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the festival

continues

September – December 2013

the soundtrack of

the 20th century

Inspired by

Alex Ross’ book

The Rest Is Noise

Southbank Centre would like to thank

its principal orchestra partner


Buzz Aldrin salutes the US

flag on the moon © NASA

Apollo Archive

‘ I wanted to tell the story of the

20th century through its music.’

contents

Alex Ross, author of The Rest Is Noise

one century one year

An overview of the festival

p4

Welcome to the second half of Southbank Centre’s year-long festival

The Rest Is Noise.

The first half of 2013 has seen us take a fascinating journey through the music of

the 20th century. We started at 1900, when the world was on the brink of imploding

into the First World War, and travelled through to the end of the Second World War,

just as America’s star was on the rise and the Iron Curtain drew an impenetrable barrier

across a shattered Europe.

During this time we provided a map for audiences that included talks, films, debates and

concerts to help explain the relationship between classical music and the social and political

changes of the last century. This approach, inspired by Alex Ross’ book The Rest Is Noise,

has allowed us to see the music of that period ‘in the round’ – bringing in the history of science,

technology, philosophical and political movements.

Now we continue...

We start with a look at the greatest British composer of the century, Benjamin Britten, and how he

emerged as a composer in a nation recovering from war. This investigation of the post-war world

continues in October, as we turn our attention to Europe and the generation of avant-garde composers

who wanted to make a clean break from history. In the autumn, we explore the social revolution of

the 1960s and the distinctly spiritual music that flowered alongside Cold-War tensions in the 1970s.

And finally, as we move closer to the year end, we focus on America again – the rise of Hollywood,

musical theatre and Minimalism. We conclude with the new world order at the end of the century –

globalisation, the rise of the internet and the end of the ‘isms’.

This year-long festival has only been made possible by our partnerships with our resident orchestras;

in particular our principal orchestra partner the London Philharmonic Orchestra plus significant

contributions from one of our other resident orchestras, the London Sinfonietta. However, orchestras

from right across the UK are also involved in addition to many international orchestras, music colleges,

youth ensembles and school programmes, all of which have helped to create this huge and rich

repertoire, plus the BBC, Open University and many writers, conductors, lecturers and film curators.

Even if the composers of the last century

claim to have written ‘music’ rather than

a reflection of events, there can be no

doubt that their work is a product of the

socio-political environment of which they

were a part and that we sense prescience as

well as inspiration.

And what a century it was, from Richard

Strauss to John Adams. We are delighted to

be continuing our roller-coaster ride which

started back in January, and takes us from

Romanticism through Nationalism, the

Second Viennese School, the Darmstadt

school, electronic music, Minimalism,

Hollywood and musicals to pop culture.

There is something for every listener in this

great festival and we are proud to be a part of it.

Timothy Walker,

Chief Executive & Artistic Director

London Philharmonic Orchestra

the story so far

January – June 2013

Britten’s Centenary

September 2013

Post-WAR World

Breaking with the past

October 2013

1960s

Counterculture and revolution

October 2013

Politics and Spirituality

in the late 20th Century

November 2013

superpower

Hollywood, Minimalism

and musical theatre

November 2013

New World Order

No more rules

December 2013

tickets & Packages

p6

p10

p16

p22

p28

p34

p40

p46

It has been a personal desire of mine to see this wonderful music, long misunderstood and sometimes

neglected, opened up to an audience that is culturally curious. This is a festival as much about

discussion and debate as it is about music. Do share your experiences and views with us.

Jude Kelly, Artistic Director, Southbank Centre

Discover the rest is noise online

southbankcentre.co.uk/

therestisnoise

turn to pages 46-47

for full details of

tickets and packages

Images overleaf

Klimt’s The Kiss © akg-images/Erich Lessing

Lenin © Sipa Press/Rex Features

Emmeline Pankhurst

Marlene Dietrich © AFP/Getty Images

Louis Armstrong © World Telegram Staff Photographer

JF Kennedy © White House Press Office

Benjamin Britten © britten100.org / Photo: Hans Wild

Hippies @ David Graves / Rex Features

Buzz Aldrin © NASA Apollo Archive

Philip Glass © Pasquale Salerno

Operation Desert Shield © Phan Chad Vann

2 3


one CENTURY, One YEAR

What do two world wars, votes for

women and a moon landing sound like?

Here comes the 20th century.

HERE COMES THE

20TH CENTURY

January

The festival got underway

with a weekend exploring

the early 1900s.

Key work: Schoenberg

String Quartet No.2

PARIS

February

A trip to see daring ballet

and to the Salons of Paris

in the Roaring Twenties.

Key work: Stravinsky

The Rite of Spring

AMERICA

March

We heard Jazz, Broadway

and a new American sound.

Key work: Duke Ellington

A Tone Parallel to Harlem

ART OF FEAR

May

How composers trod

precarious paths

between artistic freedom

and persecution.

Key work: Shostakovich

Symphony No.7

POST-WAR WORLD

October

Experience the

literature and music

written after the world

had changed forever.

Key work: Stockhausen

Gesang der Jünglinge

Page 20

1960S

October

Get to grips with the Civil

Rights Movement and a rapidly

changing society.

Key work: Berio Sinfonia

Page 27

SUPERPOWER

November

Live performances of film music

and contemporary masters Steve

Reich, John Cage and Philip Glass.

Key work: Glass Music In 12 Parts

Page 38

NEW WORLD ORDER

December

What’s next for classical music?

Discuss what the future holds.

Key work: Adams El Niño Page 45

1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990

The Rise of NATIONaliSm

February

We discovered national

identities through folk song.

Key work: Bartók Romanian

Folk Dances

BERLIN IN THE ’20S & ’30S

March

Biting satire, provocative opera

and cabaret.

Key work: Weill The Threepenny Opera

BRITTEN’S CENTENARY

September

Celebrate the British

composer’s finest pieces.

Key work: Britten

Peter Grimes Page 15

POLITICS AND

SPIRITUALITY

November

Peer behind the Iron Curtain

and eavesdrop on music from

the Soviet Bloc.

Key work: Gubaidulina

Offertorium Page 33

100 concerts, 250 talks, 12 weekends throughout 2013

Join us to listen to the soundtrack of the 20th century

southbankcentre.co.uk/therestisnoise

Follow us on Twitter @1century1year

4 5


THE STORY SO FAR

January – June 2013

Between January and June this year, in six weekends of talks and debates

and over 50 concerts, we listened to the soundtrack to the first half of the

20th century. Here are some highlights:

February

Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring was explored through talks and a

performance by the London Philharmonic Orchestra. Jonathan

Cross spoke about the impact that Stravinsky’s arrival in Paris had

both on the composer and the city. Kevin Jackson took us through

1922, the year that Ulysses and The Waste Land were published.

January

Baroness Shirley Williams opened the festival with a lecture

on the tumultuous events of the 20th century. Alex Ross, author of

The Rest Is Noise, gave his first keynote address setting the scene for

the moment when classical music changed forever. Marcus

du Sautoy explained Einstein’s Theory of Special Relativity.

February

From Tony Benn on the founding of the Labour party, to Shirley

Collins, Godmother of English Folk, and Pete Flood from

Bellowhead, we welcomed people from across the cultural

spectrum to dig deeper into how folk and national identity

shaped the music and history of the early 20th century.

March

We delved into the tensions and

contradictions at the heart of Weimar

Germany – especially in its music. Cabaret

star Meow Meow discussed Kurt Weill’s

legacy before singing in a performance of

The Threepenny Opera with the London

Philharmonic Orchestra, Vladimir

Jurowski and Sir John Tomlinson,

which received five-star reviews. Lisa

Appignanesi explored the history of

cabaret, Yvonne Sherratt uncovered

Hitler’s philosophers and Liza

Minnelli gave a one-night-only

performance that raised the roof

of Royal Festival Hall.

Emmeline Pankhurst addresses a crowd

Composer Béla Bartók © akg-images/De Agostini Picture Library

Josephine Baker in a banana skirt for a Folies Bergère production,

1970 © Walery, Fox

Hitler at the Nuremberg Rally 1935 © The Print Collection /

Heritage Images

6 7


February – April

By 1950 America had emerged as a world power in music, culture

and politics. We examined America’s legacies from all angles.

Bonnie Greer talked about the rise of Black music, and Paul

Gambaccini discussed the ‘Invisible Men’ – African-American

composers. We heard the BBC Concert Orchestra combine with

Nu Civilisation Orchestra to play Duke Ellington.

THE STORY

SO FAR:

in pictures

Learning to

tap dance

April – June

The final chapter of this first half of the year covered the oppression and

manipulation experienced during the regimes of Hitler and Stalin.

Will Self spoke about the influence of great modernist writer Kafka,

Orlando Figes explored life under Soviet rule and the City of Birmingham

Symphony Orchestra performed Shostakovich’s Leningrad Symphony,

a universal symbol of hope composed during the Siege of Leningrad.

Royal Northern

College of Music

perform Schoenberg’s

Pierrot Lunaire

Alex Ross and

Jude Kelly kick

off the festival

in January

All images © Ben Larpent

Charlie Chaplin in Modern

Times © Roy Export S.A.S,

Marlene Dietrich as Lola,

1930 © AFP /Getty Images

Go online to listen to the

talks and find out more:

southbankcentre.co.uk/

Tony Benn

therestisnoise

discusses the

founding of

the festival

the Labour Party

continues

8

9


A Nursing Sister from Queen Charlotte’s Hospital

with the latest Oxygen tent. 1948 © TopFoto

SEPTEMBER southbankcentre.co.uk/therestisnoise | tickets: 0844 847 9913

10

1945 – 1975

A weekend of talks and films, plus concerts in September and October

which uncover post-war Britain through Benjamin Britten’s music.

‘I believe in roots, in associations, in backgrounds, in personal relationships’,

Benjamin Britten once said, and there is perhaps no composer whose work

has so powerfully grappled with ideas of place, identity and community. The

windswept fishing town of Aldeburgh was the place Britten called home. His

works channel the rhythm of the waves, the vast expanse of the ocean, and

the sense of isolation and marginalisation, feelings as English in their way as

the imperial certainties of earlier times. Britten was a steely individual – in the

fraught Cold War atmosphere after the war, Britten’s pacifism, his socialist

leanings and his homosexuality contributed to his own sense of being an

outsider. While Britten was fully engaged with the avant-garde music of his

time, his constant belief in the duty of the musician to communicate to the

modern audience led to his music being viewed with suspicion by some.

‘I believe in roots, in associations,

in backgrounds, in personal

relationships’ benjamin britten

Britten’s dark and brooding operatic masterpiece Peter Grimes tells the story of

a fisherman driven to a watery grave by a claustrophobic and oppressive village

community. First staged a month after VE day, it secured Britten’s status as

one of the greatest composers of the 20th century. As Britten changed the face

of British opera, we look at the other changes that were occurring in post-war

Britain from the Windrush Generation to the National Health Service.

Residents of Hawes Steet Byker prepare to

celebrate the Queen’s Coronation, June

1953 © Trinity Mirror / Mirropix / Alamy

Benjamin Britten on the

beach at Aldeburgh

© britten100.org /

Photo: Hans Wild

SATURDAY 28 –

SUNDAY 29 SEPTEMBER

weekend events from 10am

Music that moved a nation.

In the fraught atmosphere of the Cold War, despite Britten’s pacifism,

socialist leanings and homosexuality, he became one of the most

celebrated composers of his time. However, his tonal, communicative music

was viewed as suspicious by some of his avant-garde contemporaries. We look at his

remarkable work in the context of post-war Britain.

IN DEPTH DISCUSSIONS

• Alex Ross, author of The Rest Is Noise,

looks at how composers navigated the

fractured cultural universe at the end of

the Second World War.

• Alexandra Harris, author of Romantic

Moderns, discusses how George Piper

and Graham Sutherland returned to

landscapes after the Second World War

with artist George Shaw.

• Paul Kildea, author of Benjamin Britten:

A Life in the Twentieth Century gives a

survey of this original and complex mind.

• The arrival of the SS Empire Windrush

in June 1948 marked the beginning of

post-war mass migration. Paul Gilroy,

Lawrence Scott and Susheila Nasta

discuss The Windrush Generation.

BITES: YOUR WHISTLE-STOP TOUR

15 minutes on some of the need-to-know

topics of the era.

• We look back at the life and labours

of the National Health Service, now

almost 60 years old.

• Following the destruction of the

Second World War there was a great

rise in pacifism across Britain.

• Imogen Holst – the overlooked but

talented composer who travelled the

world, helped composers exiled by fascism

and was an invaluable support to Britten.

• The Angry Young Men included writers John

Osborne and Kingsley Amis in their ranks.

But who were they angry with and why?

FOR MORE DETAILS, SPEAKERS, TOPICS AND TIMINGS, GO TO

SOUTHBANKCENTRE.CO.UK/THERESTISNOISE

BREAKFAST WITH Britten

Grab a coffee and delve inside the music

of The Rest Is Noise festival. Composer

John Browne leads a fun and informal

workshop about Britten’s Peter Grimes.

LIVE MUSIC

Britten and Russia – Alexander Ivashkin

and Andrew Zolinsky present a programme

of Britten’s cello music inspired by the

composer’s friendship with Shostakovich

and Rostropovich.

Noye’s Fludde – Britten’s colourful opera

inspired by Noah and his ark.

LISTEN TO THIS

Don’t know where to start? Michael

Berkeley, broadcaster, composer and

Britten’s godson, brings Britten’s music

to life in these beginner’s guides.

FILM SCREENINGS

Including our feature film

Moonrise Kingdom by Wes Anderson.

DAY PASs £15*

WEEKEND pASS £25*

*Concerts are not included in the

Day or Weekend Passes

BFI Southbank presents a season focused

on Britten on Film and TV in September and

October bfi.org.uk/britten

TURN OVER FOR

FULL DETAILS OF

THE WEEKEND

SEPTEMBER

southbankcentre.co.uk/therestisnoise | tickets: 0844 847 9913

11


SEPTEMBER southbankcentre.co.uk/therestisnoise | tickets: 0844 847 9913

BRITTEN’s CENTENARY

Weekend Events Timetable

Create your own timetable for the weekend, going from

keynote talks to intimate discussions and film screenings

Saturday 28 September

TIME EVENT CONTENT

Throughout the day Film Screenings Short films and documentaries relating

to Britten.

10am – 11am Breakfast with Britten Grab a coffee and delve into Britten’s

Peter Grimes.

11.15am – 12.15pm Shirley Williams on A lecture surveying Britain in the aftermath

Britten’s Britain

of war.

12.30pm – 1.30pm Listen to This Get to know the music of Benjamin Britten.

Paul Kildea on

Benjamin Britten

Noise Bites

The author of a major Britten biography

gives a keynote talk.

The need-to-know topics of the era.

2pm – 3pm Noye’s Fludde A performance of Britten’s opera inspired

by Noah and his ark.

2.30pm – 3.30pm Listen to This Please see 12.30pm.

Transistors &

Early Computing

Noise Bites

Bradley Bulletins

The rapid development of these

genre-changing innovations.

The need-to-know topics of the era.

Professor Paul Banks reflects on the

engaging diaries of post-war concert-goer

Lionel Bradley.

2.30pm – 4.30pm Gamelan Workshop* Try the instrument which inspired Britten.

4pm – 5pm Britten & Children A talk on the complex subject of Britten

and children chaired by Susie Orbach

alongside author John Bridcut.

Noye’s Fludde

Bradley Bulletins

Please see 2pm.

Please see 2.30pm.

5pm – 7pm Gamelan Workshop* Try the instrument which inspired Britten.

5.30pm – 6.30pm Royal College of Music Pre-Concert Performance.

7pm – 10pm Britten’s Peter Grimes* London Philharmonic Orchestra,

Vladimir Jurowski.

Sunday 29 September

TIME EVENT CONTENT

Throughout the day Film Screenings Short films and documentaries relating

to Britten.

10am – 11am Alex Ross on A New A whirlwind survey of music from

cultural Universe 1945 to 1980.

11am – 1pm Gamelan Workshop* Try the instrument which inspired Britten.

11.30am – 12.30pm Mark Ravenhill:

Britten & Theatre

Paul Gilroy, Lawrence Scott

& Susheila Nasta

Festival of Britain

Leading director explores the theatricality of

Britten’s music and opera.

Discussion on the impact of the Windrush’s

arrival in 1948, both for art and society.

Discussion on the cultural and social

aspirations of this forward-looking moment.

1pm – 2pm Britten’s Poets Lavinia Greenlaw talks about the poetry

which Britten set to music during his life.

turn over FOR

the music

12 13

Noise Bites

Stephen Johnson

The need-to-know topics of the era.

The War Requiem, Coventry Cathedral and

Reconciliation.

3pm – 4pm Noise Bites The need-to-know topics of the era.

Visual Arts Talk:

Post-War Pastoral

Alexandra Harris and George Shaw discuss

the work of George Piper and Graham

Sutherland.

3pm – 5pm Aurora Orchestra: The composer’s complete documentary film

Zeitgeist - Britten Films* scores alongside the original films.

Gamelan Workshop*

DAY PASs £15

WEEKEND pASS £25

Full, extended details of talks, topics, speakers and

timings plus additional events will be available online.

* Not included in the Day or Weekend Pass

Try the instrument which inspired Britten.

5.30pm – 6.30pm Britten and Russia A concert by Alexander Ivashkin (cello) and

Andrew Zolinsky (piano).

8pm – 9.30pm Moonrise Kingdom Wes Anderson’s 2012 feature film.

SEPTEMBER – october southbankcentre.co.uk/therestisnoise | tickets: 0844 847 9913


SEPTEMBER southbankcentre.co.uk/therestisnoise | tickets: 0844 847 9913

BRITTEN’S CENTENARY:

the concerts

FRIDAY 27 SEPTEMBER 2013

Britten Solo

Young musicians perform some of

Britten’s music for solo instruments.

Britten Six Metamorphoses after Ovid for

solo oboe; Nocturnal after John Dowland for

guitar, Op.70; Suite for solo cello No.3, Op.87

Musicians from the Royal College of Music

Central Bar Foyer at Royal Festival Hall, 1pm

FREE

FRIDAY 27 SEPTEMBER 2013

Brigitte Beraha & Friends:

Remembering Britten

Music from the jazz and Latin

repertoires and originals written for

the occasion inspired by Britten. Plus

re-interpretations of some of his music.

Brigitte Beraha, Steve Fishwick, Ross Stanley,

Paul Clarvis

The Front Room at Queen Elizabeth Hall,

5.30pm

FREE

FRIDAY 27 SEPTEMBER 2013

Music from Across

the Iron Curtain

Music from three friends, featuring

Shostakovich’s creative response

to the Warsaw Pact invasion of

Czechoslovakia. Plus a rare chance

to hear a Britten premiere.

Britten Serenade for tenor, horn and strings

Britten Second Movement from Movements

for a Clarinet Concerto compl. Colin Matthews

arr. Joseph Phibbs (London premiere)

Copland Clarinet Concerto

Shostakovich Symphony No.14

City of London Sinfonia, Michael Collins,

Stephen Stirling, Evelina Dobracheva, Ronan

Busfield, Graeme Broadbent

Queen Elizabeth Hall, 7.30pm

£10 - £28

FREE pre-concert event, 6pm

Queen Elizabeth Hall

A talk about the impact of the Cold War on

European and American cultural identity.

In partnership with the Forum for European

Philosophy.

SATURDAY 28 SEPTEMBER 2013

Britten: Noye’s Fludde

A concert for families. Come and join

Noye, his family, a cast of animals

and musicians from the London

Philharmonic Orchestra as they

escape from the great flood.

Also on Saturday 12 October.

The Clore Ballroom at Royal Festival Hall,

2pm & 4pm

FREE

SATURDAY 28 SEPTEMBER 2013

Peter Grimes

One of the landmark operas of

the 20th century, a chilling tale of

marginalisation and persecution.

Britten Peter Grimes – opera in 3 acts

London Philharmonic Orchestra, Vladimir

Jurowski, Stuart Skelton, Pamela Armstrong,

Alan Opie, Pamela Helen Stephen, Malin

Christensson, Claire Ormshaw, Michael Colvin,

Brindley Sherratt, Jean Rigby, Mark Stone,

Brian Galliford, Jonathan Veira, Daniel Slater,

London Voices

Royal Festival Hall, 7pm

£9 - £65

FREE pre-concert event, 5.30pm

Royal Festival Hall

A performance by musicians from the

Royal College of Music of Britten’s String

Quartet No.3 and Phantasy.

concert playlist - see page 46

SUNDAY 29 SEPTEMBER 2013

Zeitgeist: Britten Films

Britten’s complete surviving film

scores. With narration from Samuel

West, these vivid portraits of 1930s

Britain cover topics from postage

stamps to pacifism. Film screening

with live orchestral accompaniment.

Britten Night mail; The Way to the sea; Men

behind the meters; The Tocher; Coal face;

The King’s stamp; God’s chillun; Peace

of Britain; Sixpenny telegram (London

premiere of the complete scores)

Aurora Orchestra, Nicholas Collon, Samuel

West, Finchley Children’s Music Group

SUNDAY 29 SEPTEMBER 2013

Britten & Russia

Cello music inspired by the composer’s

friendship with Shostakovich and

Rostropovich.

Britten Suite No.3 for solo cello, Op.87;

Cello Sonata in C, Op.65

Alexander Ivashkin, Andrew Zolinsky

Purcell Room at Queen Elizabeth Hall, 5.30pm

Free entry for Day or Weekend Pass holders

WEDNESDAY 2 OCTOBER 2013

From Darkness to Light

Written for Mstislav Rostropovich,

Britten’s inspiring Cello Symphony is

music of fraught intensity but also of

optimism. Listen out for the sounds of

Gamelan in The Prince of the Pagodas.

Britten The Prince of the Pagodas Suite

(Prelude & dances); Suite on English Folk

Tunes (A Time There Was ...); Nocturne;

Cello Symphony

London Philharmonic Orchestra, Vladimir

Jurowski, Mark Padmore, Truls Mørk

Royal Festival Hall, 7.30pm

£9 - £65

SATURDAY 12 OCTOBER 2013

Britten: War Requiem

Britten’s reaction to the damage

sustained by Coventry during the war was

his monumental War Requiem, which he

hoped ‘would be remembered longest’

after his own death.

Britten War Requiem

London Philharmonic Orchestra, Vladimir

Jurowski, Neville Creed, Tatiana Monogarova,

Ian Bostridge, Matthias Goerne, London

Philharmonic Choir, Trinity Boys Choir

Royal Festival Hall, 7.30pm

£9 - £65

FREE pre-concert event, 6pm

Royal Festival Hall

A performance by musicians from the

Royal College of Music of Britten’s

Les Illuminations and Variations on

a Theme of Frank Bridge.

Queen Elizabeth Hall, 3pm

£10

Winston Churchill walks through the ruins

14 15

of Coventry Cathedral © Captain Horton

xx

SEPTEMBER – october southbankcentre.co.uk/therestisnoise | tickets: 0844 847 9913


october southbankcentre.co.uk/therestisnoise | tickets: 0844 847 9913

1945 – 1960

Through a weekend of talks and films plus concerts throughout

October, we lay bare the legacy of the Second World War.

The atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 mirrored the

ruins of war-torn Europe. This dark vision of destruction by new technology,

combined with the liberation of Nazi concentration camps, showed

humanity as fragile and vulnerable to annihilation. Western Europe’s victory

was achieved at such great cost that it often felt like defeat, and with the

crushing of Germany, nations quickly turned against each other in mutual

suspicion. Thus began the Cold War between the USA and the Soviet Union,

and their allies and satellites – a period of anxiety and expense.

a complete rejection of all

that had gone before

The shattered landscape that greeted all artists after the war, including

composers, was even bleaker thanks to the way the arts had been

manipulated as propaganda. With the past tainted, there was no option but

to start from scratch, with a complete rejection of all that had gone before.

A new generation of composers, led by the fiercely brilliant young Boulez and

Stockhausen, set about creating innovative, influential and radically new

music out of the ruins of post-war Europe.

East German policemen

building the Berlin Wall, 1963

© Ullsteinbild / Topfoto

Luigi Nono and Nuria

Schoenberg, 1950

Archive Luigi Nono,

Venice © Courtesy

Luigi Nono Heirs

SATURDAY 5 –

SUNDAY 6 OCTOBER

weekend events from 10am

A new generation. Innovation. Radicalisation. Electronics.

In the six years of the Second World War, art, music and technology had been

used to manipulate and destroy. Composers saw no option but to start from

scratch and set about creating radical new music in the aftermath of war.

This weekend we look at the music that came from the ashes of war. A new,

post-atomic world had emerged.

IN DEPTH DISCUSSIONS

• From the War to the Wall: Donald Sassoon

from the University of London guides us

through the political tensions that led to

the building of the Berlin Wall.

• Nuria Schoenberg-Nono, Schoenberg’s

daughter, lets us into the world of the

Darmstadt Summer School – the hotbed of

new music where her husband Luigi Nono

was a leading light. She is in conversation

with visionary composer Helmut

Lachenmann who was a student of Nono

in this event chaired by Christopher Fox.

• The battle between the intellectuals and

the masses – literary critic John Carey

enters the fray.

• Frances Stonor Saunders asks ‘Who paid

the piper?’ in this history of the covertly

CIA-funded Congress for Cultural Freedom.

• Author and broadcaster Jonathan

Meades discusses Le Corbusier –

who thought he could reshape mankind

through their houses.

• Journalist and critic Nicholas Lezard

and author Yvonne Sherratt discuss the

(sometimes biting) musical criticism of

Theodor Adorno.

DAY PASs £15*

WEEKEND pASS £25*

*Concerts are not included in the

Day or Weekend Passes

BITES: YOUR WHISTLE-STOP TOUR

15 minutes on some of the need-to-know

topics of the era.

• We look at architect Oscar Niemeyer

and his gravity defying buildings with a

socialist ideology.

• ‘It is up to you to be Lacanians if you wish.

I am a Freudian.’ What was the impact of

Jaques Lacan?

• Albert Camus: the literary and

philosophical great who was forced to

grapple with his own colonial past.

• ‘A necessary evil’? What was the impact

of the creation of the Atomic bomb?

BREAKFAST WITH STOCKHAUSEN

Grab a coffee and delve inside the music of

The Rest Is Noise festival. Composer Fraser

Trainer leads a fun and informal workshop

on Stockhausen’s Gesang der Jünglinge

on Saturday.

LISTEN TO THIS

Don’t know where to start? Let Guardian

journalist Tom Service bring the music of

Post-War World to life in these beginner’s

guides.

LIVE MUSIC

Students from Guildhall School of Music &

Drama perform music by Xenakis and Cage.

FILM SCREENINGS

Including our feature film: Stanley

Kubrick’s Cold War classic Dr Strangelove.

FOR MORE DETAILS, SPEAKERS, TOPICS AND TIMINGS, GO TO

TURN OVER FOR

SOUTHBANKCENTRE.CO.UK/THERESTISNOISE

FULL DETAILS OF

THE WEEKEND

16 17

october

southbankcentre.co.uk/therestisnoise | tickets: 0844 847 9913


october southbankcentre.co.uk/therestisnoise | tickets: 0844 847 9913

post-war world

Weekend Events Timetable

Create your own timetable for the weekend, going from

keynote talks to intimate discussions and film screenings

Saturday 5 October

TIME EVENT CONTENT

Throughout the day Electronic Music Hub The Royal College of Music presents some

of the early classics of electronic music.

Film Screenings

Short films and documentaries from the period.

10am – 11am Breakfast with Grab a coffee and delve into

Stockhausen

Stockhausen’s Gesang der Jünglinge.

11.15am – 12.15pm From the War to the Wall

Opening lecture by Donald Sassoon.

12.30pm – 1.30pm Tom Service: Listen to This Get to know the music of Post-War World.

Frances Stonor Saunders

Robert Worby

Noise Bites

The author of Who Paid the Piper? explores

the Congress for Cultural Freedom which

was covertly funded by the CIA.

A talk on the birth of electronic music.

The need-to-know topics of the era.

2.30pm – 3.30pm Tom Service: Listen to This Please see 12.30pm.

Jonathan Meades:

Le Corbusier & Modern

Architecture

Darkness Spoken

4pm – 5pm Robert Worby Please see 12.30pm.

Noise Bites

Zygmunt Bauman –

Modernity and the

Holocaust

The leading broadcaster on architecture and

place champions the bravura work of a

modernist master.

A reading and discussion focusing on the letters

of poets Paul Celan and Ingeborg Bachmann,

written in the shadow of Auschwitz.

The need-to-know topics of the era.

One of the great contemporary philosophers

examines how the Holocaust redefined our

sense of the ‘modern’.

6pm – 7pm Christopher Fox Pre-concert talk, on Stockhausen and Boulez.

7.30pm – 9.30pm Stockhausen & Boulez: Franck Ollu, Colin Currie, Nicolas Hodges,

Modern Masterpieces* Hilary Summers, Members of Aurora Orchestra

Sunday 6 October

TIME EVENT CONTENT

Throughout the day Electronic Music Hub The Royal College of Music presents some

of the early classics of electronic music.

Film Screenings

10.30am – 11.30am Nuria Schoenberg-Nono

helmut Lachenmann &

Christopher Fox

Short films and documentaries from the period.

Nuria Schoenberg-Nono recounts her life

surrounded by legendary musical figures,

with composers Helmut Lachenmann and

Christopher Fox.

12 noon – 1pm Noise Bites The need-to-know topics of the era.

Ian Buruma

The writer surveys post-war politics based

on his book Year Zero: The History of 1945.

turn over FOR

the music

18 19

Primo Levi

A discussion about the life and work of

this writer who survived Auschwitz.

1pm – 2pm Guildhall School of Performance of Xenakis and Cage.

Music & Drama

2pm – 3pm Noise Bites The need-to-know topics of the era.

Black Mountain College

3pm – 4pm Guildhall School of Please see 1pm.

Music & Drama

A celebration of the artistic experimentation

in this unique environment.

3pm – 5pm Tamara Stefanovich* Piano recital of music by Ligeti,

Stockhausen, Messiaen and Boulez.

4pm – 5pm John Carey ‘High’ and ‘low’ art in post-war Britain;

who produced art and for which audiences?

The Geometry of Fear

Introduction to Adorno

DAY PASs £15

WEEKEND pASS £25

Full, extended details of talks, topics, speakers and

timings plus additional events will be available online.

* Not included in the Day or Weekend Pass

Explore how sculpture was re-shaped in the

aftermath of the war.

Yvonne Sherratt and Nicholas Lezard

explore Adorno’s philosophy and music

criticism after the Holocaust.

5.15pm – 5.45pm Tom Service An introduction to Stockhausen’s Gruppen.

6pm – 8pm Stockhausen’s Gruppen* London Sinfonietta and Royal Academy of Music.

8pm – 9.30pm Dr Strangelove Stanley Kubrick’s 1964 feature film.

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POST-WAR WORLD: the concerts

FRIDAY 4 OCTOBER 2013

Cage for Prepared Piano

Music of delicate, seductive beauty

performed on a piano that has been

altered to sound like a percussion

ensemble. Curated by Joanna Macgregor,

the Academy’s Head of Piano.

Cage Sonatas I – IV; First Interlude; Sonatas

V – VIII; Second Interlude; Third Interlude;

Sonatas IX – XII; Fourth Interlude; Sonatas

XIII, XIV/XV ‘Gemini’, XVI

Royal Academy of Music

Purcell Room at Queen Elizabeth Hall, 1pm

FREE

FRIDAY 4 OCTOBER 2013

Russia in the Cold War World

Music from two composers denounced

by Stalin’s henchman Zhdanov.

Prokofiev Sinfonia concertante in E minor for

cello and orchestra, Op.125

Shostakovich Symphony No.10 in E minor

Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, Kirill

Karabits, Alisa Weilerstein

Royal Festival Hall, 7.30pm

£9 - £65

FREE pre-concert talk, 6.15pm

Royal Festival Hall

Marina Frolova-Walker discusses Prokofiev

and Shostakovich in Stalin’s post-war Russia.

SATURDAY 5 OCTOBER 2013

Modern Masterpieces

Three classic pieces that changed the

face of modern music forever.

Stockhausen Gesang der Jünglinge;

Kontakte

Boulez Le marteau sans maître

Members of Aurora Orchestra, Franck

Ollu, Colin Currie, Nicolas Hodges, Hilary

Summers, Sound Intermedia

Queen Elizabeth Hall, 7.30pm

£10 - £22

concert playlist - see page 46

SUNDAY 6 OCTOBER 2013

Music of Change

Radical and inventive percussion

sounds from Xenakis and Cage.

Xenakis Psappha

Cage 2nd Construction

Xenakis Okho

Cage Credo in US

Guildhall School of Music & Drama Percussion

Ensemble, Julian Warburton

The Clore Ballroom at Royal Festival Hall,

1pm & 3pm

FREE

SUNDAY 6 OCTOBER 2013

Startling Soundworld

Powerful piano music which evokes

constellations, bird song and the magic

of mathematics.

Ligeti Musica ricercata

Stockhausen Klavierstück IX

Messiaen Excerpts from Catalogue d’oiseaux

Boulez Sonata No.2

Tamara Stefanovich

Queen Elizabeth Hall, 3pm

£10 - £35

SUNDAY 6 OCTOBER 2013

Stockhausen: Gruppen

Three orchestras create a vortex of sound

which spins around the concert hall.

Stockhausen Gruppen

Nono Canti per 13; Polifonica-monodia-ritmica

Stockhausen Gruppen

London Sinfonietta, Royal Academy of Music

Manson Ensemble, Martyn Brabbins

Royal Festival Hall, 6pm

£15 - £25

SUNDAY 20 OCTOBER 2013

Anguish and Insights

Shostakovich’s most intimately revealing

music written in the shadow of Stalin.

Shostakovich String Quartets: No.7 in F

sharp minor, Op.108; No.8 in C minor, Op.110;

No.12 in D flat, Op.133

Borodin Quartet

Queen Elizabeth Hall, 3pm

£10 - £35

WEDNESDAY 23 OCTOBER 2013

The Sacred and Satirical

Poulenc’s setting of the 13th-century poem

of mourning and salvation, Stabat mater.

Poulenc Piano Concerto

Prokofiev Symphony No.7

Poulenc Stabat mater

London Philharmonic Orchestra,

Yannick Nézet-Séguin, Alexandre Tharaud,

Kate Royal, London Philharmonic Choir

Royal Festival Hall, 7.30pm

£9 - £65

FREE pre-concert event, 6.15pm

Royal Festival Hall

Dr Caroline Potter from Kingston University

looks at the life and works of Francis Poulenc.

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Karlheinz Stockhausen © akg images

Karlheinz Stockhausen © akg images


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Swing through the 1960s in this weekend of talks and films

plus concerts throughout October.

‘The Sixties’ is not just a decade in history. It is a collection of ideas,

images and events which signified profound changes in politics and

society. The middle-class youth of Europe and America were alive with

protest – against the war in Vietnam, against racism, sexism and nuclear

weaponry – culminating in the 1968 uprisings in Paris, Prague and

elsewhere. There was a revolution in social attitudes – the contraceptive

pill allowed women unprecedented control over their own fertility, and

female attendance at colleges and universities subsequently rocketed.

The Civil Rights movement’s campaigns of civil disobedience achieved

great gains, including the 1964 Civil Rights Act, and drew strength from

mass events such as the march on Washington of 1963.

a revolution in social attitudes

Paris riots, 1968 ©

Topham Picturepoint

Martin Luther King ©

Everett Collection / Alamy

SATURDAY 26 – SUNDAY 27 OCTOBER

weekend events from 10am

The Pill. Rebellion. Experimentation. Protest. Civil Rights.

This weekend we look at the Vietnam protests, pop art, social change, the anti-nuclear

movement, civil rights, the Profumo affair, the Beatles and maverick composers including

Frank Zappa, Stockhausen and Bernstein.

IN DEPTH DISCUSSIONS

• Activist, scholar and revolutionary Angela

Davis looks back on the enormous gains

made during this decade of revolution.

• Zappa on Zappa. Gail Zappa speaks about

her husband Frank, who was an iconoclast,

a composer and a musician who defies

categorisation.

• The Profumo Affair – was it extraordinary

or symptomatic of the eroded social

morals of the 1960s? Historian and

biographer Richard Davenport-Hines

investigates.

• Tariq Ali, a leading figure of the

international Left, gives an eyewitness

account of this eventful decade.

• Space scientist Maggie Aderin-Pocock

talks us through the race that put a man

on the moon.

BITES: YOUR WHISTLE-STOP TOUR

15 minutes on some of the need-to-know

topics of the era.

• Intoxicating, stimulating, harmless?

The rise and fall of LSD.

• Coronation Street was first broadcast

in December 1960 and within six months

was the most watched show on British

TV. But why?

• 500,000 people in a field with Jimi

Hendrix? It can only be Woodstock,

one of the defining moments of the 1960s.

BREAKFAST WITH BERIO

Grab a coffee and delve inside the music of

The Rest Is Noise festival. Composer Rachel

Leach leads a fun and informal workshop on

Berio’s Sinfonia on Sunday.

LISTEN TO THIS

Don’t know where to start? Let our music

experts bring the music of the 1960s to life

in these beginner’s guides.

LIVE MUSIC

Stockhausen’s Stimmung. Hypnotic, hippy

and immersive, Stockhausen’s Stimmung

could only have been written in 1968.

Martin Luther King is explored in a new jazz

collaboration between Chicago and London.

FILM SCREENINGS

Including the iconic Yellow Submarine and

Heimat 2 in its 26-hour entirety.

DAY PASs £15*

WEEKEND pASS £25*

*Concerts are not included in the

Day or Weekend Passes

Hippies at the Hyde

Park ‘Love In’ 1967

© David Graves

/ Rex Features

With a look towards the rebellion, sexual liberation and drug

experimentation that characterised psychedelic culture, contemporary

music entered its carnivalesque, topsy-turvy, through-the-looking-glass

period. It also drew closer to popular music, which was rapidly acquiring

• Did the founding of the Open University

in 1969 usher in a new era of openness in

a seriousness and depth to rival classical music, and an influence to

academia?

surpass it. When the Beatles released Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club

Band in 1967, they put Karlheinz Stockhausen in amongst their cultural

heroes on the cover.

FOR MORE DETAILS, SPEAKERS, TOPICS AND TIMINGS, GO TO

TURN OVER FOR

SOUTHBANKCENTRE.CO.UK/THERESTISNOISE

FULL DETAILS OF

THE WEEKEND

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1960s

Weekend Events Timetable

Create your own timetable for the weekend, going from

keynote talks to intimate discussions and film screenings

Saturday 26 October

TIME EVENT CONTENT

Throughout the day Film Screenings Heimat 2 and much more besides.

11am – 12 noon Tariq Ali In this keynote talk the author and activist

discusses a radical decade and key figures

such as Henry Kissinger and Malcolm X.

12.30pm – 1.30pm Stephen Montague: Get to know the music of the 1960s.

Listen to This

The Real Mad Men

Noise Bites

Pop Art

Andrew Cracknell gives an illustrated talk on

ad men and the rise of the consumer society.

The need-to-know topics of the era.

An overview of the transatlantic movement

which dominated the 1960s art world.

2.30pm – 3.30pm Maggie Aderin-Pocock: A talk on the science behind the ultimate

the Space Race

Cold War rivalry.

Marina Frolova-Walker

noise Bites

Director of Studies in Music, Cambridge,

discusses Shostakovich in the 1960s.

The need-to-know topics of the era.

Brutalism and

Love it or hate it, Brutalist architecture

southbank Centre dominated the 1960s.

4pm – 5pm American Foreign Policy We put the decade of the Cuban missile crisis

and Vietnam War under the microscope.

Mods

May ’68

Richard Weight, author of Mod: A Very British

Style, celebrates a defining style movement.

The student protests that turned into one of

the most powerful moments of the 1960s.

5.30pm – 7pm Where Dreams Lead A musical collaboration between

NuCivilisation Jazz Orchestra and

Chicago’s Live The Spirit.

7.30pm – 10pm Denys Baptiste* Now is the Time... Let Freedom Ring!

Shostakovich Symphony

No.13*

London Philharmonic Orchestra,

Yannick Nézet-Séguin.

Sunday 27 October

TIME EVENT CONTENT

Throughout the day Film Screenings Heimat 2 and much more besides.

10am – 11am Breakfast with Berio Grab a coffee and delve into Berio’s Sinfonia.

11.30am – 12.30pm The Beat Generation

Explore the words and music of the 1960s

underground.

Richard Davenport-Hines: A rip-roaring account of Britain at the time

scandal in the ’60s of the Profumo scandal.

Dominic Murcott

Noise Bites

Piano Phase / Purple Haze: classical music

meets popular culture in the 1960s.

The need-to-know topics of the era.

1.30pm – 2.30pm Zappa on Zappa Gail Zappa speaks about her husband Frank.

Rick Stroud

The Beatles

The author of The Book of the Moon

discusses the memorable year of 1969.

Discussion on the early years of the legendary

band, based on new biographical material.

3pm – 4pm Joe Boyd The producer and writer in conversation

about the 1960s.

Ravi Shankar

Noise Bites

A talk exploring the Indian music guru

whose influence resonates to this day.

The need-to-know topics of the era.

4.30pm – 5.30pm Stockhausen A performance of Stockhausen’s Stimmung

for six musicians and six microphones.

Roger McGough & The legendary Mersey poets read poems

Brian Patten and celebrate Liverpool in the 1960s.

Who Were The

Andrew Hussey explores the intellectual

Situationists? movement behind the uprisings of Paris ’68.

Noise Bites

DAY PASs £15

WEEKEND pASS £25

Full, extended details of talks, topics, speakers and

timings plus additional events will be available online.

* Not included in the Day or Weekend Pass

The need-to-know topics of the era.

6.30pm – 7.30pm Angela Davis Legendary civil rights activist looks back on

a decade of revolution.

8pm – 9.30pm Yellow Submarine The classic 1968 Beatles feature film.

turn over FOR

24

the music

25

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1960s: the concerts

MONDAY 7 OCTOBER 2013

2001: A Space Odyssey

A screening of Stanley Kubrick’s seminal

film with a live orchestral soundtrack.

Philharmonia Orchestra, Benjamin Wallfisch,

Philharmonia Voices.

Presented in association with the BFI (British

Film Institute), with support from Warner Bros.

Royal Festival Hall, 7pm

£22.50 - £55

FRIDAY 25 OCTOBER 2013

1964

A musical snapshot of 1964 featuring

pieces from Berio, Riley and John Coltrane.

Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance

Central Bar Foyer at Royal Festival Hall, 1pm

FREE

FRIDAY 25 OCTOBER 2013

Ornette Coleman Double

Quartet Project Revisted

A re-imagining of this classic

double quartet.

Julian Siegel, Musicians from Trinity Laban

Conservatoire of Music and Dance, Chris Batchelor

The Front Room at Queen Elizabeth Hall, 5pm

FREE

FRIDAY 25 OCTOBER 2013

Berio: Sinfonia

Written in 1968, Sinfonia reflects the

political and artistic heat of the time.

Berio took quotations from Mahler,

Brecht and student slogans from the

barricades and added a requiem for

Martin Luther King.

Guarnieri Symphony No.4 (Brasilia)

Bernstein Symphonic Dances from

West Side Story

Berio Sinfonia

São Paulo Symphony Orchestra, Marin

Alsop, The Swingle Singers

Royal Festival Hall, 7.30pm

£12 - £65

Part of Shell Classic

International

concert playlist - see page 46

2001: A Space Odyssey © BFI

SATURDAY 26 OCTOBER 2013

Where Dreams Lead

The results of an extraordinary

international collaboration between

The NuCivilisation Orchestra,

Tomorrow’s Warriors, and some of

Chicago’s leading jazz musicians,

including Ernest Dawkins and Corey

Wilkes. The music takes inspiration

from and addresses the legacy of

Martin Luther King.

The Clore Ballroom at Royal Festival Hall,

5.30pm

FREE

SATURDAY 26 OCTOBER 2013

Denys Baptiste’s Now is the

Time... Let Freedom Ring!

This large-scale jazz suite combines text

by Ben Okri with live news footage from

the 1960s. Commissioned in honour of

Martin Luther King’s famous ‘I have a

dream’ speech.

Denys Baptiste Let Freedom Ring

Denys Baptiste Band

Queen Elizabeth Hall, 7.30pm

£17.50 - £22.50

SATURDAY 26 OCTOBER 2013

Shostakovich Speaks Out

Shostakovich’s 13th Symphony features

controversial texts depicting the

Nazi massacre of Jews outside Kiev,

presented with bold simplicity and

tragic irony – his last major clash with

the Soviet state.

Dutilleux Tout un monde lointain ... (Cello

Concerto)

Shostakovich Symphony No.13 (Babi Yar)

London Philharmonic Orchestra,

Yannick Nézet-Séguin, Jean-Guihen Queyras,

Mikhail Petrenko, Gentlemen of the London

Philharmonic Choir

Royal Festival Hall, 7.30pm

£9 - £65

SUNDAY 27 OCTOBER 2013

Tuning In

Singers intone, recite and transform

speech sounds in this hypnotic work

for six singers and six microphones.

Directed by Gregory Rose who directed

performances in collaboration with

Stockhausen.

Stockhausen Stimmung

Musicians from Trinity Laban Conservatoire

of Music and Drama, Gregory Rose

Queen Elizabeth Hall, 4.30pm

Free to Day and Weekend Pass holders

TUESDAY 29 OCTOBER 2013

200 Motels

A cult classic, banned from live

performance at the time of its composition,

is finally heard in its full glory.

Frank Zappa 200 Motels (UK premiere)

BBC Concert Orchestra, Southbank Sinfonia,

Jurjen Hempel, Claron McFadden

Please note, this event contains explicit material

and is suitable for adult audiences aged 18+.

Royal Festival Hall, 7.30pm

£25 - £45

26 27

Frank Zappa © Keystone Pictures USA / Alamy

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Mikhail Gorbachev

© Ria Novosti

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1970 – 1989

Investigate this era of change through a weekend of talks and films

plus concerts from 30 October – 30 November.

After Stalin’s death in 1953, life behind the Iron Curtain slowly began to change –

and by the 1970s the Soviet Union under Brezhnev was beginning to modernise.

Symbols of the West such as jeans and rock music became popular in Soviet

Russia, signalling a new era of cautious thawing of Cold War relations. In the

West, the 1970s and ’80s were fast-paced decades – first a recession then

economic boom years, where advertising and communications technology rapidly

accelerated the pace of modern life. To counter this materialism, some composers

offered a return to spiritual values, and others resorted to overtly political music.

the pace of modern life

rapidly accelerated

In the UK, war-damaged buildings remained empty and worsening economic

conditions inspired new radical politics. Much of the religious music came from the

Soviet Union and its satellite states, where religious belief had been marginalised

under the official state atheism. More surprising were the commercial

possibilities in this sacred music. The simple, consonant songs of lamentation in

Henryk Górecki’s Third Symphony commemorate victims of the Holocaust and

unexpectedly sold over a million recordings when it was released. No composer

exemplified this turn to the sacred more than Estonian composer Arvo Pärt, whose

work conveys an intense and profound spirituality. Hans Werner Henze gave

voice to oppressed peoples and political radicals such as Cornelius Cardew,

who tried to sweep aside the bourgeois norms of the musical establishment.

New York, 1979 © Thomas J O’Halloran

Sofia Gubaidulina © Dmitri N Smirnov

SATURDAY 2 –

SUNDAY 3 NOVEMBER

weekend events from 10.30am

Boom. Bust. Globalisation. Religion. Hope.

By the 1970s, western influences began to creep under the Iron

Curtain. We explore this era of change, and seek to understand why it

provoked a political and spiritual response from composers across the globe.

IN DEPTH DISCUSSIONS

• Author Karen Armstrong looks back at

the global religious landscape of the

1970s and ’80s, which saw increasing

secularism in the West and a return to

the spiritual in the Communist bloc.

• Alain de Botton investigates how

spirituality fitted in to an increasingly

consumerist world.

• We hear from Hanif Kureishi who

captured all the tensions of Thatcherite

Britain in his novel The Buddha of

Suburbia.

• A rare appearance from Sofia

Gubaidulina who discusses her serene

and timeless music in person.

BITES: YOUR WHISTLE-STOP TOUR

15 minutes on some of the need-to-know

topics of the era.

• Kick-start the punk rock movement:

it’s the Sex Pistols.

• Could the government of the Soviet

Union ever be open and transparent? We

grapple with Glasnost.

• On 1 August 1981 MTV played its first

video: Video killed the radio star and

began a global phenomenon.

• As unemployment rose in 1970s Britain,

a whole community of squatters

reclaimed a bombed-out London for

the homeless.

BREAKFAST WITH GUBAIDULINA

Grab a coffee and delve inside the music of

The Rest Is Noise festival. Composer John

Browne leads a fun and informal workshop

on Gubaidulina’s Offertorium on Sunday.

LISTEN TO THIS

Don’t know where to start? Let Jonathan

Cross bring the music of Politics and

Spirituality to life in these beginner’s guides.

LIVE MUSIC

Gubaidulina’s String Quartets Nos.3 & 4

performed by the Ligeti String Quartet.

A selection of Ode Machines from Cornelius

Cardew’s Paragraph 5 of The Great Learning

by Guildhall School of Music & Drama and

James Weeks.

Andriessen’s De Staat by Guildhall School

of Music & Drama and excerpts from Hans

Werner Henze’s Voices by musicians from

the Royal College of Music.

FILM SCREENINGS

Including Solaris, Tarkovsky’s

psychological space race drama and

Kieślowski’s Dekalog in its 10-hour entirety.

DAY PASs £15*

WEEKEND pASS £25*

*Concerts are not included in the

Day or Weekend Passes

FOR MORE DETAILS, SPEAKERS, TOPICS AND TIMINGS, GO TO

TURN OVER FOR

Pope John Paul II at old Yankee Stadium,

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politics and spirituality

Weekend Events Timetable

Create your own timetable for the weekend, going from

keynote talks to intimate discussions and film screenings

Saturday 2 november

TIME EVENT CONTENT

Throughout the day Dekalog Screenings 10 short films by the groundbreaking Polish

director Krzysztof Kieślowski based on the

10 Commandments.

11am – 12 noon Catherine Merridale Historian and author of Red Fortress on how

life behind the Iron Curtain began to change.

12.30pm – 1.30pm Noise Bites The need-to-know topics of the era.

Gubaidulina String A performance of String Quartets No.s 3 & 4

Quartets

by the Ligeti Quartet.

cold War Poetry

Behind the Iron Curtain

Readings and insights into the writing of

great Polish poets Zbigniew Herbert and

Wislawa Szymborska.

Spirituality in Eastern Europe.

2.30pm – 3.30pm Noise Bites The need-to-know topics of the era.

sofia Gubaidulina

Listen to This

The composer herself speaks about her work.

Get to know the music of Politics and Spirituality.

Art Behind The Iron Curtain The changes in visual arts after the fall of Stalin.

4pm – 5pm Listen to This Please see 2.30pm.

Behind the Iron Curtain

Please see 12.30pm.

5.30pm – 6.30pm Alain De Botton The leading philosopher on spirituality

and consumerism.

6pm – 7pm Pre-Concert Talk: The Royal Philharmonic Society explores the

colour and Eternity music of Olivier Messiaen.

7.30pm – 10pm Olivier Messiaen’s From London Philharmonic Orchestra.

the Canyons to the Stars*

Sunday 3 november

TIME EVENT CONTENT

Throughout the day Dekalog Screenings

10.30am – 11.30am Breakfast with

Gubaidulina

10 short films by the groundbreaking Polish

director Krzysztof Kieślowski based on the

10 Commandments.

Grab a coffee with John Browne and delve

into Gubaidulina’s Offertorium.

12 noon – 1pm LPO FUNharmonics* Hear Britten’s Young Person’s Guide to the

Orchestra in this concert for families.

noise Bites

Hanif Kureishi

John Tilbury

The need-to-know topics of the era.

Tensions in Thatcherite Britain.

A talk on Cornelius Cardew, plus an extract

from The Great Learning from Guildhall

School of Music & Drama.

2pm – 3pm Noise Bites The need-to-know topics of the era.

Robert Winston:

Test Tube Babies

Leading scientist recounts the historic

birth of the first test tube baby.

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the music

31

Big Bang

Punk to Post-Punk

An overview of the social and economic

landscape shaped by Thatcherism.

A journey through the pop music of the era

combining rebellion and experimentation.

3.30pm – 4.30pm Karen Armstrong Spirituality in the Modern Age.

Tarkovsky

Lucy Robinson

DAY PASs £15

WEEKEND pASS £25

Full, extended details of talks, topics, speakers and

timings plus additional events will be available online.

* Not included in the Day or Weekend Pass

Layla Alexander-Garrat, his on-set translator,

speaks about the legendary film director.

Historian looks at one of the key political

symbols of the era – Greenham Common.

5pm – 6pm Andriessen’s De Staat Guildhall School Of Music & Drama

& Henze’s Voices

and Royal College of Music.

7.30pm – 9.30pm Works by Britten, Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra.

Berio and Shostakovich*

8pm – 10.45pm Solaris Tarkovsky’s 1972 feature film.

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POLITICS AND SPIRITUALITY IN THE LATE

20TH CENTURY: the concerts

WEDNESDAY 30 OCTOBER 2013

Schnittke’s Vision of the Future

Schnittke’s moving, emotion-filled and

energy-charged symphony reveals the

paradoxes at the heart of modern life.

Ligeti Lontano

Lutosławski Cello Concerto

Schnittke Symphony No.1

London Philharmonic Orchestra, Michail

Jurowski, Johannes Moser

Royal Festival Hall, 7.30pm

£9 - £65

FREE pre-concert event, 6pm

Royal Festival Hall

Professor Alexander Ivashkin plays cello

works by Lutosławski and Schnittke.

FRIDAY 1 NOVEMBER 2013

From Out Of The East

Contemplative chamber music from

behind the Iron Curtain.

Shostakovich String Quartet No.13 in Bb

minor, Op.138

Gubaidulina Chaconne

Schnittke Praeludium in Memoriam Dmitri

Shostakovich

Pärt Fratres

Musicians from the Royal College of Music

Central Bar Foyer at Royal Festival Hall, 1pm

FREE

FRIDAY 1 NOVEMBER 2013

Bruno Heinen Sextet:

Stockhausen’s Tierkreis

Reinvented

Heinen’s jazz re-working of Tierkreis,

a piece originally written for 12 music

boxes, four of which have been in his

family since he was born.

Stockhausen Tierkreis arr. Bruno Heinen

Bruno Heinen Sextet

The Front Room at Queen Elizabeth Hall,

5.30pm

FREE

SATURDAY 2 NOVEMBER 2013

Transcendent Passion

Gubaidulina said of herself: ‘I am the

place where East meets West’. Today we

hear two of her String Quartets.

Gubaidulina Sting Quartets Nos.3 & 4

Ligeti String Quartet

Purcell Room at Queen Elizabeth Hall,

12.30pm

Free to Day and Weekend Pass Holders

SATURDAY 2 NOVEMBER 2013

From the Canyons to the Stars

Opulent music depicting the vibrant

colour and spiritual grandeur of the

American West.

Messiaen Des canyons aux etoiles

London Philharmonic Orchestra, Christoph

Eschenbach, Tzimon Barto, John Ryan

Royal Festival Hall, 7.30pm

£9 - £65

FREE pre-concert event, 6pm

Royal Festival Hall

Colour and Eternity: the Royal Philharmonic

Society explores the music of Olivier Messiaen.

Sunday 3 November 2013

Great Learnings

John Tilbury introduces an experimental

work based on Dà Xué which was written

by Confucius and his pupils.

Cardew extracts from Ode Machines (from

Paragraph 5 of The Great Learning)

Singers from the Guildhall School of Music &

Drama, James Weeks

Weston Roof Pavilion at Royal Festival Hall,

12 noon

Free to Day and Weekend Pass Holders

SUNDAY 3 NOVEMBER 2013

Music Changes Things?

Politically driven works from two

significant post-war European

composers.

Hans Werner Henze Extracts from Voices

Andriessen De Staat (The Republic) †

Musicians from the Royal College of Music and

Guildhall School of Music & Drama, Simon Wills †

Queen Elizabeth Hall, 5pm

Free to Day and Weekend Pass Holders

SUNDAY 3 NOVEMBER 2013

Last Words

The last utterances of two great musical

friends – Britten and Shostakovich.

Berio Ritirata notturna di Madrid

(after Boccherini)

Britten Suite from Death in Venice

arr. Steuart Bedford

Shostakovich Symphony No.15

Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra,

Vasily Petrenko

Royal Festival Hall, 7.30pm

£9 - £65

Wednesday 6 November 2013

London Philharmonic

Orchestra Foyle Future Firsts

Galina Ustvolskaya’s final work –

a haunting setting of The Lord’s Prayer.

Programme includes:

Galina Ustvolskaya Symphony No.5 (Amen)

London Philharmonic Orchestra Foyles Future

Firsts, Ben Gernon

Royal Festival Hall, 6pm

Free

WEDNESDAY 6 NOVEMBER 2013

A Timeless Beauty

Pärt’s devastating purity, stillness

and resonance connect the distant

past to the absolute present.

Gubaidulina Offertorium (Violin Concerto)

Pärt Magnificat; Cantus in Memory of

Benjamin Britten; Berlin Messe

London Philharmonic Orchestra, Tõnu Kaljuste,

Sergej Krylov, London Philharmonic Choir

Royal Festival Hall, 7.30pm

£9 - £65

concert playlist - see page 46

WEDNESDAY 27 NOVEMBER 2013

Polish Laments

Music of anguished beauty from Polish

compatriots Penderecki and Górecki.

Penderecki Violin Concerto No.1

Górecki Symphony No.3 (Symphony of

Sorrowful Songs), Op.36

London Philharmonic Orchestra, Michał

Dworzynski, Barnabas Kelemen, Allison Bell

Royal Festival Hall, 7.30pm

£9 - £65

FREE pre-concert event, 6.15pm

Royal Festival Hall

Conductor Michał Dworzynski discusses

the evening’s programme.

SaturDAY 30 NOVEMBER 2013

19 eighties : the rhythm of

a decade

Follow the progress of rhythm in a

post-sampler, post-drum machine,

post-Minimalist and post-remix world!

BBC Concert Orchestra, Anne Dudley, Paul

Morley & special guests

Queen Elizabeth Hall, 7.30pm

£12 - £15

also in the rest is

noise this november

SUNDAY 3 NOVEMBER 2013

The Young Person’s Guide

to the Orchestra

Come and experience Britten’s perfect

musical introduction to orchestra.

Britten The Young Person’s Guide to the

Orchestra

London Philharmonic Orchestra FUNharmonics,

Stuart Stratford, Chris Jarvis

Royal Festival Hall, 12 noon

£10 – £18 (Children £5 – £9)

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november southbankcentre.co.uk/therestisnoise | tickets: 0844 847 9913

1960 – 1990

See how America dominated the world at a weekend of

talks and films, plus concerts throughout November.

America’s continued domination on the world stage was symbolised

by Neil Armstrong’s tentative steps on the surface of the moon in July

1969, but not everything was going smoothly. The 1970s saw economic

troubles, foreign-policy headaches and the dramatic resignation of

President Nixon over the Watergate scandal. Some of the idealism of the

1960s had subsided, but American artists were creating engaging work

away from the angst and in-fighting of the European avant-garde.

a fresh new physicality in rhythm

A group of American composers developed Minimalism, a music that

brought consonant harmonies to a fresh new physicality in rhythm

to the lofts and art galleries of New York. Euphoric, hypnotic and with

a commercial success that set it apart from many previous musical

movements, Minimalism had an engaging openness that took in

influences from jazz and gamelan to African drumming. Of course,

there had been American composers writing genuinely popular notated

music before Minimalism, but it was being heard in movie theatres and

on Broadway. Many cinematic and musical-theatre classics benefited

from stirring and memorable music that has become an integral part of

America’s cultural landscape.

SATURDAY 9 –

SUNDAY 10 NOVEMBER

weekend events from 10.30am

Vietnam. Watergate. Downtown New York. Scorsese.

We get under the skin of a nation which put a man on the moon, but was still rocked by

political, social and economic scandal. Plus Minimalism: the euphoric, hypnotic and

surprisingly commercial musical phenomenon.

IN DEPTH DISCUSSIONS

• ‘There’s just a handful of living composers

who can legitimately claim to have altered

the direction of musical history and

Steve Reich is one of them’ (The Guardian).

Reich discusses the cultural melting-pot

of New York in the 1960s and 1970s.

• Naomi Wolf speaks on political activism

in late 20th-century America.

• Keith Potter discusses the rise of

Minimalism in the 1960s and 1970s.

• Social historian Luc Sante reveals the

secret corners and characters of 1970s

New York, when writers, artists and

outsiders made downtown their home.

BITES: YOUR WHISTLE-STOP TOUR

15 minutes on some of the need-to-know

topics of the era.

• The show must go on! The ever-changing

fortunes of Broadway theatre.

• The whole world mourned when John

Lennon was shot on 8 December 1980.

What have we learnt from his life and

his death?

• Jane Jacobs’ diatribe against suburbs

labelled them ‘parasitic’ and proposed

a new way to plan cities across the world.

• Disco – from psychedelic counterculture

to Top of the Pops.

BREAKFAST WITH GLASS

Grab a coffee and delve inside the music

of The Rest Is Noise festival. Composer

Fraser Trainer leads a fun and informal

workshop on Glass’ Music in 12 Parts.

LISTEN TO THIS

Don’t know where to start? Let our music

experts bring the music of Superpower to

life in these beginner’s guides.

LIVE MUSIC

Musicians from the Royal Academy of Music

perform a collection of Elliott Carter’s solo

and instrumental works.

Hear Nancarrow’s unique player piano

music across the weekend.

FILM SCREENINGS

Including Philip Glass and

Godfrey Reggio’s Koyaanisqatsi.

DAY PASs £15*

WEEKEND pASS £25*

*Concerts are not included in the

Day or Weekend Passes

UH-1D © Bruce Crandall

FOR MORE DETAILS, SPEAKERS, TOPICS AND TIMINGS, GO TO

TURN OVER FOR

Buzz Aldrin salutes the US flag on the

SOUTHBANKCENTRE.CO.UK/THERESTISNOISE

FULL DETAILS OF

moon © NASA Apollo Archive

THE WEEKEND

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november

southbankcentre.co.uk/therestisnoise | tickets: 0844 847 9913

Superpower

Weekend Events Timetable

Create your own timetable for the weekend, going from

keynote talks to intimate discussions and film screenings

SATURDAY 9 NOVEMBER

TIME EVENT CONTENT

Throughout the day Film Screenings Short films and documentaries from the period.

Nancarrow Player

Piano Music

On one of the only working player pianos

identical to Nancarrow’s own.

10.30am – 11.30am Superpower? American history from 1960 – 1990.

12 noon – 1pm Keith Potter The birth of Minimalism.

No Wave

Andy Warhol

Watergate

The influential underground music, art and

video scene.

Explore the life and legacy of the artist who

defined the era.

An insight into the controversy.

1pm – 2.30pm Koyaanisqatsi Philip Glass and Godfrey Reggio’s 1982

feature film.

2pm – 3pm Royal Academy of Music Elliott Carter performance, including his

works Scrivo in vento, Improvisation, Gra and

8 Etudes and a fantasy.

Listen to This

noise Bites

Delve into the music of Superpower.

The need-to-know topics of the era.

3pm – 5pm Gamelan Workshop* Try the instrument which inspired Steve Reich.

3.30pm – 4.30pm Robert Frank An insight into the work of this great

photographer of urban America.

Luc Sante

Listen to This

noise Bites

The writer on the downtown scene in 1970s

New York.

Please see 2pm.

The need-to-know topics of the era.

5pm – 10pm Music in 12 Parts* Philip Glass Ensemble perform Glass’

masterpiece, with the composer himself on

the keyboard.

7pm – 9pm Gamelan Workshop* Try the instrument which inspired Steve Reich.

SUNDAY 10 NOVEMBER

TIME EVENT CONTENT

Throughout the day Film Screenings Short films and documentaries from the period.

Nancarrow Player

Piano Music

10.30am – 11.30am Breakfast with Glass

11.45am – 12.45pm Steve Reich

On one of the only working player pianos

identical to Nancarrow’s own.

Grab a coffee with Fraser Trainer and delve

into Philip Glass’ Music in 12 Parts.

The composer gives a keynote talk on the

cultural milieu of New York in the 1960s

and 1970s.

1pm – 2pm Andrew Zolinsky* Performs music by Morton Feldman,

Meredith Monk and John Cage.

2pm – 3pm The Cartoon Icon Journalist Bidisha on the global pop star in

the MTV era.

noise Bites

Film Music of the 1970s.

The need-to-know topics of the era.

The great film scores from John Williams to

Bernard Herrman.

3pm – 5pm Sondheim: Inside Out* BBC Concert Orchestra, Keith Lockhart.

Gamelan Workshop*

Try the instrument which inspired Steve Reich.

3.30pm – 4.30pm Naomi Wolf Radical politics in America.

noise Bites

Birth of Hip Hop

The need-to-know topics of the era.

DJ Nihal leads a discussion on Hip Hop’s

rise from the ghetto.

AIDS – A New Time of Fear Speakers give testimony to the AIDS crisis

in urban America.

5pm – 6pm John Ashbery The great poet and his influence. Includes

discussion and readings.

Birth of House Music

The Art of Jeff Koons

DAY PASs £15

WEEKEND pASS £25

Full, extended details of talks, topics, speakers and

timings plus additional events will be available online.

* Not included in the Day or Weekend Pass

Illustrated talk given by Tim Lawrence.

A discussion on the life and work of a

quintessential American artist.

7pm – 9pm Gamelan Workshop* Try the instrument which inspired Steve Reich.

7.30pm – 10pm Steve Reich & Steve Reich takes part in a concert

Colin Currie Group* which includes his Music for 18 Musicians.

turn over FOR

36

the music

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november

SUPERPOWER: the concerts

FRIDAY 8 NOVEMBER 2013

American Undercurrents

SATURDAY 9 NOVEMBER 2013

An American Pioneer

november

Contemporary American chamber music.

Musicians from the Royal Northern College

of Music

Central Bar Foyer at Royal Festival Hall, 1pm

FREE

FRIDAY 8 NOVEMBER 2013

The Genius of Film

Music 1960 – 1980

Mentored by Charles Ives, Elliott

Carter, who lived to 103, produced

music of elegant Modernism

throughout his long life.

Elliott Carter Scrivo in vento; Improvisation;

Gra; Moto perpetuo; Inner song; Adagio;

Retracing; Canaries; Eight etudes and a fantasy

Musician from the Royal Academy of Music

Purcell Room at Queen Elizabeth Hall, 2pm

Free to Day and Weekend Pass holders

southbankcentre.co.uk/therestisnoise | tickets: 0844 847 9913

Welcome to Hollywood and the golden

age of movie music.

Alex North Cleopatra Symphony

Nino Rota The Godfather, A symphonic portrait

Franz Waxman The Ride of the Cossacks

Bernard Herrmann Psycho, A narrative for

string orchestra

Bronislaw Kaper Mutiny on the Bounty

Jerry Goldsmith The New Enterprise from

Star Trek

London Philharmonic Orchestra, John Mauceri

Royal Festival Hall, 7.30pm

£9 - £65

FRIDAY 8 NOVEMBER 2013

Feldman Patterns

Morton Feldman wrote, ‘I feel that I

listen to my sounds, and I do what they

tell me, not what I tell them. Because I

owe my life to these sounds.’

Morton Feldman Patterns in a Chromatic

Field for cello and piano

Apartment House, Anton Lukoszevieze,

Philip Thomas

Purcell Room at Queen Elizabeth Hall, 7.45pm

£10

SATURDAY 9 NOVEMBER 2013

Music in 12 Parts

A rare complete performance of

Philip Glass’ four-hour Minimalist

masterpiece, with the composer

himself on keyboards.

Glass Music in Twelve Parts

Philip Glass Ensemble

Royal Festival Hall, 5pm

£12 - £35

concert playlist - see page 46

SUNDAY 10 NOVEMBER 2013

America’s Great Originals

Piano music from some great American

experimentalists that focuses the

listener on sound, silence and time.

Christian Wolff For Piano 1

John Cage One for piano

Meredith Monk Railroad; St Petersburg Waltz

Christian Wolff Preludes Nos.6, 9 & 11

Morton Feldman Palais de mari

Andrew Zolinsky

Purcell Room at Queen Elizabeth Hall, 1pm

£10

Morton Feldman © Barbara Monk-Feldman

SUNDAY 10 NOVEMBER 2013

Sondheim: Inside Out

Delve into Sondheim’s unique and

entertaining observations on love,

relationships and human interaction.

BBC Concert Orchestra, Keith Lockhart

Queen Elizabeth Hall, 3pm

£12 - £15

SUNDAY 10 NOVEMBER 2013

Steve Reich &

the Colin Currie Group

Steve Reich himself joins us for a

selection of his most bewitching scores

including Music for 18 Musicians.

Steve Reich Clapping Music; Come out;

Music for pieces of wood; Pendulum music;

Music for 18 musicians

Steve Reich, Colin Currie Group

Royal Festival Hall, 7.30pm

£12 - £35

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38 39


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1989 – tomorrow

Glimpse into the future in our weekend of talks and films

plus concerts from 28 November – 14 December.

As the Berlin Wall fell in November 1989 and Presidents Bush and Gorbachev

announced the end of the Cold War, Francis Fukuyama announced the ‘End of

History’. At that time it seemed that Western liberal capitalism had emerged from

the bloody battle victorious. Communications technology and rapid globalisation

created a hive of bustling activity – a truly worldwide musical scene that, like the

capitalist marketplace, seemed to respect no boundaries.

‘We live in a time not

of mainstream but of

many streams’ John Cage

Composers cheerfully plundered

materials from past or present;

near or far; classical, world, jazz

or pop. New audiences emerged in

every continent, and the next great

composer was as likely to be found

in Beijing as in Berlin, Venezuela or Vienna. ‘We live in a time not of mainstream but of

many streams,’ John Cage mused shortly before his death in 1992, suspicious as ever

of the very idea of ‘musical history’; the self-styled ‘anti-capitalist’ of modern music

went on, ‘or even, if you insist upon a river of time, then we have come to the delta,

maybe even beyond a delta to an ocean which is going back to the skies…’

F-15s parked during

Operation Desert Shield

© Phan Chad Vann

People on the

Berlin Wall near the

Brandenburg Gate

on 9 November 1989

© Sue Ream

SATURDAY 7 –

SUNDAY 8 DECEMBER

weekend events from 10am

Music. Art. Society. Politics. What’s next?

‘We live in a time not of mainstreams but of many streams’, said composer John Cage. With

the fall of the Berlin Wall, old certainties were cast aside and globalisation made a truly

worldwide musical scene. This weekend we ask: what next?

IN DEPTH DISCUSSIONS

• Alex Ross concludes his inspirational

narrative on the music of a century by

looking at the effects of rapid advances

in communications technology, and

looking forward to the future.

• Scientist and broadcaster Susan Greenfield

looks at technology and the brain.

• Evgeny Morozov asks whether the

internet is helping to bring down or

bolster up authoritarian regimes.

• The Young British Artists (or YBAs) turned

the art world on its head with their bold

promotion, self-belief and ‘shock-art’.

BITES: YOUR WHISTLE-STOP TOUR

15 minutes on some of the need-to-know

topics of the era.

• In September 1992 a single day cost the

UK economy £3.3 billion. We discuss

Black Wednesday.

• Tony Blair called the Millennium Dome

‘a triumph of confidence over cynicism,

boldness over blandness, excellence

over mediocrity,’ setting the scene for

disappointment and disillusion.

• We look at the effect of relaxed immigration

policies in the European Union.

BREAKFAST WITH ADAMS

Grab a coffee and delve inside the music

of The Rest Is Noise festival. Composer

John Browne leads a fun and informal

workshop on Adams’ El Niño.

DAY PASs £15*

WEEKEND pASS £25*

*Concerts are not included in the

Day or Weekend Passes

LISTEN TO THIS

Don’t know where to start? Let Jonathan

Cross bring the music of New World Order to

life in these beginner’s guides.

LIVE MUSIC

Singers from the Guildhall School of

Music & Drama perform works by British

composers including Judith Weir,

Oliver Knussen and Anthony Payne.

The Royal College of Music’s New

Perspectives Ensemble explore

contemporary British Music.

FILM SCREENINGS

Including Wolfgang Becker’s 1993 film

Goodbye, Lenin!

LONDON SINFONIETTA

NEW MUSIC show

A host of premieres throughout Sunday.

Plus, a series of talks and panel discussions

curated by the Royal Philharmonic Society

explores the future of new music. Also,

the return of Hidden – intimate solo

performances of short new works in

unusual spaces.

The Royal Philharmonic Society

celebrates its Bicentenary

The society which commissioned

Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony looks to

the future of music through a discussion

with composer George Benjamin and

Tom Service. Plus more debate and newly

commissioned music throughout Sunday.

FOR MORE DETAILS, SPEAKERS, TOPICS AND TIMINGS, GO TO

TURN OVER FOR

SOUTHBANKCENTRE.CO.UK/THERESTISNOISE

FULL DETAILS OF

THE WEEKEND

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december

southbankcentre.co.uk/therestisnoise | tickets: 0844 847 9913

new world order

Weekend Events Timetable

Create your own timetable for the weekend, going from

keynote talks to intimate discussions and film screenings

SATURDAY 7 DECEMBER

TIME EVENT CONTENT

Throughout the Day Film Screenings Short films and documentaries from the period.

10am – 11am Breakfast with Adams Grab a coffee and delve into John Adams’ El Niño.

11.15am – 12.15pm

The Century Draws to a Close A talk on the exciting and fast-paced history

of the last decades of the 20th century.

12.30pm – 1.30pm The Young British Artists From Emin to Hirst, the YBAs defined a

generation, bringing a new mass audience

to contemporary art.

noise Bites

War in the 1990s

Royal College of Music

The need-to-know topics of the era.

Discussion on the wars across the globe and

the politics of Western intervention.

Music by Knussen, Holt, Turnage and Benjamin.

2.15pm – 3.15pm Alex Ross A keynote talk on the global diversity of

music after 1980.

3.30pm – 4.30pm The Bilbao Effect Across the globe, architects created iconic

buildings for the arts, re-generating postindustrial

cities. We survey this new landscape.

Listen to This

noise Bites

The Global Art World

Delve into the music of New World Order.

The need-to-know topics of the era.

The art market and the age of the biennale.

5pm – 6pm Guildhall School of Music A performance of Weir’s King Harald Saga

& Drama

and Knussen’s Whitman Settings.

The 1990s: When Surface

was Depth

Susan Greenfield:

technology & the

21st-century Mind

From politics to pop, ‘Cool Britannia’ was the

ultimate rebrand, but what was its underlying

legacy?

A talk on the physiology of the brain in the

digital era.

Post-Communist Migration This event tracks politics of population, and

in Europe

the dramatic changes in Britain’s ethnic

make-up post-2004

Listen to This

Please see 3.30pm.

6pm – 7pm Pre-Concert Performance Foyle Future Firsts perform works by Julian

Anderson and Martin Butler.

Sunday 8 DECEMBER

TIME EVENT CONTENT

Throughout the Day Film Screenings Short films and documentaries from the period.

Hidden installations

Intimate solo performances in unusual

places with London Sinfonietta.

10am – 11am Alex Ross The author who inspired the festival in

conversation.

12 noon – 1pm New Music, What Next? A panel discussion curated by the Royal

Philharmonic Society as part of their

Bicentenary celebrations chaired by

Charlotte Higgins.

1.15pm – 1.45pm

Everything is Various Contemporary poetry in the 1990s.

Green Politics

noise Bites

With climate change a reality, how can

green politics become a priority in a world

of scarce resources?

The need-to-know topics of the era.

The New Music Show Set 1 London Sinfonietta performs.

2pm – 3pm New Labour and Britain Tony Blair’s election heralded a new era for

Britain. We dissect Iraq, the Credit Crunch

and social change under New Labour.

2.15pm – 3pm

noise Bites

Music & The Internet

The need-to-know topics of the era.

The internet has broken down traditional

roles of producer and consumer. Can

genuine new talent rise to the top?

The New Music Show Set 2* London Sinfonietta performs.

3.30pm – 4.30pm Constants and Variables: George Benjamin and Tom Service discuss

Which Future for Music? the future of music as part of the Royal

Philharmonic Society Bicentenary celebrations.

5pm – 5.30pm

The New Music Show Set 3 London Sinfonietta performs.

5pm – 6pm Evgeny Morozov World-leading theorist on the impact of the

internet on society.

6pm – 7pm

DAY PASs £15

WEEKEND pASS £25

Full, extended details of talks, topics, speakers and

timings plus additional events will be available online.

* Not included in the Day or Weekend Pass

The New Music Show Set 4* London Sinfonietta performs.

7.30pm – 8.30pm Closing Keynote Is the rest really noise? We close the

final weekend.

8pm – 10pm Goodbye, Lenin! Wolfgang Becker’s 1993 feature film.

7.30pm – 10pm Macmillan’s Veni, Veni, London Philharmonic Orchestra,

Emmanuel*

turn over FOR

Evelyn Glennie, Vladimir Jurowski.

the music

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november southbankcentre.co.uk/therestisnoise | tickets: 0844 847 9913

NEW WORLD ORDER: the concerts

THURSDAY 28 NOVEMBER 2013

No More Rules

Takemitsu’s lush, filmic sound-pictures

and Ligeti’s rich, eccentric and colourful

pieces are among the most appealing

sounds of the late 20th century.

Toru Takemitsu Green (November steps II);

Marginalia; I hear the water dreaming for

flute & orchestra

Ligeti San Francisco Polyphony; Violin Concerto

BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, Ilan Volkov,

Ilya Gringolts, Patrick Gallois

Royal Festival Hall, 7.30pm

£9 - £65

FRIDAY 29 NOVEMBER 2013

The Genius of Film

Music 1980-2000

Spectacular and evocative film scores.

Excerpts from:

John Williams Star Wars

Vangelis Chariots of Fire

Marvin Hamlisch Sophie’s Choice

Ennio Morricone The Mission

Luis Enríque Bacalov Il Postino

Angelo Badalamenti Twin Peaks

Elmer Bernstein The Age of Innocence

Danny Elfman The Nightmare before Christmas

John Powell Chicken Run

Nicola Piovani La Vita è bella

Jerry Goldsmith Mulan

Don Davis The Matrix

Hans Zimmer Gladiator

London Philharmonic Orchestra, Dirk Brossé

Royal Festival Hall, 7.30pm

£9 - £65

SUNDAY 1 DECEMBER 2013

György & Márta Kurtág,

Hiromi Kikuchi

A rare visit from from legendary

Hungarian composer György Kurtág

and his wife Márta to perform his

humorous, quirky piano miniatures.

György Kurtág Hipartita; Excerpts from

Játékok (Games); Bach arrangements

György and Márta Kurtág, Hiromi Kikuchi

FRIDAY 6 DECEMBER 2013

After Naked City

A re-imagining of the genre-hopping 1990

record by the jazz punk supergroup.

Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance

Central Bar Foyer at Royal Festival Hall, 1pm

FREE

FRIDAY 6 DECEMBER 2013

in vain

Regarded as a major masterpiece

from the end of the 20th century, this

is the first opportunity to hear in vain

in London. It draws the listener into a

glorious and adventurous sound world

performed partly in pitch black.

Georg Friedrich Haas in vain for 24

instruments (London premiere)

London Sinfonietta, André de Ridder

Queen Elizabeth Hall, 8pm

£10 - £20

SATURDAY 7 DECEMBER

Best of British

Four brilliant ensemble pieces from

major British composers, all of whom

have strong connections to the Royal

College of Music.

Oliver Knussen Organa

Holt Lilith

Mark-Anthony Turnage On all fours

George Benjamin 3 inventions

The Royal College of Music New Perspectives,

Tim Lines

Purcell Room at Queen Elizabeth Hall, 12.30pm

Free to Day and Weekend Pass holders

Saturday 7 December

King Harald

Colourful vocal works from two unique

British composers.

Knussen Whitman Settings

Payne Evening Land; Adlestrop

Weir King Harald’s Saga

Musicians from Guildhall School of Music & Drama

Purcell Room at Queen Elizabeth Hall, 5pm

Free to Day and Weekend Pass holders

Saturday 7 December 2013

London Philharmonic

Orchestra Foyle Future Firsts

British music from the 1990s.

Programme includes:

Martin Butler Jazz machines

Julian Anderson Tiramisu for chamber ensemble

London Philharmonic Orchestra Foyle Future

Firsts, Paul Hoskins

Royal Festival Hall, 6pm

Free

SATURDAY 7 DECEMBER 2013

Classic Britannia

A concert that showcases how British

composers revitalised music for

orchestras in the 1990s. It includes

MacMillan’s popular percussion concerto

and Adès’ Asyla, in which compelling

modern music meets nightclub beats.

Julian Anderson The Stations of the Sun

James MacMillan Veni, Veni, Emmanuel

Mark-Anthony Turnage Evening Songs

Thomas Adès Asyla

London Philharmonic Orchestra, Vladimir

Jurowski, Evelyn Glennie

Royal Festival Hall, 7.30pm

£9 - £65

SUNDAY 8 DECEMBER

London Sinfonietta:

The New Music Show 2013

The London Sinfonietta’s festival-ina-day

featuring world, UK and London

premieres from composers including

Francisco Coll and Edmund Finnis.

Hidden returns – a series of intimate

solo performances in secret backstage

spaces – and the Royal Philharmonic

Society curates talks and panel

discussions on the future of new music.

London Sinfonietta, Baldur Brönnimann, Sound

Intermedia (sound projection)

Queen Elizabeth Hall and Purcell Room

at Queen Elizabeth Hall, from 1.15pm

£20 day ticket

SATURDAY 14 DECEMBER 2013

Adams: El Niño

Adams’ alternative, Hispanic

Christmas Oratorio is a celebratory and

hypnotic culmination to the festival.

John Adams El Niño (Nativity Oratorio)

London Philharmonic Orchestra, Vladimir

Jurowski, Kate Royal, Kelley O’Connor,

Matthew Rose, Daniel Bubeck, Brian

Cummings, Steven Rickards, Mark Grey,

London Philharmonic Choir

Royal Festival Hall, 7.30pm

£9 - £65

FREE pre-concert event, 5pm

The Clore Ballroom at Royal Festival Hall

The London Philharmonic Orchestra’s

creative ensemble for 15 to 19-year-olds,

The Band, performs new music inspired by

John Adams’ El Niño and its source texts.

concert playlist - see page 46

Queen Elizabeth Hall, 3pm

44

£10 - £22

45

december southbankcentre.co.uk/therestisnoise | tickets: 0844 847 9913


Tickets &

Packages

explore the

festival further

Book tickets for individual events at

southbankcentre.co.uk/therestisnoise

or take advantage of one of our ticket

packages.

WEEKEND TICKETS

Spend a weekend immersed in the culture,

music, politics and art of the 20th century.

For just £25 you can enjoy two days of talks,

debates, films and expertly guided listening

sessions that each of the 12 focus weekends

has to offer*. Alternatively you can attend on

either a Saturday or a Sunday with a Day Pass.

DAY PASs £15

WEEKEND pASS £25

*Concerts are not included in the

Day or Weekend Passes

CHOOSE YOUR

OWN SOUNDTRACK

Choose your own journey throughout the year.

Pick three or more events in Royal Festival Hall,

Queen Elizabeth Hall or Purcell Room to get the

following discount packages:

Book 3 – 4 concerts and save 10%

Book 5 – 6 concerts and save 15%

Book 7 – 10 concerts and save 20%

Book 11 – 14 concerts and save 25%

Book 15 or more concerts and save 30%

CONCERT PLAYLIST

Over the course of the festival we have selected 12

key pieces that guide you through our story of the

20th century. See our final six pieces below which

explore the period from 1945 when composers

struggled to build a new world, past the swinging-

Sixties to works that provide a hint of the future.

Book 3 – 4 concerts and save 10%

Book 5 – 6 concerts and save 15%

Key works:

BRITTEN PETER GRIMES p15

STOCKHAUSEN GESANG DER JÜNGLINGE p20

BERIO SINFONIA p27

GUBAIDULINA OFFERTORIUM p33

GLASS MUSIC IN 12 PARTS p38

ADAMS EL NIÑO p45

join us

… and get priority booking for the second half of

The Rest Is Noise plus much more.

EXPERIENCE MORE

WITH MEMBERSHIP

• Priority booking for Southbank Centre events

• Members Bar with fantastic view of London

GET CLOSER WITH

SUPPORTERS CIRCLES

• Privileged access to tickets for sold-out concerts

• Exclusive supporter events such as rehearsals

and opportunities to meet performers

Explore the events of the 20th century –

its people, its places and of course, its

music. Watch incredible performances,

interviews and archive news footage.

listen to talks online

Listen to talks and playlists, enjoy image

galleries, read poems and learn about

the music and its composition.

journey email

Sign up for our journey email for great

in-depth content straight to your inbox.

free events

throughout the year

PRE-CONCERT EVENTS

Talks and performances to complement the

main evening concert.

FRIDAY LUNCH & TONIC

Southbank Centre’s hugely popular free music

series tunes into the festival across the year.

HAYWARD GALLERY

PROJECT SPACE

From September to December, visit free

exhibitions related to the huge social and

political changes which took place between

1945 and 2000. You can also see a graphic

timeline detailing events in culture, science

and politics during the second half of the

20th century.

the sound and the fury

Look out for the BBC’s critically acclaimed

The Sound and the Fury series which

accompanies the festival and will be

repeated on BBC Four in October 2013.

Further study

study evenings

Join our study evenings at Southbank Centre

following the weekend events.

More information at:

southbankcentre.co.uk/therestisnoise

open university

Learn more with The Open University,

one of our partners for The Rest Is Noise.

openuniversity.co.uk/therestisnoise

SEE ALL THE BENEFITS ONLINE

southbankcentre.co.uk/joinus

Book now at southbankcentre.co.uk/therestisnoise

or call 0844 847 9913

Visit southbankcentre.co.uk/

therestisnoise for more

information on all these events.

Two East German border guards

look at passers by through a hole

46 in the Berlin Wall, 1990 © Hartrust

47

Reiche / Deutsches Bundarchiv


HOW TO BOOK

southbankcentre.co.uk/therestisnoise*

0844 847 9913, 9am – 8pm (daily)*

* Transaction fees apply. No transaction fees for Southbank Centre

Members and Supporters Circles.

In person at Royal Festival Hall Ticket Office

10am – 8pm (daily)

CONCESSIONS

A limited allocation of half-price tickets is available for

recipients of Jobseekers Allowance, Income Support,

Pension Credit, those aged 16 and under and full-time

students. Appropriate cards must be shown and discounts

cannot be combined.

SCHOOLS

For information on school visits call 0844 875 0070 or email

groups@southbankcentre.co.uk

Southbank Centre is very grateful to our artistic partners for the

generous contribution of their events to this festival. This includes

our Principal Orchestral Partner London Philharmonic Orchestra

and also BBC Concert Orchestra, Philharmonia Orchestra and

London Sinfonietta.

We would also like to thank the Hepner Foundation for supporting

The Rest Is Noise.

IMAGES ON FRONT COVER :

Karlheinz Stockhausen © akg images

People atop the Berlin Wall near the Brandenburg Gate on 9 November 1989

© Sue Ream

Buzz Aldrin salutes the US flag on the moon © NASA Apollo Archive

The rise of the internet changed the world forever © Apply Pictures / Alamy

Jackie and John Fitzgerald Kennedy 1961 © Photos 12/Alamy

0844 847 9913

southbankcentre.co.uk/therestisnoise

Media Partner

48

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