Issue 60 / October 2015

bidolito

October 2015 issue of Bido Lito! Featuring XAM VOLO, JOHN JOSEPH BRILL, IMMIX ENSEMBLE, LIVERPOOL MUSIC WEEK 2015 PREVIEW and much more.

FREE

Issue 60

October 2015

XamVolo by Robin Clewley

XamVolo

John Joseph Brill

IMMIX

Liverpool Music

Week


TUES 15 SEPT 7pm

THE POLYPHONIC

SPREE

THURS 17 SEPT 7pm

RACHAEL

YAMAGATA

THURS 17 SEPT 7pm

BLACK RIVERS

FRI 18 SEPT 9.30pm !8+

CUBANISTO:

HOUSE OF MASK

FT. WEISS

SAT 19 SEPT 7pm

THE ISRIGHTS

SAT 19 SEPT 7pm

HOPEFEST

TUES 22 SEPT 7pm

THE TEA & CAKE

CLUB: VEGAN

THURS 24 SEPT 10pm 18+

COLOURS

FRI 25 SEPT 6pm

WEIGHTSTOCK

FRI 25 SEPT 7pm

SUGARKING

FRI 25 SEPT 11pm 18+

CHIBUKU

SAT 26 SEPT 10pm 18+

CIRCUS

THURS 1 OCT 7pm

ETCHES

SAT 3 OCT 7.30pm

MARTIN

STEPHENSON

& THE DAINTEES

SAT 3 OCT 10pm 18+

CHIBUKU

JULIO BASHMORE

+ MORE TBA

MON 5 OCT 7.30pm

GUN

THURS 8 OCT 7pm

THE BOHICAS

FRI 9 OCT 7pm

ALEXANDER

FRI 9 OCT 11pm 18+

DOT. PRESENTS

SHY FX & JOKER

FRI 16 OCT 7pm

THE SMITHS INDEED

SAT 17 OCT 7pm

LEAP OF FAITH

THURS 22 OCT 7pm

SPEAR OF DESITINY

SAT 24 OCT 6.30pm

GENTLEMAN’S

DUB CLUB

SUN 25 OCT 7pm

THE MILK

THURS 29 OCT 7pm

MY BABY

THURS 29 OCT 10pm 18+

COLOURS

SAT 31 OCT 10pm 18+

CIRCUS

TUES 3 NOV 7pm

THE CORONAS

WEDS 11 NOV 7pm

STRIKING MATCHES

THURS 12 NOV 7pm

BERNIE TORMÉ

SAT 14 NOV 7pm

SAINT RAYMOND

SUN 15 NOV 7pm

EZRA FURMAN

WEDS 18 NOV 7.30pm

KEYWEST

SAT 21 NOV 7pm

BRIX & THE

EXTRICATED

THURS 26 NOV 10pm 18+

COLOURS

SAT 28 NOV 7.30pm

DODGY

SUN 29 NOV 7pm

NOTHING

BUT THIEVES

FRI 4 DEC 7pm

HANDS LIKE

HOUSES

SAT 5 DEC 7pm

IAN PROWSE

& AMSTERDAM

THURS 10 DEC 7pm

THE ZOMBIES

FRI 11 DEC 7pm

THE BALCONY

FT. KENNY HOLLAND & WESLEY

STROMBERG FROM EMBLEM3

SAT 23 JAN 2016 7pm (Rescheduled date - original tickets valid)

LOUIS BERRY

FRI 11 MAR 2016 7pm

TRAGEDY: AN ALL

METAL TRIBUTE

TO THE BEE GEES

BUY YOUR TICKETS

FOR ALL SHOWS IN OUR

BAR & KITCHEN WITH

NO BOOKING FEE!

90

SEEL STREET, LIVERPOOL, L1 4BH


facebook.com/o2academyliverpool

twitter.com/o2academylpool

instagram.com/o2academyliverpool

youtube.com/o2academytv

Thurs 24th Sept • £15 adv

Peace

+ Splashh

+ Yak

Sat 26th Sept • £15 adv

The Icicle Works

Sat 26th Sept • £24 adv

Over 18s only

The Burlesque Ball

UK Tour

Fri 2nd Oct • £19.50 adv

Starsailor

Greatest Hits Tour

Sat 3rd Oct • £15 adv

9pm - 4am • over 21s only

Drome

ft. Rob Tissera

+ Stu Allen + MC Cyanide

Fri 9th Oct • £7 adv

Blossoms

Tues 13th Oct • £25 adv

Rich Homie Quan

Wed 14th Oct • £8 adv

Siena Root

Thurs 15th Oct • £25 adv

Ride

Thurs 15th Oct • £12 adv

Swim Deep

Fri 16th Oct • £16 adv

Insane

Championship

Wrestling

Mon 19th Oct • £13.50 adv

The Shires

Tues 20th Oct •

Years & Years

Wed 21st Oct • £15 adv

Reel Big Fish

Thurs 22nd Oct • £12.50 adv

Spector

+ Spring King

Fri 23rd Oct • £18 adv

The Cribs

+ Pulled Apart By Horses

Thurs 29th Oct • £11 adv

Prides

Sat 31st Oct • £16 adv

Hawklords

Sun 1st Nov • £25 adv

Fish

Farewell to Childhood

Fri 6th Nov • £12 adv

The Sunshine

Underground

Sat 7th Nov • £15 adv

Lucy Rose

Tues 10th Nov • £17.50 adv

The Fratellis

Thurs 12th Nov • £19 adv

Joey Bada$$

Fri 13th Nov • £28.50 adv

Happy Mondays

Pills ‘n’ Thrills and Bellyaches

25th Anniversary Tour

Thurs 19th Nov • £20 adv

Public Service

Broadcasting

Sat 21st Nov • £14 adv

Reverend & The Makers

Mon 23rd Nov • £13.50 adv

Chad Valley

Tues 24th Nov • £13.50 adv

Slaves

Wed 25th Nov • £19.50 adv

The Wailers

Performing the album Legend in its entirety

Sat 28th Nov • £10 adv

The Hummingbirds

Tues 1st Dec • £15 adv

Courtney Barnett

Wed 2nd Dec • £30 adv

Public Enemy

Thurs 3rd Dec • £22.50 adv

Scouting For Girls

Thurs 3rd Dec • £12.50 adv

Electric Six

Fri 4th Dec • £13 adv

The Lancashire Hotpots

Fri 11th Dec • £25 adv

Echo & The Bunnymen

Fri 18th Dec • £27.50 adv

The Charlatans

Sat 19th Dec • £16 adv

The Beat

Tues 26th Jan 2016 • £22.50 adv

Michael Schenker’s

Temple of Rock

Wed 27th Jan 2016 • £11 adv

Cancer Bats

Thurs 4th Feb 2016 • £20 adv

Bowling For Soup

Wed 9th Mar 2016 • £22 adv

Scott Bradlee’s

Postmodern Jukebox

Sat 3rd Oct • £29 adv

Leftfield

Fri 23rd Oct • £22.50 adv

The Wombats

Sat 24th Oct • £20 adv

An Evening with

Simon and Oscar

from

Ocean Colour Scene

Mon 9th Nov •

The 1975

Sun 18th Oct • £15 adv

Ruts DC

Thurs 12th Nov • £16 adv

Paradise Lost

Sat 12th Dec •

Echo & The Bunnymen

Ticketweb.co.uk • 0844 477 2000

liverpoolguild.org

Thurs 24th Sep • £15 adv

Peace

Thurs 15th Oct • £25 adv

Ride

Thurs 12th Nov • £19 adv

Joey Bada$$

o2academyliverpool.co.uk

11-13 Hotham Street, Liverpool L3 5UF • Doors 7pm unless stated

Venue box office opening hours: Mon - Sat 11.30am - 5.30pm • No booking fee on cash transactions

ticketweb.co.uk • seetickets.com • gigantic.com • ticketmaster.co.uk


Spread over two floors, Dawsons

Liverpool stocks a vast range of

equipment and instruments for all

musicians. The ground floor is home to

guitars, basses, drums, synthesizers,

music technology, and DJ Equipment

while downstairs, there is an extensive

piano showroom, which we believe to

be the largest in the UK. We also have

friendly, knowledgeable staff who will

do all they can to help you find the

right equipment.


At Dawsons we provide

personal, one-to-one

advice and help you find

the perfect equipment

to get your production

sounding great


Terry Cooper, Pro-Audio Specialist

Dawsons Music Liverpool

We’ll help find the perfect guitar

from our huge selection

Whether you’re still learning or a

consumate pro we have it all

Dawsons Liverpool I 14-16 Williamson Street Liverpool L1 1EB

0151 709 1455 I liverpool@dawsons.co.uk

@Dawsonsmusic

Dawsonsmusic


The extensive range of products in our basement section includes the following:

The microKORG is a compact-sized

synthesizer that delivers the true enjoyment

of synthesis. Underneath its small exterior

lurks an amazingly powerful synthesizer.

It is fun to play, and it delivers a sound and

functionality that will satisfy everyone from

the beginner to the professional. With the

microKORG you get unlimited creativity.

The new HS series reference monitors have been

created by Yamaha’s studio monitor engineering

team to deliver exceptionally flat, accurate

response that you can trust. Unlike “monitor”

speakers with exaggerated bass and treble that

make a good first impression but can’t be relied

on for accuracy, the HS series were designed to

be true studio reference monitors in the tradition

of the legendary Yamaha NS10M.

The Scarlett range of precision audio interfaces

deliver the Focusrite sound into your DAW via

USB 2.0. At the heart of these solutions are

class-leading digital conversion and 25 years

of excellent mic preamp design. Combined,

they ensure you capture every subtle nuance of

your sound. Each Scarlett interface comes the

Scarlett Plug-in Suite which includes reverb, EQ,

compressor and gate in VST/AU/RTAS formats.

An unmistakeable stage icon for 70 years, The

Shure SHII vocal microphone (also known

as ‘The Elvis Mic’) features asignature satin

chrome-plated die-cast for pure vintage look

and feel. It is perfectly suited specifically to vocal

applications, typically live performance, public

address as well as for broadcasting, recording,

and sound applications where a stand-mounted

microphone with a classic look is desired.

10% OFF

CABLES AND ACCESSORIES

Cut out this coupon and bring it along to our

Williamson Street store to claim 10% off products

in our extensive range of cables and accessories.

Please note this offer does not extend to hardware.

Dawsons Liverpool I 14-16 Williamson Street Liverpool L1 1EB

0151 709 1455 I liverpool@dawsons.co.uk

@Dawsonsmusic

Dawsonsmusic


Liverpool’s Newest Venue

Liverpool Philharmonic

MUSIC

ROOM

Music Room is a small, friendly and informal venue which will open its

doors this October. Music Room is a home for emerging Liverpool artists,

a new space for city festival events and a place to try out new things.

Have a drink at the bar, grab a bite to eat and come and enjoy!

Box Office

liverpoolphil.com

0151 709 3789

Highlights announced so far include;

Stevie Nieve Plays Elvis Costello

Saturday 1o October

The first ever gig in Music Room is composer, pianist and

founder member of The Attractions.


Seckou Keita: 22 Strings

Monday 26 October

Master of the 22-stringed kora, championed by BBC 6 Music’s

Mary Anne Hobbs & Guy Garvey.


9Bach

Thursday 5 November

Intriguing band from North Wales who have been remixed

by Gruff Rhys.


Rob Vincent & Gary Edward Jones

Sunday 22 November

A slice of Liverpool Acoustic Festival with two of the city’s finest.


Tom Robinson

Friday 4 December

BBC 6 Music presenter returns to giging with his first album in

20 years.


I am Kloot’s John Bramwell

Saturday 5 December

The front man of the popular Manchester outfit.


Bido Lito! October 2015

7

Photo: Ryan Fitzpatrick

Bido Lito!

Issue Sixty / October 2015

bidolito.co.uk

Static Gallery

23 Roscoe Lane

Liverpool

L1 9JD

Editor

Christopher Torpey - chris@bidolito.co.uk

Editor-In-Chief / Publisher

Craig G Pennington - info@bidolito.co.uk

Reviews Editor

Sam Turner - live@bidolito.co.uk

Design

Mark McKellier - @mckellier

EVERYBODY NEEDS GOOD NEIGHBOURS

Editorial

I was reprimanded in some quarters for not talking more about music in last month’s Editorial, so I’ll start with something a bit more on point this

time, but before I do… Thanks to all those people who contacted me about last month's #JezWeCan Editorial – and yes, I was tempted to go with

a #JezWeDid one for this month!

The first time I saw XamVolo I knew he was an artist we’d be featuring on our front cover one day, although I did initially need some encouragement

(thanks Yaw, Mike and Pete). The defining moment of this turnaround came when I saw Xam perform at the GIT Award show, when he blitzed the

audience with his soul-meets-rock hybrid, and ushered in a new stage in his lightning-fast upwards trajectory. The co-opting of a traditional guitar/

bass/drums backing – albeit one with a whole load of oomph – marked a moment when this rising star became a serious contender.

Occasionally we get excited about some of our local musicians after one jaw-bouncingly good show or one stupendous track, and we make

no apologies for our sometimes knee-jerk reactions. There’s so much analysis of music done today that we often forget to enjoy the pure thrill

of enjoying bands on the up, and the hit of experiencing artists operating at the top of their game. This is, after all, what we’re in this for, and we

make no excuses for bringing you the city’s best music as it breaks.

We’d also like to extend a welcome to the team from the Bombed Out Church, who’ve moved into the office next door to us at Static. Though

we’re made up to have such lovely neighbours in the adjoining office (and they’ve been very kind with their coffee runs), the situation which brings

them here is pretty galling. Last year we did a feature when they were in the middle of running a campaign to raise funds for the upkeep and

maintenance of St Luke’s, and the overwhelmingly positive response showed just how highly the people of Liverpool regard the iconic building

that stands tall and proud at the centre of our noisy city. At the time of going to press, the fate of the Church is in the hands of a city council

consultation committee while important refurbishments and upgrades are made – but you can still contribute to the council’s online survey up

until 30th September if you want to lend your support (and we urge you to do so). Just who gets given the keys after this period is unknown, but I

think you know where our loyalties lie. We said it last year but we'll say it again: this city needs a buzzing, vibrant heart where things happen. We

want the creative vibrancy of the city centre to be represented by a building where gigs, yoga classes, raves and theatre can flourish; our inner-city

Mecca for a different sort of revelling.

Finally, it was particularly heartwarming and inspiring to see the response from hundreds of people in Liverpool with regards to the Syrian

refugee crisis and the apalling situation many people find themselves in in Calais. Here in Static – as well as up at The Caledonia (did you see it on

the telly?!) and at loads of other drop-off places – the donations of clothes, food and equipment from our amazing city has been stunning. What’s

more, the mobilisation of swathes of people in our music community in organising events – from Kitchen Street to the ECHO Arena – has been

testament to the region’s fantastic attitude of inclusion and respect. When you balance this alongside events like Hope Fest and WSO Liverpool,

who are providing unbelievable support for the area’s homeless people, it shows Liverpool as a great example for everyone, caring about our

neighbours both near and far.

Christopher Torpey / @BidoLito

Editor

Proofreading

Debra Williams - debra@wordsanddeeds.co.uk

Digital Content Manager

Natalie Williams - online@bidolito.co.uk

Words

Christopher Torpey, Paul Fitzgerald,

Stuart Miles O’Hara, Rebecca Frankland,

Phil Morris, Damon Fairclough, Maurice

Stewart, Richard Lewis, Michael Fowler,

Bethany Garrett, Sam Turner, Joshua

Potts, Alastair Dunn, Tom Bell, Glyn

Akroyd, Matt Hogg, Debra Williams, Kieran

Donnachie Walrus Said, Harry Brown.

Photography, Illustration and Layout

Mark McKellier, Robin Clewley, Nata

Moraru, Aaron McManus, Ria Fell, Mook

Loxley, Ryan Fitzpatrick, Keith Ainsworth,

Mike Sheerin, Stuart Moulding, Pete

Carr, Alex Alderdice, Diego Piedrabuena,

Marty Saleh, Gareth Arrowsmith.

Advertising

To advertise please contact

ads@bidolito.co.uk

Distributed By Middle Distance

Print, distribution and events support across

Merseyside and the North West.

middledistance.org

The views expressed in Bido Lito! are those of the

respective contributors and do not necessarily

reflect the opinions of the magazine, its staff or the

publishers. All rights reserved.

bidolito.co.uk


8

W

Bido Lito! October 2015

hen FKA twigs said “fuck alternative RnB!” in an interview

with the Guardian in 2014, she was lamenting more than

just being lumped into a musical bracket because of her

mixed-race heritage: she was striking at the core of what it is to

be a musician today. Weighed down by expectations to produce

something groundbreaking, while simultaneously being judged

against the vast tapestry of recorded music that’s gone before,

artists can be excused more than a little frustration at the current

trend for compartmentalising music into easy-to-understand

umbrella terms. Even the faux liberalisation of shattering a genre

into hundreds of strands – post-this and anti-that – is a mask, a neat

way for us (mainly critics) to keep our reference points within arm’s

reach. In his own quiet way, XAMVOLO is doing his bit to muddy

those waters of genre. Just don’t expect him to stay quiet for long.

XamVolo – or Sam Folorunsho to his parents – is one of those

artists that just has a natural presence about them, whether it’s on

record or on stage. There’s also an almost professorial air about him,

which I detect when we meet up to discuss his new EP, The Closing

Scene, which comes with a conviction that only a fierce talent can

muster. As much alt. rock as it is alt. RnB, The Closing Scene is the

result of a production deal Xam has signed with Grammy Awardwinning

producer Steve Levine: within its muscular movements,

the EP has a depth of tension that wouldn’t be out of place on a

Frank Ocean record, yet still kicks with the energy of BANKS’ take on

new wave, contemporary RnB. It’s a departure, certainly, from 2014’s

bright and bouncy introductory EP Binary In Blue, which exhibited

someone considers me as a seven, and I meet someone who’s, say,

a two, and I disregard that person, I may miss out on the opportunity

to become a nine – because that person may have had a two that

I didn’t have, and I could have learnt from them. Everyone has

something to offer. It’s the same in LIMF Academy: everyone in my

year has taught me something about the industry, or performing

or writing or whatever.”

As an architecture student, Xam evidently has a thorough mind

that’s trained on the importance of structure and strategy, and this

seeps through into his music. “I like everything to have a meaning, I

like people to be able to analyse things,” he says. “This thing has to

have layers, and each layer has to be understandable.” He has a clear

grasp of how it all fits together, too, with every aspect of his music

and the themes behind it deeply thought out. Whole swathes of our

discussion are taken up with Xam just recounting his thoughts behind

each track, giving more of a background to the stories, and wrestling

with the notion of control. “I’ve realised that a recurring theme I write

about a lot is power,” he replies, when pressed on the lyrical content

of The Closing Scene. “Most people in the RnB through soul spectrum

write about love a lot and it gets a bit corny. I’ve realised that writing

about power is like a long giant pool of potential topics: it takes the

corniness right out of it and allows you to explore things. Cos life is a

lot more complex than, you know, person meets person.”

“The reason I chose that [title] is cos The Closing Scene sort of

represents finality,” he continues. “It’s all in reverse in terms of the

mentality of each song. So the first song is Rescue Me, which is a

with anyone on any of his productions, self-teaching himself the

basics of Logic, FruityLoops and Cubase in putting together Binary

In Blue. Even though it took something of a leap of faith on Xam’s

part (“Well, Steve won a Grammy! It’s not like he’s any guy come

out of nowhere.”), Levine helped him strip away all the extraneous

elements that he’d built around himself – the plugins and effects –

and kind of set him free. “For this whole new EP I had to re-train my

brain to get away from all those habits, allow the drums to be a bit

freer, allow everything to move within the record,” he admits. “It

sounds better… You can’t really get that vintage soul sound – which

I like a lot – with plugins and synths. It works so much better with

non-quantised, real instruments.”

Another aspect of the new-look XamVolo is the lush and striking

impact of strings, supplied by Goldfrapp collaborator Davide Rossi.

The man who contributed string arrangements to two Coldplay

records worked on additional parts to The Closing Scene remotely,

from his home in LA, as a favour called in by his old friend Levine.

They add a heightened sense of drama to the overall atmosphere,

especially on the taut, brooding Rescue Me, where you can almost

see Xam’s head pressed on the window pane in contemplation.

Breathe Slowly – the standout track on the EP – is punctuated by

a tremendous plunging riff, which gives something for the string

additions to pivot about and accentuate the drama around the lyrics.

Given that Xam had produced every last beat of the music he’d

createdup until this point, he was at first reluctant to relinquish that

control. “I’m always worried whenever anyone else puts their hands

XamVolo

Is In Control

more of the playfulness of Kendrick Lamar and the neo-soul delivery

of, say, a young D’Angelo.

Reclining in his chair, right hand thrust in pocket (it’s never not)

and dressed in his customary all black, Xam considers the position

he finds himself in, and pauses a moment while he balances his

words. “The voices and the big techniques and all the craziness,

that’s all in the urban spectrum – though I don’t like to use that term

– but they don’t have the lyricism or the musicality that rock and indie

music have,” comes his measured reply, delivered with a surprisingly

light voice. “I feel like, if people sat down and studied outside their

genre, really thought their lyrics and the arrangements through,

they would get into the music and understand it more. That’s what

I’ve tried to do, to go into other genres and pick out their best bits.”

A bright spark of the LIMF Academy 2014 intake, Xam has been

learning from every conceivable side since he started making music

as a teenager, drinking up influences at a prodigious rate. In fact,

he’s big on learning, and it’s something that he comes back to a lot

during our conversation. “When I see people who are miles better

than me at something I think ‘oh great, there’s something to live for,

there’s more to learn’,” he explains. He talks of “rubbing minds” with

other artists when working with them, and says that he knows he

still has a long way to go, even though the strides he’s made so far

(he’s signed a management deal with the playmaker group) place

him far above some of his contemporaries. “I’m trying to stay as

bidolito.co.uk

humble as possible,” he continues, “to learn from everybody. Say if

lot to do with these weird delusions of grandeur. At the end of it I

believe that the position I end up in is a position of power, where

I don’t need anyone to rescue me. Be Cool, that one’s about… we

compromise things, and we feel like we’re not in control but kind

of accept that – and in that acceptance, you’re kind of in control. And

Breathe Slowly is all about having the correct way of viewing things

while describing the wrong way of viewing things.”

I’d hesitate to describe Xam as a perfectionist because that makes

him sound like a diligent school swot; his unswerving attitude towards

precision is more like that found in a concertmaster. From the outset

he’s keen to hear what I think of the new EP, quizzing me on what

I thought about it (“dead good” was my not-so-succinct response).

His hunger for reaction from people is part of the feedback loop that’s

wired in to his mechanism to improve things at all stages.

“I tend to aim to please the environment that I’m in…” he says,

carefully, when describing the move towards a darker, noir-y sound

on his track Bone Marrow, which came about from noticing a shift in

the “market” towards that style. “You can’t exist outside the world –

we live here. If people are thinking that this or that [aspect] could be

better, then you can’t just say ‘I’m outside of their world, their opinion

doesn’t matter’. If the majority think something, at least address it.”

Working with Steve Levine on this EP has also had a huge impact

on Xam, not least because it was the first time he’d worked in a

full studio, and with his new band, plucked from friends “in the

rock spectrum”. Up until this point, Xam had never collaborated

on stuff I’ve created,” he says, smiling as a memory comes back to

him. “In the studio with Steve I memorised the levels on the faders,

just in case he changed one of them and it didn’t work and I could

put it back to the exact level!”

“Producing is my instrument. I wanna show that I’m hands-on and

that I control the artistic direction,” he continues, but with giving up

some ownership to a new producer and a fully-functioning band,

does he still feel in control?

“Ummm…” he deliberates for a beat, before continuing in a

measured tone: “Yes – only because – like what I was talking about

in Be Cool – I’ve understood that the feeling of control comes from

accepting the situation that you’re in. I feel like I’m in control because

I’ve relinquished that bit of control consciously. Having the choice of

who you let in to help you is being in control.”

It’s perhaps misleading to asses XamVolo’s progression from

Binary In Blue to The Closing Scene in too much detail, as he’s in

that period where you’re measuring progress more in giant leaps

than baby steps. But the potential he’s shown thus far is limitless,

and you feel that he is only just beginning to flex his muscles. God

help us when he does.

The Closing Scene EP is released in October by Hubris Records. XamVolo

plays Liverpool Music Week on 30th October, supporting Shura at Arts Club.

Head to bidolito.co.uk now to see an exclusive live session with

XamVolo, recorded for us by Steve Levine.

soundcloud.com/xamvolo


Bido Lito! October 2015

9

Words: Christopher Torpey / @CATorp

Photography: Robin Clewley / robinclewley.co.uk

bidolito.co.uk


10

Bido Lito! October 2015

ithout doubt, Ireland has had the single biggest influence on shaping

the city of Liverpool. Centuries of migration have percolated and

crystallised in the very essence of Scouse identity – Catholicism, the

high value placed on family, and even the distinctive accent are lasting vestiges

of a predominantly traditional Irish heritage. It is widely posited that over half of

the city’s diaspora share in this Gaelic background. Liverpool Irish Festival aims

to eulogise this unique and inextricable relationship with an eclectic curation

of Irish culture, spanning 50 events across 10 days and 30 venues.

Time-honoured folk elements of ceilidh bands and bodhráns will of course

be abundantly represented. But the primary focus of this year’s celebration is

on how a younger generation, raised in rich cultural diversity, are developing

movements both across the Irish Sea and in Liverpool. Festival Manager Laura

Naylor believes that an exciting counter-culture is a characteristic inherent in

both Liverpool and Ireland: “One of the powerful ties uniting Liverpool and Irish

culture is pride, identity and a strong, politically-motivated counter-culture. When

we think of Ireland we may have a very traditional picture in our minds, but that’s

often not the same as what is emerging and what the younger generation is

creating. The rich diversity in both Liverpool and Ireland has led to a migrant

culture, a re-purposing of old traditions that are being reinvented and reworked.

That’s how culture evolves and develops.”

Laura’s sentiments about the prevailing counter-culture are no better

illustrated than by one of the festival’s headline performers, RUSANGANO FAMILY.

As a hip hop collective of Irish, Zimbabwean and Togolese descent, Rusangano

Family represent the cutting edge of Ireland’s divergent creativity. Even their

name – derived from the Bantu word for “togetherness” – suggests a refreshing

new chapter of culture for a historically sectarian Republic.

Rusangano Family started as a collaboration between Shannon-based rapper

God Knows and Ennis-raised beatsmith mynameisjOhn. The family was complete

when Togo-born rapper MC MuRli was adopted into the fold. Together they have

explored issues of identity and belonging through intense lyrical realism.

Their music is a heady fusion of well-sourced hip hop production and curiously

grime-inspired vocals. They are renowned, too, for channelling this brilliantly

transatlantic concoction into electrifying live performances. After a year filled

with astonishingly high-profile support slots – which included playing alongside

Snoop Dogg, Run The Jewels and Mercury winners Young Fathers – the trio are

the must-see-act at this year’s Liverpool Irish Festival.

The show, which takes place on 17th October, features support from Liverpool’s

own Irish connection: the astounding SERTONE. Heralded as one of Ireland’s

most promising producer talents, SertOne is a maverick on his own terms. After

moving to Liverpool, he co-founded Fly High Society, a label and artist collective

that continues to reboot the credibility of UK electronic music. Tune into their

brilliantly Brainfeeder-esque shenanigans at flyhighradio.og.

Since the Irish are predisposed to the gift of the gab – and in sheer anticipation

of their Kazimier collaboration – we asked SertOne to quiz Rusangano Family on

their formation, future and life back in the old country.

SertOne: Tell us how you got together to form the project and what you’ve done

together since then?

God Knows: jOhn was part of a collective that used to host hip hop shows and

electronic gigs in Limerick city. He booked us for a show back in 2011/2012, and

straight off we had a lot of similar tastes in music, so it just made sense to link

and make it a bigger, stronger unit. Since then, we’ve had two full releases and

one single. The first was titled Rusangano Family and was released back in May

2014. Then MuRli’s Surface Tension came out earlier this year in January. For

the last year, we’ve been busy bringing all our work under the umbrella title of

Rusangano Family, and building our foundations to make something that can

evolve quite easily but keeps that core sound and belief.

SertOne: When I moved to Liverpool, one of the ways I started building

connections and friendships was through music and the music scene. Have you

guys experienced anything similar?

MuRli: I arrived in Ireland at age 12, so African music and world music was what

I was mainly influenced by, the music my folks listened to. I definitely didn’t

know anyone in school in Limerick with any interest in that type of music back

then but, because I was starting to listen to some RnB, a classmate soon put me

onto hip hop, and that changed everything for me. Hip hop helped me connect

with people in a different way, and that still continues to this day. In a sense,

music gave me an identity, and because of that, it’s helped me adapt to my new

environment here.

SertOne: Are there any acts you’d recommend to anyone who might not be so

familiar with the contemporary Irish music scene?

mynameisjOhn: Right now, the bands who bang on our stereos the most are

Melty Brains, Girl Band, Windings and Nanu Nanu. In terms of producers, Naive

Ted is the absolute king, with Graeme S and T-woc always coming with fresh

beats and ideas. There’s some really interesting African music starting to emerge

in Dublin too, with acts like Mandem Express and Ajo Arkestra. Big shouts to all

the promoters doing good things, like Sim Simma, Southern Hospitality, Misha

Freshin’ and Bap To The Future.

SertOne: What’s next for Rusangano Family then?

mynameisjOhn: We’ve been working on our debut album, which should be

released in early 2016. It’s called Let The Dead Bury The Dead, and it’s not as

dark as it sounds. Basically, it’s a concept that we’ve explored throughout the

writing and recording process, trying to examine different attitudes from all sides

and letting go of any anchors that stall your journey. We’re hoping to be able

to create something that brings you deep into the world of Rusangano Family.

Rusangano Family play The Kazimier Garden on 17 th October as part of Liverpool

Irish Festival, with support from Fly High Society’s SertOne and Bolts.

facebook.com/RusanganoFamily

Words: Phil Morris / @mauricedesade


15 Slater Street Liverpool L1 4BW

theshippingforecastliverpool.com — @ship_forecast


12

Bido Lito! October 2015

ith the proliferation of the festival scene, more

bands than ever can boast on their CV of sharing

a stage with huge acts, without mentioning that

their slots were 12 or 13 sets apart. Not so IMMIX ENSEMBLE,

Liverpool’s foremost new and classical music crossover combo.

But don’t let that description confuse you. “I’ve always been

really interested in crossover-type projects. Crossover can be a

dirty word: it makes people think of Il Divo, which is not what

interests me in the slightest,” says Daniel Thorne, founder and

de facto leader of IMMIX, when we sit down for a chat. “It’s still

about getting the right notes, the right durations. It’s just as

hard to write a simple piece of music as it is to write a complex

one. I can see why people can struggle to get their head around

that. There’s a tendency to view uncomplicated/less virtuosic

things as less worthwhile, perhaps.”

The dramatis personae of our 40-minute conversation are

nothing short of a rundown of the Liverpool scene: IMMIX

have triumphed in collaborations with Ex-Easter Island Head

and Bill Ryder-Jones - with line-ups including players from the

Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra alongside those from

Thorne’s own diaspora - and have delivered concerts featuring

everything from post-brass band works to electronica via solo

guitar. And that’s barely even a sketch of IMMIX’s first season. To

be perfectly clear: the project isn't even two years old.

So how does a New Zealander come to be so embedded in this

welding of musical approaches here in Liverpool? Thorne’s own

potted history on Merseyside starts in the heady days of 2013.

“I built up relationships at a composers’ lab and through that

was offered a Time And Space residency at METAL,” he explains

in his warm, affable manner. “They helped me put together

an Arts Council bid to start my own ensemble, and gave us a

rehearsal space. The idea was to have something with unusual

instrumentation that tried to bridge the gap there seemed to be

between classical musicians in Liverpool and interesting things

happening in the pop, rock, and electronic scenes.”

That funding was for four shows that were delivered

throughout 2014, where IMMIX pitched some of the region’s

most talented songwriters, musicians and composers together

to attack the lack of dialogue between these seemingly

disparate communities. In doing this, and working alongside

each collaboration, IMMIX helped create some startling new

work: between Ex-Easter Island Head and composer Joe Hillyard;

with electronic musician Tom Cowcher (Sun Drums, Bagheera)

and multi-instrumentalist and singer Rachel Nicholas; with

Bristolian producer Vessel; and with composers Lucy Pankhurst

and John McGrath at Static (a live recording of which will be

released on Product Records).

To the sound of swooping disco strings in the

background, Thorne describes a typical IMMIX line-up:

“It’s roughly fixed. As we’re dealing with freelancers, the

personnel might vary for each show, but it’s

currently a six-piece of cello, violin, oboe,

bass clarinet, alto sax and trumpet. I’d love

for it to get bigger though. In new music,

texture is in. People are just getting their

heads round Ligeti. There’s the opportunity

to distinguish acoustic [and electronic] textures by virtue of the

fact that you’re using 60 people to do it.”

Over the course of the project, Thorne has worked as a

composer, arranger, and director. But he still insists it’s not ‘his’.

“At the moment, I’m sort of driving, and Andrew Ellis is ensemble

manager, dealing with bookings,” he explains. “If there’s an

artist who hasn’t worked with this soundworld before, I am

here as a tool to facilitate what that artist wants, but there’s no

obligation for me to be anything more than a player.”

Talk of collaborations inevitably lead on to the porous nature

of some of art’s most famous scenes (1920s Paris, Warhol’s

Factory), and whether Liverpool’s could rival such hotbeds. Of

course, they’re hotter in retrospect – day-to-day it was probably

much quieter in Hemingway’s Paris than in the 100-or-so pages

of A Moveable Feast. “The orchestra’s such a big part of this city’s

musical landscape,” Thorne states when discussing the impact

of the world-renowned RLPO, “but orchestras are behemoths: to

put anything on takes a lot of money and time. I wanted to put

something less bureaucratic together where I can say to John

[McGrath], ‘Let’s go for coffee: I want to do a concert with you,

this is the instrumentation, interested?’ in the same way you’d

ask someone to play at any other gig. It’s cross-pollination.”

That cross-pollination isn’t restricted to the music scene.

IMMIX have dealt with other disciplines too. “When we played

at The Bluecoat, we thought it would be really cool to link it

to the exhibition at the time, Negligent Eye. We [Thorne and

Ex-Easter Island Head] previewed the exhibition, had a chat,

went away, came back and heard these pieces of music which

related to what we’d seen. We’re keen for it to be more than

just ‘I write some music, you write some music’ – it could be

arranging someone else’s, or enabling a solo artist.”

Bill Ryder-Jones is one of those artists. His appearance with

IMMIX at FestEVOL in The Kazimier in August was one of the

stand-out sets of the festival calendar, but I wonder if there’s a

rigid hierarchy when collaborating? “It varies. I chatted with Bill,

who had a very clear idea of where he was going, then I wrote

my interludes and arranged the parts for his songs,” says Thorne.

“That said, the opening cello solo – performed by Abel Selaocoe

– was scored out, but each time he played it was different. All the

groups I’ve been in, even heavily composed jazz groups run by

the composer, have been democratic set-ups where everybody

wants to contribute. I think that’s really beautiful and leads not

just to good music but enhances everyone’s experience, so

you come away with a different appreciation of how you might

compose your next piece, or play your next solo.”

The next stage for IMMIX will see them extend this

collaborative strand further, before embarking on more

ambitious recorded projects in 2015. Their performance with

Stealing Sheep at The Bluecoat on 25th October will be a multilayered

collaboration with Liverpool Music Week and Liverpool

Irish Festival. The addition of contemporary dance from two

of Ireland’s leading dancers and choreographers, Fearghus Ó

Conchúir and Aoife McAtamney, will showcase lesser-known

aspects of Irish culture while still being integral to the musical

performance. Thorne is looking further ahead, though. “Next

season, I want to pair a playwright with a composer, maybe

producing a spoken-word piece or a song cycle. I also want to

do more concerts like last year’s. That, and finding new artists.”

Open-mindedness is part of what makes IMMIX so versatile. It

doesn’t really have a brief beyond the creation of music. It does

have a specific set of resources: the players’ technical ability and

sense of ensemble. But, simpler than that, they provide timbres

not usually heard in pop music, and not usually employed in the

classical realm. IMMIX’s identity is bound up in ideas, attitude,

and realising potential. That’s how cultural institutions survive

the centuries. As an entity, IMMIX could continue indefinitely.

“As a sax player, I’m between the two worlds of classical and

pop. It’s been interesting meeting local orchestral players and

freelancers who get excited about music in the same way I do.

There are so many people who – it sounds corny, but – are just

into music. Your average punter here seems more willing to try

new stuff. Elsewhere, it can be very ‘this is the rock scene, here

is the jazz scene’ and the two don’t mix, and there aren’t any

musicians working in both. Whereas here, it’s a very up-for-it

musical community. There’s so much potential for collaboration

– Liverpool’s the perfect city for it.”

IMMIX play at The Bluecoat on 25th October in an exclusive

collaboration with Stealing Sheep, as part of Liverpool Music

Week and Liverpool Irish Festival.

immix-ensemble.tumblr.com

Words: Stuart Miles O’Hara / @ohasm1

Photography: Nata Moraru


14

Bido Lito! October 2015

There

are few places

more potent than a pub on a

weekday afternoon. I don’t mean

your local Wetherspoon’s, with its filter coffee

and discount curries and aroma of unbranded

disinfectant. I mean those pubs that you

glimpse from the corner of your eye – that exist

just beyond daylight, round corners, down

alleys. Despite three decades of stuttering

regeneration, a few of them still exist in this

city and, when you find one, you might just

overhear whispers of projects and plans that

are certain, no messin’, to change the world.

Take STUPLEX for instance. Conceived in The

Roscoe Head a couple of years ago, Stuplex

is the product of an afternoon booze-fuelled

pub chat that didn’t just fade on the stale

breeze, but remained rattling round in its

progenitors’ minds until they couldn’t help but

do something about it. Those progenitors were

the writer and artist A.E. Pearsall and Liverpool

music legend Paul Simpson, and though

Stuplex began as little more than an intriguing

title and a collection of shared ideas, it wasn’t

long before it became one more fascinating

artistic product to emerge from Liverpool’s

postmeridian pub world.

All of which might help you understand its

context, but it won’t tell you what it actually

is. So let’s attempt a description. Stuplex is

a publication, but one that can take many

forms. It features writers, artists, musicians

and more who all help put it together by hand

– stitching booklets, burning CDs, making

prints – before everything is combined in a

sealed box and published in a limited edition.

You can buy copies of Stuplex online – or from

the occasional art market or print fair – but once

they’re gone, they’re gone. Stuplex 001 sold

out long ago, but you may find a copy of 002

on their website if you’re quick.

Each edition of Stuplex has a theme, with

contributors free to take the idea where they

want. Stuplex 001, built round the concept of

‘decay’, featured stories, poetry, prints, a CD

and a magic spell. The second edition, themed

around ‘decadence’, was bigger, a little more

lavish, and included photographs, envelopes,

and a gleaming golden cassette. I was so taken

by the idea myself that I’ve now become a

Words: Damon Fairclough / noiseheatpower.com

Enter the

Enigmatic World of

regular

Stuplex

contributor,

submitting short

stories to both of the first

two editions.

For the writer Jeff Young, whose work often

explores the mildewed corners of memory,

Stuplex is a natural repository for his words.

“As someone who collects limited edition value. For

small press books and pamphlets – and as a

great admirer of Joseph Cornell’s box art – I had

the feeling that Stuplex would be something

I’d buy if I saw it in a bookshop,” says Young.

“That was enough for me to want to be part

of it.”

Young inadvertently helped conjure Stuplex

into existence when he introduced the cofounders

to each other back in 2013. “Paul

Simpson, of Wild Swans repute, and I meet

once a week for a catch-up and a glass of

wine,” Young continues. “I introduced him to

writer and artist A.E. Pearsall, who had been

a student of mine on the Writing MA at JMU,

and, when they hatched a plan for a series of

limited edition boxes, I was invited to write a

piece for the first one.”

That piece was 23 Proposals For Decay Magic,

a curious incantation designed to “encourage a

state of decay” according to Young. His second

Stuplex contribution was 23 First Lines of

Decadent Novels I Will Never Write, at which

point it becomes clear that Young has an

apparent fixation with the number 23 – and

knowing a little of the way his mind works, I

somehow doubt that it’s simply his favourite

National Lottery ball.

In fact, Young’s reference point is the 23

enigma, a phenomenon that a number of

writers and artists have cited over the years,

from William Burroughs to Psychic TV to Bill

Drummond. Put simply, it refers to the belief,

or at least the observation, that many curious

events, both significant and obscure, are

connected to this innocent-looking arithmetical

Jeff Young, it is

a conceptual nugget

to nibble at rather than

swallow whole, but, nevertheless,

it has still proved an enduring idea.

“I first came across it in the mid-1970s

from various places – Ken Campbell’s Science

Fiction Theatre of Liverpool, which would have

led me to Robert Anton Wilson’s Illuminatus!

Trilogy, which I would have picked up in the

original Atticus bookshop on Clarence Street,

and about the same time I’d have been buying

William Burroughs paperbacks. I liked the idea

that these worlds were overlapping and it

all coloured my sense that Liverpool had an

occult, counter-cultural aspect to it. I didn’t

actually believe in the power of the number

23 but I liked the idea of it.”

It may be no surprise then that the third

iteration of Stuplex won’t be a multi-author

extravaganza like the first two, but will be the

publication of Jeff Young’s 23 Enigma Vortex

Sutra in a limited edition of 230. The work is a

journey through 23 verses describing incidents

and events, both real and half-imagined, in

which that fate-bothering number seems to cast

a mysterious, unsettling spell. Half the copies

will consist of the text in pamphlet form, while

the other half will also come with a CD of the

piece recorded at the Everyman Theatre last

October. Read by Young and the actor Penny

Layden, the recording also features live music

by Liverpool-based composer Martin Heslop.

“23 Enigma Vortex Sutra was first

commissioned by the Everyman for an event

called Radical City,” says Young. “When my play

Bright Phoenix was on at the Everyman last

year, it seemed right to regroup and perform 23

Enigma again. We performed it at 23 minutes

past 23 hundred hours on 23 rd October. It has

always been accompanied by music, and it was

always Martin who created it. We have similar

tastes, interests and influences and we’re close

friends too. That closeness provides us with a

mix of instinct, intuition and spontaneity. The

man is wondrous.”

According to Heslop, it was the original 23

Enigma commission that brought him and

Young together. “We realised quite quickly that

artistically we had similar reference points,” he

says. “Since then we’ve worked on all kinds

of things – live art installations, spoken word

and music, and various theatre shows. Jeff’s

themes and imagery, like mine, are submerged

in the city as a dangerous, magical fairground

full of cracks where forgotten spirits roam. He

always finds a way of coaxing them out of

the cracks and giving them back their

lives on the page.”

Just like

Young, Heslop

has also contributed

23

to every manifestation of Stuplex thus far,

though as a poet rather than a musician.

“I love writing music but words are my main

obsession,” Heslop continues. “I see each

piece of work as crossing over into the next

one anyway, whether that’s music, poetry or

prose. You can describe war or the city or the

sea with words or sounds or music, and it’s all

one and the same.”

Young and Heslop are both currently

conjuring phantoms around Liverpool – Heslop

as a composer for Lizzie Nunnery’s play Narvik

at The Playhouse, and Young in a number of

small-scale pieces including a response to

Niamh O’Malley’s Bluecoat exhibition in

October. But keep your third eye open for

Stuplex 003, and dose up on 23 Enigma Vortex

Sutra. Then go out for an afternoon pint and a

chinwag.

Perhaps the 23 Club would be a good place

to start.

Stuplex 003 is out now, and is available to buy –

along with a small number of previous editions

– from stuplex.co.uk.


16

Bido Lito! October 2015

What do you do when you've reached a landmark

anniversary and celebrated it with your biggest

party yet? Well, you try and top it, of course. An

evergreen fixture on the latter part of the city’s live music

calendar, LIVERPOOL MUSIC WEEK is set to embark on its biggest

programme of gigs to date this October, showing us that it has

no intention of standing still. Returning for its eleventh year,

LMW 2014 drew in 20,000 people across its 10-day run, with

the festival making the shortlist at the UK Festival Awards 2014

for Best Line Up (Mogwai, Caribou, CHVRCHES, Forest Swords).

The biggest indoor festival of its kind to be held in Europe

over the winter months, LMW has long since expanded past

its seven-day format of musical cramming; 250 acts are set

to appear at over 50 events across Liverpool’s key city-centre

venues, running from Friday 23rd October until Halloween nine

days later. Once again the line-up is an absolute smorgasbord

of musical confections for your consideration, where alternative

rock titans sit alongside cutting-edge pioneers in electronica. It

also wouldn’t be a Liverpool Music Week without an undercard

of flourishing local acts, and this year is no different, with several

of them now sitting comfortably alongside the headliners.

If you need some help in drawing up your own list of this

year’s must-see acts, here’s our guide to what’s taking place.

Holly Herndon

Richard Hawley

Words: Richard Lewis, Bethany Garrett.

OPENING PARTY

23rd October @ The Kazimier, Rat Alley and The Arts Academy

SHOWCASE EVENTS

Though there are other shows running alongside this on 23rd

October, the Opening Party is the real place where Liverpool

Music Week comes alive. The Kazimier, its adjoining outdoor

Rat Alley, and the recently adopted Arts Academy will act as

the incubator to an opening night of epic proportions, with a

plentiful amount of stages and nooks pressed into service.

Avant-garde electronic artist HOLLY HERNDON, a lynchpin of

the constantly fascinating 4AD label, headlines this event in a

stunning opening gambit for LMW 2015. Herndon’s cerebral take

on that grey area where experimental electronica meets club

music is full of inventive tingles, with her second LP Platform,

issued in May, winning her near-unanimous critical acclaim. This

LP landed Herndon on the cover of Wire magazine in April, where

she discussed liberating the potential of technology.

Another Wire magazine cover artist in 2015, Mica Levi, makes

a welcome return to Liverpool as part of the Opening Party with

her avant pop group MICACHU AND THE SHAPES. Fresh from

the release of new LP Good Sad Happy Bad, the Shapes’ bright,

cut and paste manner has now added and extra emotional

dimension that works on a wealth of levels. Micachu And The

Shapes’ inclusion demonstrates LMW’s eclecticism as they line up

alongside electronic duo DARKSTAR, whose third LP Foam Island

finds the Warp heavyweights in classic dark-yet-uplifting form as

they tackle their own disillusion with 21st-century society.

Shadowy electronic music producer and DJ JAM CITY – the

project of Jack Latham – also features at the shindig, bringing

to life his updated version of what the post-dubstep landscape

sounds like. This year’s Dream A Garden album is something

of an about-turn from his 2013 debut record Classical Curves,

and sees Latham venting his frustration at everything from DJ

culture to the non-committal attitude of modern musicians. He

has, as ever, got plenty to say, and delivers it with a detached,

alien-like voice.

A special guest slot is also reserved for returning heroes

OUTFIT, as they reassemble on Merseyside after an extensive

UK and European tour. Slowness – their Memphis Industriesreleased

album from earlier in 2015 – has had a slow-burning

effect in winning listeners over, but win them over it has. If the

reaction to their gloopy, angular melodica at their Kazimier

headline show in June is anything to go by, this could mutate

into the night’s biggest happening.

VEYU will add a flourish of bruised, driving indie to proceedings

as they warm things up, and they’ll be joined by a clutch of fellow

local stars-in-waiting across the three performance spaces.

Many of the highlights of this year’s LMW will come from its

series of standalone shows which, when put together, look like

an especially star-studded constellation. For many people, the

centrepiece of these shows will be the appearance of RICHARD

HAWLEY on the festival’s opening night. Hawley is on the road to

promote new LP Hollow Meadows, which is a return to the classic,

sophisticated songwriting of the Pulp guitarist’s formative solo

years. It is a highly anticipated follow-up to 2012’s Standing At

The Sky’s Edge, an LP which secured Hawley a second Mercury

Prize nomination. The little-used Dome at Grand Central Hall will

be the setting, a spectacular location which will hopefully follow

in the same vein as Hawley’s fantastic show at the Philharmonic

Hall in 2013, a similarly ornate venue for the Sheffield singer’s

baroque pop songs.

A collaboration between LMW and alternative music

promotions powerhouse All Tomorrow’s Parties brings Canadian

post-rock titans GODSPEED YOU! BLACK EMPEROR to Camp and

Furnace on Tuesday 27th October. Godspeed have one of the

most distinctive audio footprints in music – a loud/quiet/louder

approach, with strings and found sounds stuffed into the gaps

to devastating effect – and they have undoubtedly been a huge

influence on post-rock bands of every hue. The Montreal group

are travelling the globe showcasing recent LP Asunder, Sweet

And Other Distress, which was issued to widespread acclaim

bidolito.co.uk


Bido Lito! October 2015

17

Godspeed You! Black Emperor

Josh T. Pearson

Telegram

DIY PRESENTS:

BREAKING OUT

earlier this year: this is the first time the band have ever played

on Merseyside in their 21-year career, and their monumental live

show is ideally suited to the former industrial recesses of Camp

and Furnace.

Shifting gear completely, LMW team up with city-based

promoters Harvest Sun to present country troubadour JOSH T.

PEARSON in the evocative surroundings of The Scandinavian

Church (Wednesday 28th). Formerly of cult indie rockers Lift To

Experience, the Texan singer-songwriter counts Mark Lanegan

and Guy Garvey among his many fans, while also commanding

a formidable cult following Stateside and in the UK. The semi-

Biblical nature of Pearson’s lyrical wordsmithery, coupled with the

fact that he’s one of the most intimidating-looking gentlemen in

rock, are the main contributing factors to this obsessive following.

Following their appearance in The Kazimier Garden in July

where they debuted their wonderfully off-kilter performance

Legs, STEALING SHEEP continue the dance theme via a hook-up

with IMMIX ENSEMBLE at The Bluecoat on Sunday 25th October.

The collaboration also features a live dance performance by two

of Ireland’s leading contemporary dancers and choreographers,

Fearghus Ó Conchúir and Aoife McAtamney. Staged in association

with Liverpool Irish Festival, the performance combines the

former’s sparkling alt. pop with the latter’s traditional orchestral

instrumentation.

Nipping over to Wolstenholme Square on the same night, US

noise rockers HEALTH play The Kazimier, their first show in the

city in half a decade. Known for their discordant and distinctively

deafening sound, the LA quartet manage to evade the usual

labels by ploughing an intriguing furrow between noise rock

and stadium-sized posturing. August’s Death Magic is their third

studio album, coming six years after their last (Get Color), and

two years after their soundtrack to video game Max Payne 3.

Though pegged as the heirs apparent to Trent Reznor’s theatrical

noise throne, HEALTH have a lot more in their locker to show yet,

especially given the newfound melodic strain on Death Magic.

On 29th October The Kazimier plays host to the latest Trance

Party from Ellesmere Port beatsmith EVIAN CHRIST. Presented in

association with Oscillate Wildly and Abandon Silence, this latenight

party is Evian Christ’s chance to bring together his favourite

artists from Beatland for one massive party, with not a hastilyerected

backstage cage in sight.

There’s another welcome return from an LA-based band on

Friday 30th when BEST COAST drop in at The Kazimier. The fuzz pop

duo – fronted by the cat-loving Bethany Cosentino – released their

third record, California Nights, in May, which sees them add a layer

of overdriven shoegaze guitars to their trademark weed-infused

alt. rock bounce. Best Coast are assured to bring the brightness of

summer cutting right through October’s dark nights.

A new element to this year’s festival, the Breaking Out series of

shows is presented in association with DIY mag, and aims to put

Liverpool’s music lovers in touch with the nation’s next wave of

alternative stars. Six such shows are scheduled – five at The Shipping

Forecast, and one at Arts Club – beginning on Friday 23rd October and

running until the following Friday (30th), with admission set at an

extremely reasonable £3 each; there will also be a limited number

of £10 wristbands that cover the entire series. Arena-bound indie

stars PALACE get the Breaking Out series rolling on the opening

night alongside newcomers THE AMAZONS, a quartet from Reading

with a penchant for chest-beating indie rock. Monday, 26th October

sees anthemic Irish alt rockers ALL TVVINS down in The Hold, a duo

who’ve already supported Pixies, Arcade Fire and Jungle so far in

their embryonic career. Sydney trio DMA’S join forces with Caithness

broodsters NEON WALTZ for what will be a bouncing show on

Tuesday 27th, and Wednesday 28th sees motorik London troupe

TELEGRAM bringing the glam to town. Another 4AD act, this time one

of the bright young things, drops by on 29th October in the form of

PIXX, the airy electronic pop project of 19-year-old Hannah Rodgers.

The sole non-Shipping Forecast show rounds off this Breaking Out

series when SHURA – the electro pop project alter ego of Aleksandra

Denton – appears at Arts Club (Loft) on Friday 30th October. All shows

will be complemented by a host of Merseyside acts on the respective

undercards, with plenty of future LMW headliners in the mix.

bidolito.co.uk


18

Bido Lito! October 2015

Deerhunter

All We Are

Gang of Four

CLOSING PARTY

31st October @ Camp and Furnace

The end of Liverpool Music Week’s festivities fro 2015 comes in

the form of the reliably brilliant Closing Party, which takes place

on All Hallow’s Eve at Camp and Furnace, scene of triumphant gigs

by Mogwai, Forest Swords and CHVRCHES last year. The final word

for 2015 is given over to Atlanta, GA’s DEERHUNTER, yet another

4AD star snared in the Liverpool Music Week net. This totemic US

alt. rock quartet, led by the brilliantly unpredictable Bradford Cox,

unveil their new LP (Fading Frontier) a fortnight before this show,

and will likely be one of the biggest draws of the whole festival.

Juxtaposing the storied and the brand new are two acts that

occupy the sub-headline spots (but only just): the storied half

is represented by ground-breaking post-punks GANG OF FOUR,

who showed at The Kazimier earlier this year that they’re still

packing the punches almost 40 years after their formation; the

latter, brand new, half is represented by SOAK, one of 2015’s most

talked-about new artists. The project of Derry-born songwriter

Bridie Monds-Watson, SOAK has received sizeable acclaim for

accomplished debut LP Before We Forgot How to Dream released

in May. A firm favourite with BBC 6Music, which supported singles

B A Nobody and Sea Creatures, the upcoming set at Camp and

Furnace will be SOAK’s Liverpool debut.

Another new artist who has turned heads with his individualist

alt. pop is LA PRIEST, the new guise of former Late Of The Pier

singer Sam Dust. Scoring impressive reviews for debut LP Inji, his

new set-up sees Dust move away from the leftfield electronica

of his former band towards oddball psych pop. Elsewhere, BAIO –

who, under his full name Chris Baio, is best known for his day job

as bassist for superlative NYC alt. rockers Vampire Weekend – is

preparing the ground for his forthcoming debut solo LP of dancefriendly

hits The Names, due for release this winter. Continuing

in this indie disco vein but hailing from this very conurbation are

poppy rockers CLEAN CUT KID, who received the support of Radio

1 for their infectious debut single Vitamin C earlier this year, with

the group’s debut LP expected next year.

Bringing it all back home are ALL WE ARE, who wrap up an

incredible year which has seen their “psychedelic boogie”-

infused debut LP reap sterling reviews. Returning from a series

of festival appearances across Europe, the three-piece take to

the stage in the former warehouse space for the second year

running, in what will doubtless be a memorable homecoming.

Percussionist Rich O’Flynn informs us he’s itching to play to a

home crowd and that the mellowed and melancholic trio are

planning on mixing things up a little at Camp and Furnace:

“We always try to do something a bit different when we play

in Liverpool. We’ve done stuff before where we’ve got people

up playing some extra drums or playing extra instruments, but

whether it’s having some people on stage with us or doing some

new tunes, we try to make things a bit different. We just love

playing so to be in Liverpool and play a home gig – the Closing

Party – will be a real buzz.”

Also representing the home front will be pioneering punk

rockers SUGARMEN who make their Music Week debut after a

series of higher-than-high-profile summer shows and festival

slots. Currently cooking up a storm in the studio, keep your ears

peeled on the night for something a little different sounding

from the four-piece, powered by the same electrifying stage

presence they’ve built up a rep with. Guitarist and vocalist Chay

Heney took a break between takes in the studio to tell us how

the band are “really looking forward to playing. Over the last

ten years or so Music Week’s become a huge part of the gig

diary in Liverpool, so we’re made up to be playing the Closing

Party which is always the biggest night and has got such a great

line up this year – we’re fans of Gang Of Four and Deerhunter

too. That’s the great thing about it, you get to play among

contemporary bands as well as bands that have more stature

than you and that you’re fans of. It’s also just nice to be included

in a show that someone in your hometown has put together and

thought that you’re good enough to play – you know? It’s boss

that someone’s put us on a bill with bands that we really like.”

SPRING KING, the energetic surf rock quartet who went from

under the radar, word-of-mouth success to worldwide exposure,

return to the parish which one of their number (guitarist Tarek

Musa) once called home. Famously the first act to be played on

Zane Lowe’s Beats 1 radio show, the band are limbering up to

support Spector on tour next month. Relishing being back in

his surrogate city, Musa informs us “I’m really excited to play,

we’ve never played Music Week before either and I know that

a lot of good bands end up playing it. We played Sound City

and I guess every time I come to Liverpool it’s just a bit of a

laugh, it’s like a second home to me cos it’s where I studied

and a lot of my mates are still there, like [producer] Joe Wills

and [songwriter] James Canty.” The guitarist also praises the

festival for promoting sonic open-mindedness amongst giggoers.

“Music Week is good because there are a lot more people

going along to the venues just on a whim to try out new sounds

and hear new bands, whereas when you’re headlining most of

the people are gonna come because they’ve maybe seen you

before or they’ve heard your stuff on SoundCloud. With Music

Week, it’s more like ‘let’s try out something new, let’s try out

this venue or this one’.”

Enough there to keep even the most weary, wandering punter

happy? We think so.

Liverpool Music Week runs from 23rd to 31st October. Full

details on line-ups and tickets for all shows can be found at

liverpoolmusicweek.com.

bidolito.co.uk


BOOK NOW: 0161 832 1111

MANchesteracademy.net

PEACE

THURSDAY 1ST OCTOBER

WALK OFF THE EARTH

FRIDAY 2ND OCTOBER

HAWKTOBERFEST 2015: HAWKWIND

+ RUTS DC

SATURDAY 3RD OCTOBER

BOYCE AVENUE

FRIDAY 9TH OCTOBER

BUZZCOCKS

+ MARION +GOLDBLADE

SATURDAY 10TH OCTOBER

MIGUEL

SUNDAY 18TH OCTOBER

FROM THE JAM + THE UNDERTONES

+ THE BEAT

+ LOUISE DISTRAS

SATURDAY 31ST OCTOBER

BLACKBERRY SMOKE

FRIDAY 6TH NOVEMBER

SKINDRED

+ CROSSFAITH

SATURDAY 7TH NOVEMBER

GARBAGE - 20 YEARS QUEER

FRIDAY 13TH NOVEMBER

THE WEDDING PRESENT

+ THE VASELINES + CINERAMA + EMMA POLLOCK

DOORS 6PM

SATURDAY 14TH NOVEMBER

FUSE ODG

MONDAY 16TH NOVEMBER

HAPPY MONDAYS

THURSDAY 19TH NOVEMBER

MEGADOG: DREADZONE

+ EAT STATIC + SYSTEM 7

+ DJ MICHAEL DOG + MC TBAG + VJ’S PEEKA & EEFEE

SATURDAY 21ST NOVEMBER DOORS 9PM - 4AM

FRANK TURNER & THE SLEEPING SOULS

TUESDAY 24TH NOVEMBER

A TRIBUTE TO MANCH25STER FT:

THE CLONE ROSES - THE OASIS

EXPERIENCE THESE SMITHS - TRUE ORDER

PLUS SPECIAL GUEST DJ PHIL BECKETT (STONE ROSES TOUR DJ)

DOORS 7PM - 12AM

FRIDAY 4TH DECEMBER

NEW MODEL ARMY

DOORS 4.30PM / SHOW 5PM

DOORS 4PM

DOORS 4PM

+ THE DUB PISTOLS + GUN + TV SMITH

SATURDAY 5TH DECEMBER DOORS 4.30PM / SHOW 5PM

THE DARKNESS

+ THESE RAVEN SKIES

THURSDAY 10TH DECEMBER

BOWLING FOR SOUP

FRIDAY 5TH FEBRUARY

SOUL II SOUL

FT. JAZZIE B & CARON WHEELER

+ JAMES TAYLOR QUARTET + AFTERSHOW DJ SET

FROM NORMAN JAY MBE

SATURDAY 20TH FEBRUARY

TWENTY ONE PILOTS

SUNDAY 21ST FEBRUARY

SABATON / ALESTORM

SATURDAY 27TH FEBRUARY

FORMERLY THE MDH FORMERLY THE HOP & GRAPE FORMERLY THE CELLAR

PARADISE LOST

WEDNESDAY 30TH SEPTEMBER

HUNTER HAYES

THURSDAY 1ST OCTOBER

GAZ COOMBES

THURSDAY 8TH OCTOBER

CLASSIC ROCK TRIBUTE TOUR

FEATURING HELLS BELLS, BLACK ROSE AND STATE OF QUO

FRIDAY 9TH OCTOBER

THE ICICLE WORKS

SATURDAY 10TH OCTOBER

KWABS

Sunday 11th October

PROTOJE

FRIDAY 16TH OCTOBER

R5

SUNDAY 18TH OCTOBER

CRADLE OF FILTH

THURSDAY 22ND OCTOBER

BATTLES

FRIDAY 23RD OCTOBER

DELAIN

SATURDAY 24TH OCTOBER

REEL BIG FISH

MONDAY 26TH OCTOBER

INSANE WRESTLING CHAMPIONSHIP:

LIVE FOREVER

FRIDAY 30TH OCTOBER

HEAVEN 17

SATURDAY 31ST OCTOBER

THIRD EYE BLIND

THURSDAY 5TH NOVEMBER

YELAWOLF

FRIDAY 6TH NOVEMBER

IMPERICON NEVER SAY DIE! TOUR 15

FT: THE AMITY AFFLICTION

+ DEFEATER + BEING AS AN OCEAN + CRUEL HAND

+ FIT FOR A KING + BURNING DOWN ALASKA

MONDAY 9TH NOVEMBER

PERIPHERY

+ VEIL OF MAYA

SATURDAY 14TH NOVEMBER

KATZENJAMMER

SUNDAY 15TH NOVEMBER

THE FRATELLIS

MONDAY 16TH NOVEMBER

KREPT & KONAN

THURSDAY 19TH NOVEMBER

STRIKING MATCHES

FRIDAY 20TH NOVEMBER

THE STORY SO FAR

WEDNESDAY 9TH DECEMBER

BAABA MAAL

SATURDAY 23RD JANUARY

EXTRACTION FESTIVAL FT: [SPUNGE]

+ WHITMORE + PHINIUS GAGE + FIGHTS & FIRES

+ RED LIGHT REBELS

FRIDAY 25TH SEPTEMBER

ENSLAVED

SUNDAY 27TH SEPTEMBER

WHEATUS

WEDNESDAY 30TH SEPTEMBER

AGNOSTIC FRONT

+ THE OLD FIRM CASUALS

FRIDAY 2ND OCTOBER

XENTRIX

+ ACID REIGN + SHRAPNEL

SATURDAY 3RD OCTOBER

RALEIGH RITCHIE

SUNDAY 4TH OCTOBER

RAINTOWN

WEDNESDAY 14TH OCTOBER

WOLFSBANE

SATURDAY 17TH OCTOBER

THE WOODENTOPS PERFORM ‘GIANT’

SUNDAY 18TH OCTOBER

LUCY ROSE

MONDAY 19TH OCTOBER

DAN BAIRD & HOMEMADE SIN

SATURDAY 31ST OCTOBER

Y & T

TUESDAY 3RD NOVEMBER

LEAVES EYES

SATURDAY 7TH NOVEMBER

TRACER

THURSDAY 12TH NOVEMBER

MY LIFE STORY

+ TALK IN CODE + THE ORIELLES + ELLEKAYE

SATURDAY 14TH NOVEMBER

PORTICO

+ SNOW GHOSTS

THURSDAY 19TH NOVEMBER

RESCHEDULED FROM SUNDAY 26TH APRIL - ORIGINAL TICKETS REMAIN VALID

BACKYARD BABIES

+ HEAVY TIGER + JUNKSTARS

TUESDAY 24TH NOVEMBER

THE DEAD DAISIES

THURSDAY 10TH DECEMBER

ROXY MUSIQUE

FRIDAY 11TH DECEMBER

RON POPE & THE NIGHTHAWKS

SATURDAY 16TH JANUARY

CANCER BATS

SATURDAY 23RD JANUARY

SNUFF

THURSDAY 18TH FEBRUARY

EVILE

SATURDAY 26TH SEPTEMBER

POSTPONED FROM 27TH SEPTEMBER 2014 - ORIGINAL TICKETS REMAIN VALID

ELIZA AND THE BEAR

THURSDAY 1ST OCTOBER

HAYSEED DIXIE

FRIDAY 2ND OCTOBER

NORTHLANE

+ VOLUMES + THE ACACIA STRAIN + HELLIONS

WEDNESDAY 7TH OCTOBER

HOFFMAESTRO

THURSDAY 8TH OCTOBER

AGAINST THE CURRENT

SATURDAY 10TH OCTOBER

AMBER RUN

FRIDAY 30TH OCTOBER

DARLIA

THURSDAY 5TH NOVEMBER

NORTHSIDE

SATURDAY 14TH NOVEMBER

SEPULTURA - 30TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR

TUESDAY 17TH NOVEMBER

HIATUS KAIYOTE

THURSDAY 19TH NOVEMBER

ZEBRAHEAD

FRIDAY 27TH NOVEMBER

THE LANCASHIRE HOTPOTS –

50 SHADES OF GRAVY TOUR

SATURDAY 28TH NOVEMBER

MATT BERRY & THE MAYPOLE

WEDNESDAY 2ND DECEMBER

THE ZOMBIES

WEDNESDAY 9TH DECEMBER

THE ARISTOCRATS

TUESDAY 15TH DECEMBER

EVIL BLIZZARDS’S BLIZZMAS BALL

SATURDAY 19TH DECEMBER

THE FRONT BOTTOMS

THURSDAY 4TH FEBRUARY

UK FOO FIGHTERS

SATURDAY 5TH DECEMBER

THERION

+ THE LUCIFERION LIGHT ORCHESTRA + IMPERIAL AGE

SATURDAY 16TH JANUARY

MANCHESTER ACADEMY PRESENTS

BITERS

THURSDAY 8TH OCTOBER

GIRL FRIEND

SATURDAY 10TH OCTOBER

facebook.com/manchesteracademy @manchesteracademy FOR UP TO DATE LISTINGS VISIT MANChesteracademy.net


20

Bido Lito! October 2015

Words: Paul Fitzgerald / @NothingvilleM

bidolito.co.uk

Photography: Aaron McManus / ampix.co.uk

JOHN

JOSEPH

BRILL


Bido Lito! October 2015

21

Something happened, something changed for JOHN JOSEPH BRILL on the

day he took the decision to up sticks and relocate from west London to

south Liverpool. This transition, a reverse of the usual journey, brought

about a sea change in how he saw his life, his music and his future. The dark

intensity of his lyrics, and the atmospheric throb of his simple three-piece band,

are picking up keen interest from all quarters, and he continues to make the

right moves. 18 months since that original decision to move was made, we meet

in a Lark Lane pub on a rainy summer’s afternoon, as he takes a break from

rehearsing for shows at Reading and Leeds Festivals on the BBC Introducing

stage. The upwards trajectory of this most-intriguing songwriter is the chief topic

of our discussion, with asides into the interesting back story and the undeniable

healthy future of a performer that Liverpool has come to know as one of its own,

one of them, one of us.

Bido Lito!: You’ve been in Liverpool for a while now. It seems like a strange move

to make to come from London and settle yourself here, and right now, there are

a lot of people who see you as a Liverpool act. The city, and its scene, seem to

have welcomed you and made

you its own. How did the move

north come about?

John Joseph Brill: Well, the

genesis of this project was

back in January 2013, and I was

living in this incredible flat in

Shepherds Bush. I’d split from

this heavy rock band I was in at

the time, and was sharing this

flat with a couple of great bands.

I went through a weird sort of

transitional phase, because

everyone else was in a great

band, and I didn’t have a project

to my name. It was kinda hard.

Then I became really ill, for

about three months, and kind

of used the time I had to start

writing and putting together

some songs. That’s where songs like Pieces and Muscle And Bone came from,

and that’s when that whole EP – the Pieces EP – started to occur. Then, in May

of that year, my girlfriend moved here to do a PHD. I’d been spending time in

Liverpool since I was young, I’d been coming up to visit my entire life, I’d always

had a very strong connection with the city, and I’d always loved the place.

I found myself coming to visit my girlfriend, and each time it was for longer and

longer. She’d go off to work, and I’d wander down to Bold Street, armed with

books and books of lyrics, so that, even though I was technically living in London

at the time, most of the EP was actually written in Bold Street Coffee. Then I

started demoing the songs back in London, and eventually in January 2014, we

found a studio in Kent to record the Pieces EP. So, there was a period of about a

year where I’d split from a band, written a tonne of songs, spent a whole lot of

time in Liverpool, and recorded an EP. I’d never met any musicians here, I was

kind of working in isolation, but it became such an inspirational place to work. It

feels like musical creativity is woven into the fabric of the city, you can’t escape it.

said. There were local musicians and bloggers in the crowd, and they were really

responding well to what we do here. It was liberating, I felt more free. It was

totally different to working in London, where it’s all so competitive. Here it’s

collaborative, and it’s great that people are so accepting. Liverpool is just such

a better place to be, creatively, and it’s just so much more of a perfect home for

me than London was.

BL!: The Pieces EP is quite heavy in parts, both musically and lyrically. There’s a

certain brooding kind of intensity to what you write, almost an anger about it:

it’s edgy in all the right places, intimidating, even. Creating that, and matching

those lyrics with the moods created by the band, is clearly a part of the process

that’s important to how you shape what you do.

JJB: Yeah, it’s weird, I tend to work alone when I’m writing, mainly just me and

an acoustic. But I’ve gotta say, the atmospherics and the dynamics come from

working with an absolutely brilliant band. Those guys are fantastic. They totally

get exactly where I’m coming from, and from the moment I first played them the

EP, they clocked exactly what I was going for and that’s a real big part of it all.

When I split from my last band,

I knew I wanted to concentrate

on writing, on lyrics. I wanted

to study and learn exactly what

makes a truly good writer. Not

just songwriters, authors, poets...

I like people who deal with literal

lyrics. For me, something like

Perfect Day by Lou Reed, which

on the face of it is just a list, is

a great example. It’s just, you

know, things that happened

today. But obviously, the whole

thing’s a metaphor, and there’s

this really dark undertone to

it, which I find appealing. I’m

obsessed – absolutely obsessed

– with lyrics. And one line can

start it for me. I start there, poke

around looking for a melody with

it, and it kind of grows from there. With the song Pieces, I was out in the pub with

a mate of mine, and thinking about lots of stuff that had gone on – you know,

everything in that song happened – and I just decided that I had to go home at that

exact moment, it was something I had to do right then, otherwise I might never

write again. So I went home and got it all down really quickly, and my poor mate

had to sit there the whole time until I was finished, the poor bastard.

BL!: The voice helps, particularly with that song. It’s a rich, instinctive and really

individual baritone sound you have. The depth and richness will always help

deliver a great lyric.

JJB: Ha, yeah! It’s kind of the school of Reed and Leonard Cohen and when Bowie

goes low – I love that. There’s so much character there. When I was in a rock band

previously, I was all ‘up there’, totally different, but yeah, it’s all in the depth

and the tone. I kind of think it’s almost a heavier sound than a guitar through 17

amplifiers can ever bring you. You can do so much more with it.

BL!: How did you go from that point to releasing an EP?

JJB: The EP was picked up by a label called Killing Moon, but they didn’t want to

put it out until January 2015. So that gave me six months or so to think about

what I wanted to do, and my plan became to go to Liverpool and build a band

around this project. So I moved here, found this wonderful flat, and started to

embed myself in the scene up here. It just felt like such a natural place for me

to work in. Within a week, I’d found the band, and they’re fantastic. We started

rehearsing, and it just felt so… right. It made perfect sense. We did a couple

of shows, and got a lot of great support from Dave Monks, who was brilliant,

playing the songs all the time. From there 6Music came along, then there were

some more shows – including a sold-out gig at Studio 2, which was such an

affirming experience. It kind of felt like I’d been accepted as a local act, like you

BL!: So, 2015. What’s it brought you? Where are you at with it now, and what

happens next, another EP?

JJB: Yeah, we’re recording another, and we’re in pre-production with that. Again,

Killing Moon will be releasing that, and we’re in the midst of putting all that

together. Looking further down the road, I’ve written quite a large body of songs

since being here, a lot of which are about being here too. I’m really so happy

to be based here in Liverpool to do all of this though, I really couldn’t imagine

doing it anywhere else. It’s gonna be a really special time.

Pieces is out now via Killing Moon Records. John Joseph Brill also plays the Bido

Lito! Social Live @ Aloft on Thursday 22nd October, which is free to attend.

soundcloud.com/johnjosephbrill

bidolito.co.uk


22

Bido Lito! October 2015

The rituals of going to a gig – from trying to second-guess

the stage times of the support acts to timing your trip to

the toilet/bar perfectly so as not to miss your favourite

song – can be as addictive as the thrill of the show itself. But

for those hardened souls who’ve been to more gigs than they

care to remember, and want a bit more engagement from the

standard three-bands-and-home format, the opportunities

for what a night can be built around are a lot wider than first

imagined. Following on from the runaway success of their first

exhibition-cum-gig, the people behind NO HOMERS CLUB are

expanding on their format of making a pop-culture reference

the central theme for a night, into which the live acts fit. One of

the event’s founders, Michael Fowler, tells us how resurrecting

dinosaurs and serving d’ohnuts can be as central to your event

as the performances.

scene

stealers

Words:

Michael Fowler / @homersclub

Illustration: Ria Fell / riafell.co.uk

From Springfield To Isla Nublar With No Homers Club

I’d done some pretty outlandish events before

No Homers Club with my writing gang, The Wild

Writers. In our finest feat we managed to fit a

full-size wrestling ring into The Kazimier and

had professional wrestlers brawl for a literary

night called Sancho Panza. One of my closest

mates told me for months afterwards that I’d

never be able to top something like that, and

I was inclined to agree with him. No Homers

Club came about through a lifetime spent

with eyes glued to The Simpsons and the

feeling that we could celebrate its impact on

our lives in an art exhibition. So me and Ria

Fell, truly one of Liverpool’s most talented

artists and my best friend, set out on

organising our very own Simpsons-palooza.

We didn’t have any high expectations for the show – in fact, we

didn’t even realise so many people liked The Simpsons – but with

25 years of the sitcom preceding the event we could have

been a little more confident.

Before we had all the artists signed up, our

plans were for a much smaller exhibition, and we

had some venues in mind but they all started

closing down around us, meaning we had to

search a little further afield. When we first saw

Constellations we thought it was a massive

space and we weren’t sure if we’d be able fill it

with art, let alone people, but the guys there are so

unfathomably creative and enthusiastic that, before

I’d even finished talking about the idea with Becky, their

chief, she was riffing all these new ideas about doughnut

bars and Squishee machines. They were the perfect fit to help

create a real spectacle and bring a small part of Springfield to

the Baltic Triangle.

To find artists for the exhibition we stuck posters wherever

we could, shouted as loudly as possible on social media, and

approached artists that are currently making

some of the most incredible Simpsons

artwork in the world. Just over 30

artists in all got back to us, and we

were blown away by how good

they were. To namedrop a few: we

received work from the inimitable

Katie Craven, (who helped Ria with the

mural and did her own ink detail take on The

Simpsons’ animals); Martin Kirke, who crafted Ralph Wiggum’s

Star Wars Figures; Harrison Edwards, who made the James Deanlike

Thrillhouse piece; and Liverpool’s own PickWick, who did

perhaps the most iconic piece of the show, recreating Marge

Simpson’s Chanel dresses.

Getting a music act that would fit an event like No Homers

Club would have been a near impossible task if a band like Organ

Freeman didn’t exist. We had our hearts set on them playing

from the start and knew they’d deliver an unforgettable show.

I think they’re one of the most entertaining live acts that

Liverpool has, and their love for the Simpsons is as

deep rooted as my own. Once we had the artists

and live act signed on, we were starting to think

that we might have something pretty special on

our hands.

The week before the event was as stressful as

hell and most of our original worries were now

turned on their head. The event that was supposed

to have no expectations suddenly had a tonne

of them. We were now worrying that we had too

much work to fit in the exhibition, and, though we had

meticulously planned it, we only had the day of the launch

to put it together. All our mates, my girlfriend, and Ria’s family

mucked in to help put up the exhibition and put up with me and

Ria stressing-the-fuck-out. It was a finer deadline finish than I’d

have wanted. I was hammering in information placards seconds

before the first people were let in, but from then on I was in a

state of euphoria. I couldn’t believe we’d

finished it and it looked really good too. I

put that down to Ria’s creative direction

more than mine.

After No Homers Club, that friend

told me the exact same thing, “You’re

never going to top that.” And again, I’m totally

inclined to agree him. But we’re really going all-out to

try and prove him wrong. Ria had the idea for ISLA NUBLAR,

our Jurassic Park-inspired event the day after we launched

the Simpsons exhibition. I think we’ve seen the film

together three or four times and watched it separately

a countless amount, so it made complete sense to us to

start unearthing live Tyrannosaurs.

Katie Craven, Harrison Edwards and Martin Kirke are

back making pieces for the show, and we have over 20 new

artists, including QUAD Collective (a team of artists whose

values of participation and interaction with artwork

match our own), Laura-Kate Chapman (of Laura-Kate

Illustrations fame) and Sick Note (a local

street artist who’s also doing a speciallycommissioned

mural for us).

Isla Nublar will be a bit different to No Homers

Club: for a start, this time we have three bands

playing – Sex Hands, Silent Sleep and our trusty talismans,

Organ Freeman – and, though it’s still going to be a fun evening,

I think there might be a bit more suspense and excitement from

the prehistoric surprises we have in store. Constellations are

getting right behind it too, helping us to create the fictional

island where Jurassic Park is set. In fact, the last email I received

from Becky said, “Got an offer of two pygmy goats… but hanging

on for the classic full-sized”. That cracked me up. I mean it’s that

kind of detail that Jurassic Park fans are looking for, right?

Isla Nublar takes place at Constellations on 9th October, with live

music from Organ Freeman, Sex Hands and Silent Sleep.


15-25 October 2015

Rusangano Family, African-Irish Hip Hop handpicked by Snoop

Ciaran Lavery & Ryan Vail • Róisín O • Sert One • Bolts • Little Rivers

Stealing Sheep & Immix Ensemble with dancers Fearghus

Ó Conchúir and Aoife McAtamney • Saltcutters • Dallahan

Craft Beer expo • Academy award-winning films and animations

Folk and electronica • Whiskey tasting with Irish Distillers

UK première of Meta-Perceptual Helmets • Good Vibrations with

Terri Hooley: idealist, radical and rebel in conversation and DJ set

Multi-award winning authors and poets • Augmented reality

dystopian art • Premières and preview screenings

Co-commission finalé with Liverpool Music Week.

Good Vibrations with Terri Hooley

10 days, 50+ events, over 30 venues

Tickets now on sale at

www.liverpoolirishfestival.com

Rusangano Family

facebook.com/LivIrishFest

@LivIrishFest

Première of ‘Brooklyn’


24

Bido Lito! October 2015

Draw the line

Gig sketching with Mook Loxley

Images: Mook Loxley / mookloxley.tumblr.com

Words: Maurice Stewart / theviewfromthebooth.tumblr.com

Picture the scene – a dark, sweaty Liverpool venue pulsing

to the beat of the latest gang of musicians to arrive on

our shores. While bodies twist with abandon (or gaze

in wonder depending on the pint count), you graze elbows

with a crazy man stood at the edge of the throng, scribbling

intently into a sketchpad. If you’ve been in this scenario and

wondered who on earth this guy is, I can now reveal: his

name is MOOK LOXLEY.

Well, his name is actually Robin Peters, and for the last

three years he’s been sketching live performances under the

Mook moniker, some of which you may have seen on the

@bidolito Instagram account. Now his impressions of the

likes of Mugstar, Richard Dawson, Evian Christ and Mogwai

will be collated into an exhibition – the imaginatively titled

Mook Loxley Gig Sketching – launching on 8th October at The

Well Space on Roscoe St., featuring live music on the night

from Afternaut.

As we sit down over a glass of rum and a particularly fiery

plate of jerk chicken to discuss the full Mook Loxley origin

story, it turns out to be fittingly convoluted, not to mention

accidental, for such a devoted comic book fan. “I was living

in London, just drawing, while at the same time a friend was

writing in Liverpool,” Loxley begins searching for the first ink

blots of this journey. “We were both complaining that no-one

was interested in our work, so decided to join forces and make

a comic, set in the 1930s about a jazz band. That was a big

part of the reason I moved to Liverpool.” However, they soon

ran into practical problems: “It was ridiculously complicated!

The first episode has an earthquake, as well as a Dr. Caligari

figure, complete with a menagerie of animals. It’s easy to

write “Earthquake” across a double-page spread, but a lot

harder to research and then draw one.”

As the comic drifted towards the back burner, a trip to

America provided the catalyst to a new direction. “I was in

New Orleans, and started drawing a double bassist playing

a bar on Bourbon Street,” remembers Loxley with fondness.

“I was still thinking about learning techniques for comics,

but also remembering the words of my A-level art teacher:

‘You always have to draw from real life’.” Recreating this

experience back home initially proved difficult: “I couldn’t

afford life-drawing classes, so I ended up drawing my mate’s

band The Wild Eyes quite a lot. I’d sit in their practice room for

hours and just sketch.”

It was around this point that Loxley, alongside friend and

fellow artist Michael Snowdon, created Draw The Line – a

gathering of artists of all skill levels who came together to

share tricks, techniques and a canvas, one Thursday a month

in Django’s Riff. “It was a way to meet other people who

drew, in order to get better,” Loxley explains. As it became

more popular they added live music, partly because of the

venue but also there was common ground between the

people attending musically as well as artistically. “That’s

when I began regularly sketching live performances,” reveals

Loxley. “Drawing from real life, it means I have to go out and

draw in real situations. Drawing from a photo is only going

to take you so far – you won’t get the real experience of what

is going on.” While Django’s remains its spiritual home, over

the years Draw The Line has trodden a nomadic path through

a cross-section of the city’s cultural totems, including FACT,

The Bluecoat, MelloMello and Radio Merseyside. There

was also an appearance at September’s Above The Beaten

Track festival, which also featured a Mook Loxley DJ set. As

someone with such a strong love of music, and particularly of

drawing while listening to music, it was inevitable that those

two streams would merge.

Speaking from personal experience, I’ve found Mook

Loxley to be a knowledgeable and entertaining gig buddy. It’s

not uncommon for him to draw as much attention as those

onstage, much to my amusement and his embarrassment.

Loxley has got used to being watched, but it’s clear he’d rather

be in the background, as long as he can see the stage: “For

the Jonwayne show I ended up right up his nostrils in the

front row, which felt weird, as well as dangerous, as he’d

already put his hand over someone’s camera. But I showed

him the picture afterwards and he really liked it.” Like any

artist Loxley wants his work to be appreciated, yet he’s

often damned by the faint praise of those simply excited

by the novelty of seeing something new: “Some people

will tell me I’m amazing when I’ve only drawn three lines!

Although I’d say the most common comment I get is ‘at least

it’s better than taking a picture’.” Other gig goers have been

less impressed, believing him to be as disengaged from the

music as the camera-phone zombies. “I overheard someone

at the Mogwai gig saying ‘yeah but he’s not really listening

or enjoying it, is he?’, and it made me really think about it.

If anything, drawing makes me more sensitive to the

sounds – I hate people talking at gigs even more

now!”

Loxley is adamant that focusing on both

drawing and listening enhances rather than dilutes

his concentration: “I find it harder to draw without

something else distracting my mind. There’s a theory

concerning drawing with either the verbal or the visual

side of your brain. For example, if you’re drawing a nose,

your verbal side has a pre-conceived idea of what a nose

looks like, and as this is the dominant side it often stops

you from actually looking. When there is something to

distract that side of the brain, like music, you actually have

to look, and suddenly it’s not ‘I’m drawing a nose’, but more

‘I’m drawing that curve there’. It breaks it down into shapes

rather than objects. You get into the music, and the feeling

and everything just flows naturally.”

The responses of those drawn have been “mostly positive,

although some musicians just think I want money out of

them,” he admits. The confusion is understandable, though

– this isn’t like the kind of fan art you’d expect to see thrown

at One Direction or 30 Seconds To Mars. What Loxley does

is more of a visual review, with the end results very much

dependant on the performance: “If it’s a bad gig, I think I do

a worse picture. If I’m enjoying the gig and get lost in the

experience, I feel like it comes easier, although I’ll have to

look back through all my old sketch books to see if that’s

actually true!”

Trawling through old work in preparation for this

exhibition has taken up a significant amount of time

already, as he’s not merely picking his favourites, but

“those that feel more like complete pictures rather than

just sketches”. The sheer number of pictures in just

over three years is remarkable, with an evolution in

style that can be tracked along the timeline, ranging

from comic-style portraits to abstract explosions

of colour and emotion. “Comics are about simple

black lines that capture so much. There’s hardly any

lines but they’re so accurate, as all the crazy pencil

lines are obliterated in the inking stage, which I

found a bit disappointing after all that hard work.

There’s something about the messiness of live

sketching that I really like.”

The Mook Loxley Gig Sketching Exhibition

launches on 8th October at The Well Space.

To see more of Mook Loxley’s work, follow Bido

Lito! on Instagram (@bidolito) or follow Mook

on mookloxley.tumblr.com.

Richard Dawson

The Wytches


Mogwai

bidolito.co.uk

The Wild Eyes


26

Bido Lito! October 2015

THE CHANGING SPACE

OF RAVE CULTURE

Words: Becca Frankland / @beccafranko

Photography: Ryan Fitz / ryanfitzphotography.com

BUILD ME UP

The purpose of historic buildings in Liverpool has

bidolito.co.uk

altered, with the most impressive of architectural

forms being adopted and adapted for raves. Becca

Frankland explores why...

Dance music events have made themselves at home

in an abundance of spaces since the inception of the rave

phenomenon – everything from the dark and dingy factory in

Chicago championed by Frankie Knuckles at the birth of it all,

to fields and gritty industrial sites off the M25 in the 80s as the

architectural designs. This ability to manipulate emotions

encourages us to prefer certain building styles over others, and

we have manifested our interest in these breathtaking historical

landmarks.

“It’s something that is part of a new phenomenon which

is about music, culture and arts merging together and thus

being seen to be an appropriate activity to take place in public

buildings,” explains Professor Kronenburg. The music itself

sits centrally in the overall experience when in attendance at

their inhibitions. It provided salvation and a home for all races

and sexualities; the common ground was music. House music

itself had origins with traditions like gospel. Spiritually and

aesthetically, it developed from the need of the oppressed in

the US as they built a community through dance, and it was

shortly followed by those frustrated by Thatcher’s England and

their alternative society: acid house.

Inside a building structured for a religious routine like the

Bombed Out Church, it is near impossible not to compare the

UK turned to acid. They soon settled in fully licensed clubs and

warehouses and resided in them comfortably.

But crowds are insatiable, their thirst for new and immersive

experiences unquenchable, which has led promoters to source

spectacular venues, rich with history. Opulent neoclassical halls,

prodigious places of worship and eerie derelict mental asylums

have all been seized for party purposes in order to cater to the

varied needs of clubbers, predominantly within Liverpool.

There is something indisputably triumphant about housing

events in these unique spaces. We have an abundance of

opportunities, in theory, to create incredible parties within aweinspiring

venues, but in practice the leeway has not always been

there to achieve it. In 1994, John Major’s Criminal Justice Bill

sought to outlaw outdoor dance festivals and “sounds wholly

or predominantly characterised by the emission of a succession

of repetitive beats”. This was the fundamental reason the early

rave scene transferred to properly licensed buildings. The parties

filled with spontaneous spirits and allegedly disorderly punters

were seen as a threat to the authorities, so their dynamics were

forced to change.

These days, promoters are working closely with the local

councils in order to create a safe environment for us to revel

in, without it feeling restrained. Inside the historical venues

that organisers inhabit, the opportunity for clubbers to lose

themselves is heightened. Combine the music with listed or

neglected architecture, and it has the power to substantially

change our frame of mind for the duration of time spent there.

“Architecture does affect the way people think,” says Professor

Robert Kronenburg, author of Live Architecture: Venues, Stages

and Arenas for Popular Music. “With raves, it’s a different

sort of atmosphere: rather than it being about the act or the

performance, it’s more about the individuality of the person

taking part.”

These venues encourage the individuals to connect on a much

deeper level, with their environment and with the buildings

themselves. We live in a 21st-century world where personal

connection can be limited; we are surrounded by technology and

lacklustre habitats, but these dance music events revolve around

the energy generated and aesthetic emotional responses, which

are characterised by feelings stimulated by artefacts such as

these events, but so many club nights offer too much of the

same; most line-ups have been done two times over, and the

musical policies occasionally become stale and predictable. In

order to keep audiences interested, the visual impact needs to

be unforgettable and it needs to be attributed to a certain event

in order for the promoter to develop a brand. “These buildings

become kind of a sanctioned part of urban life, and a powerful

part of it,” adds Professor Kronenburg. “Cities look on live music

events as ways of creating an identity for themselves.”

In Liverpool it is the club night Freeze that has created an

identity in relation to unique and powerful buildings, dominating

the likes of St. Luke’s Church (otherwise known as the Bombed

Out Church), an abandoned asylum in Newsham Park and the

Grade I-listed St. George’s Hall.

Some of these venues, most notably the Bombed Out Church,

reflect so much more than just the building’s infrastructure: they

are a symbol of how the city has stood against adversity and

has succeeded in maintaining its authentic beauty. “The lack of

a roof at the Bombed Out Church creates a special sort of vibe,

irrespective of the weather. Generally speaking there’s a tangibility

of friendliness at our events in this venue,” explains Rob Casson, the

owner of Freeze, “which is definitely down to the type of people we

attract, but the space also enhances this – especially because there’s

an evangelical purpose behind the location.”

“It’s the same with the event at the [Anglican] Cathedral,” Casson

continues. “The atmosphere was very respectful, almost awestruck,

which meant it never quite went ‘off’ the way clubs can. This wasn’t

a bad thing at all: if anything, it creates a really unique mood that

you don’t usually get at all-night dance music events.”

The pious purpose of these venues echoes the religious

connotations that have been related with dance music culture

since the very beginning. Frankie Knuckles himself once

claimed: “When those three thousand personalities become

one personality, it’s the most amazing thing. It’s like that in

church. By the time the preacher gets everything going, or that

choir gets everything going, at one particular point, when things

start peaking, that whole room becomes one.”

Frankie Knuckles’ Warehouse club was seen as a sanctuary

for the so-called undesirables, a place were black and gay men,

who struggled to find a place to belong, could come and lose

chapel experience with the rave experience. As the crowds pour

into these events, there is adulation of the DJ who takes the role

of a leader, directing the thoughts of those in their company.

And those moments, when various minds come together and

the crowd vocally show their appreciation of the music and the

environment in unity and chant, mirror the prayers repeated in

a church.

For some movers and shakers, coming together in these

environments for dance music events is still as significant

as a religion; it is a chance to join with people who have a

similar outlook on life, it is a spiritual experience, a melting

pot of freedom and compassion; but the notion of trespassing,

mischievousness and rebellion against modern society is still

palpable.

“I think what we do as an event has an impact on crowds

because it’s so different from anything else they can experience

elsewhere when it comes to clubbing,” says Casson. “These

venues have incredible heritage and the interest that surrounds

them develops from this idea that these buildings were never

built for these events.”

Despite the overwhelming success of the events that take

place in these historic buildings, it does not come without

hurdles for promoters. The confines of a normal club space have

been designed wholly for music events, with almost everything

in place prior to the event, but when ideas are put in motion to

reinvent architecture, it takes extensive planning and can often

be met with adversity.

The Bombed Out Church is set to be repaired in the autumn,

with £150,000-worth of repairs planned to make the landmark

safer. A major consultation has taken place to determine the

future of the church, with the public able to decide on what

sort of events should take place within the building. The council

will now entertain expressions of interest, with the possibility

of new occupiers taking it over next year, but what does this

mean for Freeze?

Time will tell what happens to one of Liverpool’s most aweinspiring

places to party, but the strength of the opinions

concerning what will happen to the space has highlighted

that our relationship with bricks and mortar stretches so much

further than a roof (or lack of) over our heads.


LMW15

LIVERPOOL MUSIC WEEK

23 – 31 OCTOBER 2015

TICKETS FOR ALL SHOWS AVAILABLE AT

WWW.LIVERPOOLMUSICWEEK.COM

TWITTER: @LIVMUSICWEEK

FACEBOOK: OFFICIALLIVERPOOLMUSICWEEK


Godspeed You! B

LMW15

Richard Hawley

Deerhunter Gang o

Josh T. Pearson Evian Chri

Holly Herndon Micachu and

Darkstar All We Are Jam C

Stealing Sheep x Immix Ensem

Spring King Clean Cut Kid DMA’

John Joseph Brill Palace Pixx Neon W

Viola Beach Whitecliff The Amazons Barberos B


LIVERPOOL MUSIC WEEK

23 – 31 OCTOBER 2015

lack Emperor

f Four Best Coast

st – Trance Party HEALTH

the Shapes SOAK Shura

ity Baio Outfit LA Priest

ble

with live dance performance by Fearghus Ó Conchúir & Aoife McAtamney

s Holy Holy Meilyr Jones Veyu

altz All Tvvins Telegram Sugarmen

ody a.P.A.t.T. Strange Collective Gulf XamVolo


LMW15 + THE KAZIMIER PRESENT

October 23 – The Kazimier

LMW15 Opening Party

Holly Herndon

Micachu and the Shapes

Outfit

Darkstar

Jam City

Veyu Body

18+ / 7PM / £10 EARLY BIRD

LMW15 PRESENT

October 23 – The Dome, Grand Central Hall

Richard Hawley

Meilyr Jones

John Joseph Brill

16+ / 7PM / £25

LMW15 + LIVERPOOL IRISH FESTIVAL PRESENT

October 25 – Bluecoat

Stealing Sheep

x Immix Ensemble

with live dance performance by

Fearghus Ó Conchúir & Aoife McAtamney

6.30PM / £7

LMW15 PRESENT

October 25 – The Kazimier

HEALTH

Barberos

a.P.A.t.T.

16+ / 7PM / £10

LMW15 + ATP PRESENT

October 27 – Camp and Furnace

Godspeed You! Black Emperor

16+ / 7PM / £20

LMW15 + HARVEST SUN PRESENT

October 28 – Scandanvian Church

Josh T. Pearson

16+ / 7PM / £18.50

LMW15 + OSCILATE WILDLY + ABANDON SILENCE PRESENT

October 29 – The Kazimier

Evian Christ – Trance Party

18+ / 10PM / £5 – £10

LMW15 PRESENT

October 30 – The Kazimier

Best Coast

16+ / 7PM / £10

LMW15 PRESENT

October 31 – Camp and Furnace

LMW15 Closing Party

Deerhunter Gang Of Four

SOAK LA Priest All We Are

Baio Holy Holy Spring King

Sugarmen Clean Cut Kid Gulf

14+ UNTIL MIDNIGHT / 6PM / £15 EARLY BIRD

PRESENTS

BREAKING OUT at Liverpool Music Week

October 23 – The Shipping Forecast

Palace The Amazons

October 26 – The Shipping Forecast

All Tvvins

October 27 – The Shipping Forecast

DMA’s Neon Waltz

October 28 – The Shipping Forecast

Telegram

October 29 – The Shipping Forecast

Pixx

October 30 – Arts Club Loft

Shura XamVolo

INDIVIDUAL SHOWS £3 / 7PM /18+ (EXCEPT SHURA 14+)

£10 WRISTBAND: ENTRY TO ALL ‘BREAKING OUT’ SHOWS

LMW15


32

Bido Lito! October 2015

OCTOBER IN BRIEF

THE VOODOO BALL – THE REVENGE OF EL COCO

If you’re after New Orleans voodoo vibes this Halloween but your pockets won’t stretch to the French Quarter, look no further than VOODOO BALL at

The Kazimier. Kicking off with a procession of a 40-strong samba band leading lost souls through the city’s cobbled streets, the Kaz will be decked out

in suitably deadly and decadent style. Sets from dark magic devotees THE VOODOO LOVE ORCHESTRA, UNITED VIBRATIONS, 7 SUNS and KATUMBA will

be interspersed with appearances from characters plucked from Cajun nightmares, while in the gardens you’ll find DJ sets to sell your soul for.

The Kazimier / 31st October

Edited by Bethany Garrett

THE PARROTS

Hailing from Madrid, garage surf gang of three THE PARROTS bring their drone-drenched and sunshine-soaked sounds to the shores of Costa del

Mersey. Riding off the back of EP Weed For The Parrots, released on Luv Luv Luv Records earlier this year, the trio have accumulated an NME buzz-band

billing and impressed musos at SXSW with their fuzzy grunge and garage meets surf pop signature. Having built up a reputation for their riotous live

shows, their Shipping Forecast outing offers a chance to see them in close quarters before they move onto bigger climes.

The Shipping Forecast / 7th October

SECKOU KEITA: 22 STRINGS

One of the first concerts to be held in the Phil’s new Music Room – the prestigious venue’s venture into a more intimate and informal setting – sees

Senegalese kora player SECKOU KEITA bring his 22-stringed West African harp to the Georgian Quarter. Known for his charismatic performances as well

as being a master of his craft, his dextrous manipulation of the kora combines the ancient intricacy of the instrument with the familiarity of modern

flamenco. Support comes from Welsh songstress GWYNETH GLYN, whose intricate guitar work is complemented by her bilingual singing.

Philharmonic Music Room / 26th October

IT’S REET CUP NORTH

The North West’s premier coffee festival returns to Manchester in November, with CUP NORTH celebrating its second year in existence. The event

brings independent baristas, industry professionals and coffee lovers of all stripes to the Victoria Warehouse for a two-day extravaganza, with a series

of speakers lined up to discuss their industry stories too. A contingent of Liverpool coffee shops will be represented at the festival, as will your very

own pink-paged music monthly. We've put together Blended Bido @ Cup North – a playlist celebrating the best in new music across the North West

to be enjoyed with a perfectly percolated brew. You can find more information at cupnorth.co.uk.

ETCHES

Liverpool-based beat and bass heavy five-piece ETCHES bring their electronic/melodic melange to the Arts Club. Tipped for great things, the

band are gearing up to release their reverb-fuelled track Do Nothing and stripped back B-side The Great Void in digital and beermat formats

(yep, a beermat with a download code), as part of new label Fierce Panda’s limited edition singles club. This should keep fans of their guitar

and electronic hybrid style satiated ahead of the November release of James Bragg-produced EP, Wall Of Sleep.

Arts Club / 1st October

MUSIC FOR EMPTY SPACES

Merseyside is full of empty spaces, many of them unnecessarily empty, some atmospherically so. Radio Merseyside’s legendary Pure Musical

Sensations programme, led by its presenter Roger Hill, is running a project for the autumn to invite local musicians to create music with empty spaces

in mind, as an opportunity to draw attention to the many issues relating to empty properties in Merseyside. Musicians will be invited to choose a space

that is empty, or inaccessible, and to create a piece of music which evokes it. The music will be broadcast on the show on 1st November: register your

interest by by getting in touch via email on roger.hill@bbc.co.uk.

MERSEYRAIL SOUND STATION FINAL UPLOAD DAY

Budding musicians will get another chance to vie for the Merseyrail Sound Station Prize on Saturday 10th October, and make sure they’re in with

a chance of winning a year of music industry mentoring and advice, plus 12 months of free rail travel. The final upload day takes place at Liverpool

Central Station where bands, solo artists and anyone in between are invited to come along and record their entry song. A talented few will go on to

perform at the final at Moorfields Station in the culmination of the year-long event. All details can be found at merseyrailsoundstation.com – and

interested acts are encouraged to book their slots via the Merseyrail Sound Station Facebook page.

bidolito.co.uk


Bido Lito! October 2015

33

CHIBUKU BLOOMING IN AUTUMN

If you’re the type of person who comes across all gloomy as the gusts of autumn breeze in, well SNAP OUT OF IT! The bods at Chibuku have got a fine

run of shows lined up for this month, so you’d better stop looking wistfully at that knitted scarf. Chibuku bring the party kicking and screaming to Arts

Club over two successive weekends early in the month: on 3rd October, JULIO BASHMORE (pictured) and BONDAX share headline duties, followed by

HANNAH WANTS and SHADOW CHILD on 10th October. They then take things over to Camp and Furnace with a special daytime event that sees a DJ

set from BONOBO top their bill in Camp. chibuku.com

RIDE

In 1989, RIDE’s Mark Gardener and Andy Bell were just 19, looking out from their Oxford home at a boring and hopeless world. Their subsequent

outpouring of angst, style and overdriven noise on debut LP Nowhere saw them burst out of this rut and lay waste to the charts as one of the leading

lights of Creation Records and the early 90s shoegazing scene. Now reformed (for a second time), the quartet are marking 20 years since their last live

shows with a UK tour, following highly-acclaimed sets at Primavera Sound and Coachella earlier in the year.

O2 Academy / 15th October

VINYL STATION

To get your ears around an exclusive advance play of new album Fading Frontier from Liverpool Music Week performers and 4AD stars DEERHUNTER,

come along to our next instalment of Vinyl Station at Metal, Edge Hill Station on Monday 12th October. Masterful MC BERNIE CONNOR will once again

be hosting an evening of concentrated listening from start to finish, followed by a discussion thrown up by the highs and highers of the record. The

new album from the Atlanta four-piece promises a shift towards melody and texture, and you can find out the shape of that shift at Vinyl Station.

Sign up for your free ticket now at metalculture.com.

THE PHANTOM BAND

The elusive and enigmatic Scottish six-piece that we now know as THE PHANTOM BAND (but which have gone by many names in the past) are, without

doubt, one of the most imaginative bands operating in the UK today. They are the sound and product of six fertile minds tugging threads in their own

directions, and the fact that they make this seemingly discordant mess sound so damn good is the product of some not insignificant alchemy on their

behalf. 2014’s Strange Friend, and its anagrammatic half-brother Fears Trending, show a band at one with their unique sense of danger and hope.

The Shipping Forecast / 22nd October

ORPHEUS

Award-winning theatre company Little Bulb bring their musical, 1930s Parisian version of the Greek tragedy to life with this charming production, which

saw director Alex Scott recognised at the Salzburg Festival for his bold work. The story focuses on a young Django Reinhardt, living in Paris and invited

to play the part of Orpheus in a production by charismatic songstress Yvette Pépin. Set to a live score of hot club jazz, opera and French chanson, the

play is a thrilling telling of Orpheus’ ill-fated descent into the underworld to reclaim his lost love, Eurydice.

Everyman Theatre / 20th-24th October

THE BIDO LITO SOCIAL LIVE @ ALOFT

The third instalment of our monthly social at Aloft Liverpool takes place on 22nd October with yet another amazing array of local talent. We’ll be

celebrating the arrival of Bido Lito! number 61 with a gig headlined by the exquisite JOHN JOSEPH BRILL. Support on the evening comes from BILL

NICKSON and REID ANDERSON. Following the success of our previous gigs at the super-plush premises, it’s guaranteed to be a great night, and it’s

all completely FREE!

Aloft Hotel / 22nd October

GENTLEMAN’S DUB CLUB

Starting out in a basement in Leeds in 2006, GENTLEMAN’S DUB CLUB have come a long way from their humble beginnings, having taken their

energetic dub sets to the rave scene in Goa, and the middle-class festival-goer in Glastonbury. The nine-strong dub collective bely their office-wear

stage uniform with masses of high energy, delivering on-stage fireworks akin to a pumped-up headline DJ. Their debut album, 2013’s FOURtyFOUR,

has remained in the top 40 of iTunes’ reggae album chart since its release, putting them near the summit of the worlds of bass and dub music.

Arts Club / 24th October

BROADCAST #2

Challenging preconceptions about the way that audience and media interact is a shared totem of both Deep Hedonia and A Small Cinema, so it’s

no surprise to hear that they’ve hooked up to produce an event that’s already been a success. BROADCAST is designed to give a platform to the work

of, and collaborations between, musicians and filmmakers in the North West. This, their second such event, will feature live music from CORSEA and

GERMANGER, as well as bringing together audiovisual forms by screening shorts and music videos set to new compositions.

A Small Cinema / 9th October

bidolito.co.uk


34

Bido Lito! October 2015 Reviews

Echo & the Bunnymen (Mike Sheerin / michaelsheerin.photoshelter.com)

LIVERPOOL INTERNATIONAL

MUSIC FESTIVAL

The festival’s previous incarnation as a

regressive catastrophe of tribute bands is a

distant memory as we set out to take in all

that this year’s extensive LIMF has to offer. Likeminded

individuals have flocked to St George’s

Hall for the first of the Liverpool International

Music Festival Commissions on the opening

night: The Revolution Will Be Live’s tribute

to the late Gil Scott-Heron. Our host for the

evening, Radio Merseyside’s Ngunan Adamu,

introduces SOPHIA BEN-YOUSEF, whose rich,

velvety tones and accomplished keyboardplaying

get the evening off to a soulful start.

Her song Perfect includes the refrain “who is

perfect?” and is perhaps an apposite reference

to Scott-Heron’s more self-destructive traits.

Scott-Heron’s son, Rumal Rackley, makes a

brief and understated speech, as much about

the warm Liverpudlian welcome as it is about

his father’s legacy, and introduces MALIK AND

THE O.G’S. Fronted by Malik Al Nasir, the creator

of tonight’s tribute, two things quickly become

apparent as the band commence their set.

Firstly, the O.G’s, veterans of the international

jazz scene, are an incredible bunch of musicians,

all snappy drum patterns, crisp percussion and

funked-up bass, blistering guitar and sinuous

sax and vibe solos. Secondly, the Great Hall may

look magnificent, but it certainly doesn’t sound

it; you have to search for the musicianship

through a blanket of woolly reverb that

threatens to bury an evening of otherwise

great performances. You know it’s bad when the

artists themselves feel compelled to comment,

like Garry Christian during a cracking set of

THE CHRISTIANS’ soulful, harmony-laden hits,

including Scott-Heron’s The Bottle.

The crowd has grown by the time ASWAD

appear, crunchy drum and bass and a vibrant

horn section managing to punch through the

distortion, and CRAIG CHARLES keeps the crowd

dancing for the next hour with a pop/soul set.

By the time headliner TALIB KWELI hits the stage

with another brief nod to Gil Scott-Heron, the

crowd has dwindled somewhat. The faithful are

treated to a crowd-participation set of machinegun

rapping and heavy beats. A final eulogy

from a clearly delighted Malik Al-Nasir brings

the curtain down.

There have been a few strange decisions in

the curation of Friday’s LIMF Commission event

at the Epstein Theatre, Routes Jukebox: why,

for example, are we watching a video of film

critic Mark Kermode’s THE DODGE BROTHERS

perform when Liverpool still has some of the

finest purveyors of skiffle and bluegrass plying

their trade week-in, week-out in places like

The Caledonia? Also, do DAVE MCCABE AND

THE RAMIFICATIONS really bring the story of

Liverpool’s transatlantic relationship “bang up

to date” when there are bands like Outfit and

Hooton Tennis Club who are more relevant and

possess much more obvious links to the US?

However, this does little to detract from a

night that is obviously geared towards music

fans of a certain age having a fab time. Early

performances from an assembled house band

who span decades and geographical area set

the tone admirably. Widnes’ NATALIE MCCOOL

delivers her trademark version of Billy Fury’s

Wondrous Place to fantastic effect, while

Washington’s JALEN NGONDA brings some

genuine Motown style to proceedings. Local

vocal stars MIC LOWRY get one of the best

receptions of the night when they perform

Sweet Was The Wine.

It’s obvious who many punters are here

to see, as well as their musical era of choice,

when both CHRIS DIFFORD of Squeeze and THE

FARM are welcomed vociferously by a sold-out

Epstein Theatre. Squeeze hits Up The Junction,

Pulling Mussels (From The Shell), and Cool For

Cats get full singalong treatment and Difford’s

tales from his long career are warmly received.

There’s a genuine love for this Londoner in

these parts but, again, it’s difficult to see where

he fits in with the narrative of the evening.

JANICE LONG does well to weave a story

around the acts who make up the evening’s

first half, which climaxes with a stripped-back

set from The Farm. Presenting the Routes

Jukebox radio show, she picks out local

landmarks which have hosted the various

musical traditions which have crossed the Pond

over the years and line the memory lane down

which we have taken this quite satisfactory trip.

So many people enjoy dance music in

its various forms, whether it’s on the radio

on the way to work, in a bar or even a rave

in a warehouse. But not enough people

acknowledge the origins of where it all started,

or its relevance within the city of Liverpool.

Over at the Palm House we have a selection of

bidolito.co.uk


Reviews

Bido Lito! October 2015

35

Talib Kweli (Mike Sheerin / michaelsheerin.photoshelter.com)

the finest selectors, all paying their dues to the LIMF offers a change of pace the following

most influential black American music as part day, with an evening recreating Nashville’s

of yet another fascinating LIMF Commission, world-renowned Bluebird Café in the Bluecoat

Liverpool: Next Stop New York.

as part of a partnership between the two venues

Approaching the venue is an experience in struck up through the festival this year. The

itself, elegant but striking, simple yet intricate. event is split into two shows: the first features

The tiered shape, filled with glass panels the two local singer-songwriters, KIRSTY

and framed by white rims of beamed light, MCGEE and KAREN TURLEY, who were selected

illuminates the shell of the venue – resembling from an open call earlier in the year to go to

Jay Gatsby’s tastes. Inside, the towering, Nashville to hone their craft by collaborating

verdant plants draped over the temporary stage with other musicians and songwriters, as

create a tropical backdrop laced with bulbs. well as Grammy Award-recognised US singersongwriters

Don Henry and Kim Richey.

The sounds of LES SPAINE’s set has everyone

inside twirling around the dancefloor as he Being sequestered with press and guests

delivers feel-good track after feel-good track, on the balcony makes it more difficult to fully

laying down classics as attendees sip their experience the Bluebird’s famed ‘in the round’

drinks and absorb the unique surroundings. format, but the complimentary Jack Daniel’s

GREG WILSON is next on stage. Known for cushions the blow. It also means that, when

bringing the sounds of the past to audiences an eerie, wailing sound not unlike a Theremin

of the present, Wilson has an appeal that echoes around the room, it is at first difficult

resonates not only with older crowds but with to identify the source, until the comments of

youngsters too. He takes to the mic to thank the other musicians provide enlightenment:

Les and fellow DJ Norman Killen, and reminds McGee is playing a saw, with a bow, and it’s

us why we were all here – to celebrate a truly utterly brilliant – a definite highlight. They close

special kind of music.

their part of the evening with a song about

Wilson takes the crowd on a journey, how Nashville brought them together, which

delivering tracks like Aretha Franklin’s Respect contains the lyric, “We’ve all come here on love

and Gino Soccio’s Try It Out that everyone from and speculation,” which encapsulates the vibe

their early 20s to late 50s lap up. Unfortunately, of the city.

the sound system in the Palm House doesn’t The second session is hosted by Bob Harris

always manage to keep up. However, Next Stop with award-wining singer-songwriters BETH

New York is a respectful and enjoyable homage NIELSEN CHAPMAN and JIM LAUDERDALE, and

to the music that’s been before us. Represented ANDREA DAVIDSON. It again follows the ‘in the

by a triumphant roster of artists, the soundtrack round’ format, with Harris’ contribution being

is every bit as spectacular as the venue. to engage the musicians in discussing their

craft. All stress the importance of collaboration

on their work, and mention how Nashville

today is a magnet for all artists, not just

musicians and songwriters but visual artists

as well, all tuning into the city’s authenticity

and capacity to enhance creativity. Lauderdale

also comments on Liverpool as being “a

musical energy vortex”. The event is advertised

as ending at 11pm, but it’s still going strong

almost an hour later when it’s time for us to

leave, sated on love and speculation – and a

drop of Jack Daniel’s.

The bank holiday weekend brings a jampacked

bill of acts playing across four stages

in Sefton Park. They say LIMF brings in punters

from all corners of the world but it seems ESA

SHIELDS has arrived from another galaxy, over

on the It’s Liverpool Stage. With an out-ofthis-world

sound from another astral plain,

the surreal art popper takes the audience on

a voyage through his eclectic soundscapes.

Creating songs of every genre, from electronica

to folk, the artist’s voice flies over his musical

environments with swooping notes like some

exotic bird over a rainforest.

Keeping within the otherworldly realm

are Wirral’s very own psych rockers HOLY

THURSDAY. Doing what Merseyside is infamous

for, the seaside 60s revivalists dig out retro

vibrations with a modern spin. It was almost

as though their song She, with its distinctly

Indian-inspired sound, beautiful harmonies

and trippy guitar, was born to flow freely

through the oaks of Sefton Park.

Helping to hold the nostalgic theme is LOUIS

BERRY, holding up the flag for Scouse rebel

rock. Forget Folsom Prison Blues it’s time for

Walton Prison Blues. Armed with his trusty

acoustic guitar, Liverpool’s answer to Johnny

Cash arrives on stage and thrashes straight into

his harsh country-inspired brand of good ol’-

fashioned rock ‘n’ roll, getting the crowd feetstamping,

head-bopping and dancing along

throughout his set.

The first real Liverpool love-in of the weekend

happens on the It’s Liverpool Stage with Jayne

Casey leading the all-female supergroup

HERSTORY. Liverpool’s princess of post-punk is

joined by Sense Of Sound director Jennifer John

and the tireless Natalie McCool for a rousing

rendition of All You Fascists Bound To Lose,

which is met with an enthusiastic response

from the families enjoying the last of the days

warmth. Local legends and two fingers to the

establishment make for a fitting way to see out

day two.

A dark and moody sky greets the crowds

walking across the fields of Sefton Park on

Monday and it is echoed by some dark and

moody riffage blasting from the main stage

courtesy of LIAM BAILEY’s tight blues/soul

four-piece.

JALEN NGONDA’s blend of 60s-inspired pop/

soul plays to relaxed crowds over at the LIMF

Academy stage, which showcases the best

up-and-comers; a fantastic string which has

been added to this festival’s burgeoning bow.

At the beautifully tree-ringed It’s Liverpool

Stage, masked drum and synth trio BARBEROS

are blasting out a prog/dance mash-up to an

enthusiastic crowd which continues to grow

during the pop/indie fun of HOOTON TENNIS

CLUB and the dancey synth of the TEA STREET

BAND.

Over on the main stage, LAURA MVULA and

her band present a superb set of classy jazz

and soul. Her cool delivery belies the strength

and depth of her vocal range. The band deliver

a bravely slow tempo but captivating set before

pushing up the tempo with some syncopated

crowd-clapping and a magnificent version of

See-Line Woman.

When SPACE take to the It’s Liverpool Stage

to a field of cheering aficionados – ones who

have braved the only inclement weather of the

weekend – the assembled crowd lap up a set

which gets progressively better, culminating in

singalong versions of their big hits Ballad Of

Tom Jones (with a friend stepping in, slightly

unconvincingly, on Cerys Matthews’ vocal

parts), Neighbourhood and Female Of The

Species.

Next Stop New York (Pete Carr / petecarr.net)

bidolito.co.uk


Meine Nacht (Alex Alderdice / facebook.com/alexalderdicephotography)

The thousands of Space watchers then

make a beeline for the festival’s main Central

Stage, which is already besieged by a massive,

expectant crowd for headliners ECHO AND THE

BUNNYMEN, augmented by the LIVERPOOL

PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA string section. No

live shots of the band on the giant screens, no

spotlight for Ian McCulloch who, eternally sunglassed,

remains the epitome of rock star cool.

He sounds tremendous too, as do the band, and

each song is welcomed by an adoring crowd like

the arrival of an old friend. Will Sergeant’s guitar

soars and the strings add to the emotional

punch as The Cutter, Killing Moon, Villiers

Terrace et al transport the crowd. A beautiful

Ocean Rain fades as fireworks whoosh and

crackle in the night sky, rising as quickly as the

LIMF star has in its short existence. A lump in

the throat moment to end an event-packed and,

at times, thrilling five days. Bravo, and more of

the same next year, please.

Glyn Akroyd, Sam Turner, Rebecca

Frankland, Debra Williams, Matt Hogg

MEINE NACHT

Static Gallery

MEINE NACHT. It doesn’t take a bilingual raver to

work this one out: it stands for My Night –which

is suitably reflective of the concept around

which these events are built: every person

who attends is encouraged to make of it what

they will – it’s all about the personal experience

someone has when it comes to nightlife.

The club scene in Liverpool is thriving, and

it’s not just the big dogs that are wowing

crowds. Events like Meine Nacht are catering to

our natural need for intimacy – something that

is frequently lost when the crowd numbers are

high and the pyrotechnics are bright. The party

was launched by two Liverpool-based DJs (a

familiar enough story), but the territory they’re

crossing into is unique. They push excitement

through the choice of a secret venue prior

to their last event, with the postcode kept

shush until the last minute. But they tease

the location through social media this time,

dropping hints and posting pictures of the

interior and exterior.

Although in many ways they have gone

back to basics and have stripped back the

idea of clubbing, they’re pushing forward with

relevant and new technology. The whole night

is streamed through Chew TV; something which

has been executed by major festivals through

services like BE-AT TV, and also small and

exclusive parties for Boiler Room, allowing

audiences to be involved even when they’re

not able to attend.

On arrival at what is eventually revealed as

Static Gallery on Roscoe Street, we are greeted

with friendly faces and a surprisingly chilled

atmosphere. Meine Nacht is characterised

as a project that combines media, music and

artistic visual representation, and the layout

reflects it. The projection screen behind the DJ

dances with pastel colours, contrasting against

the bare walls and metal beams on the ceiling

in the small main room, which only holds

approximately 60 people.

Orlagh Dooley, the co-founder of Meine Nacht

along with Jessica Beaumont, explains: “We

don’t focus on how many people come through

the door; it’s more like a collaboration with the

audience, and this takes us back to the house

party feel which is rife within student lives.”

There is an element of trespassing, the

space seems hidden away from the centre of

the city, it is far from the hustle and bustle but

close enough to still feel like it is part of the

urban buzz. It is something that the creators

purposefully aim for. “Another big influence

came from our personal experiences exploring

Berlin,” Orlagh tells us. “The hidden scene around

the area of Kreuzberg is something we took into

consideration when starting the night.”


CC_BL_Advert_Oct_v1.indd 1 09/09/2015 14:50

WIN A YEAR OF EXPERT MUSIC

INDUSTRY MENTORING, PERFORMANCE

SLOTS AT TOP SUMMER FESTIVALS

AND RECORDING TIME!

THE MERSEYRAIL SOUND STATION

PRIZE CLOSES ON 10th OCTOBER!!

For information visit

MerseyrailSoundStation.com

Get There By Train


38

Bido Lito! October 2015 Reviews

It’s not only the venues which are intricately

thought-out; the choice of headliner is

undoubtedly a smart one. SAMUEL DEEP is

one of the most diverse and forward-thinking

young artists currently leading the scene. He

brings rolling bass, teasing synths and a set

filled with substance and style. It is quality

house music with no frills, leaving the crowd

bopping along as they mingle with friends.

“We really look at the way DJs connect with

an audience,” Orlagh says as she talks us

through her reasoning behind the booking.

“There’s no real musical trend when choosing

headliners; obviously we pick artists that we

feel are making waves in the underground

scene, but we don’t want to be confined in our

choices.”

The future looks bright for Meine Nacht, with

a loyal following of ravers that appreciate and

utilise the parties that they curate, and the lineups

are set to cement their reputation even

further. “We have artists coming up who are

signed to the likes of Jackmaster’s Numbers

label and also Smallville Records,” says Orlagh,

“and we do have plans to link up with other

brands for our parties.” Every detail makes

the difference with Meine Nacht and, moving

forward, the club night definitely has the power

to bring a little bit of Berlin to Liverpool with

each event.

Rebecca Frankland / @beccafranko

GREEN MAN FESTIVAL

Glanusk Park, Brecon Beacons

You only need two things for a truly great

festival: bands who impress and weather

that doesn’t depress. GREEN MAN is certainly

offering the former this weekend. The

headliners are a mixture of bona fide legends

and current members of the zeitgeist. However,

the weather, even as we make the short walk

from the shuttle bus to our chosen pitch, is

looking pretty ominous.

BILL RYDER-JONES’ stage demeanour is

reliably passive-aggressive whatever the

weather. However, a well-received set of new

and old tunes seems to elevate his mood, even

Real Ale Pub & Kitchen

Open 7 days a week. Quality cask ales,

plus boss craft beers from Mad Hatter,

Brew Dog and others, bottled Belgian

beers, and great food.

Whisky tastings, cheese & wine nights,

live music and football, outdoor stage

and courtyard – all set in a Grade II

listed former jailhouse, in the city centre.

Speak to us about booking a cell

for the game.

Liverpool One Bridewell

Campbell Square, Argyle Street

Liverpool L1 5FB

t 0151 709 7000

www.liverpoolonebridewell.com

Liverpool One Bridewell @Lpool1Bridewell

Super Furry Animals (Wunmi Onibudo)

with one of the Brecon Beacons’ boisterous

wasps interrupting one of them. Newies

Catharine Huskisson and Two To Birkenhead

bring images of home rolling over the green

hills that surround the Mountain Stage as,

accompanied by members of By The Sea,

the Wirralite puts on a beautifully realised

performance.

The sunny songs of SWEET BABOO keep

the mountainous mist and cloud at bay and

the Welsh native, along with his nine-piece

band, are a deserved hit with the main stage

throng. His latest LP was released just a week

previously, and songs like Got To Hang On To

You and Walking In The Rain (which he prefaces

with a wish for a “Travis moment”) look set

to elevate the pint-sized balladeer to wider

appeal.

Canadian noiseniks VIET CONG offer

something entirely different over at the Far

Out Stage. A protracted soundcheck leads

into an intense sprawl of soaring post rock.

Matt Flegel’s Celtic-style growl complements

painfully tight riffs and Mike Wallace’s

unbelievable drumming. An epic breakdown

seems to last the entire afternoon but is

hypnotic in its engagement. Thrilling stuff.

It’s party time back at the Mountain Stage

as a veritable supergroup play the unearthed

hits of reclusive Nigerian genius William

Onyeabor. THE ATOMIC BOMB BAND features

members of LCD Sound System, Hot Chip and

Beastie Boys collaborator Money Mark and is

led by musical director Ahmed Gallab. They

are the first of two bands this weekend who

will bring music which seemed destined to be

only enjoyed on vinyl into the live arena. This

collection of disparate figures come together

to fantastic effect, ensuring that Friday night

finishes in style and setting the party bar high

for the weekend.

The weather takes a turn for the worst just

as we anticipate two of the highlights of the

weekend. Fortunately, nothing can distract from

seeing a masterpiece such as Marquee Moon

being performed in the flesh by Tom Verlaine

and his band TELEVISION. The performance hits

all the spots the record does with razor-sharp

guitar, anthemic call and response choruses,

and Verlaine’s vocal sounding exactly the same

as it did in 1977. This is a real treat and you get

the impression from many wet attendees that

it was the reason they bought their ticket.

However, there is more to come: true

heroes in this part of the world, SUPER FURRY

ANIMALS, follow in the footsteps of giants to

great effect. Their career-spanning set further

postpones the realities of a soaking wardrobe.

There’s the obligatory arms round shoulders,

a beautiful singalong in the form of Run

Christian Run, and a fully-fledged wig-out with

Receptacle For The Respectable. Traditional set

closer Man Don’t Give A Fuck pours down on

the crowd to infinitely more appreciation than

the accompanying drizzle, and it’s a triumphant

end to Saturday.

Sweet Baboo talked tongue-in-cheek about

Travis’s festival moment at Glastonbury some

years ago and Sunday sees Green Man’s own

version of this pathetic fallacy halfway through

MATTHEW E WHITE’s set. The super-smooth soul

man performs a great RnB version of The Velvet

Underground’s White Light/White Heat before

inviting the curiously named DEEP THROAT

CHOIR on to the stage for Feeling Good Is Good

Enough. With that, the sun cuts through the

thick grey cloud to reveal a beautiful blue sky

which illuminates the grounds at Glanusk; the

day is saved.

FATHER JOHN MISTY is an artist who has

seemingly come from nowhere in the last

couple of years (in reality he spent years

recording mediocre albums under the moniker

J Tillman and drummed for Fleet Foxes before

hitting on his magic formula). His performance

this evening justifies his rise in status. Like an

even sleazier Jarvis Cocker, he prowls the stage

exuding a camp, cool charisma which causes

the entirety of Green Man to fall in love with

him whilst simultaneously being sick in their

mouth. From opening track I Love You Honey

Bear with its swell of orchestral splendour, we

are transfixed and it’s a delight to be in the

palm of Father John’s sweaty hand.

Such a monumental bill of stellar acts

inevitably comes with clashes. Perhaps the

biggest dilemma of the weekend comes last.

ST VINCENT is set to put on her set of funky

electro pop at the same time as Swedish psych

giants GOAT perform their ceremony of the

apocalypse. The option of sampling a little bit

of both means compromising one’s immersion

in the shows, but it’s too difficult a decision.

The pain of the choice is tempered by the fact

that St Vincent plays many of her best songs

in the first part of her act. Rattlesnake and

Digital Witness, dripping with Prince-esque

sexuality, look all the better for the epic light

show lighting up the main stage congregation

as well as Annie Erin Clark’s perfectly executed

moves.

Goat put on a performance which is perhaps

not quite as energetic as their showing at last

year’s Psych Fest, but still contains all the

atmosphere and trademark timeless aesthetic.


The ritualistic performance also provides the

perfect preface to the traditional burning of

the Green Man. The ceremony is still moving,

awesome to behold, and incendiary despite the

wet, wet weather. How apt.

Sam Turner / @samturner1984

ARTHUR RUSSELL’S

INSTRUMENTALS

The Kazimier

A cohort weaned on the abundant fruits of

Arthur Russell’s posthumous veneration turn

out in force to see PETER GORDON et al perform

the late cellist’s instrumental odyssey. The

celebration of Russell’s tragically short life has

arrived as often as a birthday since the release

of documentary film Wild Combination. Only

last year Red Hot paid their homage with a

star-studded covers album. This year, Audika

Records released Corn, a reissue that boasts

unheard recordings from 1982-83. The almost

annual testimonial to Arthur Russell’s work

has exposed his undeniably rich and eclectic

catalogue to a new generation of fans who are

keen to partake in the fullness of his archive.

Russell’s unorthodox approach to composition,

inspired by disco and the pedagogues of

contemporary classicism, was demonstrably

ahead of its time. Albums like World Of Echo

and Tower Of Meaning continue to resonate

with listeners some two decades after Russell’s

untimely demise.

Fortunately, Peter Gordon’s ensemble

faithfully fulfils the demand accrued by

Russell’s escalating notoriety from beyond

the grave. Gordon and Russell met in New York

City in 1975. After bonding over a shared love

of pop music and instrumental arrangement,

the pair quickly became collaborators in The

Flying Hearts and The Love Of Life Orchestra.

Gordon worked closely with Russell on his

Instrumentals masterpiece; a nine-piece

extended movement inspired by the nature

photography of Yuko Nonomura. Twenty years

on, Gordon revived Instrumentals at a sold-out

performance at renowned New York arts and

music venue The Kitchen. Tonight’s ensemble

consists of the same line-up of musicians, as

well as the welcome addition of Ned Sublette

(a noteworthy name from Russell’s Sleeping

Bag Records imprint).

Russell’s frequent collaborators Ernie Brooks

(Bass) and Bill Ruyle (Drums/Vibraphone)

provide the trademark motorik-meets-disco

groove, which accommodates a pair of Peters

– Gordon (Sax) and Zummo (Trombone) – who

in turn make their signature counter-melodic

interjections between gradually elevating

sections. Rhys Chatham (Flute) reads diligently

from the score, while Gavin Russom (Synths) and

Max Gordon (Keys/Trumpet) provide flurries of

harmonic content. The performance is authentic,

fluid and resoundingly joyous. Although large

swathes of the piece remain true to the original,

Gordon’s glorious funk and soul-tinged melisma

are the dominant allele within the genus.

Apparently, the original Instrumentals score is

predominantly notated in Gordon’s handwriting;

this becomes salient as the night unfolds.

Gordon’s authority over the proceedings is

apparent. Vigorously, he conducts between

movements and instructs between changes. It’s

perhaps not until Peter Zummo’s sombre and

muted solo, referencing his work on the beloved

Tower Of Meaning, that the audience are able

to recalibrate their focus on the ensemble as

a whole. As the night departs with unravelling

splendour, the opaquely hedonistic Is It All Over

My Face? provides ample encore-stimulation

for The Kazimier to erupt into euphoric climax.

Rhys Chatham claps with hearty aplomb and

Gavin Russom defies his vocal register with the

familiar refrain.

FESTIVAL NO. 6

Portmeirion

Phil Morris

You know when you’re watching a sexagenarian

with the air of a particularly uppity ostrich

hula-hoop furiously to a drum solo and you’re

thinking “I kinda saw this coming – even

if nothing quite prepared me”? No? That’s

the incredible GRACE JONES at FESTIVAL

NO. 6, in a Sunday-ending Slave To The

Rhythm in which she’s don of all she surveys.

This we expected; it’s the starlings in the

slipstream of known unknowns that make such

a revelation of this weekender in Wales.

If you seek disorientation, why not D R O H

N E ft. NATALIE McCOOL? It’s a testament to the

D R O H N E lads’ overriding vision that initially

McCool’s vocal blends into their regurgitating

collage. What they eventually offer, though,

is escape from the chaos: in Sample Pictures

and Feral Child, the final two tracks, they hit a

clubby stride that brings unforeseen structure

to McCool’s coos and cries. It’s as if Burial or

ponytail-era Thom Yorke has blundered into

this chapel-like tower, then gone “actually,

wrong room”, not before allowing a thrilling

glimpse of another side of all involved.

There’s nothing concealed about the firstnight

closers. Pop music at the moment is about

hooks, right? Motifs more than songs – after

hip hop, after digital recording, after pins, posts

and shares, that’s the currency. THE 2 BEARS get

this, and come loaded: Hot Chip’s moonlighting

Joe Goddard et al reel off catchlines and dirty

synths in ringtone-length chunks that, laid

end-on-end, are a lesson in modern songcraft.

With tunes like Bear Hug and Sexy Donut, how

can they fail? Foot-shifting, playful and pimped

by a gaggle of drag queens, they demand your

best moves and never, ever lose the floor.

And yet, there’s more than one way to skin


SJM CONCERTS PRESENTS

L I V E O C T O B E R 2 0 1 5

PLUS

JOEY BADA$$

THURSDAY 12 NOVEMBER

O2 ACADEMY LIVERPOOL

GIGSANDTOURS.COM

0844 811 0051

LIVENATION.CO.UK

0844 826 2826

TICKETWEB.CO.UK

AN SJM CONCERTS & LIVE NATION PRESENTATION BY ARRANGEMENT WITH WME

FRIDAY 23RD OCTOBER

O2 ACADEMY LIVERPOOL

GIGSANDTOURS.COM TICKETMASTER.CO.UK THECRIBS.COM

TICKETWEB.CO.UK 0844 811 0051 0844 826 2826

THE NEW ALBUM FOR ALL MY SISTERS FEATURING

BURNING FOR NO ONE & DIFFERENT ANGLE AVAILABLE NOW

AN SJM CONCERTS PRESENTATION BY ARRANGEMENT WITH WME

SJM CONCERTS BY ARRANGEMENT WITH SOLO PRESENT

UK TOUR DECEMBER 2015

FRIDAY 18 DECEMBER

O2 ACADEMY LIVERPOOL

HHHH

Q MAGAZINE

MODERN NATURE OUT NOW

HHHHH

DAILY TELEGRAPH

HHHH

MOJO

HHHH

THE GUARDIAN

HHHH

THE OBSERVER

THECHARLATANS.NET

HHHH

THE TIMES

HHHH

THE DAILY MIRROR

GIGSANDTOURS.COM - TICKETMASTER.CO.UK - TICKETWEB.CO.UK

TOUR ANNOUNCEMENTS & PRIORITY BOOKINGS • FIND US ON

0844 811 0051


42

Bido Lito! October 2015 Reviews

a cat. GRAHAM MASSEY’S TOOLSHED – rockdetonating

tools therein: axe, bass, drums

and sax – leave their audience (90% bearded,

1,000% committed) just as delighted. If the 808

State dude and co. are a hug they’re a scruff-ofthe-neck

grab, and if they’re a donut they are

undoubtedly jam. Massey on axe duels with,

on charging four-string, Paddy Steer, liberated

from his short-circuiting-machine-operative

solo mode but, naturally, bringing the shiny

outfits. Their collision of Sun Ra Arkestra and

MC5 has both the 90% and the 10% losing their

shit: some admit urges to go home to listen to

jazz, but it’s only Saturday teatime. Others are

delirious, demented.

Then FN6’s refined vibe is toasted as

another fuzz-face has a wobbly when the

band are told to wind up. “No, all weekend,”

he howls. “Fuck everybody else.” Quite.

But wait. HOT VESTRY, like Grace Jones, know

how to make an exit. Macclesfield’s black-clad

finest leave their gig in single file before anyone

knows it’s over, which doesn’t half pique the

interest. The aforesaid tower – housing the Tim

(Burgess) Peaks Diner and acts championed by

his O Genesis label – had been empty when

they entered. Harry Ward, twin brother Joe,

Will Taylor and Tilly Florence look like a gothy

security firm and proceed to play fast and

loose with health and safety regs, as H Ward

hares off outside to assail Portmeirion with his

loudspeaker. With one EP out, spring’s A Scene

In Between, they occupy a space equidistant

to S.C.U.M. and The Rapture that’s all theirs.

They’ve just visited Berlin to “get inspired”, and

Grace Jones (Glyn Akroyd)

play dates in November at which they’ll inspire

you, too.

Across a square in a tiny room in the Town

Hall, the No. 6 ENSEMBLE are reworking bands,

among them JAMES, to audiences of about

50. Tim Booth’s voice suits the treatment,

particularly on Say Something and B-side The

Lake, which Booth recalls was voted off the

Laid album despite his and producer Brian

Eno’s protests.

Dissent is imminent here in the local

corridors of power, too, as the tourist village’s

temporary residents refuse to let Booth

leave until strings, woodwind and harp are

cajoled into an unplanned, improvised take

on Laid. People queued for four hours, so

no wonder, but what should disturb them is

living in ignorance, year upon year, without

chancing upon PAPER DOLLHOUSE, whose

set creeps from a woodland clearing as if

they’ve just woken there after nuclear war.

Astrud Steehouder and Nina Bosnic have

been doing this – this anaesthetised machinefolk/witch-drone/creeping-out

after nuclear

war – since Steehouder made the 2011 debut

album A Box Painted Black. At times they lean

towards a Broadcasty robotism, heard on the

corrupted call centre and response of Helios,

and at others it’s the vocal layering of Julianna

Barwick or Grimes, notably on Mermaid Song.

There are faint traces of Telepathe, Fever Ray

and Salem but really Paper Dollhouse evoke

only their own haunting of this space, and your

dream matter, for some time to come. In fact, a

lot of this festival can feel like one huge dream,

and that hula-hoop is still going…

Tom Bell

TRIO UROBORO

Kazimier Garden

Music can sometimes be impossible to pin

down – maybe it ought to be. For every woolly (if

liberal) definition along the lines of “organised

sound”, there are a dozen Wikipedia entries on

pygmy subgenres whose list of exponents run

to one, maybe three bands. And there’ll always

be people who want to argue over which three,

and why one of them belongs on another list,

and why only someone with the hearing of a

retired pneumatic drill operative would ever

put them on that list. The only thing that’s

certain is those people definitely do belong

on a list, or register, to use to the appropriate

legal term.

Sometimes first impressions are better.

Take TRIO UROBORO, for example. Despite

their ascendancy (appearances on Radio 3 and

acclaim from Chris Ackerley of The Sound Of

Now and Jazzwise), there’s little online beyond

the listing for this afternoon’s gig, stating that

they “wander a changeable course between

composition and improvisation” without

explaining why “play jazz” wouldn’t do. If you’re

reading this review and haven’t heard them yet,

what are first impressions anyway?

Their set is uncompromising at first – the

opening improvisation reaches Ornette

Coleman levels of wig-out. There are moments

of interaction, especially between Johnny

Hunter’s arabesque drumming and Keith

Jafrate’s alto sax lines, stretched out to sublime

length, but Anton Hunter’s single-chord playing

seems uncooperative, obstinate. That said,

later pieces tread more conventional paths,

referencing West Coast jazz and Afrobeat,

and proving that Trio Uroboro are a bona fide

ensemble, not three individuals indulging

themselves.

The Kazimier should be applauded for

putting on such ‘difficult’ sounds for two

hours on a Sunday afternoon. It’s either a

Renaissance moment or the last days of Rome.

The audience are mostly chatting, eating, or

keeping an eye on their kids and don’t seem

to be bothered by the ambient spray of skittish

drumming and acid sax. Are they getting more

out of it? It seems Trio Uroboro put in too much

effort for the results to be background music

but, between the onstage intensity and the

gregarious audience, listening and waiting

for a final argument or conclusion becomes a

testing experience.

John Coltrane wished he could “walk up to

[his] music for the first time, as if I had never

heard it before”. Perhaps a second hearing

of this gig with fresh ears would stop such

unanswerable questions from being raised by

this abstract, resolutely non-verbal music. Or

should that just be “free jazz”? “Lo-fi irony punk

(with sax)”? In Indo-European cultures, there’s

the archetypal motif of a snake consuming

itself tail-first: the ouroboros, a symbol of


25% OFF

STUDIO BOOKINGS

FOR BIDO LITO! READERS

CODE: BIDO25

visit: parrstreetstudios.com

Offer only available to online bookings. Offer expires 15/10/15.

Full terms and conditions available on request.


LIVERPOOL’S

INTERNATIONAL ARTS VENUE

WHAT’S ON

www.thecapstonetheatre.com Autumn Season 2015

01 I Oct £14

Matthew Halsall and the

Gondwana Orchestra

20 I Oct £11.50

Stephen Hough

23 I Oct £11.50

Roller Trio

27 I Oct £12.50 (£9.50 con)

I loved you and

I loved you

30 I Oct £11.50

Philip Clouts

Quartet

04 I Nov £11.50

Julian Argüelles

Tetra

renewal and self-reflexivity. In the same way

that this set started with antagonistic soloing

and ends with a pseudo-lounge number

gradually descending into incoherence via

dub’s echoing stairwell, Trio Uroboro take you

back to the start, with no guarantee there’ll be

any answers second time round.

Stuart Miles O’Hara / @ohasm1

FUNERAL FOR A FRIEND

Vestals – Native Kings

Bam!Bam!Bam! @ The Kazimier

Huzzah – MySpace lives! And ear expanders, and

Chris Moyles, and the pink death bear on your bag;

they’re all fashionable! You may dick around on

a public green space, kick-flipping a skateboard

thinner than cracker bread, without suspecting

that the careers of your peers are overtaking

yours! Pre-WhatsApp, prepubescent, you are the

life of the world. There’s the bitter taste of Red

Bull at the back of your mouth, but you’re alright.

How it feels to be young and slightly agitated…

The Kazimier has promised time travel

before. What’s bizarre is finding nostalgia in a

part of yourself you’d thought had been burned

to death by GHDs. Out of all the bands that

emerged during the mid-noughties hardcore

boom, FUNERAL FOR A FRIEND were one of the

best. Are. They are, not were. It’s gratifying and

unusual to know that. Sure, they were tertiary

to my particular neck of the woods, but they

were popular, and good songwriters. They were

Kerrang!-approved. I head along tonight to see

what emo looks like as it’s staring around at the

ruins of itself, because those with us who flirted

with it are now old enough to do so. Unless

you’re the hardest of hardcore fans, there’s no

other reason.

First, some solid support. NATIVE KINGS

(genuine Merseyside natives) are fun from

the get-go, juicing up a stack of fairly average

dance-rock clatter with a range that makes

each track distinctive, if toothless. The Sound

Of Victory lets their bassist work a bit, which is

good since he seemed bored 'til now, letting

frontman Cameron Warren do all the heavy

lifting. This is a band, by the way, that have an

eyeless owl as a mascot. Yes, “Mad Clive” sits

on the lip of the stage, possibly hoping for Twin

Atlantic to come and take him away to a place

where music like this still gets airplay.

Warren’s excellent vocals save us in time

for THE VESTALS, who couldn’t be any more

self-consciously chic if they dabbled in coffee

science as a side project. Case in point: they

open with their singer’s mouth projected in

monochrome on a screen that shows the

obligatory Donnie Darko scenes for their

Bunnymen cover. They motor along in a

summer-camp haze that’s actually quite nice.

I want more of it, although I suspect they never

would’ve played this sort of crowd 10 years ago.

A sign of emo’s survivors softening their inner

circle? You hope so. We should’ve gotten along

with the indie kids back then anyway, showed

them our spiky belt collection.

When FFAF turn up, it’s to a well-filled

room. Before a note is played, they admit to

not noticing how many people are here, and

congratulate us for it. Cute, but – what? There’s

200 of us, max. This is a band that fought their

way into the charts, that released two or three

touchstone records. It’s a sobering start, and

Matthew Davies-Kreye struggles to get a bunch

of lads shouting requests under control.

Luckily, they gear up to breakneck speed and

sustain it. The group do hit a few clichés on

the way: there’s the guitarist with a Pantera

T-shirt, riffing away despite the fact his textile

idol would have no care for his music if they’d

14 I Nov £11.50

Yaron Herman

BOX OFFICE

0844 8000 410

www.ticketquarter.co.uk

TicketQuarter Handling Fee of £2.25 per order applies when booking online or

by phone. Call charges apply. There is no Handling Fee when buying tickets

with cash from the TicketQuarter Box Office, Queens Square Centre, Queens

Square, Liverpool L1 1RG.

Funeral For A Friend (Robin Clewley / robinclewley.co.uk)


Another Great Season of Comedy at the Brindley

Cheshire’s Award Winning Venue

Only 25 mins from Chester, 20 mins from

Liverpool, 30 mins from Manchester.

Good road and rail links. FREE PARKING

Chris Ramsey’s All

Growed Up

Oh Well, Goodbye (Diego Piedrabuena / fotografialive.com)

Manford’s Comedy Club

Thursday 8 October | 8pm | Studio | £15

Monday 21 Sept | 8pm | Theatre | £17.50

Lee Nelson – Suited

and Booted

Andrew O’Neill – Heavy

Metal – a History

Thursday 22 Oct | 8pm | Studio | £12

Monday 19 Oct | 7.30pm | Theatre | £20

Manford’s Comedy Club

Thursday 12 Nov | 8pm | Studio | £15

The Brindley, High St, Runcorn, Cheshire WA7 1BG

Box Office: 0151 907 8360 Online:

www.thebrindley.org.uk

www.facebook.com/brindleyartscentre

www.twitter.com/TheBrindley

ever met; dick jokes are welcomed; barely five

minutes pass before the inaugural jump-inthe-air-with-knees-tucked-in.

Yet the will of

the fans is satiated, and a circle pit gets going

after a couple of songs.

It’s great to be back in a dim, sweaty box

where choruses charge through you like

chariots, all sort of the same, as open-hearted

as it’s possible to be. The only track I remember

entirely is Streetcar, and that gets knocked out

in the first third of the set. The rest dribble and

fragment into my brain, warming memories of

summer fields. If screamo/emo/whatever-thefuck

deserved much of the scorn thrown at it,

then this is proof there were bands worth sticking

around for, who will do the same for you.

Josh Potts

OH WELL, GOODBYE

OHMNS – Sex Dream

Edils Recordings @ Maguire’s Pizza Bar

Maguire’s is kind of like Narnia: a rather

inconspicuous gig venue, which to the

untrained eye could very easily be just another

bar; however, delve a little deeper, past the

bookcase, and you may just come across some

of Liverpool’s most exciting underground gigs.

The gig room is small and almost pitch

black, with only the stage’s red lights to

remind you that you haven’t entered the abyss

completely. As SEX DREAM arrives on stage,

his pedal board’s lights sparkle like beacons

of hope for what is to come. With a series of

effects as long as my arm, the noise rocker

produces unrelenting soundscapes worthy

of comparison to the likes of My Bloody

Valentine’s Kevin Shields. Using his guitar

to its upper limits, exploiting it in every way

possible, the sonic youth tears open the room

to reveal another dimension. The set is a brutal,

uninterrupted experiment of just how far a

guitar can be pushed, resulting in what sounds

like a tsunami crashing through a black hole

backwards. As his set finishes, he just drops

his guitar as though there is no love lost and

walks away, coolly proving himself as the new

face on the scene.

Next to pick up tonight’s noise are garage

rockers, OHMNS (pronounced Omens). From the

minute they plug in, the room is a flying furore

of fuzz and bellowing long curly hair. Their

sound explodes through the room, shaking

Maguire’s to its very core as plaster crumbles

and posters fall in mercy to the almighty primal

power of the punk rockers. Guttural screams

fall from the mouth of the lead singer as he

is serenaded by raucous guitar, driving bass

and heavy tub-thumping. Occasionally the

lead guitarist screams with such energy it’s

expected that his vocal chords will explode

and blood fly halfway across the room. With

these boys the stage isn’t the limit, with the

audience giving them room like GG Allin has

just entered the venue. As one fan sums it up

quite bathetically, “That’s sound, lads”.

Finally up are tonight’s stars, releasing their

EP entitled BG902, are OH WELL, GOODBYE.

If you enjoy haunting vocals, reverb-filled

guitar melodies and a lot of tambourine, then

this band are for you. After the in-your-face

performance of OHMNS, the post-punk fourpiece

bring a slightly more chilled-out mood

to the affair. With comparisons made to the

likes of The National, these guys are bringing

something unique to the city. Lead singer PJ

Rourke’s vocal style echoes through the room,

hypnotising the audience. Forget Bez, when it

comes to handheld percussion Rourke is the

master. His tambourine dancing is mesmerising

and conjures images of a less frantic Ian Curtis

as he truly loses himself in the music. However,


Ceremony Concerts Present

China Crisis

PLAYING THE ALBUM 'FLAUNT THE IMPERFECTION'

The Epstein Theatre, Liverpool - Saturday 17 th October 2015

The Magic Band

The Kazimier, Liverpool - Sunday 8 th November 2015

DJ Format & Abdominal

The Shipping Forecast, Liverpool - Monday 9 th November 2015

Amsterdam

Gulliver's, Manchester - Saturday 14 th November 2015

Thea Gilmore

The Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool - Tuesday 17 th November 2015

Boo Hewerdine

The Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool - Wednesday 25 th November 2015

Dodgy

Arts Club, Liverpool - Saturday 28 th November 2015

Turin Brakes

+ Cousin Jac + Thomas J Speight

The Kazimier, Liverpool - Friday 4 th December 2015

John Bramwell (I am Kloot)

The Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool - Saturday 5 th December 2015

Dr John Cooper Clarke

The Atkinson, Southport - Saturday 12 th December 2015

TicketQuarter / See Tickets / WeGotTickets / Gigantic


50

Bido Lito! October 2015 Reviews

Get The Blessing (Marty Saleh)

Rourke is not alone in his mastery, with the

rest of the band keeping tight throughout the

whole performance, providing a fitting climax

to a great evening of music in a hidden world.

Matt Hogg

BEAK> / GET THE BLESSING

AGP

EVOL and Bam!Bam!Bam! @ The Kazimier

Portishead are one of those bands that

seemingly all music fans can agree on.

Regardless of affinities to metal or hip hop

there is something about the Bristol outfit –

and in particular Beth Gibbons’ sultry tones

– that really seems to do the trick. So it’s no

surprise that, on the first night of a doubleheader

that features three different members

playing in two side projects, the Kaz is packed

to the rafters to witness BEAK> perform.

Before that though the crowd is treated

to an airing of seven new tracks from local

songwriter/producer AGP’s upcoming release.

Through the resident sound system, his

spacey and rhythmic creations sound almost

unsettlingly perfect. For those present who

have been following his progress, it is quite

apparent that he has really gone up a level.

Headliners Beak> provide the near-capacity

crowd with a performance that raises the

bar even higher. Their stripped-back sound

is never lacking in depth, and it is admirable

how much they do with so little. With just

bass, drums and synths they create a sonic

wash that is rhythmically driven and clearly

rooted in their Bristolian trip hop background.

At times there are glimmers of post-hardcore

influence, marking a satisfying change from

what is otherwise a tight and focussed

set. With minimal vocals delivered by the

drummer, and occasional switches onto the

guitar by the keys man, there is a lot of space

left for the bassist to inhabit. He does this

superbly and his contributions are probably

the most imaginative and memorable of the

three. Overall, it is a thought-provoking set

that melds the contemporary and the past

seamlessly whilst managing to preserve what

is most interesting about each.

For those who enjoyed the previous night’s

outing there is not long to wait for that postgig

itch to be soothed – 24 hours to be exact

– and tonight the balm comes in the form

of GET THE BLESSING. This time featuring

Portishead’s rhythm section in Jim Barr and

Clive Deamer, as well as two other members on

trumpet and saxophone, we stroll ecstatically

into Lounge Lizards-esque territory. We are

informed that the new songs in tonight’s set

were written in a house in Cornwall and so,

naturally, all of the track titles are derived

from the names of fish. As we settle into the

strains of Yellow Herring, it becomes clear that

the marine influence stretches only as far as

the name, and what we actually experience is

at times an almost industrial take on the jazz

form. Not straying too far from their output

in their other band, the rhythm section is

solid yet bouncy, providing structure for the

horn section whilst still playing around and

enjoying themselves. Eschewing any vocals,

the melody is delivered mainly by the horns

and also quite often by Barr’s high-end bass

riffs, which weave effortlessly between the

cracks of space afforded to him by Deamer’s

drum work. The symbiotic relationship that

has formed between the two after many years

of playing together is clear for everyone to

see, and it is really them that drive the songs

forward. One of the more surprising elements

of the show is the charisma and wit of bespoke

frontman Barr, who at first appears moody and

serious but actually turns out to be a hilarious

on-stage presence. The songs themselves are

also, at times, light-hearted and airy, creating

an atmospheric and dynamic shift that makes

for a pretty interesting dichotomy.

In terms of musicianship there is little to

be desired, as each member demonstrates

their virtuosity neatly whilst still serving the

song and bringing new elements to the mix.

There is sometimes the risk that instrumental

music with jazz stylings can become verbose

and slightly overbearing, but with Get The

Blessing this is never the case, and the songs

are fully-fleshed and well realised: they hold


SOUND MATTERS

In this monthly column, our friends at DAWSONS give expert tips and advice on how to achieve a great

sound in the studio or in the live environment. Armed with the knowledge to solve any common (or unusual)

musical problem, the techy aficionados provide Bido Lito! readers with the benefit of their experience so you

can get the sound you want.

Here, sound specialist Harry Brown discusses how to achieve an authentically retro sound by looking at rock

‘n’ roll origins, New Romantic roots and equipment which enables you to lay down tracks in your own home.

There are some products we sell as a store that

could be viewed as ‘forward-looking’, incorporating

the latest technology and perhaps making it more

accessible for many musicians to perform and record

their music. But we also have a stock of retro products

that possibly inspired the sound of a generation, as

well as those based on long-discontinued products.

A good example of this is a Shure 55SH microphone,

sometimes referred to as the “Elvis mic” as it

vaguely resembles the Model 55. This microphone

was first designed in the 1940s for vocal clarity in

close proximity to very loud PA speakers, which

meant it had to be very feedback-resistant. It

did this by having a tight pickup pattern (it only

picked up sounds that were present right in front

of the microphone). Its frequency response was

particularly sensitive in the 5-8kHz range, great for

accentuating the intelligibility in the human voice

(the frequencies which help us understand what we

are saying to each other).

Although there are now microphones available that

are widely accepted as having a better tonal balance

for vocals, and have even tighter pickup patterns, this

microphone is still an immensely popular product.

Its evocative, retro look and quite distinctive sound

are still a hit with musicians and sound engineers

the world over.

A little later and a lot more make-up down the line,

the likes of Tears For Fears, Duran Duran and Roxy

Music were out-shining guitar bands everywhere,

making the keyboard the most sought-after

instrument for many years. Roland's Jupiter 8

synthesiser was the weapon of choice, being used

to good effect for the soft, pad-like keyboards heard

on Roxy Music's hit Avalon.

Today, one of Roland's flagship keyboard products

is the Jupiter 80. Heavily modelled on the look of

the original Jupiter keyboards, it has a retro look

but incorporates a whole host of features that the

original models did not. The eight synth voices,

each comprised of two VCOs, can be layered on top

of any sound from the library of ‘real’ instrument

sounds. Throw in the powerful effects section and

the ability to have all your live keyboard sounds at

your fingertips and there might no longer be the

need for those 15 keyboards that Rick Wakeman

was frequently surrounded by.

The pop/rock bands of the last decade, exemplified

by bands such as The Killers, have relied upon more

straightforward synths than a Jupiter, such as the

MicroKorg. This infinitely portable synth is almost

permanently audible throughout The Killers’ album

Hot Fuss and gave rise to a new generation of bands

writing music heavily featuring synth melodies. The

MicroKorg has a programmable 16-step arpeggiator,

which can be heard prominently on the infamous

Frankie Knuckles remix of The Source hit You Got The

Love (Candi Staton not Florence).

As times have moved on, the way musicians record

their music has changed. It is now commonplace for

musicians to record their music in places other than

recording studios. Recording your material at home

now only requires a fraction of the money it would

have cost 20 years ago, while actually still consisting

of the same basic technology. A recording studio

needs an enormous mixing console in case the

band/ensemble all want to record at the same time,

a rack of A/D converters connected to a powerful

computer, and several sets of amplifiers and

monitoring speakers to help the engineer balance

the mix as accurately as possible.

In a home-studio situation where you are unlikely

to be recording any more than one performer

at a time, you need all the same technology as

the big recording studio, but on a much smaller

scale. Also, some of the technology required can

be condensed down to fewer physical pieces of

equipment. For example, a Focusrite Scarlett 2i4

is both your preamplifier/mixing console and your

set of converters (two channels’ worth), at a very

reasonable price, by the same company that have

designed some of the most highly acclaimed mixing

consoles and mic preamps ever built. Then your rack

of amplifiers needed to power your monitor speakers

could be done away with altogether by purchasing

self-powered or ‘active’ monitor speakers, such as

Yamaha's HS8s.

So, wherever or whenever you are, it is possible to

capture the same great sounds of any classic decade

of music.

Dawsons are offering 10% off lots of products in

their extensive range at their Liverpool store (14-16

Williamson Square). Further details can be found on

pages 4 and 5. dawsons.co.uk

up as straight pop songs to which you would

gladly listen at home, whilst still retaining

their experimental nature.

Though the closure of The Kazimier has

perhaps been over-lamented within these

fine pink pages and generally across the

board of Liverpool music publications, it

is worth noting that it is hard to imagine

witnessing such an adventurous and

impressive double-bill in other venues. Not

that this city is lacking in forward-thinking

venues that will jump at the chance to fill the

inevitable vacuum that the Kaz will leave, but

such unique events could not really have a

better home. But songs about fish will always

find a place in which to prosper.

MARVIN POWELL

Cavalier Song – Hazy Head

Bido Lito! Social Live @ Aloft

Alastair Dunn

Inside a Downton-meets-Star Trek woodpanelled

room with futuristic halo lights

hanging from the ceiling, people recline in

beanbags, hotel staff mill around and HAZY

HEAD’s bassist politely asks the sound guy

if they can play. One guitar, one bass, one

drum kit makes for a classic garage set-up.

Their music is a mix of shoegaze, Hank Marvin

guitar and, oddly, Julee Cruise. Each song

sounds intended for a long-lost David Lynch

movie; a dreamy slow pace is set as the guitar

play practically crashes against the shore. The

set culminates with a cover of Galaxie 500’s

Marvin Powell (Mike Sheerin / michaelsheerin.photoshelter.com)

Tugboat, as Hazy Head wear their influences

on their collective sleeve. Admittedly they

have a couple of cock-ups, but you can see

these guys know what they’re doing and lo-fi

is on the way up.

CAVALIER SONG are next to take to the

carpeted floor. A more disparate group this

time, but as with all great experimental bands

they’re brought together by the music. Joined

by local performance artist Mark Greenwood

and his poetry, they subject us to a diverse

set of noisy assaults and slow-burning

spoken-word pieces. The bass suddenly

breaks during the first track and I notice that

the hi-hat is also cracked, intentionally, I

hope. Greenwood’s lyrics match the sinister

dread the band oozes perfectly, weaving a

fantastical tapestry of people, nature and

their darker halves.

MARVIN POWELL’s love of music is further

apparent (he’s been sat enthusiastically

watching all the supports) as he sings and

jigs along with the folk strains trickling from

the sound system. Suddenly the room fills

with family, friends and fans. I overhear his

mother chatter excitedly about him practising

at home and his Bido feature article. He’s a

local lad and there’s a lot of the love in the

room for the troubadour. Marvin begins

suddenly, the crowd silenced by his guitar,

and anticipation seeps in. His voice takes

on a Celtic quality, the music is folk through

and through. His band soon join him, and the

tempo is kicked up a notch. As the closing

song ends his fans, old and new, call for more

and we’re treated to one final solo piece.

Local talent is clearly in rude health.

Kieran Donnachie


WRS

WIRRAL REHEARSAL STUDIOS

Permanent secure rehearsal

2 mins from the tunnel

REHEARSAL STUDIOS

PRIVATE 24/7 STUDIOS FROM

LOCKUP +1 FULL DAY

£25/4HRS

£46/WK

£30/WK

PRO REHEARSAL STUDIOS

FREE CAR PARK

2 MINS FROM THE TUNNEL

24 HOUR ACCESS

PERMANENT SECURE ROOMS EASY LOADING ACCESS

07906376701

WWW.WIRRALREHEARSALSTUDIOS.COM

NOVEMBER 2015 NILS LOFGREN RUMOURS OF FLEETWOOD MAC

ROY WOOD RICKY ROSS THE BLOCKHEADS THE BLUES BAND RALPH MCTELL

THE IMPOSSIBLE GENTLEMEN MARTIN TAYLOR & ULF WAKENIUS

THE RICK VITO BAND GARY MURPHY THE HAMISH STUART BAND

TONY REMY & THE STOLEN CLONES THEO TRAVIS - DOUBLE TALK

LIVERPOOL MOZART ORCHESTRA FEAT. CRAIG OGDEN NEIL CAMPBELL

GERRY MURPHY PETER PRICE NASHER MODJANGO JOHN GOLDIE

WIRRAL UKULELE ORCHESTRA THE PHIL CHISNALL BAND + PRESHOW & AFTERSHOW GIGS

For details of performances contact our box office on

0151 666 0000 or visit our website bestguitarfest.com


54

Bido Lito! October 2015

DIGGING A LITTLE DEEPER

with Stylus

We’re always interested to hear what waxy gems are lurking in the depths of the record

bags of the city’s DJs, or the kind of music they’re indulging in away from the dancefloor.

This month we asked Walrus Said of STYLUS to pick out some of his favourite cuts, and

he has chosen to take us on a trip into the sullen world of experimental ambient music.

“With its roots firmly in musique concrète and experimentalism, dark ambient music really

does have a wealth of influence. This genre – or set of genres – is so vast that I could barely

include all those worthy of mentioning (Tangerine Dream, Grouper and Merzbow all missed

out). Put on your headphones, don your favourite head torch and read this in the purgatory

of the un-illuminated.”

THE

FINAL

SAY

Bethany Garrett / @_bethanygarrett

Each month we hand over the responsibility of having the final say in the magazine to a guest

columnist – what they choose to do with it is entirely in their own hands. This month, our new Editorial

Assistant Bethany Garrett gives her own lyrical praise of the power of the written word, and exhorts

us all to wisely use the power these words invest in us, and not to let them go to waste.

THE CARETAKER

Patience (After Sebald)

Possibly the greatest piano music ever written: well, it’s not

but it should be. The noise and hiss that dulls the tone of every

note played leaves each recurring moment just lingering in the

vibrating air. You may listen to this and think that it’s just repeating

the same thing, but it really isn’t: the tiny nuances are what make

this great. It’s John Cage with static.

LUSTMORD

The Word As Power

Throbbing Gristle’s debut LP The Second Annual Report has nothing

on the fear-inducing brilliance of this album. It’s like the theory of

dualism in music form, and it’s dead scary. Once you’ve bought it

on vinyl, record it and then listen to the whole thing – put on your

headphones, climb into bed with the curtains closed and lights off

and you will be transported to another realm.

THE HAXAN CLOAK

Excavation

This album mumbles and claws its way into existence then finally

comes to life with a sampled conversation and the emergence of

some deep, deep bass. There are elements of the dark ambient

genre running throughout, with choral vocals simmering just

below the surface and engaging with reverb. But the beats say

something completely different and levitate it to a world of Burial-type dubstep/garage

and electronic weirdness in the vein of Holy Other or Vessel.

EMPTYSET

Material

33/45? It really doesn’t matter, you can just experiment yourself

and enjoy the experience. For something so harsh it truly is a

beautiful tapestry. The album is a series of three recordings in

various locations: a flint mine, a nuclear power station and a

concrete testing laboratory. The three pieces react differently in

each location, which is transcribed into the individual recordings and etched forever into

your ambient memory.

Stylus host a weekly vinyl fair and listening event every Sunday at Arts Club, starting at

midday. Check out their amazing podcasts too, at soundcloud.com/stylus-liverpool.

A couple of threads inform this piece of unformulated

writing. The first is that I’m in the process of moving

house and have found more than a dozen notepads

of various size and significance; spanning six years

of attempted writing, some are densely packed with

inky blue-black ramblings, others half-arsed, halffull

and abandoned, and a single pad remains clean

and hauntingly empty. The second is finding myself

in awe of the articulated assurance of author and

performance poet Malik Al Nasir at FACT’s A Tribute

To Gil Scott-Heron event, and of the ability of Malik

and of the honouree to craft and cultivate political

poetry. Where do these threads meet? In words,

writing and articulation [arr-tik-u-lay-shun].

“What are words worth?”

The two films shown in FACT’s tribute – an

offshoot of the LIMF-commissioned event featured

in our September issue – underscore the importance

of writing, education and articulation in granting

voices to marginalised stratifications of society. In

Who Is Gil Scott-Heron?, a selection of friends and

artists close to the late poet praise his nimble and

book-smart manipulation of language, his playing

with vocabulary, pronunciation and syntax in order

to lay down rich sentences with richer bearings.

Word Up – From Ghetto To Mecca details the work of

Malik Al Nasir, the street-smart Scouse hustler who

featured on our Issue 58 cover and who became

Scott-Heron’s protégé, going from ill-educated

daydreamer to published spoken-word poet with a

university education. Though years and continents

distinguish them, written and spoken word provided

a creative means for both poets to critique unjust

systems and structures, while telling their own story

and preaching their own principles.

This all got me thinking; if we are in the privileged

position to do so, we should write our own stories

instead of letting an elite few dictate them to us.

Words are powerful and accountable. The way we

speak – the adjectives, emphasis, verbs and nouns

that we employ so often with little thought – dictate

our perceptions. How quickly the rhetoric changes

from a threatening swarm of migrants to a needy

refugee, as we wait again for it to change to what it

should have always been: human.

You might not think your story is as fascinating

as Scott-Heron’s or Al Nasir’s but it’s yours uniquely

to tell, and jotting anything down is a start. The

process can be cathartic; your words are a little bit

of you laid bare that you’ve given to the page or

handed over to the cavernous depths of the internet.

Whether published with proud name, shrouded in

pseudonymic mystery or kept in an old notebook

for your eyes only, your writing is an extension and

assertion of yourself.

“For now get ’em high off this dialect drug”

It’s not all strictly serious; words are there be

toyed with. For me, language is similar to music in

the sense that there is an infinite amount of lexis

we can lunge into, yet we hear the same phrases

over and over again without giving them much

thought. Gil Scott-Heron knew this and used it to

his advantage. Like the never-ending catalogue of

music that is available to us, there are words to be

dug up, dusted off and dipped into conversations

new, where you mightn’t have laid them down

before. Have fun with ’em. Wordplay is up there with

foreplay, if I may say so, as far as turn-ons go.

An amateur myself I’m no authority, but I do write

as someone who can fill a notepad or few. Writing is

what you make of it and do with it. Not happy? Rip

it up and start again. Hell, cut shit up à la Burroughs

and Bowie and rearrange your sentences beyond

any sense. You might even cut a hit record.

Though it might read that way, this rant is no

recruitment drive for these pretty pink pages, rather

a call to arms/hands/fingers on keyboards (whatever

your chosen medium requires) to write for yourself if

you want to, and, if you can, write well. In celebration

of wordsmithery, creativity and poetry, look to Scott-

Heron and Al Nasir and then take a good gander at

yourself. Be your own outlet, tell your own story, and

don’t let Murdoch and co. – or anybody else – put

words in your mouth.

bidolito.co.uk


Lesions

in the

Landscape

18 September - 22 November / FREE

An exhibition by Shona Illingworth

fact.co.uk/lesionsinthelandscape

Image: Shona Illingworth, Lesions in the Landscape, Digital video still, 2015


YOUSEF PRESENTS...

FRI 25TH SEPT - ARTS CLUB

THEATRE

SKEPTA

ONEMAN

THE SQUARE FT NOVELIST,

ELF KID, FAUST, HILTZ

BSSMNT

LOFT: CIRCLES

PREDITAH

KLOSE ONE

MATT JAM LAMONT

BASS BOY HOSTED BY C4

PAUSE DJS

BAR: HOT PLATE TAKEOVER

NAUTZ

THOM WHITE

GILBEY

SAT 17TH OCT - CAMP & FURNACE

DAY TIME EVENT

CAMP: CHIBUKU

BONOBO (DJ SET)

VERY SPECIAL GUEST TBA

PBR STREETGANG

JASPER JAMES

FURNACE : RAM JAM

DJ EZ

DAVID RODIGAN

SPECIAL REQUEST

RANDALL

DJ BARELY LEGAL

PAUSE DJS

HAUS : FEEL MY BICEP

BICEP

MARCEL DETTMAN

SCUBA

LEON VYNEHALL

ANDREW HILL

BIRTHDAY - SAT 26TH SEPT - ARTS CLUB

THEATRE

SETH TROXLER

YOUSEF

JACKMASTER

SCOTT LEWIS

LOFT

RICHY AHMED

HECTOR

TOM TRAGO

LEWIS BOARDMAN

BAR:

KYDUS

DAVID GLASS

HALLOWEEN - 31ST OCT - ARTS CLUB

ELLUM LABEL SHOWCASE

THEATRE

MACEO PLEX

DANNY DAZE

SHALL OCIN

LEWIS BOARDMAN

LOFT

DAVIDE SQUILLACE

POINT G - LIVE

KRANKBROTHER

BAR: UBER

KI CREIGHTON

DAVID GLASS

JAMIE ROY

INFO: 0151 706 8045, INFO@CHIBUKU.COM

WWW.CIRCUSCLUB.CO.UKWWW.CHIBUKU.COM

TICKETS ONLINE: TICKETARENA.CO.UK, TICKETLINE.CO.UK

RESIDENTADVISOR.NET, TICKETWEB.CO.UK, SEETICKETS.COM

TICKET STORES: ARTS CLUB (NO BOOKING FEE) 90 SEEL ST

3B RECORDS (NUS) 0151 353 7027, RESURRECTION (BOLD ST)

More magazines by this user