& Flood Plain Policy Update

haldimandcounty.on.ca

Background Report October 12, 2011 - Haldimand County

SECONDARY PLAN &

FLOOD PLAIN POLICY

UPDATE

DUNNVILLE

Secondary Plan

& Flood Plain

Policy Update

B A C K G R O U N D

RESEARCH REPORT

October 2011

DTAH


TABLE OF CONTENTS

1.0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 1

1.1 Study Purpose ........................................................................................................................... 1

1.2 Study Area Description .............................................................................................................. 1

1.3 Study Process/Timeline ............................................................................................................. 1

2.0 Study Framework ........................................................................................................................ 5

2.1 Planning Context........................................................................................................................ 5

2.2 Community and Urban Design ................................................................................................. 18

2.3 Economic Development, Tourism and Recreation ................................................................... 20

2.4 Infrastructure ............................................................................................................................ 24

3.0 Community Character ............................................................................................................... 27

3.1 Community Profile .................................................................................................................... 27

3.2 Urban Structure and Built Form ............................................................................................... 27

3.3 Existing Character Zones and Built Form ................................................................................ 29

3.4 Recent Development Initiatives ............................................................................................... 32

4.0 Flood Plain Analysis ................................................................................................................. 35

4.1 Existing Flood Plain Policy and Secondary Plan ...................................................................... 35

4.2 Existing Hydraulic Modelling and Flood Plain Description ....................................................... 37

4.3 New 2-D Modelling Approach & Preliminary Results ............................................................... 38

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | i


5.0 Public Consultation ................................................................................................................... 41

5.1 Public Open House #1 – September 14, 2011 ......................................................................... 41

6.0 Preliminary Issues and Options ............................................................................................... 43

6.1 Special Flood Plain Policy Area Boundaries ............................................................................ 43

6.2 Repositioning County-Owned Waterfront Lands ...................................................................... 43

6.3 Expansion of Historic Commercial Core ................................................................................... 46

6.4 Waterfront Access .................................................................................................................... 47

6.5 Main Street ............................................................................................................................... 48

6.6 Broad Street/Taylor Road Retail Node ..................................................................................... 49

6.7 Broad Street Transition Area .................................................................................................... 52

7.0 Next Steps .................................................................................................................................. 55

Appendix A: Town of Dunnville Zoning By-law Zone Summary

ii | OCTOBER 2011


FIGURES

Figure 1.1: Study Areas .............................................................................................................................. 2

Figure 2.1: Dunnville Urban Area Land Use Plan ..................................................................................... 10

Figure 2.2: Potential Intensification Lands in Dunnville ............................................................................ 15

Figure 2.2: Potential Intensification Lands in Dunnville ............................................................................ 15

Figure 2.3: Potential Greenfield Lands in Dunnville ................................................................................. 16

Figure 2.4: Dunnville Zoning By-law Map ................................................................................................. 17

Figure 2.5: The “Four Big Moves” (Streetscape Plan) .............................................................................. 19

Figure 2.6: Existing Trail Network in Dunnville ......................................................................................... 22

Figure 2.7: Proposed Trail Network in Dunnville ...................................................................................... 23

Figure 3.1: Existing Character Zones ....................................................................................................... 30

Figure 3.2: Recent Development Applications ......................................................................................... 33

Figure 6.1: County-Owned Waterfront Lands ........................................................................................... 45

Figure 6.2: Broad Street/Taylor Road Retail Node ................................................................................... 51

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | iii


iv | OCTOBER 2011


1.0 INTRODUCTION

1.1 Study Purpose

Haldimand County has initiated the preparation of a

Secondary Plan and Special Flood Plain Policy Update

for the community of Dunnville. This study presents an

exciting opportunity for residents and members of the

community to identify a solid framework to plan for the

growth and evolution of Dunnville.

The Dunnville Secondary Plan will establish a more

detailed policy framework for Dunnville, identify

community-specific issues, and provide policy guidance

for resolving these issues. The Flood Plain Policy

Update includes the development of recommendations

on whether to proceed with an update to the Haldimand

County Official Plan Special Flood Plain Policy Area

policies.

The Background Report identifies the community

character, planning context, issues and potential options

to be addressed in the Secondary Plan and Special

Flood Plain Policy Update. Furthermore, the Report

provides a basis for which new policies will be

established to guide Dunnville in achieving its goals.

1.2 Study Area Description

The Study Area comprises Dunnville’s historic

commercial core, the Grand River waterfront and

extends east through the residential area towards the

large format retail area at Taylor Road and Broad Street

East. Figure 1.1 outlines the Study Area, which has

been divided into two key areas:

1. Secondary Plan Area; and

2. Flood Plain Policy Areas.

The Secondary Plan area is generally bounded by Cedar

Street in the west, the former CNR Line in the north,

slightly east of Taylor Road in the east, and Main Street

East/North Shore Drive and the Grand River/Front Street

in the south.

The County Official Plan divides the flood plain area into

3 distinct policy areas, each containing varying policy

regulations to protect from flood hazards. They include:

1. Area 1: Grand River in the south, west of

George Street/Helena Street in the west, south

of the former CNR Line, Cedar Street in the

east.

2. Area 2: Grand River in the south, south of

Taylor Road in the west, Main Street East/North

Shore Drive in the north, and Main Street East

and east of Hydro Street.

3. Area 3: Cedar Street in the West, South Cayuga

Street/Alder Street East in the north, Tamarac

Street in the west, and Main Street East in the

south.

1.3 Study Process/Timeline

The Study is being conducted in 3 Phases:




Phase 1: Background Review

Phase 2: Issues and Options

Phase 3: Prepare Secondary Plan and Special

Flood Plain Analysis Policy Update

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 1


Figure 1.1: Study Areas

2 | OCTOBER 2011


The following sections briefly summarize the goals and

anticipated timing for each of the project phases:

Phase 1: Background Review

Phase 1 of the Dunnville Secondary Plan and Special

Flood Plain Policy Update involves a thorough

background review of existing reports, documents and

resource materials that relate to the community, the

planning policy framework, urban design and flood plain

analysis. An overview of these initiatives and how they

relate to the Study and the Secondary Plan and Special

Flood Plain policies are summarized in this Background

Report.

A Public Open House was held on September 14, 2011,

to introduce the Study, provide an overview of the

background work, and present preliminary issues and

options for Dunnville. The Open House provided

attendees with an opportunity to provide input, identify

issues and ask questions of the Study.

Anticipated Timeframe: June – September 2011

Phase 2: Issues and Options

Phase 2 of the Study involves the

identification/confirmation of issues, opportunities,

constraints and options based on feedback received

from the Public Open House, and the Background

Report, including the Flood Plain Analysis. An important

component of this Phase is the Issues and Options and

Design Charrette, which will be held to gain essential

feedback on the issues facing the community of

Dunnville and options regarding future development of

the downtown and waterfront area, and particularly the

County-owned lands.

Based on the feedback received and background work

completed, alternative urban design and land use

concepts are anticipated to be created for repositioning

the County-owned lands adjacent to the Grand River,

the Broad Street Corridor and the emerging Broad

Street/Taylor Road Retail Node. These concepts will be

presented as part of the Issues and Options Report and

anticipated for adoption by Council in December 2011.

Anticipated Timeframe: September - December 2011

Phase 3: Prepare Secondary Plan and Special

Flood Plain Policy Update

Phase 3 of the Study involves the preparation of the

Secondary Plan and Special Flood Plain Policy Update.

Based on previous analysis and public feedback, more

detailed land use policies and urban design guidelines

will be prepared, and a recommendation will be made as

to whether the County should proceed with an update to

the Special Flood Plain Policies in the Official Plan or

consider alternative flood plain policies for the Study

Area. A final public meeting will be held by the County

Council in Committee, to obtain feedback on the Draft

Secondary Plan, Urban Design Guidelines, and Special

Flood Plain Policy Update recommendations. The Final

Drafts will be presented to Council for

adoption/endorsement.

Anticipated Timeframe: December 2011 - May 2012

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4 | OCTOBER 2011


2.0 STUDY FRAMEWORK

2.1 Planning Context

2.1.1 Planning Act

The Planning Act provides the fundamental land use

planning framework in Ontario. It provides guidance to

municipalities for planning processes, outlines the

decision-making process with respect to planning

matters, and provides a framework for municipalities to

make planning decisions for their communities. Further,

the Planning Act governs the overall content and

direction of official plans through section 16 (1), which

states:

“an official plan,

a) Shall contain goals, objectives and policies

established primarily to manage and direct

change and the effects on the social, economic

and natural environment of the municipality of

part of it, or an area that is without municipal

organization; and

b) May contain a description of the measures and

procedures proposed to attain the objectives of

the plan and a description of the measures and

procedures for information and obtaining the

views of the public in respect of a proposed

amendment to the official plan or proposed

revision of the plan in respect of a proposed

zoning by-law.”

The Secondary Plan will form part of the County’s

Official Plan while providing more detailed land use

guidance for the Planning Area. The Flood Plain Policy

Update may provide guidance for future revisions to the

County’s Official Plan respecting its specific policies

relating to the identified Special Policy Area (SPA) in

Dunnville. The Planning Act also identifies matters of

Provincial interest that the council of a municipality, local

board, planning board or Ontario Municipal Board “shall

have regard to” when carrying out their responsibilities

under the Act, including the preparation of Secondary

Plans. These matters are:

a) The protection of ecological systems, including

natural areas, features and functions;

b) The protection of the agricultural resources of

the Province;

c) The conservation and management of natural

resources and the mineral resource base;

d) The conservation of features of significant

architectural, cultural, historical, archaeological

or scientific interest;

e) The supply, efficient use and conservation of

energy and water;

f) The adequate provision and efficient use of

communication, transportation, sewage and

water services and waste management

systems;

g) The minimization of waste;

h) The orderly development of safe and healthy

communities;

h.1) the accessibility for persons with disabilities to

all facilities, services and matters to which this

Act applies;

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 5


i) The adequate provision and distribution of

educational, health, social, cultural and

recreational facilities;

j) The adequate provision of a full range of

housing, including affordable housing;

k) The adequate provision of employment

opportunities;

l) The protection of the financial and economic

well-being of the Province and its

municipalities;

m) The co-ordination of planning activities of public

bodies;

n) The resolution of planning conflicts involving

public and private interests;

o) The protection of public health and safety;

p) The appropriate location of growth and

development; and

q) The promotion of development that is designed

to be sustainable, to support public transit and

to be oriented to pedestrians.

2.1.2 Provincial Policy Statement

The Provincial Policy Statement (PPS), 2005, is issued

under the authority of Section 3 of the Planning Act. The

PPS provides further direction on key Provincial interests

related to land use planning, including promoting and

maintaining strong communities, a clean and healthy

environment, and a strong economy. The County is

required to be “consistent with” the PPS when exercising

its authority in planning matters, and when implementing

appropriate land use designations and policies. The

PPS provides three umbrella principles and a series of

supporting policies. The three principles of the PPS and

their general directions, as applicable to the Study Area,

are described below.

1.0 Building Strong Communities

Efficient land use and development patterns that

support liveable and healthy communities, protect

the natural environment and public safety, and

promote economic growth.

The PPS directs municipalities to ensure an appropriate

range and mix of housing and employment opportunities

in designated growth areas, as long as adequate

infrastructure and public service facilities are in place.

Settlement areas have been identified to accommodate

growth and promote intensification and redevelopment.

Settlement areas in proximity to rural areas are to be

appropriate and compatible with the rural landscape,

separate from agricultural areas, and are not to constrain

agricultural uses. Additionally, designated growth areas

are to help improve air quality through encouraging short

commutes and alternative modes of transportation, such

as walking and cycling.

2.0 Wise Use and Management of Resources

In order to maintain the long-term prosperity of the

Province, environmental health and social wellbeing

which depend on the protection of natural

heritage, water, agriculture, mineral and cultural

heritage and archaeological resources, must be

protected.

Natural features and areas are to be protected for the

long-term and the diversity and connectivity of natural

features and the long-term ecological function and

biodiversity of natural heritage systems should be

maintained, restored, and where possible, improved.

The PPS states that development shall not be permitted

6 | OCTOBER 2011


in provincially significant wetlands, woodlands,

valleylands, wildlife habitat, and areas of natural and

scientific interest. Development will be permitted

adjacent to these areas, only where it can be

demonstrated that there will be no negative impacts on

the natural features or on their functions. Municipalities

are also to protect, improve and restore the quality and

quantity of water by implementing the necessary

restrictions on development, minimizing potential

negative impacts, and using mitigative measures or

alternative development approaches.

Significant built heritage resources and significant

cultural heritage landscapes are to be conserved by

ensuring that new development protects built/cultural

heritage attributes, and mitigative approaches are

implemented to ensure conservation.

3.0 Protecting Public Health and Safety

Development shall be directed away from areas of

natural or human-made hazards that pose the risk

of public cost, safety, and property damage.

The PPS places restrictions on development associated

with natural and human made hazards. The Study Area

is located along the Grand River and is characteristic of

flood hazards, and as such, development is directed

outside of this flooding area. Furthermore, hazardous

lands and hazardous sites are not to be the location of

institutional facilities, essential emergency services, and

waste disposal facilities. Aside from these situations,

development may be permitted in portions of hazardous

lands and hazardous sites, where a Special Policy Area

has been approved by the Province, and where the

effects and risk to public safety are minor and can be

managed or mitigated in accordance with provincial

standards.

The PPS defines a Special Policy Area as “an area

within which a community that has historically existed in

the flood plain and where site-specific policies, approved

by both the Ministers of Natural Resources and

Municipal Affairs and Housing, are intended to provide

for the continued viability of existing uses (which are

generally on a small scale) and address the significant

social and economic hardships to the community that

would result from strict adherence to provincial policies

concerning development. The criteria and procedures

for approval are established by the Province.”

The County’s Official Plan identifies the approved

Special Policy Areas and associated policies and

development criteria which will be reviewed as a

component of this Study.

2.1.3 Places to Grow

The Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe

(Places to Grow) was prepared to provide planning

policy guidance to better manage growth in the Greater

Golden Horseshoe (GGH) to the year 2031. The Plan

anticipates growth in the GGH of up to an additional 3.7

million people by 2031. For Haldimand County, the

Places to Grow Plan projects a 2031 population of

56,000 and an employment population of 20,000.

According to the 2006 Census, Haldimand County has a

population of 45,212 and an employment population of

17,300, resulting in a population growth of approximately

10,800 and an employment growth of 2,700 in a 25-year

time span.

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 7


Development is envisioned to take place in built-up

areas of communities through supporting intensification

opportunities, as well as in designated greenfield areas,

which will assist in creating complete communities that

provide live/work opportunities, support a variety of

housing types, and promote various modes of

transportation.

The Places to Grow Plan also encourages municipalities

to identify natural heritage features and areas that

complement, link, or enhance natural systems.

2.1.4 Haldimand County Official Plan

The Haldimand County Official Plan (OP) was approved

in June 2009 and implements Provincial policy and

provides a planning framework to guide the County

through a 2031 planning horizon. The OP provides

policy guidance to protect and manage the natural

environment, direct growth and development, and

promote the economy and tourism in Haldimand County.

The growth principles of the OP aim to enhance growth

opportunities while maintaining and enhancing

appropriate levels of service in both physical

infrastructure and social services. Several urban areas

are identified in the OP, including:







Caledonia;

Cayuga;

Dunnville;

Hagersville;

Jarvis; and

Townsend.

The OP provides provisions for a mix of residential,

commercial, industrial and other land uses. These land

uses shall be built in a compact form which is

appropriate for pedestrians, promotes walking and

cycling where feasible, and reduces the dependence on

the automobile. More specifically, the OP identifies

Dunnville as playing a key role as a service center for

the surrounding agricultural community and lakeshore

area, as well as a role as a tourist destination and health

care service provider.

Section 8.F of the OP provides direction to establish

Secondary Plans for smaller areas of the County,

particularly urban areas that are presently undeveloped

or experiencing development pressures. In order to

facilitate the efficient use of land and municipal services

and promote urban design, the County may adopt a

Secondary Plan for such areas, which will consider the

following criteria:

a) Existing and anticipated patterns of land use;

b) Population projections;

c) Existing and anticipated distribution of housing

types and densities;

d) Provision for adequate and appropriate areas for

commercial, institutional and other communityoriented

facilities;

e) Provision for parks and open space facilities;

f) Environmental constraints;

g) Development of a network of arterial, collector

and local roads that facilitates the efficient

movement of vehicular and pedestrian traffic;

h) Servicing considerations relating to the provision

of water, sanitary sewers and storm water

management;

i) Phasing considerations; and

8 | OCTOBER 2011


j) Establishment of criteria and principles with

respect to streetscape, heritage considerations,

buffering, landscaping, urban design and other

matters as deemed appropriate by the County.

Section 8.F.5 of the OP identifies a Secondary Plan Area

for Dunnville, as shown in Figure 1.1. The Secondary

Plan for the Dunnville area will address the following

specific considerations:

a) expansion of the historic commercial core to

incorporate the Grand River Waterfront;

b) establish linkages, both economic and physical,

between the emerging area of large format

retailers near Taylor Sideroad between Highway

3 and Main Street to the historic commercial

core of Dunnville;

c) the implications of the area of large format

retails and historic commercial core on the

intervening lands;

d) establishment of urban design guidelines for the

Highway 3 and Main Street Corridor; and

e) considerations for brownfield/greyfield

redevelopment opportunities.

These guiding principles provide the basis for the

Secondary Plan and Flood Plain Policy Update and must

be addressed to develop a comprehensive planning

framework for Dunnville.

The OP contains several land use designations that

apply to the community of Dunnville. These

designations are outlined in Figure 2.1, and include:

Residential Designation

The residential area located east of Downtown Dunnville

is designated “Residential”. Residential areas are to

accommodate a variety of housing forms and community

facilities such as schools, community centres, libraries

and cultural centres. Neighbourhood scale commercial

uses such as local convenience stores are also

permitted in residential areas. The following densities

are permitted for residential development:

Low Density (single and semi-detached: max. 20

units/gross residential hectare;

Medium Density (townhouses and low-rise

apartment): max. 40 units/gross residential

hectare; and

High Density (apartment buildings): max. 75

units/gross residential hectare.

For new residential dwellings that are proposed in

existing, stable residential areas, the OP provides design

criteria to ensure the character and scale of the

surrounding area are maintained and enhanced. These

criteria include provisions for adequate setbacks,

building height, façade treatments, landscaping and

parking.

Community Commercial Designation

The Historic Downtown Core of Dunnville is designated

Community Commercial. In general, central business

areas in the County’s urban areas are identified as

Community Commercial, and will incorporate retail,

shopping functions, offices, professional and personal

services, entertainment and other commercial activities.

Additional uses include institutional and community

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 9


Figure 2.1: Dunnville Urban Area Land Use Plan

10 | OCTOBER 2011


facilities, and apartment units. Buildings may be a

maximum of 4-6 storeys high, where appropriate.

Urban Business Park

Lands designated Urban Business Park are located on

the north and south sides of Broad Street between

Niagara Street and Brant Street, the southwest quadrant

of Broad Street and Taylor Road, and along Broad

Street east of Taylor Road. Urban Business Park areas

are classified as clusters of industries and businesses

located within urban areas. Urban Business Parks are

intended to provide services to the industrial area, as

well as attract office and retail outlet uses that require

outdoor storage areas. The OP acknowledges that

additional uses may be suitable to locate in Urban

Business Park areas. In these cases, an amendment to

the OP is required.

Business Park/Commercial

The area designated Business Park/Commercial

includes those lands found in the southern portion of the

Frank A. Marshall Business Park on the east and west

sides of Ramsey Drive. Permitted uses in this

designation include offices and ancillary retail and

service uses, prestige industrial uses, retail commercial

uses including automobile sales, rental and service

establishments, industrial merchandise sales and

services for nearby office/industrial uses, sports, health

and fitness recreational uses, community facilities and

public or private sector utilities.

An existing residential cluster is located adjacent to the

Frank A. Marshall Business Park. Section 4.C.2.1.5 of

the OP recognizes the need to protect this residential

area from the industrial/commercial uses. Adjacent

development is required to buffer these residential

properties and avoid any undue adverse impacts to the

residents. This section also recognizes the long-term

plan for this residential area to be absorbed into the

Business Park, which would be facilitated through an

amendment to the OP.

Large Format Retail Designation

Lands designated as Large Format Retail are found

around the intersection of Broad Street and Taylor Road.

The uses identified for this designation are categorized

as destination-oriented and space extensive. These

uses should be located along provincial highways or

arterial roads and have a minimum of 465 square metres

of gross leasable floor area. Any application to build a

large-format retail development requires a market impact

analysis to address any adverse impacts to Community

Commercial uses.

The Official Plan also identifies site specific policy areas

which are defined on Schedule B.3 for the community of

Dunnville, and provide more detailed policies pertaining

to specific lands. Of particular note, are site specific

policy areas 29, 42 and 43 within the Taylor/Broad Street

retail node:




Site specific policy area 29 provides specific

provisions which permitted the existing Sobey’s

and Canadian Tire development.

Site specific policy area 42 provides specific

provisions which permit a supermarket and

accessory uses and automotive service station.

This site is the subject of the No Frills

Supermarket development application.

Site specific policy area 43 provides specific

provisions which permit a department store with

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 11


a maximum gross leasable floor area of no more

than 8,361 sq. m. and up to 3

commercial/service commercial buildings.

2.1.4.1 Natural Environment and Hazards

One of the guiding themes of the County’s OP is to

manage and protect natural environment areas. The OP

provides policies for the following key areas: a) Natural

Environment; b) Water Resources, and; c) Hazard

Lands.

Natural Environment Policies

Section B.A.1 defines Natural Environment Areas

(NEAs) as those areas and features that provide

important ecological, or biological and/or hydrological

functions, contribute to human health, exhibit varied

topography, contribute to water resources, contain

threatened or endangered plant or animal species or

provide habitat for threatened and endangered species.

Policies have been established to identify and protect

the ecological functions and protect natural biological

diversity in NEAs. More specifically, policies have been

established that require the completion of Environmental

Impact Studies (EIS) for any development that is not

permitted in NEAs, the protection of woodlands and

linking NEAs to open spaces and other environmentally

significant areas.

Schedule B.3 (Figure 2.1) of the Haldimand County OP

identifies NEAs in the community of Dunnville, and

specifically identifies Provincially Significant Wetlands

and Riverine Hazard Lands as a major characteristic of

the community. These lands are predominantly located

along the Grand River waterfront, but also affect the

existing residential and industrial communities within the

Secondary Plan Area.

Water Resources

Policies to protect water resources have been

established to protect both groundwater and surface

water systems, which include wetlands, ponds, lakes,

streams, rivers and underground aquifers. This includes

implementing preventative measures for water

contamination, the use of safer materials for agriculture

practices, and the reduction of water consumption levels.

The County has also included measures for watershed

planning and to protect the waters of the Great Lakes,

watercourses that traverse the County, and their

associated headwaters and recharge areas. Policies

have also been provided in the OP that identify the need

for sub-watershed studies in areas that may experience

urban development.

Hazard Lands

Development is encouraged to be directed away from

these lands. Riverine Hazard Lands, which are

identified as being sensitive to flood hazards, are located

in Dunnville. The County implements a one and twozone

flood plain concept and also Special Policy Areas

to identify Riverine Hazard Lands. In a one-zone

concept, new development or site alteration in the

defined flood plain will be prohibited or restricted. In a

two-zone concept, development may be permitted in an

area known as the “flood fringe area” which constitutes a

less hazardous area that will overlay another land use

designation. Currently, a two-zone concept has been

applied to the Study Area to allow for some

development. A Special Policy Area is an agreement

12 | OCTOBER 2011


whereby development is permitted in flood prone areas

in recognition of a certain level of increased flood risk

and according to site specific rules.

The Secondary Plan and Special Policy Area Update will

ensure that the natural environment is protected and,

where possible, enhanced, and that potential natural

hazards, such as flooding, are appropriately identified. A

policy framework will be established to regulate

development in environmentally sensitive areas.

In order to provide specific policy guidance to Dunnville’s

identified Hazard Lands, the County OP has delineated

a Special Policy Area, shown in Figure 3.1. This area is

subject to the Special Flood Plain Policy Update being

undertaken as part of this Study.

Section C 1) 11. of the County Official Plan outlines the

policies pertaining to the Dunnville Flood Plain Special

Policy Areas (SPA). The existing SPA delineated for

Dunnville ensures the protection of new buildings,

structures and major additions (i.e. more than 50% of

existing floor area of existing buildings or structures) in

these areas, to the following Regulatory Flood levels:

Area 1: to the level of the Regulatory Flood - to

an elevation of 179.0 m;

Area 2: to the level of the Regulatory Flood - to

an elevation of 176.5 m; and

Area 3: to the level of the 100 Year Flood - to an

elevation of 178.7 m.

Minor additions or alterations less than 50% of the floor

area of existing buildings and structures may be

permitted below the elevations identified above but not

lower than existing elevations, where the economic,

social and environmental cost is proven to be too great.

All development proposals within the SPA will be

reviewed in consultation with the Grand River

Conservation Authority and, where appropriate, require

floodproofing techniques which reduce the risk of

flooding. The following matters will be taken into

consideration in the review of such proposals:





Flood depths and velocities;

Adverse hydraulic effects;

Adjacent land uses and properties; and

The economic, social and environmental costs

required to overcome the flood hazard.

The Official Plan recognizes that with the ongoing

modelling of the Grand River and the establishment of

new and more detailed hydrologic information for the

area, the Special Policy Area policies and boundaries

may need to be updated by amendment to this Plan to

reflect this information. The purpose of this study is to

evaluate and make recommendations on updating the

SPA areas based on a review of more detailed

modelling.

It should be noted that the existing SPA does not extend

to all Regulatory Flood inundated portions of the

Secondary Plan area, especially lands located east of

SPA Area 3. These areas are designated Riverine

Hazard Lands in the County Official Plan.

2.1.4.2 Housing and Places to Grow

Implementation Study

The Housing and Places to Grow Implementation Study

was completed in 2009 to report on the implications of

the Province’s Places to Grow Plan on the County, and

the 6 urban areas of the County. The Study identifies

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 13


Dunnville as a community that can accommodate new

development in the form of infill/intensification. More

specifically, the historic core of Dunnville which is

entirely within the Secondary Plan Area, is identified as

an Intensification Area, and a portion of Main Street

West (located west of the downtown) is identified as an

Intensification Corridor. These areas are planned to

absorb a significant portion of intensification/infill

development in Dunnville and shall accommodate a mix

of residential and commercial uses primarily in the form

of apartments, stacked townhouses and mixed-use

buildings.

Dunnville contains approximately 15.2 hectares of

vacant and redevelopment sites, allowing for a strong

potential for intensification sites in the Downtown and

along the Grand River south of Main Street. Figure 2.2

outlines the supply of potential intensification lands in

Dunnville. Further, the Study identifies a total of 67.12

hectares of vacant employment land, 54.09 hectares of

which are found in designated Greenfield areas, and

13.03 hectares of which are found within the built-up

area of Dunnville. Figure 2.3 outlines the areas that can

accommodate Greenfield development (residential and

employment), which includes lands in the emerging

commercial/retail node at Broad Street and Taylor Road.

These lands present an opportunity for accommodating

future employment in Dunnville.

The current population in Dunnville is approximately

5,700. The Study allocates a 2031 total population of

6,900 for Dunnville, an increase in 1,200 residents,

which is anticipated to include an additional 521 new

households for the community, which has been further

broken down to include 307 single/semi-detached units,

61 row/townhouse units and 153 apartment units. As

well, 32% of new dwelling units are expected to be

provided annually through intensification after 2015. An

overall target of 29 persons/jobs per hectare has been

allocated for new development on Greenfield lands in

urban areas (combined 46 persons/jobs per hectare for

residential portion and 15 jobs per hectare for

employment lands).

In December 2009, the County adopted OP Amendment

No. HCOP-21 to implement the results and

recommendations of the Housing and Places to Grow

Implementation Study. The Amendment is before the

Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing for approval.

2.1.5 Dunnville Zoning By-law

The Dunnville Zoning By-law includes the land

incorporated in the former Town of Dunnville, and

highlights the various zones and standards that apply to

the Secondary Plan and Special Flood Plain area.

Figure 2.4 highlights the zones found in the Study Area.

The zones applicable to the Study Area are included in

Appendix A.

2.1.6 Lakescape Action Plan

The purpose of the Lakescape Action Plan is to provide

a 10-year integrated strategy outlining the potential for

organization and product intensification of the County’s

Lakefront and Grand River waterfront areas. The Plan

will identify key issues, development opportunities and

constraints, primarily along the Lake Erie shoreline. In

February 2011, a report was released to provide an

overview of the Phase 1 work of the Study. The report

highlights key issues and areas of focus for the Action

Plan, which include:

14 | OCTOBER 2011


Figure 2.2: Potential Intensification Lands in Dunnville

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 15


Figure 2.3: Potential Greenfield Lands in Dunnville

16 | OCTOBER 2011


Figure 2.4: Dunnville Zoning By-law Map

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 17


Incorporating an integrated trail network;

Protecting natural features;

Encouraging tourism along waterfront areas;

Resolving issues of public/private land

ownership in waterfront areas; and

Support short-stay getaways and commercial

development in waterfront communities to

support visitors.

The Report identifies Dunnville as a community that can

accommodate waterfront development and support the

growing commercial/retail and tourism sector. Dunnville

contains publicly-owned land along its waterfront, and a

key component of the Secondary Plan will provide a

policy framework to properly utilize these lands to

promote the County’s shoreline objectives and

coordination and protection of waterfront assets. A key

recommendation from this Study is to encourage

partnerships and cooperation between public and private

landowners along the waterfront to improve public

access.

2.2 Community and Urban Design

2.2.1 Streetscape and Urban Design Guidelines

(2010)

The County recently completed a Streetscape Plan and

Urban Design Guidelines document in 2010. For the

urban communities of Dunnville and Caledonia there

were a set of detailed streetscape recommendations to

improve downtown pedestrian movement, revitalize the

public realm, and support existing and future

development. The ‘Four Big Moves’ (outlined in Figure

2.5) for Dunnville included the following:

1. Pedestrian connections to riverfront area.

Dunnville would benefit from a better connection

to the riverfront. The Streetscape Plan

recommends enhancing and prioritizing

pedestrian connections to the riverfront and

conservation area to make movement fluid and

continuous.

2. Queen/Main gateway and public space. One

of the Plan’s main recommendations is to

improve the visibility of the historic core by

signifying at this critical intersection entrance

into the downtown. This gateway will include an

enlarged public open space on the northeast

corner, signs, landscape features, and improved

pedestrian amenities. This project is now under

design and will begin construction in the coming

year.

3. Riverfront park/downtown integration. The

Grand River is a special amenity that is currently

not easily accessed or connected to the

downtown. The Plan recommends improving

the frontage along Main Street in addition to

improving amenities on the north-south routes,

specifically Chestnut and the mid-block

pedestrian lane to better integrate to the areas

south of the downtown and Garfield Disher

Riverfront Park to the rest of Dunnville’s core.

4. Main Street pedestrian promenade. The

Streetscape Plan recommends that this primary

east-west riverfront route should have sidewalks

on both sides of the street, consistent

furnishings and tree plantings.

Recommendations also include roadway

18 | OCTOBER 2011


Figure 2.5: The “Four Big Moves” (Streetscape Plan)

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 19


modifications to accommodate marked cycling routes

and widened pedestrian boulevards.

The Plan identified urban design guidelines for use in

each of the urban communities included in the study. A

series of principles were developed to guide new public

space and private development, with a primary focus on

creating a more pedestrian- oriented environment. The

guidelines were organized into four categories: Open

Space, Streets, Built Form, and Parking/Servicing.

2.3 Economic Development, Tourism

and Recreation

Supporting economic development, and encouraging

tourism and recreational opportunities are critical

components for the health and vitality of a community.

The success of Dunnville as an economic, tourist and

recreational hub for Haldimand County and beyond lies

on the framework established to support continued

economic development of the community and encourage

tourism and recreational opportunities.

2.3.1 Haldimand County Downtown

Community Improvement Plan

The Haldimand County Community Improvement Plan

(CIP) was completed in 2008 to enhance retail and

commercial opportunities in Haldimand County. More

specifically, the CIP was established to motivate,

stimulate and leverage private sector investment and

promote community improvement in 5 of the County’s 6

identified urban areas of Caledonia, Cayuga, Dunnville,

Hagersville, Jarvis and one identified hamlet, which is

Selkirk.

As part of the CIP Strategy, critical needs for each of the

communities were identified. A series of financial

incentive programs were developed to address the

unique needs of each community and support

community improvement. Additionally, a series of

municipal leadership strategies were established, to

develop ways in which the County can support economic

development and community improvement. As part of

the CIP Study, a series of critical needs were identified

for the community of Dunnville. These critical needs,

such as traffic congestion, pedestrian safety, public

space provision, and retail space vacancies, will be

revisited and used to further expand the critical needs

identified for Dunnville Secondary Plan.

Since the implementation of the CIP, a total of 39

applications under the program have been approved by

Council, including a recent approval for community

improvement for the Royal Canadian Legion Branch in

Dunnville. The County has funded a total of $218,125

for CIP projects, spawning a total of $1,181,613 in

construction value.

2.3.2 Haldimand County Trails Master Plan

The Haldimand County Trails Master Plan was

completed in 2009, and provides a framework to create

an integrated trail system and guide and direct the

County towards linking current trails and establish a

priority plan for trail location and development.

Specifically, the Master Plan identifies the need for a

series of on and off-road, and multi-use use trails that:

Appeal to a variety of users and allow for

different experiences;

Are accessible to different users, and offer

amenities and facilities;

20 | OCTOBER 2011


Are appropriately located and enhance links to

the trails throughout the County;

Link destinations, including waterfront areas,

parks and tourist areas;

Connect across physical barriers;

Are expandable to new areas within and beyond

Haldimand County;

Promote environmental sustainability and

provide access to natural features; and

Are properly designed and well managed.

An inventory of existing trails is provided as part of the

Trails Master Plan. Figures 2.6 and 2.7 outlines the

existing trail network and trail expansion opportunities for

Dunnville, as outlined in the Plan. The recommended

trail network for Dunnville includes:





On-road routes that cross the community;

Off-road routes within major parks and natural

areas, including an off-road loop in the future

sports park, with on-road connections from

Taylor Road, Ramsey Drive and Logan Road;

Neighbourhood walking loops north and south of

South Cayuga Street; and

Wide shared lanes on Main Street and across

the bridge to allow cyclists to safely access the

Downtown.

number of issues and needs that remain relevant for

Downtown Dunnville, including:










Flooding hazards;

The needs of seniors and the retirement

community;

Wetlands need to be protected;

Architectural/heritage preservation;

Provision of recreation opportunities;

Accommodation for the visitor;

Provision of marinas and docking facilities;

Provision of adequate and safe parking; and

Connections to the Grand River waterfront.

Many of these issues have been addressed through the

completion of urban design, community improvement,

economic development and infrastructure projects,

however, the Secondary Plan and Special Flood Plain

Policy Update will draw upon these issues and develop a

framework to further include methods that respond to the

flooding hazards characteristic of the community, the

needs of all residents and visitors, enhance the

streetscape and architecture of the Downtown, further

encourage appropriate development of the waterfront,

and protect the natural environment, particularly along

the Grand River.

2.3.3 Dunnville Chamber of Commerce

Downtown Plan (CAUSE)

An Action Plan was undertaken for Downtown Dunnville,

as part of the Community Assist for an Urban Study

Effort (CAUSE) initiative, in 1990. While the Study was

undertaken over 20 years ago, the document identifies a

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 21


Figure 2.6: Existing Trail Network in Dunnville

22 | OCTOBER 2011


Figure 2.7: Proposed Trail Network in Dunnville

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 23


2.3.4 Premier Ranked Tourist Destination

Study

The Premier Ranked Tourist Destination Study was

jointly undertaken by the Counties of Elgin, Norfolk and

Haldimand in 2008 as a collective approach to

destination development and marketing in Ontario’s

“South Coast”. The Study identified key attractors of

tourism, which include auto racing and motor sports,

outdoor recreation such as canoeing, kayaking, fishing,

birding, and heritage such as historic sites and

community events. In order to support continued

tourism development in Dunnville, there is opportunity to

draw upon their many natural and cultural heritage, and

water-based assets that are characteristic of the

community.

2.4 Infrastructure

Infrastructure is an important component of any

successful community. It is vital to ensure that Dunnville

is equipped with the appropriate infrastructure to assist

the community reach its goals to service its current and

future residents, workers and visitors. The following

provides an overview of the framework established and

projects currently underway, that provides on-going

infrastructure support to Dunnville.

2.4.1 Dunnville Master Servicing Plan

The Dunnville Master Servicing Plan (MSP) was

developed in response to the need for a plan for water,

wastewater, storm and transportation services to

accommodate future development in Dunnville. The

MSP projects a growth in 370 new household units

between 2006 and 2026, with the majority of future

development anticipated to be on lands allocated for

industrial uses. The Plan investigates current and

proposed water, wastewater, stormwater and

transportation servicing for Dunnville.





Water Servicing: Water distribution comes from

the Dunnville water treatment plant and reservoir

located in the southern area of Dunnville at Main

St. and Cedar St., and through a system of

pumps and watermains circulating through the

urban area of Dunnville. Future enlargements

and enhancements to water servicing

infrastructure are required to accommodate

future growth.

Wastewater Servicing: The existing

wastewater system consists of a water pollution

control plant, two pumping stations and a

network of sanitary mains and forcemains.

Expansions of wastewater infrastructure will be

required to accommodate future growth.

Stormwater Servicing: A large majority of

downtown Dunnville drains directly into the

Grand River. The reports states that no existing

stormwater management facilities or water

quality or control measures exist within the

Study Area. Significant improvements in

stormwater infrastructure are recommended.

Upgrading this infrastructure is recommended to

be undertaken as part of other capital works

projects involving right-of-way excavation.

Transportation Servicing: An inventory of

arterial and collector roads, and local streets,

sidewalks, bikeways and trails were examined to

determine the transportation capacity of

24 | OCTOBER 2011


Dunnville. Future transportation needs were

evaluated based on a count of vehicular,

pedestrian and active transportation modes. A

number of transportation network alternatives

have been proposed, and include traffic signal

adjustments, road reconfiguration, intersection

and sidewalk improvements, and enhancement

of the trail system.

The servicing infrastructure identified and proposed for

the Secondary Plan area will influence the timing and

scale of future growth and development in Dunnville.

The recommendations as a result of the Dunnville MSP

will be considered in the servicing recommendations of

the Secondary Plan.

2.4.2 Haldimand County Engineering Design

Criteria

In 2008, the County released Engineering Design

Criteria in order to provide a clear and concise

description of the County’s Engineering review process

and design standards. The document provides detailed

information of the engineering requirements for planning

application submission, construction, and design

considerations, including:










Application submission requirements;

Requirements for development approval;

Servicing;

Site Plan Agreements;

Road infrastructure and streetscapes;

Stormwater Management and Drainage;

Lot Grading;

Parklands; and

Electricity lines/electrical distribution.

2.4.3 Parking Study

A Parking Study was completed in 2008, to develop a

comprehensive, cohesive and integrated parking

strategy and implementation plan for Haldimand County.

The Study was undertaken for 6 urban areas in the

County, including Caledonia, Cayuga, Dunnville,

Hagersville, Jarvis and Townsend.

A total of 609 parking stalls were counted in Downtown

Dunnville. Key issues discussed in the Study include

concerns over safety/lighting, signage, cars exceeding

parking limits and lack of parking stalls for individuals

with accessibility issues. The Study concluded that

there is sufficient parking for Dunnville, however,

modifications to parking could be made to reconfigure

existing parking lots, provide additional accessible

parking stalls, modify parking limit restrictions and add

signage for parking areas. The Study also

recommended a review of existing parking standards

through the County’s Zoning By-law, and a system to

allow cash-in-lieu of parking for new developments.

2.4.4 Main Street Dunnville Reconstruction

The County has initiated the reconstruction of Main

Street between Cedar Street and Tamarac Street in the

Secondary Plan area. This project will include the

replacement of asphalt surface, concrete curb and

sidewalk repairs, new sidewalk in required locations, the

replacement of existing storm sewers, and installation of

new decorative lighting along Main Street and in

Municipal parking lots. The construction project will also

result in upgrades to traffic signals at Main and Queen

Streets, as well as the introduction of streetscaping

components, such as brickprint cross walks, trash

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 25


eceptacles and benches, planting areas and street

trees, and decorative concrete meeting areas.

These upgrades to Main Street will result in an improved

pedestrian and streetscape environment, making Main

Street safer, more aesthetically pleasing and improving

driving and walking conditions along this important

corridor in Dunnville.

Construction is anticipated to begin in Fall 2011, and be

completed by Summer 2012.

2.4.5 Queen Street/Lock Street Channelization

Study

The Queen Street/Lock Street Channelization

Environmental Assessment (EA) Study was completed

in 2006. The thrust to initiate the study came from the

Dunnville BIA’s desire to have a permanent location for a

seasonal Christmas tree and a permanent location for a

clock tower. The selected design option for the

Queen/Lock Street intersection included “bump-outs”, or

an enlargement in the width of the sidewalks, on all 3

corners of the intersection. The concept also envisioned

enhanced streetscape elements in all three areas,

including the introduction of a tree canopy, small shrubs

along the sidewalks, and marked pedestrian crossings.

A location for a Christmas tree to be used in the winter

has been identified, which will be converted to a space

for plants in the summer, as well as a space for a clock

tower.

This construction project, which is now complete, will

help to improve pedestrian safety and traffic flow to this

intersection, and also provide numerous community

benefits by adding to the tree cover of Dunnville and

enlarging the amount of public space.

Queen Street/Lock Street Intersection

26 | OCTOBER 2011


3.0 COMMUNITY

CHARACTER

3.1 Community Profile

Dunnville is located along the Grand River in proximity to

Lake Erie, and has a long history of acting as a major

commercial centre in Haldimand County and the

surrounding area. The area presently referred to as

Dunnville was first settled in 1825, however, it was not

until 1827 where the first wave of growth occurred as a

result of a decision to build a dam along the Grand River

to divert water for the Welland Canal. As the entrance

point to the Welland Feeder Canal, wharves and

storehouses developed along the water to serve ships

and small vessels that ventured up the Grand River.

This area, commonly referred to as “Slabtown”

(southeast of the current Downtown) became the home

of boarding houses for store and construction workers.

The Feeder Canal was widened and deepened in 1842,

resulting in increased boat traffic in Dunnville.

In 1834, a toll bridge was built across the dam, linking

Dunnville with the community of Byng, allowing for

convenient access to and from Dunnville. By the 1850’s,

Dunnville became a prominent location for trade and

business, as it became a significant port for receiving

and shipping large quantities of produce. By this time,

the community had a population of approximately 1,000.

Dunnville was established as a Village in 1860.

By 1856, the Grand Trunk Railway opened a rail line

through Dunnville, connecting the community to the

surrounding area. In 1914, a second rail line was built,

further allowing passenger and freight traffic through

Dunnville. Dunnville was established as a Town in 1900

and the community had a population of approximately

2,000.

In 1974, Dunnville was expanded to include the former

Townships of Canborough, Dunn, and Moulton-

Sherbrook to form the new Town of Dunnville, under the

Regional Municipality of Haldimand-Norfolk. In 2001,

The Town was amalgamated into the newly formed

Haldimand County.

Today, Dunnville has a population of approximately

5,682. It is considered a major commercial centre in

Haldimand County, is located near the only airport in

Haldimand County, and comprises a historic commercial

core comprising many cultural and natural heritage

attributes. Significant community services are also

found in Downtown Dunnville, including the Dunnville

library, post office, churches and Haldimand County

offices.

3.2 Urban Structure

Dunnville’s urban structure is set around a traditional

street grid network and parcel pattern. The shift in the

grid originating at Chestnut and Queen provides a

unique arrangement for small-town Ontario. The historic

fabric consists of primarily narrow frontages in the

downtown commercial and residential areas, with larger

parcels associated with the industrial and commercial

properties associated with the waterfront and the rail

corridor to the east.

Dunnville is characterized by many large street trees,

specifically in the residential neighbourhoods and along

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 27


Historic Images of Dunnville

Historic Photos of Dunnville

28 | OCTOBER 2011


Broad Street. Historic postcards and photographs

indicate a strong definition of streets by consistent tree

planting, contributing a great deal to the overall

character and sense of place

3.3 Existing Character Zones and Built

Form

Dunnville is not a time capsule, it consists of a varied

collection of building types and styles representative of

urban development over time. The community’s

character is defined by the use of traditional building

materials and modest architectural expression, with

strong street related site organization.

Figure 3.1 illustrates the existing built form character

zones within the Secondary Plan area. This assessment

follows from the observations noted below, and will

inform built form and public space design directions.

Historic Core

Within the historic downtown core, the built form consists

primarily of two to three storeys, main street type

buildings that form a continuous, well-defined street wall,

with typical ground floor retail/service commercial uses

with offices and residential above. Building materials

include a combination of brick, masonry and wood

exteriors.

Main Street Corridor/Waterfront

Along the Main Street Corridor, built form is quite varied.

To the west is composed of older service commercial,

infrastructure-related shed buildings, and the last

remaining building from the Monarch Knitting Factory,

Streets, Blocks and Parcel Pattern

now home to the Optimist Club and the Dunnville

Community Theatre. The fabric east of Queen is quite

different due to the chronology of development, where

an inlet from the Grand River was filled in to create more

useable land after the downtown was well established.

Institutional

The Broad and Chestnut precinct is home to the majority

of institutional uses in this area, including the Dunnville

library, several churches, the Haldimand County

municipal building, and the Dominion-style post office.

Architectural expression is civic minded, with the

churches and the post office serving as enduring

landmarks for the community.

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 29


Figure 3.1: Existing Character Zones

Emerging Industrial/Commercial

The Industrial/Commercial precinct at Taylor Road and

Broad Street provides opportunity to complement the

built form and urban design character of Dunnville, but

presently it is (perhaps unintentionally) a typical

commercial retail development. The site organization is

a mix of satellite/drive-thru and large format retail with

street facing surface parking lots. Architectural

expression is related to the corporate identity of

individual businesses, rather than that of Dunnville. The

extension of Ramsey Drive makes accessible a large

land area for future industrial/commercial development in

the vicinity of the new arena.

Residential/Transitional Residential

The residential neighbourhoods within the Secondary

Plan area to a large extent define the character and

quality of Dunnville, and one of the main reasons for why

30 | OCTOBER 2011


many choose to live there. North of Broad Street, the

residential building stock is relatively stable, with a mix of

older established homes with some infill along tree lined

streets. South of Broad Street it is more varied with a

mix of architectural styles and housing types.

the traditional building pattern of two storey detached

residences. This building type as currently demonstrated

is not representative of Dunnville’s small town character.

Throughout the study area are relatively recent suburban

form semi-detached houses, indicating a departure from

Images of Dunnville

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 31


3.4 Recent Development Initiatives

The County has received a number of recent commercial

and residential development applications within the

Dunnville Study Area. The following provides an

overview of these applications. The location of these

applications is shown in Figure 3.2.

1. Broad & Taylor OPA / ZBA: An Official Plan

Amendment and Zoning By-law Amendment

application has been received by staff to permit

an increase in floor area to an existing building,

located at 1017 Broad Street East. The

application involves the potential expansion to

permit a range of commercial uses. A Market

Demand and Impact Assessment was prepared

to investigate the feasibility of accommodating

such additional uses in this area. The County

will be obtaining peer review services to review

the Report, in addition to investigating the entire

Broad Street/Taylor Road Retail Node to assess

the impacts of accommodating further

commercial/retail development in this area and

the impacts on the historic commercial core.

This will influence policies and urban design

guidelines for the area.

condominium units, located at 776 North Shore

Drive East, at Taylor Rd.

4. Haldimand War Memorial Hospital: A Site

Plan application has been submitted to permit

the development of a parking lot at 324 Lock

Street, to service the existing office building at

324 and 340 Lock Street. The Site Plan has

been received by staff and is anticipated for

approval by the end of 2011.

5. No Frills Supermarket: An application has

been received to permit the development of a

40,300 square foot No Frills supermarket on the

south side of Broad Street, east of Taylor Road.

The application also includes a standalone gas

bar. The Site Plan has been submitted.

2. Giant Tiger Expansion: An application has

been approved for a building expansion to the

Giant Tiger discount store at 231-243 Queen

Street. The development is under construction.

3. Heron Landing: A Site Plan application has

been received by staff to permit the

development of 31 single detached residential

32 | OCTOBER 2011


Figure 3.2: Recent Development Applications

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 33


34 | OCTOBER 2011


4.0 FLOOD PLAIN ANALYSIS


Area 3: to the level of the 100 Year Flood - to an

elevation of 178.7 m

4.1 Existing Flood Plain Policy and

Secondary Plan

Riverine hazard lands exist within the Dunnville

Secondary Plan area. Flooding originates from the

Grand River under extreme flow events, this flooding

potential is recognized in various past flood plain

mapping studies and within the existing Special Policy

Area (SPA) that addresses a portion of lands within the

Secondary Plan area and along the waterfront.

Existing SPA delineation in relationship to the Secondary

Plan area is indicated in Figure 4.1. Also indicated in the

Figure is the extent of predicted flooding as outlined on

existing Grand River Conservation Authority (GRCA)

flood plain mapping for a Regulatory event. This

Regulatory event approximately equates to the predicted

flows in the river associated with the 1954 Hurricane

Hazel storm – if that storm were to occur over the Grand

River watershed.

The SPA applicable to Dunnville and currently adopted

within County planning documents is contained in

Section 2.C.1.11 of the Official Plan and shown in Figure

4.1. In summary, the three zones within the existing

SPA (labelled as Area 1, 2 & 3) ensure protection of new

buildings, structures and major additions by requiring

flood-proofing to the following levels:



Area 1: to the level of the Regulatory Flood - to

an elevation of 179.0 m

Area 2: to the level of the Regulatory Flood - to

an elevation of 176.5 m

As indicated, the existing SPA does not extend to all

Regulatory flood inundated portions of the Secondary

Plan area. Most notably lands located east of SPA Area

3 and north of SPA Area 2 are not included in an SPA.

Additionally, it is clear that where Areas 1, 2 and 3 of the

SPA converge, determining the correct protection level

to use will be problematic (discussed further in Section

4.4).

The Provincial Policy Statement requires that significant

development be excluded from flood inundated areas

unless those areas are addressed within an approved

SPA (or a Two-Zone Flood Plain Policy). Areas that lie

outside of an SPA (or Two-Zone Flood Plain Policy) are

generally subject to a One-Zone policy approach

whereby all new development is restricted from areas

subject to flood inundation.

Within Dunnville and other existing urbanized and settled

areas that include some historical flood plain

development, the regulating agency for flood plains

(GRCA in Dunnville) has some flexibility in considering

adjustments to a One-Zone policy. However, each of

these areas proceeds only on a case by case basis, with

the accompanying potential for inconsistencies and

generally a more onerous review process.

Given the opportunity to address a larger and contiguous

area of historical flood plain development, such as lands

located within the Dunnville Secondary Plan,

consideration is usually given to applying a common

policy across the lands – i.e., a Special Policy Area. An

SPA sets common rules for development that have been

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 35


36 | OCTOBER 2011

Figure 4.1: Existing Special Policy Areas and Defined Flood Plain


agreed to by the flood plain regulator, the County and

the public. It is based upon recognition of a given

additional level of flood risk, with this determined through

a hydraulic study of various potential development

configurations combined with the existing area’s overall

characteristics.

4.2 Existing Hydraulic Modelling and

Flood Plain Description

The existing Grand River and associated flood plain in

the vicinity of Dunnville is recognized by the GRCA and

others as having challenging characteristics to model

accurately. In short, the number of in-river weirs

affecting flows as well as the buildings and streets

associated with the community itself make hydraulic

modelling quite complex.

In addition to the potential for high flows from upstream,

the Grand River near Dunnville can also be significantly

affected by temporary level increases in downstream

Lake Erie (seiche events) and also by ice. These two

items add another layer of complexity to an already

complex hydraulic model. Typically these two other

factors are evaluated as boundary conditions (or starting

points) within hydraulic models.

The flooding event that took place in February 2009 is

said to have been caused by a combination of many

factors, including ice jamming problems, a seiche event

on Lake Erie, and high flows in the Grand River resulting

from both snow melt and rainfall events. The exact

nature of this flooding event has not been explored in

this study.

The most up to date existing hydraulic modelling for the

Grand River and associated flood plain areas through

Dunnville is a HEC-2 model, provided by GRCA along

with other updated river bottom surveys and associated

HEC-RAS modelling completed more recently for lower

flow studies (HEC-RAS is a more recent update to the

HEC-2 program, both created by the U.S. Army Corps of

Engineers).

The HEC-2 modelling contains several split flow

routines, with these enabling more detailed modelling of

flows over various weirs, through the parallel Sulphur

Creek, and also through the downtown portions of

Dunnville. For this report, no changes were made to

these split flow assumptions, with modelling reviewed

only for context, understanding and concurrence.

HEC-2 and HEC-RAS are One-Dimensional (1-D)

models, whereby a steady state flow proceeds along one

axis only, with this axis being the direction of the main

channel. For the Dunnville model, flood flows coming

down the river are modelled according to representative

cross-sections that describe the river bed and banks.

The existing HEC-2 model cross-sections are indicated

in Figure 4.1.

The model predicts what flood level of water is required

to “push the flow” and give it the momentum it needs to

be conveyed downstream. For each cross-section, the

model needs to start with incorporating the calculated

level in the next downstream cross-section level. The 1-

D model starts at the downstream and works upstream,

earning it the name “backwater model”. Super-critical

flow or forward looking 1-D modelling techniques exist

as well, but these are not generally applicable to the

Dunnville flood plain.

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 37


The steady state flow in the river (the single large peak

flow being modelled) is first generated by a completely

different program that mainly models rainfall (i.e. a

hydrologic model), with the resulting flow inserted into

the hydraulic model. For the preliminary study, no

changes were made to this flow value provided within

the GRCA held models. Future study will confirm

appropriate assumptions regarding the flow values

utilized in the hydraulic modelling defining the flood

plain.

4.3 New 2-D Modelling Approach &

Preliminary Results

More recently, advancement in computing speeds (i.e.

the relative price reductions in powerful processors) has

allowed other modelling options to be considered.

Where the original HEC-2 model (1-D model) may have

taken many minutes or even hours to run on a personal

computer of earlier eras, it now easily runs within

fractions of a second. An exponential increase in

modelling complexity can readily be handled by today’s

typical desktop computers.

Accordingly, Two-Dimensional or 2-D models, several of

which have been around for some time, can be feasibly

run, even with a significant increase in survey detail. A

2-D model is able to compute flow movements in two

directions, with tens of thousands (or more) individual

grid points solved simultaneously for flow velocity and

flooding depths. Grid sizes can vary, with a 2 m by 2 m

size likely being about as small a size that is necessary

for very accurate results.

A 2-D model generally is used for flood plain areas, and

is joined to a 1-D model that is still generally required for

the river channel portion only. The 2-D model is joined

to the 1-D model in such a way that flows can proceed in

or out of the river channel from the flood plain at many

points. This can result in a more accurate

representation of how a flood plain interacts with the

river.

A challenge that the original HEC-2 and HEC-RAS

models face occurs when flood flows proceed in a

different direction than the flow in the main channel of

the river. In the past, these occurrences have resulted in

the previously referenced split flow options. A 2-D

model can more readily compute flow movements

between river and flood plain, which means that the

extensive work and calculation defining split flow options

is greatly reduced.

The 2-D representation of the flood plain can include

buildings and roads and other types of hydraulically

significant structures. The amount of data needed to run

a 2-D model greatly exceeds the 1-D model. For

Dunnville, the GRCA has recently obtained a very

detailed LIDAR produced digital elevation model of the

floodplain – down to a 1 m grid.

For this report, a 2-D model of the Dunnville area flood

plain was developed from the GRCA survey data. The

grid size was increased to 20 m by 20 m to facilitate a

greater run speed, with plans to tighten the grid to

between 2 m and 5 m for future analysis for this project.

Additionally, various ‘what-if’ options for development

can be modelled to predict their flood proofing

requirements and any impacts upon the flood plain.

38 | OCTOBER 2011


Figure 4.2 illustrates the various predicted flood levels

associated with the preliminary 2-D modelling. In

general, the 2-D modelling more or less replicates the

levels predicted by the existing and painstakingly

obtained split-flowed 1-D modelling approach of HEC-2.

Additionally, the 2-D model is able to predict flood levels

on every 20 m X 20 m square, as opposed to the

alternative of interpolating between 1-D model crosssections

that may be more than a couple of hundred

metres apart.

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 39


40 | OCTOBER 2011

Figure 4.2: Preliminary Two-Dimensional Flood Plain Modelling Results


5.0 PUBLIC CONSULTATION

The final product of this Study will be a Secondary Plan

for the community of Dunnville, and a set of

recommendations on how to proceed with an update to

the Flood Plain policies for Dunnville. The Secondary

Plan will be a document written for the community, and

developed by the community. Consultation with

residents, business owners and interested groups and

stakeholders is a critical component to the success of

this project.

5.1 Public Open House #1 – September

14, 2011

The first public open house was held on September 14,

2011 to introduce the Dunnville Secondary Plan and

Flood Plain Policy Update to the community and

interested stakeholders, as well as provide an overview

of the background work and identification of preliminary

issues and options, undertaken as part of Phase 1 of the

Study. Approximately 30-40 individuals attended the

public open house, to review display boards and ask

questions to the study team on their thoughts, concerns

and visions for Dunnville.

Many questions and issues were raised at this open

house, which helped to establish a preliminary view of

some of the critical issues and opportunities facing

Dunnville. Some of the key topics that were discussed

include:

Farmer’s Market: The Dunnville Farmer’s

Market is a community focal point, and should

be enhanced or expanded to accommodate a

larger number of stalls, and potentially include




an indoor component to accommodate uses in

cold and inclement weather, and potentially

boutique shops, restaurants and cafes. The

Farmer’s Market should be maintained generally

in the core waterfront area.

County-Owned Lands: The County should

ensure that the former Dunnville Arena lands

remain in public ownership, and that the

property be used in a way that benefits the

community.

Main Street Parking Lot: The municipal parking

lot on Main Street divides Downtown Dunnville

and the waterfront area. The buildings flanking

the parking lot “turn their backs” to Main Street

and the waterfront and do not facilitate a

relationship between the downtown core and the

waterfront. Further concerns were expressed

regarding the aesthetics and streetscape along

Main Street, which may be improved.

Flooding: Flooding hazards are a key concern

to the community, as many homes and

businesses in Downtown Dunnville were

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 41


affected by the February 2009 flood event.

Opportunities should be explored to mitigate

potential flood risks while still accommodating

appropriate development.

These issues, among many others, will be considered in

developing a policy framework for Dunnville. More

importantly, the topics will help frame the critical issues

and options identified for Dunnville, and will play an

important role in shaping the recommendations that will

form the Dunnville Secondary Plan and Flood Plain

Policy Update.

42 | OCTOBER 2011


6.0 PRELIMINARY ISSUES

AND OPTIONS

Based on the background review and discussions with

County staff, the following section identifies preliminary

issues to be addressed through the Secondary Plan and

Special Flood Plain Policy Update Study. The

preliminary issues and options identified are for

discussion purposes and will continue to be refined with

members of the community and stakeholders through

various consultation events undertaken throughout the

Study.

6.1 Special Flood Plain Policy Area

Boundaries

Since the existing Special Policy Area (SPA) does not

extend to all flood prone lands within the Secondary Plan

area, the SPA may be recommended to be expanded to

encompass all flood inundated areas. The complexity of

the flood plain in the Dunnville area warrants

consideration of further developing a 2-D model

(appropriately linked to a 1-D river model as is

necessary) to most accurately inform the SPA. A 2-D

model will allow much greater flexibility in determining

appropriate flood protection levels, both in terms of the

ability of modelling anticipated ‘what-if’ development

scenarios and also in allowing for smooth transitions in

protection levels along the river. Additionally, areas of

high flood water velocity can be more readily identified

and addressed within the SPA as required.

The update to the Special Policy Area should also

ensure that Lake Erie levels and the effects of river and

lake ice are appropriately integrated into the analysis of

flooding risks.

6.2 Repositioning County-Owned

Waterfront Lands

The County-owned waterfront lands consisting of the

former Dunnville Memorial Arena and Recreation

Centre, outdoor farmers market, Garfield Disher Park,

Dunnville Boat Club and associated parking areas and

vacant lands provide an opportunity for revitalization and

redevelopment of Dunnville’s waterfront (Figure 5.1).

Following the completion of the new Dunnville Arena and

Community Centre in the east end of the community, the

old arena complex on Main Street is proposed to be

demolished based on Council’s directive at the June 27,

2011 meeting. The County is undertaking

decommissioning work and it is anticipated that the

building will be demolished by the end of 2011.

The Haldimand County Streetscape Plan and Urban

Design Guidelines (Streetscape Plan) identifies the

creation of a riverfront park place on Main Street that

faces and integrates with the urban form of the

downtown, which includes the County owned lands and

privately owned lands to the east.

A major impetus of the Study is to identify strategies and

establish a policy framework for the repositioning of

these County-owned lands, including potential strategies

for the redevelopment and future use of these lands.

Alternative land use options will be explored through

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 43


consultation with the community and a design

charrette/workshop at the second Public Meeting,

anticipated in early November 2011.

Issues and options related to the repositioning of the

County-owned waterfront lands may include:

expansion/improvement of existing assets,

including the boating/docking facilities, Garfield

Disher Park and farmers market;

the development of new community uses or

facilities;

extension of public open spaces, pedestrian

connections and trails;

the development of new commercial/retail or

mixed residential uses should the County

consider disposing of certain lands;

reconfiguration/improvements to the internal

road network and streetscape (Bridge Street,

Hydro Street, Market Street);

future development opportunity in light of the

constraints associated with the flood plain

hazards; and

ensure compatibility of land uses given the

critical flood hydraulics at this site.

hydraulic juncture along the river, and worthy of

additional study. This additional study, to be completed

in the next phase of this project, will help to inform

planning direction for these lands.

Former Dunnville Memorial Arena Recreation Centre

Hydraulic modelling will be modified as required to

determine predicted velocities and flooding levels for the

County-Owned waterfront lands. Additionally, various

‘what-if’ scenarios will be modelled in anticipation of the

types of development that might be considered at this

location.

Preliminary examination of the lands from a purely

qualitative standpoint (not a modelling evaluation)

suggests these lands are likely located in a sensitive

Dunnville Boat Club

44 | OCTOBER 2011


Figure 6.1: County-Owned Waterfront Lands

Dunnville Boat Club

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 45


6.3 Expansion of Historic Commercial

Core

The Official Plan identifies that the Dunnville Secondary

Plan should assess and make recommendations

regarding the expansion of the community’s historic

commercial core to incorporate the Grand River

Waterfront. The historic commercial core is delineated

by the Community Commercial designation in the

County Official Plan. The Community Commercial

designation accommodates a broad range of retail,

shopping functions, offices, professional and personal

services, entertainment and other commercial activities.

Additional uses include institutional and community

facilities, and apartment units.

The County-owned waterfront lands, consisting of the

former Dunnville Memorial Arena Recreation Centre,

outdoor farmers market, and Garfield Disher Park, are

located within the Community Commercial designation

and the repositioning of these lands to accommodate

new/enhanced uses and their configuration will be

explored.




provide for visual and physical connections from

the downtown to the waterfront (signage,

walkways, landscaping, building facades);

future development opportunity in light of the

constraints associated with the flood plain

hazards; and

economic and market conditions to support

additional community commercial development.

Issues and options for the expansion of the historic

commercial core may include:



incorporate additional waterfront lands which

may include the lands south of Front Street to

the waterfront;

the potential impacts and transitions with

neighbouring land uses (i.e., residential,

employment uses);

The heart of the Dunnville Historic Commercial Core

46 | OCTOBER 2011


6.4 Waterfront Access

Improving the accessibility and connectivity of the

downtown core and the waterfront is desirable to

capitalize on the social, economic and recreational

amenities associated with the waterfront. The

Streetscape Plan identified improved pedestrian

connections from Bridge Street to the waterfront and the

extension of the pedestrian connection from the

Chestnut Street alleyway, extending south of Main Street

to the waterfront.

Issues and options regarding waterfront access may

include:

improved/new pedestrian accesses/connections

from the historic core to Main Street and the

waterfront;

improved connections from Main Street to the

Garfield Disher Park through the repositioning of

the County-owned waterfront lands and Bridge

Street;

new pedestrian facilities (trails/boardwalks)

along the waterfront; and

potential acquisition of additional strategic

waterfront lands and/or public easements, if

deemed appropriate, which may facilitate a more

continuous waterfront trail or public space.

New pedestrian walkway (Chestnut Street terminus

to Main Street)

Boat launch facilities

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 47


6.5 Main Street

The Official Plan identifies that the Dunnville Secondary

Plan should assess and make recommendations

regarding the establishment of urban design guidelines

for the Main Street Corridor. The Haldimand County

Streetscape Plan and Urban Design Guidelines

(Streetscape Plan) identifies a number of improvements

to Main Street. The Study area for the Streetscape Plan

was based on the CIP boundaries and extends along

Main Street from generally John Street in the west, to

Tamarac Street in the east. The Streetscape Plan

identifies a Main Street promenade and cross-section

which provides a consistent right-of-way and links the

CIP area and tourist destinations with the waterfront. It

is not the intent of this Study to revisit these

recommendations, but rather identify opportunities to

implement the Streetscape Plan recommendations

through the policies of the Secondary Plan, and consider

opportunities for lands beyond the Streetscape Plan

study area.

The County is currently undertaking improvements to

Main Street to implement the Streetscape Plan for Main

Street that will result in an improved pedestrian and

streetscape environment, making Main Street safer,

more aesthetically pleasing and improving driving and

walking conditions along this important corridor in

Dunnville.

The Dunnville Secondary Plan may implement through

policy, the recommendations of the Streetscape Plan.

This Study may establish urban design and built form

guidelines for the development of buildings along Main

Street to ensure the development of an attractive and

cohesive streetscape. This may include establishing

Main Street and Hydro Street

build-to-lines to ensure infill development is close to the

street to create a vibrant and pedestrian oriented

environment; and provide opportunities for infill

development within existing parking areas to create a

built form edge along the street.

48 | OCTOBER 2011


Issues and options for Main Street may include:

identify appropriate urban design and built form

guidelines for the redevelopment of lands

fronting Main Street, and east of Tamarac

Street, which are consistent with the

Streetscape Plan;

implement recommendations of the Streetscape

Plan through policies in the Secondary Plan

which encourage new infill commercial/retail

development along Main Street and improved

edge treatments to provide an attractive and

pedestrian oriented streetscape along Main

Street;

opportunities to enhance the relationship of the

downtown core to the waterfront through new

infill development which faces the waterfront and

provides linkages and greater pedestrian

animation along Main Street; and

future development requires addressing flood

plain hazards..

Existing rear facades of buildings facing Main Street

6.6 Broad Street/Taylor Road Retail

Node

The Official Plan identifies that the Dunnville Secondary

Plan should assess and make recommendations

regarding establishing linkages, both economic and

physical, between the emerging area of large format

retail uses near Taylor Road between Broad Street

(Highway 3) and Main Street to the historic commercial

core of Dunnville; and consider the implications of the

large format retail uses and historic commercial core on

the intervening lands.

The retail node, as illustrated on Figure 6.2, is

characterized by a mix of large format retail, commercial

retail, employment uses and large vacant land parcels.

The new Canadian Tire and Sobey’s complex is located

at the southeast corner of the intersection of Broad

Street and Taylor Road. Two development applications

are currently being reviewed; the first is for a No Frills

supermarket in the southwest quadrant of the

intersection of Broad Street and Taylor Road (Site

Specific Policy Area 42), for which zoning is in place to

permit this development and a Site Plan application is

currently under review; and the second is for a

development proposal for an addition to the existing

building, located at 1017 Broad Street East, to permit

commercial uses. A Market Impact Analysis has been

completed for this property to assess the application and

its broader impact on the historic downtown commercial

core. The Analysis is currently being peer reviewed.

The peer review has also been extended to the parcels

of land to the immediate east and west of the Broad

Street property in order to determine if there is potential

for certain types of commercial development on these

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 49


properties. In addition, Site Specific Policy Area 43,

which applies to the property located on the northeast

corner of Taylor Road and Main Street, was intended to

permit up to approximately 5,100m 2 of new large format

retail and commercial retail uses.

Issues and options for the emerging Broad Street/Taylor

Road Retail Node may include:

urban design and built form guidelines to

address large format retail development and the

urban design objectives of the County;

assess the intersection of Broad Street and

Taylor Road as a potential gateway;

assess implications of additional commercial

uses in the area on the historic downtown

commercial core;

review development opportunities on vacant

and/or underutilized lands; and

future development requires addressing flood

plain hazards.

Large Format Retail and Broad Street/Taylor Road

Commercial development at Broad Street/Taylor

Road Retail Node

50 | OCTOBER 2011


Figure 6.2: Broad Street/Taylor Road Retail Node

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 51


6.7 Broad Street Transition Area

The Official Plan identifies that the Dunnville Secondary

Plan should assess and make recommendations

regarding brownfield/greyfield redevelopment

opportunities; and regarding the establishment of urban

design guidelines for the Broad Street (Highway 3)

Corridor. In addition, the implications and linkages

between the large format retail node and historic

commercial core on these intervening lands should be

considered.


residential pocket at Brant and Brace Street);

and

use of the Smucker’s facility which is anticipated

to close.

The Broad Street transition area is generally defined as

the area of Broad Street between the historic downtown

commercial core (Tamarac Street) to the emerging large

format retail node. The Broad Street transition area is

characterized by a mix of residential and commercial

uses and employment uses. A consistent planning and

urban design framework is required for the future

growth/transition of the corridor. The Smucker’s Plant is

anticipated to close in the Fall of 2011. Reuse of the

existing building and site should be further explored.

Broad Street Transition Area

Issues and options for the Broad Street transition area

may include:

establish physical linkages between the

downtown core and the emerging retail node,

through urban design and built form guidelines

which provide for a consistent streetscape;

defining appropriate lands uses and built form

for the corridor;

consider impacts on existing residential uses

and land use transitions between commercial/

employment uses in the corridor (including the

52 | OCTOBER 2011


Figure 6.3 - Broad Street Transition Area

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 53


54 | OCTOBER 2011


7.0 NEXT STEPS

This Background Research Report will form the basis for

consultation with the public to identify, confirm and/or

revise the preliminary issues and options.

The study next steps include:

Prepare Draft Issues and Options Report – October,

2011

Following Public Meeting #1 and confirmation of the

preliminary issues, we will prepare a Draft Issues and

Options Report to elaborate on the issues and identify

potential actions and policy directions that may be

pursued to address the issues. This report will be

summarized and presented at the second Public

Meeting.

The input and feedback received from the second Public

Meeting will be used to prepare the final Issues and

Options Report which will be presented to Council for

endorsement in December 2011. Once endorsed by

Council, the Issues and Options Report will form the

basis for preparing the Secondary Plan and Special

Flood Plain Policy Update recommendations in the new

year. Further opportunities will be available for review

and input on the draft Secondary Plan and Special Flood

Plain Policy Update which is anticipated to be adopted

by Council in May 2012.

Public Meeting #2 (Issues and Options & Design

Charrette) – anticipated in early November, 2011

The intent of the second Public Meeting is to present the

Draft Issues and Options Report, and undertake a

community design charrette. The meeting will provide

an opportunity to review and confirm the issues and

preferred options to guide the preparation of the

Secondary Plan and the future land use and urban

design/built form considerations for Dunnville downtown

and waterfront area. The design charrette workshop will

focus on developing community planning and design

solutions for the repositioning of the County-owned

lands, the Broad Street Corridor and the relationship

between the emerging large format retail nodes and the

historic downtown, and built form/design guidelines for

Main Street.

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT | 55


56 | OCTOBER 2011


APPENDIX A

TOWN OF DUNNVILLE ZONING BY-LAW ZONE

SUMMARY

DUNNVILLE SECONDARY PLAN AND SPECIAL FLOOD PLAIN POLICY UPDATE: BACKGROUND REPORT


Zone Permitted Uses General Location

Urban Residential

Type 1 (R1) Zone

- One family dwellings Broad St. and Lock St. west of

Helena St.

Urban Residential

Type 2 (R2) Zone

- One family dwellings

- Two family dwellings

Residential blocks east and west of

commercial core

Urban Residential

Type 3 (R3) Zone

- R1 & R2 uses

- Three family houses

- Four family houses

- Boarding or lodging house

Residential blocks east and west of

commercial core

Urban Residential

Type 4 (R4) Zone

Urban Residential

Type 5 (R5) Zone

Hamlet Residential

(RH) Zone

General Commercial

(GC) Zone

- Street townhouses

- Group townhouses

- Two, three and four family dwelling houses provided they are located on the

same lot with group townhouses

Block bounded by Cedar St, Main St.,

Pine St. and Lock St., south of Taylor

Rd. and North Shore Dr.

- Apartment dwelling house South side of Oak St. and Queen St.

intersection, Chestnut St. and

Cayuga St. E

- One family dwelling house South side of Broad St. E, east of

Taylor Rd.

- Retail establishment

- Wholesale establishment

- Personal service shop

- Merchandise service shop

- Office

- Bank

- Hotel, motel, motor-hotel, tavern

- Restaurant

- Automobile service station

- Vehicle sales and/or rental establishment and may include open storage

accessory thereto

- Bus or taxi terminal

- Laundromat

- Dry cleaning distribution centre

- Place of entertainment

- Animal hospital provided the entire operation is carried on within an enclosed

building

Dunnville Commercial Core, north of

of Main St. E, east of Niagara St.,

Large Format Retail/Commercial

Node at Broad St. and Taylor Rd.


Service Commercial

(CS) Zone

- Parking lot of structure

- Sheet metal, plumbing, heating, electrical or woodworking shop or any similar

activity

- Printing and publishing establishment

- Any non-residential use permitted in the CI Zone

- A maximum of four dwelling units in a permitted commercial building

- Any use permitted in the R3 Zone located on a separate lot, in accordance

with the provisions of that Zone

- Automobile service station

- Restaurant

- Hotel, motel, motor-hotel, tavern

- Vehicle sales and/or rental establishment and may include open storage

accessory thereto

- Farm implement sales and service establishment

- Swimming pool sales and service establishment

- Lumber yard and buildings supply establishment

- Garden supply centre

- Commercial greenhouse and tree and plant nursery

- Fruit and vegetable outlet

- Florist shop

- Merchandise service shop

- Sheet metal, plumbing, heating, electrical or woodworking shop or any similar

activity

- Dry cleaning establishment

- Animal hospital, provided the entire operation is carried on within an enclosed

building

- Craft and souvenir shop

- Office

- Parking lot structure

- Open storage accessory to a permitted use

- Any non-residential use permitted in the CN Zone

- Any non-residential use permitted in the IC Zone

- A maximum of 2 dwelling units in a permitted building

- Any use permitted in the r2 Zone, located on a separate lot, in accordance with

the provisions of that Zone.

South side of Main St. between

Bridge St. and east of Tamarac St.,

various parcels along Broad St. E.,

Alder St. E and Chestnut St.


Highway Commercial

(CH) Zone

Marine Commercial

(CM) Zone

General Industrial

(MG) Zone

Light Industrial (ML)

Zone

- Automobile service station

- Restaurant

- Motel, motor-hotel

- Vehicle sales and/or rental establishment and may include open storage

accessory thereto

- Farm implement sales and service establishment and may include open

storage accessory thereto

- Commercial greenhouse and tree and plant nursery and may include open

storage therefor

- Fruit and vegetable outlet

- Convenience store

- Fire hall

- Police station

- Ambulance service

- One dwelling unit

- Marina

- Restaurant accessory to a marina

- Boathouse

- Private club facilities accessory to a marina

- Fertilizer dealership

- Fuel storage depot for farm sales

- Truck terminal

- Railway terminal and yards

- Research and development facilities

- Any use permitted in the ML Zone

- Industrial supply establishment

- Retail sales related to an industry on the same lot

- Industrial offices

- Day care centre

- Fitness and health care facilities

- Sports facilities

- Restaurant

- Adult entertainment parlour

- Merchandise service shop

- Lumber yard and building supply establishment

Main St. W, south of George St.,

Large Format Retail/Commercial

Node at Broad St. and Taylor Rd.

South of Main St. E, on the east and

west sides of Front St.

Broad St. E, west of Brant St., and

Northwest corner of Main St. E and

Taylor Rd.

Taylor Rd./Ramsey Dr. and Broad St.


Rural Industrial (MR)

Zone

- Custom workshop

- Printing and publishing establishment

- Dry cleaning establishment

- Automobile service station

- Vehicle sales and/or rental establishment and may include open storage

accessory thereto

- Farm implement sales and service establishment

- Industrial garage

- Warehouse

- Wholesale establishment

- Facilities and office for engineering, surveying and any similar activity

- Dairy

- Bakery

- Contractor’s yard

- Public utility yard

- School

- Trade school

- Fire hall

- Policy station

- Ambulance service

- Animal hospital

- Open storage accessory to any permitted use

- Fertilizer dealership

- Fuel storage depot for home and farm sales

- Farm machinery and equipment supply and repair shop

- Agriculturally oriented contractor’s yard and facilities, such as irrigation

contractor’s yard and any similar contracting operation

- Public utility yard

- Lumber yard

- Feed mill

- Flour mill

- Dairy

- Grain elevator

- Grain drying facilities

- Animal hospital

Broad St. E, east of Taylor Rd.


Community

Institutional (IC) Zone

Neighbourhood

Institutional (IN) Zone

Hazard Land (HL)

Zone

- Any use permitted in the Agricultural (A) Zone in accordance with the

provisions of that Zone

- Museum

- Library

- Art gallery

- Funeral home

- Private club

- Government and public utility offices

- Hospital

- Fire hall

- Policy station

- Ambulance service

- Clinic

- Place of assembly

- Place of recreation

- Golf course

- Training and rehabilitation centre

- Any use permitted in an IN Zone in accordance with the provisions of that

Zone

- School

- Community centre

- Nursing home

- Cemetery

- Place of worship including an accessory dwelling unit

- Day nursery

- One dwelling unit in a permitted building

- One family dwelling house located on a separate lot.

- Boathouse

- Park, provided there are no buildings located thereon except buildings used for

sanitary facilities, change houses for bathers and accessory maintenance and

storage buildings

- Golf course excluding any building

- Farm excluding any building

Various parcels within, and east and

west of commercial core.

Alder St. and Pine St.

Grand River Waterfront

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