional issues. Students also undertake studies

in statistics and research techniques.

Placement courses

Some clinical placements are outside the Brisbane

metropolitan area and students are expected

to fund these placements. This involves travel,

accommodation and daily living expenses. A range

of locations for placements is utilised. Students

submit their preferred areas for placements. It may

be possible to arrange accommodation at local

nurses quarters for Queensland Health placements

for a minimal cost. Allocation will be as equitable as

possible and issues of hardship will be dealt with at

the discretion of the head of division. Placements

are usually conducted on a full-time basis in the

third and fourth years and are of seven or 10 weeks

duration.

Due to increasing legal, insurance and security

concerns, students cannot undertake block

fi eldwork placements outside Australia and

New Zealand except in the following specifi c

circumstances:

– International students undertaking studies at UQ

may be permitted to undertake a placement in

their home country.

– Placements which are arranged by UQ staff in

conjunction with another university as part of an

established fi eldwork exchange relationship.

– Placements in developing countries supervised

by UQ staff (or staff of other approved universities

in an established placement program).

For all overseas placements, the student must have

an acceptable prior level of performance and the

course coordinator must approve the timing of the

placement.

Note: overseas placements are not generally

recommended for a fi rst placement.

Supplementary information

Students are required to provide proof of

immunisation against certain diseases, including

Hepatitis B before the commencement of study. A

Senior First Aid Certifi cate (including CPR) and a Blue

Card are also required before the commencement of

clinical practice. Further details of these requirements

will be provided with offer material.

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

63


Career opportunities

Occupational therapists work in:

– centres of tertiary education

– consultation services

– country or community health centres

– independent living centres

– nursing homes

– private practice

– psychiatric clinics and hostels

– public and private hospitals

– regular and special schools

– rehabilitation units (medical, vocational, psychiatric)

– research institutions

– residential and rehabilitation centres for people

with an intellectual disability

– special centres providing development and

training for persons with a social, intellectual or

physical disability

– workplace health and safety units.

Professional memberships

The Bachelor of Occupational Therapy is accredited

by the Australian Association of Occupational

Therapists. Graduates are eligible for registration

with the Occupational Therapists Board of

Queensland.

Additional cost

Senior First Aid Certifi cate (including CPR):

approximately AUD$140. Students are required

to provide proof of immunisation against

certain diseases, including Hepatitis B before

commencement of clinic placements in Semester 1.

A clinical uniform is required. Shirts are approximately

AUD$25 each. Students also wear plain bottle

green slacks which can either be their own or can

be purchased from the School for approximately

AUD$60 each. Some clinic placements may

be outside the Brisbane metropolitan area and

students are expected to fund these placements

independently. More information is available in the

Placement / Work Experience fi eld.

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

ORAL HEALTH

Location Dental School, Herston, Oral Health

Education Unit (Yeronga)

Commencement semester 1

Duration 3 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year

12 (or equivalent) English and one of Biological

Science, Chemistry or Physics (Biological Science

recommended). For applicants who need to provide

evidence of English profi ciency, please note that this

program requires a higher level of English language

profi ciency than the UQ minimum. IELTS overall 7;

speaking 7; and writing 6 is required. TOEFL test

results are not accepted.

Honours Available as an extra year of study

Application closing date 30 November 2009

Program outline

The BOralH program was the fi rst bachelors degree

program for dental auxiliary training to be offered

in Australia. It has been fully accredited by the

Australian Dental Council and has been considered

the benchmark for similar tertiary programs in other

Australian universities.

The program qualifi es graduates to work as oral

health therapists, dental therapists, dental hygienists

and in health promotion. The fi rst year of study

provides students with foundation knowledge in the

health of oral tissues, emphasises the importance

of prevention as a goal, and introduces them to

clinical practice. In second year, courses develop

the knowledge and clinical skills needed for the

care of individual patients. Students apply their

knowledge of dental diseases to dental therapy

and dental hygiene practice. Third year students

extend their clinical experience and focus on the

provision of care to groups with special needs,

and on oral health for communities and population

groups. Throughout the program, courses explore

the principles and philosophies underlying health

promotion for individuals and the community.

Supplementary information

Students should note that completion of all or part

of this program does not permit direct entry into the

Bachelor of Dental Science.

The Dental Board of Queensland policy prevents

dental therapists and dental hygienists carrying

blood-borne viruses from undertaking invasive

procedures, the defi nition of which includes most

aspects of clinical dentistry. Students are therefore

required to provide serological evidence of their status

with respect to blood-borne transmissible viruses

(Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and HIV). Carriers of bloodborne

transmissible viruses will not be permitted to be

enrolled in the BOralH program. Students will also be

required to undertake Tuberculosis (TB) screening.

Students are required to complete a

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) course prior

to the commencement of second semester of year

one of the program and to complete a CPR recertifi

cation course prior to the commencement of

years two and three.

Students are also required to have a current

Blue Card (Working with Children Check) before

commencing clinical work. For information on

obtaining a Blue Card, contact the School of Dentistry.

Career opportunities

Graduates will work in positions such as:

– dental hygienists and health promotion

– dental therapists

– oral health therapists.

Opportunities exist for graduates wishing to undertake

a research career. Some teaching positions in the

undergraduate program are occasionally available.

Professional memberships

Graduates may join organisations such as the:

– Dental and Oral Health Therapist Association of

Queensland

– Dental Hygienists Association of Australia.

Additional cost

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) course (year one)

(approximately AUD$55), annual CPR re-certifi cation

(years two and three) (approximately AUD$50). Laptop

computer (AUD$1,500-$2,000) for integrated patient/

student management system (years two and three).

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

PHARMACY

Location St Lucia

Commencement semester 1

Duration 4 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12 (or

equivalent) English, Mathematics B, Chemistry. For

applicants who need to provide evidence of English

profi ciency, please note that this program requires a

higher level of English language profi ciency than the

UQ minimum. IELTS overall 7; writing 6; speaking 7 is

required. TOEFL test results are not accepted.

Honours Available as part of the standard program

Application closing date 3 November 2009

Program outline

The study of pharmacy is mainly concerned with

the action of drugs on biological systems and their

applications for human drug therapy. The program

prepares graduates for the contemporary role of the

pharmacist in society ensuring that patients optimise

medication usage. Initial courses on chemical,

physical, and biological studies lead to professional

specialties in later years. Practical and clinical science

studies begin in fi rst year, providing students with

a strong background in professional practice. The

program integrates six streams of study: quality

use of medication; dosage form design; social and

professional aspects of pharmacy; drug discovery;

biological fate of drugs; and data analysis in pharmacy.

Placement courses

Every year of the Bachelor of Pharmacy program

involves pharmacy placements in rural and community

pharmacies and Queensland Health facilities.

Students may be required to have a current

Blue Card (Working with Children Check) before

commencing practical work.

Queensland Health requires completion of

Occupational Health and Safety certifi cates prior to

placements. The School will provide further information

as to when and how these must be completed.

Supplementary information

Queensland Health requires all health care worker

students to be immunised against Hepatitis B prior

to their fi rst clinical placement. Students are required

to provide documentary evidence of immunisation

against hepatitis B as soon as possible after

commencement of the program. Other health

requirements may be necessary.

Career opportunities

There are three major employment areas for

pharmacists.

– Community pharmacy is a multifaceted fi eld

incorporating: the dispensing of prescriptions

(also providing medication information and

monitoring), primary health care (assistance

with the identifi cation and treatment of common

ailments), health promotion (advising the

community about illness prevention and healthy

lifestyle decisions), home medicines review

– Hospital pharmacists play an important role in the

healthcare team promoting safe and effective use

of medicines within hospitals. They may be involved

in: the preparation and supply of medicines,

education of patients, doctors and nurses on safe

and appropriate medicine use, Provision of drug

information to health care professionals.

– Industrial pharmacists are generally involved in

the manufacture, quality control, registration

and marketing of pharmaceutical products.

New opportunities are also developing in other

professional areas, such as a consultant pharmacist,

(undertaking medicine reviews with patients and

general practitioners) and prescribing advisors.

Professional memberships

Before Bachelor of Pharmacy graduates can

practise pharmacy they must be registered with the

Pharmacists Board of Queensland as a pharmacist.

To be eligible for registration they must complete

48 weeks of pre-registration training. Training

may be obtained within a community, hospital,

defence forces or industrial setting and must

always be under the supervision of a registered

pharmacist in approved premises. During this

pre-registration period the Pharmaceutical Society

of Australia (Queensland Branch) administers a

structured education program. Qualifi cations for

admission to professional pharmacy are prescribed

in the Pharmacists Registration Act 2001 and the

Pharmacists Registration Regulation 2001.

Additional cost

For information on placements contact the School

of Pharmacy or consult the School of Pharmacy

website. Immunisation requirements, transport,

school attire and accommodation costs apply to all

students on placements. A clinical uniform shirt is

required. Shirts are approximately AUD$36 each.

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

64

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


HEALTH

BACHELOR OF

PHYSIOTHERAPY

Location St Lucia

Commencement semester 1

Duration 4 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12 (or

equivalent) English and one of Biological Science,

Chemistry or Physics (Physics recommended). For

applicants who need to provide evidence of English

profi ciency, please note: this program requires a

higher level of English language profi ciency than the

UQ minimum. IELTS overall 7; writing 6; speaking 7 is

required. TOEFL test results are not accepted.

Honours Available as part of the standard program

Application closing date 30 November 2009

Program outline

Physiotherapy is concerned with the promotion,

maintenance and restoration of health and the

prevention of disability, in people of all ages.

Physiotherapists optimise potential ability,

physical function, independence and quality of life

through rehabilitation practices. To achieve this,

physiotherapists require an extensive understanding

of physical, structural and physiological aspects

of human form and movement, as well as factors

relating to human functioning and the acquisition

of skill. Physiotherapy often involves promotion

of motor development and coordination, physical

methods to control pain, therapeutic exercise for

impaired muscle systems, assisting in the physical

management of the cardio-respiratory system, or

improving balance and motor control for better

performance and function.

The program teaches graduates how to care for

people experiencing pain or loss of function caused

by a physical injury or disorder and for people with

physical disabilities. Such disabilities and disorders

can arise from a variety of causes including injury,

disease, congenital abnormalities, ageing and

degenerative processes. The program includes

basic science courses such as anatomy, physics,

psychology and statistics, as well as relevant

medical courses. Throughout the program students

visit hospitals, developing their understanding of

the profession. During their fi nal year, students

undertake supervised clinical practice in affi liated

hospitals and community situations.

Placement courses

Some clinic placements may be outside the

Brisbane metropolitan area and students are

expected to fund these placements independently.

This usually involves travel, accommodation and

daily living expenses. A range of locations for

placements is used depending on availability.

Students are asked to submit their interest and

preferred areas for placements. It may be possible

to arrange accommodation at local nurses homes

for Queensland Health placements for a minimal

cost. Placements are of fi ve weeks duration and are

usually conducted on a full-time basis and occur

in the third and fourth years of the program. This

allows for suffi cient planning for regional, interstate

or international placements. Allocation will be as

equitable as possible and issues of hardship will be

dealt with at the discretion of the head of division.

Students wishing to undertake a clinical placement

in an international location may be permitted to do

so under certain conditions. This especially applies

to international students who wish to undertaken

a placement in their home country. Students are

responsible for personal arrangements such as

visa, insurance, travel and accommodation and are

liable for associated costs. Placements will not be

organised or will be cancelled if a travel warning

to the country/region applies. Interested students

should discuss their proposal in advance with the

clinical education placement manager.

Supplementary information

Students are required to provide proof of

immunisation against certain diseases, including

Hepatitis B before the commencement of study. A

Senior First Aid Certifi cate (including CPR) and a Blue

Card are also required before the commencement of

clinical practice. Further details of these requirements

will be provided with offer material.

Career opportunities

Following a recommended year in a general hospital,

physiotherapists may continue their work in hospitals,

community health centres and agencies, rehabilitation

units, or in preschool and school programs.

Alternatively, they may prefer to work in private

practice offering treatments to a full range of patients

or specialising in areas such as sports physiotherapy,

manipulative physiotherapy, paediatrics, obstetrics,

orthopaedics or other fi elds of particular interest.

Additional employment opportunities exist for

researchers, advisors or consultants in educational,

industrial or government institutions.

Professional memberships

The Bachelor of Physiotherapy is accredited by the

Australian Physiotherapy Association. Graduates

are eligible for registration with the Physiotherapists

Board of Queensland.

Additional cost

Senior First Aid Certifi cate (including CPR):

approximately AUD$140. A clinical uniform is

required. Shirts are approximately AUD$25 each.

Students also wear plain navy blue slacks which

either be their own or can be purchased from the

School for approximately AUD$60 each. Students

are required to provide proof of immunisation

against certain diseases, including Hepatitis B

before commencement of clinic placements. Some

clinic placements may be outside the Brisbane

metropolitan area and students are expected to fund

these placements independently. More information is

available in the Placement / Work Experience fi eld.

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

SPEECH PATHOLOGY

Location St Lucia

Commencement semester 1

Duration 4 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12 (or

equivalent) English and one of Biological Science,

Chemistry or Physics. For applicants who need

to provide evidence of English profi ciency, please

note: this program requires a higher level of English

language profi ciency than the UQ minimum. IELTS

overall 7; writing 6; speaking 8 is required. TOEFL

test results are not accepted.

Honours Available as part of the standard program

Program outline

Speech pathologists assess and treat disorders

of communication in areas such as speech, voice,

language and fl uency. Clients include children who

fail to develop normal communication and people

who acquire communication problems as a result of

disease or injury such as stroke. A person’s ability

to communicate may also be impaired because

of disabilities such as hearing loss, brain damage,

intellectual disability, stuttering, malfunction of

the speech or respiratory organs, or emotional

disturbances. In addition, speech pathologists

work with clients who have feeding or swallowing

problems. Speech pathology is closely associated

with medicine, education and rehabilitation.

The fi rst two years of the program focus on

basic studies in anatomy, linguistics, physiology,

psychology, medical specialties and statistics. In fi rst

year, an emphasis on normal communication forms

the reference point for second-year studies in the

description and analysis of communication disorders.

Students explore the areas of voice, fl uency, hearing,

speech, language and oral functioning. Third and

fourth years are case/problem-based and integrate

understanding of communication disorders with the

assessment and management of clients. Academic

studies are complemented by supervised clinical

practice in a wide variety of settings.

Placement courses

Block clinical placements occur in the third and

fourth years of the undergraduate program.

These placements are of six weeks duration and

are conducted on a full-time basis. Students are

placed in clinics according to previous clinical

experiences. Some students may be required to

take up clinical placements outside the Brisbane

metropolitan area and are expected to fund these

placements independently. A range of locations for

placements is utilised depending on availability, and

allocation of students to these placements will be as

equitable as possible. Students will only be placed

within Queensland. It may be possible to arrange

accommodation at local nursing quarters for a

minimal cost. Overseas placements are not available.

Students are required to have a current Blue Card

(Working with Children Check) before commencing

clinical placements in second year. For information on

obtaining a Blue Card, contact the School of Health

and Rehabilitation Sciences.

Students are required to complete a prescribed

schedule of immunisations and to hold a current fi rst

aid and CPR certifi cate.

Supplementary information

Students are required to provide proof of

immunisation against certain diseases, including

Hepatitis B before the commencement of study. A

Senior First Aid Certifi cate (including CPR) and a Blue

Card are also required before the commencement of

clinical practice. Further details of these requirements

will be provided with offer material.

Career opportunities

Graduates work in many different settings including:

– centres for the hearing impaired and intellectually

disabled

– community health centres and agencies

– general, paediatric and geriatric hospitals

– industrial and government institutions

– preschools, kindergartens and childcare

programs

– private practice

– rehabilitation units.

Professional memberships

The Bachelor of Speech Pathology is accredited by

Speech Pathology Australia. Graduates are eligible

for registration with The Speech Pathologists Board

of Queensland.

Additional cost

Senior First Aid Certifi cate (including CPR):

approximately AUD$140. Students are required

to provide proof of immunisation against

certain diseases, including Hepatitis B before

commencement of clinical placements. A clinical

uniform may be required. If so a white shirt and

plain brown slacks are the standard. Some

clinic placements may be outside the Brisbane

metropolitan area and students are expected to fund

these placements independently. More information is

available in the Placement / Work Experience fi eld.

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

65


Alvin Lim came to UQ from Singapore to complete the

CAREER Bachelor of Communication. AREAS Since graduating in 2007

he is now working back in Singapore as a Marketing

and Communications Executive.

Alvin says his current role includes planning and

organising events, liaising with international

counterparts, conducting surveys, and regulating the

advertising scene.

Thanks to the high quality education he received at

UQ, Alvin says he is a more analytical person who can

easily sync theory with practice. “I cannot emphasise

the importance of the research and analysis that I did

throughout my degree. It has proven so helpful to me

now,” he said.

“The program was very hands on and gave me lots of

opportunities to shine. Without these chances and the

support of the dedicated lecturers, I would not be where I

am today,” said Alvin.

ALVIN LIM

BACHELOR OF COMMUNICATION

MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS EXECUTIVE

The disciplines of Humanities, Social Science, Education and

Arts produce graduates who have the skills to understand and

conceptualise the world in which we live. Programs can be

focused on one area, or can be broader and more liberal, and

are often taken as part of a dual degree program. The career

possibilities for graduates are as broad as the range of study

options and may lead to employment in areas including:

– archaeology

– acting

– advertising, marketing and

public relations

– communication and trade

– community development

– consulting

– consumer affairs

– criminal justice

– cultural affairs

– diplomacy

– disability services

– editing and publishing

– environmental protection

and management

– events coordination

– galleries

– government

– health

– humanitarian aid

– human resource management

– human service organisations

– indigenous affairs

– interpreting services

– journalism

– labour unions

– libraries

– media

– museums

– music

– policy development

– politics

– psychology

– public affairs management

– social services

– sports administration

– statistical research

– teaching

– theatre management

– writing

– youth services

66


HUMANITIES,

SOCIAL SCIENCE,

EDUCATION & ARTS

Why choose UQ for studies in

humanities, social science, education and arts?

The University of Queensland employs

many leading educators and researchers

in the fields of humanities, social science,

education and arts. This unsurpassed

teaching support is coupled with flexibility

to choose from a huge number of courses

and a wide range of dual programs.

UQ’s facilities and special features include:

– cutting-edge computing facilities with 24-

hour access

– invitations to participate in the Arts Faculty

Scholars Program (AFSP). AFSP offers an

elite group of students an academically

integrated University experience at

the highest level, informed by the best

international standards of teaching and

learning in contemporary studies in the

liberal arts. Participation in the program is

also noted on academic records

– a place in the Dean’s Scholar Program

for high-achieving students enrolled in

programs through the Faculty of Social and

Behavioural Sciences. This program offers

an enhanced University experience through

highlights such as summer research and

work internships and extended library and

computer laboratory rights, and participation

noted on academic records

– an Anthropology Museum housing a

signifi cant collection of around 26,000 items

celebrating the culture of the Indigenous

people of Oceania

– an Antiquities Museum containing

archaeological artefacts spanning almost

3500 years of history

– an Art Museum supporting teaching and

research in visual culture and presenting an

innovative exhibitions program

– various internships are available to Bachelor

of Arts students in areas including: drama,

history, sociology, anthropology, political

science, English, and art history. Internship

courses are designed to foster the

development of skills and competencies in

a work situation and in most cases provide

an opportunity for a short-term placement in

industry

– a new initiative for 2009 is the Bachelor of

Creative Arts, where students who wish to

pursue a career in the creative arts sector,

can study one of the practice-based majors

– Drama, Music, and Writing. Students

can also study majors in the interpretation

of creative works — Art History, English,

English Literature, Film and Television

Studies, Media Studies and Popular Music

– international exchanges offering exciting

opportunities for students to undertake

study exchanges with partner universities in

places other than their home countries

– a wide range of research centres conducting

investigative analyses

– a Faculty of Arts Research Precinct in

well-designed, purpose-built space. This

humanities research precinct is allowing the

University to develop high-profi le research

programs in Australian studies, media and

cultural studies, and intellectual history

– one of the most prestigious Schools of

Psychology in Australia recognised both

nationally and internationally as a centre of

excellence for teaching and research

– a School of Music featuring concert

programs, recording studio and composition

laboratory, and practice and performance

rooms. Students may apply to participate

in an ensemble (instrumental or vocal

internships)

– innovative teaching practices that meet the

academic and professional needs of our

students. Our dedicated teaching staff have

been nominated for, and won, numerous

Faculty, University and national teaching and

research awards.

Faculty of Arts

www.arts.uq.edu.au

Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences

www.uq.edu.au/sbs

Degrees in this discipline

– Arts 68

– Communication 71

– Creative Arts 71

– Education (Middle Years of

Schooling) 72

– Education (Primary) 72

– Education (Secondary) 73

– Human Services 73

– Journalism 73

– Music 74

– Psychological Science 74

– Social Science 75

– Social Work 75

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

67


Eligibility for visa

International students must undertake

programs on campus at UQ on a full-time basis

to be eligible to apply for an Australian student

visa. See page 96 for more information.

BACHELOR OF

ARTS

Location St Lucia

Commencement semester 1, 2

Duration 3 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12

(or equivalent) English

Honours Available as an extra year of study

Program outline

A Bachelor of Arts degree gives you a better

understanding of how human beings make,

recognise, and argue about life’s meaning and

the values that support civilisation. The BA offers

a wide choice of academic subject areas in the

core disciplines of humanities and social sciences.

Students tailor the degree to suit their own career

aspirations - there are many majors from which to

choose. Students undertake two single majors, or

a more concentrated extended major and a minor,

plus a range of electives. A BA graduate is someone

who has gained skills and knowledge, not just in

a subject area but also in written communication,

critical thinking, and problem solving and can apply

these skills in many different jobs, careers and life

situations.

The honours program requires an additional year

and calls for greater specialisation in a chosen area at

a high standard of scholarship.

Majors

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Studies

This major will help you appreciate the unique way

that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people see

the world. You will gain a deep understanding of

Indigenous perspectives on everyday life in Australia

today as well as on the major social, economic and

political events and processes in Australia’s history.

You will get your knowledge from Aboriginal and

Torres Strait Islander teacher’s fi rst-hand as well as

from non-Indigenous staff who work closely with

Indigenous communities.

Ancient History

The early Mediterranean cultures provide the

foundations of much of Western civilisation and

their study is relevant today. You will learn about

ancient civilisations and cultures including Greece

and Rome. Their history, literature, religion,

philosophy, social customs, art and architecture

are examined in depth. With ancient society and

traditions infl uencing the customs and culture of

our current society, this focus provides you with an

understanding of the basis of many facets of current

society.

Ancient History/History

The Ancient History/History major provides you

with a wide breadth of history across the ancient

and modern worlds. Ancient History allows you to

examine the early Mediterranean cultures including

their literature, religion, philosophy, social customs,

art and architecture. With ancient society and

traditions infl uencing the customs and culture

of our current society, this focus provides an

understanding of the basis of many facets of current

society. History teaches you how to interrogate the

past and how to enter into dialogue with the forces

that have shaped the world.

Anthropology

Anthropology is the study of human life and

experience in all its diversity and richness, ranging

from small-scale Indigenous peoples to the modern

capitalist world system with all its globalising

processes. Anthropologists have many different

perspectives on the study of human societies and

culture, past and present, and they consider a range

of interpretive questions, the broadest being ‘why

do people do what they do?’ Since anthropology

employs a broad approach it also draws on other

disciplines such as human biology, ecology,

linguistics, history, politics and psychology.

Archaeology

Archaeology is the scientifi c study of our human

past and archaeologists search out and excavate

ancient sites and examine artefacts to gain clues

about how various peoples and cultures developed

and changed through the ages. Archaeologists at

UQ undertake research of international importance

and their varied interests take them into the fi eld in

Australasia, the Pacifi c (Hawaii, Easter Island), the

Mediterranean and Near East (Pompeii, Turkey), the

Maya region of Central America, India and France.

In Australia they study the archaeology of 50,000

years of Aboriginal settlement as well as the post-

European colonisation period.

Art History

How often have you walked through a museum or

art gallery and asked the question: is that art? Art

History is the study of the objects considered to be

art across a variety of cultures and times. We look

at paintings, sculptures, modern works of art that

cannot really be called either of these, Aboriginal

art and the art of the Asia-Pacifi c region. We look

at fi lms, and in the more advanced courses answer

that famous question: what is art?

Asian Studies

Whether it be work, study or pleasure, dealing

with Asia requires a knowledge of sometimes very

different societies. This major provides a fl exible way

of getting to know the region and the opportunities

that await you, without having to learn a foreign

language. All teaching of Asian Studies courses is

in English. Asian Studies introduces students to

the diverse cultures and histories of the countries

in the region. Students learn about the political

and economic systems of the countries and their

ramifi cations for Australia.

Chinese

China not only has one of the oldest and most

splendid cultures but is now an increasingly

important player on the world economic and political

scene. Chinese is spoken by one in every six

people in the world today and is the most common

language spoken in Australia after English. China

and Australia also have close economic and cultural

ties. The Chinese program offers courses in spoken

and written language from introductory to advanced

levels. There are separate majors for native speakers

of Mandarin and other Chinese dialects. You can

undertake specialist courses in literature, culture,

translation, business and language teaching.

Classical Languages

One fascinating way to explore the depths of

another culture is to familiarise yourself with the

languages in which those ideas were originally

presented. Classical Greek and Latin provide

students with a basis to further their reading and

writing skills in two of the oldest languages in

the world. These two classical languages have

traditionally held a central position in Western

education, and they remain important for the study

not only of the Greco-Roman world, but also of the

languages, ideas and literatures (including English)

of societies that grew out of the classical world.

Communication and Cultural Studies

Communication studies and cultural studies deal

with the general processes through which we

communicate and both are particularly concerned

with investigations of everyday life. Together

they concentrate on examples of communicative

processes in interpersonal, intercultural and

institutional contexts, and on the forms and

meanings of popular culture. Students consider a

range of everyday situations and interactions, and

analyse popular cultural texts including television,

radio, Internet and print sources.

Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies

The Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies major

is designed to allow you to study the literatures

and cultures of France, Germany, Russia, Spain

and their associated (post)colonial variations from

a comparative perspective. All classes are taught

in English and all texts are studied in English

translation so there is no language requirement.

The courses studied in this major will appeal if you

are interested in literary and cultural studies but will

provide an international perspective on these fi elds

of inquiry.

Criminology

The Criminology program at The University of

Queensland can be distinguished by its focus on

the public policy implications of crime in a way that

is both theoretically informed and methodologically

rigorous. The program is strongly cross-disciplinary

and enables students to combine criminology with

other fi elds of study such as sociology, political

science, law, psychology, history and philosophy.

Students undertaking a major in criminology at UQ

become highly trained in social research methods

and critical thinking and learn to examine crime and

its regulation within the context of social, economic

and political shifts in contemporary society.

Drama

Seeing and critiquing professional performance,

reading plays from around the world and throughout

the past 2000 years, honing your performance skills:

these are all part of the Drama major. You will learn

how to interpret theatre through time and space,

but you will also be challenged to think about what

constitutes performance, not only on the stage, but

on the page and in everyday life. You will develop an

understanding of the theatrical and literary aspects

of drama, from ancient Greek classics to medieval

theatre to the most recent Australian and European

plays. You do not have to audition but there are

practical performance options at advanced level.

Economics

Economics is the science of decision-making.

As individuals, communities, companies and

governments, we face choices every day, weighing

up the costs and benefi ts of our decisions. With the

ongoing momentum of globalisation, development,

economic/fi nancial/cultural integration and

increasing pressure for ecological sustainability,

economics remains the key element. Economics

determines much of today’s social and political

landscape, and students trained in this fi eld are

exceptionally well-positioned to play a leading part

in the future direction of business, government and

society.

English

English is the medium of communication, business

and entertainment for millions of people around the

world. From witty plays and elegant fi lms to pungent

protest songs and complex novels, it allows people

to formulate and convey their particular vision of

the world and their often urgent desire to celebrate

or improve it. Students will examine examples of

English at work in different circumstances, ranging

from poetry to television and the Internet.

68

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


HUMANITIES, SOCIAL SCIENCE, EDUCATION & ARTS

English Language and Communication

As the world’s most global language, the English

language permeates almost all aspects of our

daily social lives, from face-to-face interaction to

professional presentations, from emails to report

writing. The English Language and Communication

major combines a study of the structural

organisation of the English language with its role in

communication practice to explore the many ways

English can be used in societies, large and small.

The courses in the major are designed to develop

an awareness of language as a central part of the

practice of communication as well as an awareness

of the role of English in cross cultural contexts.

English Literature

The program in English literature introduces

students to one of the world’s key literary traditions

as well as to contemporary global English-language

literary culture. Undertaking the formal study of

English literature from its beginnings to the present

day is to be introduced to a vast intellectual and

cultural history - one that records the almost

infi nitely different ways in which men and women,

from a great variety of different times and places,

have lived, thought, argued, felt and imagined. Many

of the novels, poems, plays and non-fi ctional works

students encounter in this program rank amongst

the greatest products of the human mind. The

program also introduces students to some infl uential

ways of thinking about literature.

Film and Television Studies

Film and Television Studies involves the critical

study of fi lm and television texts. It introduces the

language of fi lm and television and the principal

ways in which they are written about and analysed.

The major focus is on popular fi lm and television

and the contexts within which they are produced.

You will look at various fi lm movements, including

Australian cinema, and fi lms in a range of foreign

languages, as well as various fi lm and television

genres.

French

You will study both French language and culture

concurrently. Whether you wish to study French

because it is one of the major diplomatic languages

of the world; or because you want to do business

with members of the massive Francophone

population; because you have always been

fascinated by one of the richest and most infl uential

Western cultures in existence; or simply because it

is the language of love; you will need to understand

something about French and Francophone culture.

You are able to study French without any prior

knowledge or having done French at high school.

Geography

A career in geography has never been more relevant

or important to society and its future. With the Earth’s

population set to expand from six billion to nine billion

in the next 50 years, humans will infl uence and be

infl uenced by the environment more than ever before.

The world will need professionals who are able to

monitor and assess changes in the environment.

Geographers study patterns and processes of

natural and built environments and of human

activities, and their causes and consequences. They

collect, analyse and report this information to enable

informed decision making to take place. Geographers

are actively involved in addressing many of today’s

big issues such as climate change and population

growth.

German

German is one of the most widely spoken languages

on earth, and a major community language in

Australia. The German-speaking countries lie at the

heart of Europe, and Australia welcomes tens of

thousands of tourists from those countries every

year. Germany has one of the strongest economies

in the world, and is a leader in many areas of

technology and culture. German language skills are

an asset in many careers, including international

relations, international business, tourism,

interpreting/translation, teaching and the sciences.

*Commencing students with Senior German or

equivalent enrol in GRMN2010 and GRMN2020.

History

History is an on-going dialogue between the

present and the past, about how the past should

be understood and interpreted, about what

meaning we should assign to the past. An informed

understanding of the present and our expectations

for the future go hand-in-hand with a knowledge

of history. History provides an essential framework

for all the humanities and social sciences. The

study of history further promotes the acquisition of

important professional skills such as the ability to

conduct archival research and the ability to interpret

information embedded in the past.

Indonesian

Indonesian is the offi cial language of Indonesia.

There are more than 200 million speakers of

Indonesian, making it the fi fth most widely spoken

language in the world. As the national language,

Indonesian serves as a focus of national identity,

linking together the rich ethnic and cultural diversity

of Indonesia’s more than 300 distinct ethnic groups.

Indonesian is used in all government and public

domains, including in education, commerce and

the mass media. Knowledge of Indonesia, with the

world’s largest Muslim population, is a key part of

Australia’s future. Learning Indonesian is a great fi rst

step to becoming an Indonesia expert.

Information Technology

Computing is an important tool in just about every

discipline, from human movement studies to

psychology to drama. To make best use of the tools

available, and especially to see the possibilities of

new tools, you need to understand what computers

do and how to program them. In this major, you will

learn how to think logically about a problem and

its solution. You will learn how to develop software

as tools for humans to make use of. You will have

the opportunity to focus on different aspects of

computer systems: writing programs, designing

information systems and understanding how the

computers, communication networks and programs

work together as a coherent system.

International Relations

Studies in International Relations equip you with the

necessary theoretical and practical tools to analyse

and evaluate events and issues both domestically

and internationally. They are designed to introduce

you to the signifi cant trends shaping the world

around you, to train you in ways to conceptualise

and apply key approaches to the ideas and policies

that drive contemporary international politics, and

to incorporate such training into the development

of practical skills designed to enhance your

professional competitiveness and opportunities.

The major commences with an introduction to

international relations and international inequality

and development.

Islamic Studies

This major will enable you to complete an in-depth

study of Islam and of Muslims in a range of historical

and contemporary perspectives. Perspectives

include the contemporary as well as the premodern.

By studying the Islamic past, you will be

more able to comprehend the socio-economic

and political dilemmas facing Muslims today, both

in and outside of Australia. This major is designed

to provide you with a broad background in the

culture of Muslim societies in various parts of the

Islamic world, and how the Islamic world and the

West interact. Particular emphasis is placed on

the history, religion, law and literature of Islamic

civilisations, as well as contemporary issues such

as nationalism, tolerance and ethnic confl ict, and

modern social movements.

Japanese

Japanese is a key world language used to facilitate

economic pursuits, research and government

interaction. It is particularly useful if you are seeking

a career in business, tourism, technology, the media,

art, literature or education. Learning to use Japanese

broadens the scope of your personal, social and

professional networks giving you the potential to

travel, live and work in Japan and to engage with

speakers of Japanese in Australia, Japan and

elsewhere. More than 20 exchange programs with

prestigious Japanese universities are available to

allow students to advance their linguistic skills and

cultural understanding through in-country experience.

Journalism and Mass Communication

The major draws on the established reputation of

the BA to prepare graduates for jobs where critical

understanding, fl exibility, research, analytical and

communication skills are required, including careers

in mass communications, the media and journalism.

The Journalism and Mass Communication major

provides a broader basis for careers in mass

communications, the media and journalism as well

as a wide range of other occupations.

Korean

Students who study and use the Korean language

will gain a profound appreciation of different ways

of thinking, a diverse history and rich cultural

traditions. Students will experience contemporary

Korean popular culture such as fi lms and TV drama.

Korean skills give you a competitive edge in the

job market, for example in law, business, tourism,

teaching, fi nance, diplomacy, journalism, science,

information technology, manufacturing, and any area

with an international focus. Presently in Korea there

are many English teaching positions available, from

kindergarten to university level.

Linguistics

Linguistics is the study of language as a human

behaviour; how it is structured and used. Linguistics

at The University of Queensland addresses

the nature and use of language in general, as

manifested in specifi c languages. Courses in

the structure of language examine its sounds

(phonetics and phonology), words (morphology),

sentences (syntax) and meaning (semantics) and

the complex interactions between these properties

of language. Students also study how language is

used, including how children acquire language and

how adults process it (psycholinguistics). Other

areas investigated are the way languages change

across time (historical linguistics), and how different

regional, social or occupational varieties develop

(sociolinguistics).

Logic and Philosophy of Science

The Logic and the Philosophy of Science major

examines fundamental issues in formal and informal

reasoning, the nature of scientifi c reasoning, and

other issues concerned with scientifi c method,

scientifi c knowledge, the rise of modern science,

the nature of scientifi c entities and metaphysical

concepts that underlie science. Questions of

general interest remain unanswered – questions

about the world, the concepts we use to describe it,

and the ways we reason about it. The University of

Queensland is the only university in Queensland to

offer a major in logic and philosophy of science.

Mathematics

Mathematics is one of the oldest disciplines

and many mathematicians continue to develop

new mathematics for its own sake. But today

mathematicians also combine their knowledge

of mathematics and statistics with modelling

and computational skills and the latest computer

technology, to solve problems in the physical

and biological sciences, engineering, information

technology, economics and fi nance.

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

69


Media Studies

Media Studies involves the critical study of various

aspects of the media. The courses in the major

consider newspapers, magazines, radio, fi lm,

television and new media in order to develop an

appreciation of how these operate in our culture

and how the industries that produce them, the

audiences that consume them, and the institutions

that interact with them, all function.

Music

Music is one of the most powerful and evocative of

arts forms. To the uninitiated, however, the source

of its attraction and communicativeness remains

little more than a potent mystery. The Music major

will help you to understand music’s diverse social

and historical meanings and well as providing you

with a key to its written and aural complexities.

You will approach the study of Western art music

in a challenging and engaging way, incorporating

critical perspectives and historical knowledge

along with written and aural skills. Students

contemplating the extended major will have a

choice of two streams—a musicological stream

which further develops the aspects described

above, and a professional stream which combines

elements of the above with a specially developed

suit of courses designed for students interested to

pursue the professional fi elds of music education or

music therapy through the relevant dual degree or

postgraduate programs.

Peace and Conflict Studies

Peace and confl ict studies are assuming increasing

importance both internationally and within nations

as governments and non-government organisations

struggle to fi nd ways of resolving confl icts without

recourse to violence. The objective of the peace

and confl ict studies major is to provide you with

an understanding of the causes of political confl ict

and the possibilities of fi nding peaceful solutions to

them. This requires development of diagnostic tools

for the analysis of social and political situations, a

capacity to engage in and understand the evaluation

of alternative courses of action and the skills to

incorporate values within political analysis.

Philosophy

Philosophy examines fundamental problems such

as the scope and limits of human knowledge,

the ultimate constituents of reality, the sources

of value and obligation and the nature of correct

reasoning. All this began with attempts to answer

two deceptively simple questions: ‘what can we

know?’ and ‘how should we live?’ The subject

matter of philosophy is not clearly marked out, as it

is for physics, mathematics or history. However, for

you to pursue any of these disciplines, questions of

universal interest remain unanswered – questions

about the world and our place in it, about moral

standards and methods of reasoning. Philosophy is

the systematic attempt to address such questions.

Philosophy aims not to teach you what to think, but

how to think. The University of Queensland is the

only public university in Queensland to offer a major

in philosophy.

Political Science

Political Science includes studies of political

structures, processes and policies in Australia

as well as other societies, the contemporary

ideas, ideologies and theories that determine

the framework for political decision-making, and

the organisational and diplomatic approaches

to cooperation and confl ict resolution in the

international system. Studies in political science

provide you with detailed knowledge of the

discipline’s sub-strands and how they may be

integrated into a broader understanding of key

political processes.

Popular Music

Popular music is an ever-present part of our lives. It

has the power to uplift, stimulate, comfort, motivate,

and communicate like no other art form. Its

attractiveness lies in its ubiquity, openness and lack

of convention. It provides the raw material for a vast

international industry. The courses offered in the BA

Popular Music Major may not even answer some of

the fundamental questions about music, but they

will help you to understand your own response to

music and the society in which you live, they will

help you to express yourself in writing and in music

production, and they will inspire you to consider and

experience the power and wonders of music.

Psychology

Psychology is a broad ranging discipline that

includes the scientifi c study of human behaviour

and mental processes, and the systematic

application of this knowledge in specifi c contexts

such as mental health (clinical psychology), work

(organisational psychology), education or sport.

Many people who study psychology will not go on

to become psychologists, but will fi nd their training

in psychology to be highly relevant and useful

in their lives and work. Those who do become

psychologists may work in a variety of settings

including hospitals, schools, government bodies,

large corporations, or in private practice.

Public Policy

Studies in Public Policy are designed to help you

come to grips with issues of modern governance in

general, and with the institutions and processes of

public policy in particular. The main focus of studies

in this area is on the political, institutional, economic,

social and ideological forces that shape Australian

governance and public policy. On completing the

major, the questions you should be equipped to

answer include: how do we formulate and analyse

economic, environmental, social or foreign policy?

Which groups have the most say? How do we

understand the complexities of the policy system

and make sense of what governments do?

Russian

With almost 200 million native speakers in Europe

and Asia, Russian is truly an international language

and at the same time a gateway to one of the

world’s great cultures. Your major will combine a

comprehensive language acquisition program from

beginners’ level with studies in many other aspects

of the Russians’ world. Learning to understand how

the Russian state has expanded and Russian society

has evolved over the centuries or developing an

appreciation of Russian literature, drama or fi lm not

only gives you insights into the wider context within

which the language is used, but also encourages you

to look beyond the stereotypes and clichés that often

characterise our notions of other nations.

Sociology

The Sociology discipline at The University of

Queensland has a longstanding tradition and

is widely recognised as a leader in sociological

scholarship in Australia. Students who complete

a major in sociology at UQ develop a distinctive

set of skills and experiences that are highly sought

after by employers. These include rigorous training

in research methods and an ability to apply

critical thinking and evidence-based research to

understand a broad range of phenomena, such

as social change, modern society and culture,

contemporary social institutions and the relationship

between people and the environment.

Spanish

Spanish is the fi rst language of more than 400

million people and the second language of

millions more in Europe, the United States, Brazil,

Asia and North Africa. Due to demographic and

political factors, Spanish is now a de facto second

language in the United States, Brazil, and virtually

all the smaller states in the Caribbean and Central/

South America. Spanish is an offi cial language in

international bodies such as the United Nations and

World Bank. With Australia’s increased exposure to

the world economy and competitive labour market,

being fl uent in a world language like Spanish will

give you highly employable communication skills.

The ability to speak Spanish will also enhance your

travel experience throughout the vast Spanish

speaking world. There is also a long and strong

tradition and diversity in the areas of Spanish and

Latin American literature and culture, which our

courses will explore.

Sports Studies

Sports Studies provides you with an understanding

of the sport and leisure industries from sociological,

historical, economic and psychological

perspectives. You will undertake courses in the

social science and humanities areas of the study of

sport as well as courses relating to the sociology of

sport and the human body in society. The growth

in the sport, physical activity and health industries

over the past two decades has created a range

of employment opportunities in the areas of social

policy, journalism, management, marketing, planning

and development, education, and psychology.

Sports Studies graduates currently hold leadership

positions with state and national sporting teams, the

media and international sporting organisations.

Studies in Religion

Religion and spiritual ideas have shaped and

continue to shape many societies across the

globe. You now have the opportunity to expand

your religious and spiritual horizons, increase your

knowledge of (some of) these traditions and ideas

and to develop critical methods of evaluating them.

Studies in Religion offers courses by professional

and highly enthusiastic teachers in the areas of

Western and Eastern religious traditions, spiritual

practices and religious thought, in the psychology

of religion, in new religious movements, and in the

original languages of the sacred texts of Buddhism,

Christianity, Hinduism and Islam.

Women’s Studies

Women’s studies became an important fi eld of

study in the early 1970s fuelled by the impetus of

the explosion of second wave feminism. It has been

infl uential across many disciplines and innovative in

pioneering cross-disciplinary modes of inquiry that

remain its characteristic methodology. Women’s

studies continues to offer innovative and evolving

perspectives, and original approaches to social and

political problems.

Writing

There is a knack to producing writing worth reading,

and that is what this major will help you to achieve.

You will develop a fundamental and substantial

understanding of how language works at the word,

sentence, paragraph, and document level. You will

learn strategies for designing, structuring, writing, and

revising on paper and online. Whether you are aiming

to be a creative or a corporate writer, this major will

train you to produce compelling, career-enhancing

writing in a variety of fi ction and non-fi ction genres.

Career opportunities

The Bachelor of Arts provides a broad, fl exible

education and is excellent preparation for a wide

range of careers. Many employers, especially in

large organisations, look for people with the skills

an Arts degree provides. Some specialised areas

of study lead to careers in specifi c fi elds such

as psychology, linguistics, or languages. Other

areas are general training for professional/semiprofessional

careers in fi elds such as economics,

English and information technology. Other career

opportunities exist in:

– administration

– adult training and professional development

– advertising

– banking

– community education

– communication and trade

– corporate communications

– diplomacy

– editing and publishing

– human resources

70

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010


HUMANITIES, SOCIAL SCIENCE, EDUCATION & ARTS

– intelligence agencies

– marketing and public relations

– media – TV, radio, fi lm, print

– multi-national corporations

– non-government organisations

– policy and research

– social services

– teaching

– translation.

Dual degree programs

– Business

– Business Management

– Commerce

– Communication

– Economics

– Education (Middle Years of Schooling)

– Education (Secondary)

– Engineering

– Information Technology

– International Hotel and Tourism Management

– Journalism

– Laws

– Medicine Surgery

– Music

– Science

– Social Science

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

COMMUNICATION

Location St Lucia

Commencement semester 1, 2

Duration 3 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12

(or equivalent) English

Honours Available as an extra year of study

Program outline

Communication at UQ puts you at the centre of the

contemporary information society and economy.

You will develop knowledge of communication and

communication processes. You will also become a

more effective communicator.

Communication straddles many aspects of life

and work. In the core courses you will develop

understanding and skills in a number of areas

– visual, written, multimedia and spoken and

interpersonal communication – and in researching

and exploring communications.

You then specialise by choosing a major

in Communication, Media and Culture, Public

Relations, Mass Communication or Organisational

Communication.

To complete your program, you choose free

electives, a second major, or a smaller minor in

one of the four areas or in Advertising, Interaction

Design, or Health Communication. All combine

practice and theory and provide a platform for either

employment or further study.

Communication is an expanding area of

employment and the Bachelor of Communication

is a preparation for careers in public relations,

advertising, media planning and analysis; fi lm and

television; web design and management; business

communication; health promotion, and many

more. Further study can lead to careers in teaching

communication at all levels.

Majors

Communication, Media and Culture (St Lucia)

The Communication, Media and Culture major

combines the study of basic language and

communication with the study of contemporary

culture and everyday life concentrating on examples of

communicative processes in interpersonal, intercultural

and institutional contexts, and on the forms and

meanings of popular culture. Students consider a

range of everyday situations and interactions, and

analyse popular cultural texts including television,

radio, internet and print sources as well as the cultural

identities, spaces and practices associated with

these. The program emphasises critical and analytic

skills and encourages students to develop these

alongside general skills of communication.

Mass Communication (St Lucia)

Mass Communication encompasses various

streams of study. Courses cover the impact of mass

communication on society; analysis of populations and

audiences; understanding of media cultures; political

communication; communication of stereotypes,

racism, prejudice; and global communication.

Organisational Communication (Ipswich)

This area of study offers students the opportunity

to learn forms of communication within and

between organisations; to learn the art of infl uence

and persuasion. Students become adept at

evaluating and improving the design of paper

and electronic communication systems. Courses

offer an understanding of concepts of advertising,

public relations, corporate identity and intercultural

communication.

Public Relations (St Lucia)

This major involves a mix of theory and practice.

You will learn how to use communication

as a persuasive tool; learn to think about

communications strategically; and learn how to

both plan and manage public relations campaigns.

In addition you will learn how to write and produce

publicity material. The courses you study give

you the skills and knowledge required to become

a competent practitioner in the ever-expanding

workforce of public relations professionals and there

is an option for a public relations internship.

Career opportunities

Communication graduates are suited to a variety of

career opportunities, including:

– advertising

– communication management in government and

commercial agencies

– event management

– interactive multimedia design and web

management

– media administration

– mediation/dispute/crisis consultancy

– organisational communication

– publicity and campaign management

– publishing, magazine and corporate publication

writing

– strategic communication and public relations

– web-based education

– writing for the media.

Dual degree programs

– Arts

– Journalism

– Social Science

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

CREATIVE ARTS

Location St Lucia

Commencement semester 1, 2

Duration 3 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12

(or equivalent) English

Honours Available as an extra year of study.

Program outline

Students enrolling in the Bachelor of Creative Arts

can study one of the practice-based majors –

Drama, Music, and Writing. They can also study

majors which introduce them to the interpretation

of creative works – Art History, English, English

Literature, Film and Television Studies, Media

Studies and Popular Music. Students completing

the program acquire skills in understanding how

human beings use art to make meaning. Students

undertake two majors or a more concentrated

extended major and a minor, plus a range of

electives. BCreativeArts graduates have skills

and knowledge specifi c to the subjects they have

studied but also know how to communicate well, to

think critically, and to apply these and other more

general skills in many different jobs and careers.

Majors

Art History

How often have you walked through a museum or

art gallery and asked the question: is that art? Art

History is the study of the objects considered to be

art across a variety of cultures and times. We look

at paintings, sculptures, modern works of art that

cannot really be called either of these, Aboriginal

art and the art of the Asia-Pacifi c region. We look

at fi lms, and in the more advanced courses answer

that famous question: what is art?

English

English is the medium of communication, business

and entertainment for millions of people around the

world. From witty plays and elegant fi lms to pungent

protest songs and complex novels, it allows people

to formulate and convey their particular vision of

the world and their often urgent desire to celebrate

or improve it. Students will examine examples of

English at work in different circumstances, ranging

from poetry to television and the Internet.

Drama

Seeing and critiquing professional performance,

reading plays from around the world and throughout

the past 2000 years, honing your performance skills:

these are all part of the Drama major. You will learn

how to interpret theatre through time and space,

but you will also be challenged to think about what

constitutes performance, not only on the stage, but

on the page and in everyday life. You will develop an

understanding of the theatrical and literary aspects

of drama, from ancient Greek classics to medieval

theatre to the most recent Australian and European

plays. You do not have to audition but there are

practical performance options at advanced level.

English Literature

The program in English Literature introduces

students to one of the world’s key literary traditions

as well as to contemporary global English-language

literary culture. Undertaking the formal study of

English literature from its beginnings to the present

day is to be introduced to a vast intellectual and

cultural history - one that records the almost

infi nitely different ways in which men and women,

from a great variety of different times and places,

have lived, thought, argued, felt and imagined. Many

of the novels, poems, plays and non-fi ctional works

students encounter in this program rank amongst

the greatest products of the human mind. The

program also introduces students to some infl uential

ways of thinking about literature.

Film and Television Studies

Film and Television Studies involves the critical

study of fi lm and television texts. It introduces the

language of fi lm and television and the principal

ways in which they are written about and analysed.

The major focus is on popular fi lm and television

and the contexts within which they are produced.

You will look at various fi lm movements, including

Australian cinema, and fi lms in a range of foreign

languages, as well as various fi lm and television

genres.

UNDERGRADUATE PROSPECTUS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2010

71


Media Studies

Media Studies involves the critical study of various

aspects of the media. The courses in the major

consider newspapers, magazines, radio, fi lm,

television and new media in order to develop an

appreciation of how these operate in our culture

and how the industries that produce them, the

audiences that consume them, and the institutions

that interact with them, all function.

Music

Music is one of the most powerful and evocative of

arts forms. To the uninitiated, however, the source

of its attraction and communicativeness remains

little more than a potent mystery. The music major

will help you to understand music’s diverse social

and historical meanings and well as providing you

with a key to its written and aural complexities. You

will approach the study of Western art music in a

challenging and engaging way, incorporating critical

perspectives and historical knowledge along with

written and aural skills. Students contemplating the

extended major will have a choice of two streams

— a musicological stream which further develops

the aspects described above, and a professional

stream which combines elements of the above with

a specially developed suit of courses designed for

students interested to pursue the professional fi elds

of music education or music therapy through the

relevant dual degree or postgraduate programs.

Popular Music

Popular music is an ever-present part of our lives.

It has the power to uplift, stimulate, comfort,

motivate, and communicate like no other art form.

Its attractiveness lies in its ubiquity, openness and

lack of convention. It provides the raw material for

a vast international industry. The courses offered

in this major may not even answer some of the

fundamental questions about music, but they will

help you to understand your own response to

music and the society in which you live, they will

help you to express yourself in writing and in music

production, and they will inspire you to consider and

experience the power and wonders of music.

Writing

There is a knack to producing writing worth reading,

and that is what this major will help you to achieve.

You will develop a fundamental and substantial

understanding of how language works at the word,

sentence, paragraph, and document level. You will

learn strategies for designing, structuring, writing,

and revising on paper and online. Whether you are

aiming to be a creative or a corporate writer, this

major will train you to produce compelling, careerenhancing

writing in a variety of fi ction and nonfi

ction genres.

Career opportunities

Graduates are able to demonstrate a range of

skills that make them attractive to a wide range of

employers in the creative arts industries. Career

opportunities exist in:

– acting

– advertising

– arts management

– arts policy advising

– classroom teaching

– drama teaching

– editing and publishing

– festival and event management

– media – TV, radio, fi lm, print

– media management

– museum and gallery management

– music

– orchestra and festival management

– play and screenwriting

– public relations studio teaching

– theatre and TV

– theatre management/production/direction.

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

EDUCATION

(MIDDLE YEARS OF

SCHOOLING)

Location St Lucia

Commencement semester 1

Duration 4 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12

(or equivalent) English

Honours Available as an extra year of study

Program outline

The Bachelor of Education (Middle Years) is a fouryear

pre-service teacher qualifi cation designed

for effective teacher preparation in the unique

contemporary context. The program develops

capacities required by teachers working in the

information age, a time of rapid change where

education is recognised as playing an increasingly

important role in society. The program develops

specialist teachers across the year levels four to

nine, aligning with the Middle Phase of Learning. In

particular, the program focuses on the development

of skills, understandings and attributes that enable

graduates to demonstrate specialist abilities with

respect to: literacy and numeracy; diversity and

differentiated learning; leadership and research

connected practicum.

Placement courses

Students are required to complete 80 days of

supervised practicum and 40 days of internship

over the four years of the program. Every effort

is made to place students within a reasonable

distance of their home base but they can be

expected to travel up to 90 minutes due to public

transport connections and incur costs associated

with travel and possible lost income over this period.

Students are generally placed at Ipswich, Brisbane,

and southeast Queensland and are encouraged

to explore the option of a rural placement. Rural

scholarships are available from the School of

Education to assist with travel and accommodation

costs.

Supplementary information

Students are required to have a current Blue Card

(Working with Children Check) before commencing

the practicums. Students can apply for a Blue Card

through the School of Education and should do

so three months before their practicum is due to

commence. The Practicum Handbook provides

additional information about practicum and school

experience requirements and is available from the

School of Education (www.uq.edu.au/education).

Professional memberships

Graduates may be eligible for registration with the

Queensland College of Teachers.

Dual degree programs

– Arts

Additional cost

Students are responsible for transport costs

and incidentals when undertaking practicum

and internship placements. Please note that

some placements may be outside the Brisbane

metropolitan area.

International contact details

International Student Advisor

Online enquiries: www.uq.edu.au/international/enquiry

Email: study@uq.edu.au

Phone (outside Australia): + 61 3 8676 7004

Within Australia (Free Call): 1800 671 980

BACHELOR OF

EDUCATION

(PRIMARY)

Location St Lucia

Commencement semester 1

Duration 4 years full-time

Admission requirements Queensland Year 12

(or equivalent) English

Honours Available as an extra year of study

Program outline

The Bachelor of Education (Primary) is a four-year

pre-service teacher qualifi cation designed for effective

teacher preparation in the unique contemporary

context. The program develops capacities required

by teachers working in the information age, a time

of rapid change where education is recognised as

playing an increasingly important role in society. The

program develops teachers across the year levels

one to seven, spanning the Early and Middle Phases

of Learning. In particular, the program focuses on the

development of skills, understandings and attributes

that enable graduates to demonstrate specialist

abilities with respect to: literacy and numeracy,

diversity and differentiated learning, leadership and

research, connected practicum.

Placement courses

Students are required to complete 80 days of

supervised practicum and 40 days of internship over

the four years of the program. Every effort is made to

place students within a reasonable distance of their

home base but they can be expected to travel up

to 90 minutes due to public transport connections

and incur costs associated with travel and possible

lost income over this period. Students are generally

placed at Ipswich, Brisbane, and southeast

Queensland and are encouraged to explore the

option of a rural placement. Rural scholarships are

available from the School of Education to assist with

travel and accommodation costs.

Supplementary information

Students are required to have a current Blue Card

(Working with Children Check) before commencing

the practicums. Students can apply for a Blue Card

through the School of Education and should do

so three months before their practicum is due to

commence. The Practicum Handbook provides

additional information about practicum and school

experience requirements and is available from the

School of Education (www.uq.edu.au/education).

Professional memberships

Graduates may be eligible for registration with the

Queensland College of Teachers.

Additional cost

Students are responsible for transport costs

and incidentals when undertaking practicum

and internship placements. Please note that

some placements may be outside the Brisbane

metropolitan area.

A list of fi rst year courses is given below:

– Child and Adolescent Development for Educators

– Education and Australian Society

– Education and Creativity

– Pedagogical Content Knowledge

– Introduction to Education

– Introduction to Role of Science and Technology

Education in Society

– Literacy in Primary and Middle Years Contexts

– Numeracy in Primary