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CSD 2361 - Communication Sciences and Disorders - Appalachian ...

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CSD 2361 Introduction to Phonetics

Fall 2011

Tuesday & Thursday 3:30-4:45 pm

Edwin Duncan Hall 224

Instructor: Dr. Michelle Flippin, CCC-SLP Office hours: Monday 12:00-4:00

Email: flippinm@appstate.edu Tuesday & Thursday 1:45-3:30

Office: Edwin Duncan Hall 120D

This syllabus serves as an outline for the course as intended on the first day of class. The

Instructor reserves the right to modify this course syllabus (and, in turn, the course) for reasons

such as a weather-related cancellation, in the event that we need to slow down/speed up with

course content based on the performance of the class, etc.

Purpose and Description: This course is an introductory, undergraduate level course aimed at

supplying students with the skills needed to phonetically transcribe typical and atypical speech

patterns. Phonetic transcription is an important and helpful tool for speech-language pathologists,

who will use it in clinical practice, and for linguists, who will use it to study distinctions among

various languages around the world. This course will also cover the basic anatomical structures

related to speech production and culturally influenced speech production.

Necessary level of prior preparation: There are no formal prerequisites for this course. Students

with additional preparation through courses and experiences should use this knowledge to

contribute to class discussions, thereby positively affecting the learning of others with less

experience.

Course Objectives

1. To be able to broadly transcribe spontaneous speech using the International Phonemic

Alphabet (IPA).

2. To be able to interpret other’s broad phonetic transcriptions using the IPA.

3. To be able to identify and understand the purpose of specific phonetic markers used in narrow

transcription using the IPA.

4. To broadly identify the basic anatomical structures that support speech production and relate

the movements of the speech mechanisms to the articulation of speech sounds.

5. To understand the purpose and use of phonologic transcription for speech-language

pathologists in terms of recognizing how phonetic transcription may be used to analyze

spontaneous speech samples of typical patterns, as well as atypical patterns, such as those related

to developmental errors or structural differences (e.g., cleft palate).

6. To appreciate cultural differences and influences on speech patterns (e.g., accents and dialects).

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES & ASHA standards addressed by this course

The course objectives address some of the required competencies for speech-language

pathologists (SLPs) set forth by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA).

ASHA has established Knowledge and Skills Acquisition (KASA) standards for those seeking the

Certificate of Clinical Competency in Speech-Language Pathology. This course addresses some

of the required competencies for SLPs listed in the KASA. These are listed below. Please note

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that the course objectives are meant to contribute to these KASA requirements, they are not

meant to fulfill each competency listed.

Upon completion of this course, students will:

• Use phonetic transcription to transcribe and analyze spontaneous speech samples of

typical patterns; (KASA III-C, Articulation Characteristics)

• Interpret phonetic transcription; (KASA III-D, Articulation Assessment)

• Broadly identify the basic anatomical structures that support speech production and relate

the movement of the speech mechanisms to the articulation of speech sounds; (KASA

III-B, Basic Human Communication Processes – Biological)

• Use phonetic transcription to transcribe and analyze spontaneous speech samples of

atypical patterns, such as those related to developmental errors or structural differences

(e.g., cleft palate); (KASA III-D, Articulation Assessment)

• Use your knowledge of transcription to describe cultural differences and influences on

speech patterns (e.g., accents and dialects). (KASA III-B, Basic Human

Communication Processes – Linguistic and Cultural)

Course Textbook (required)

Shriberg, L.D., & Kent, R. D. (2003). Clinical Phonetics (3 rd ed.). Boston: Allyn &

Bacon.

Course Requirements and Evaluation

Attendance: Each student is expected to attend all class sessions and to be on time for class. It is

the policy of Appalachian State University that class attendance is considered to be an important

part of a student's educational experience. Students are expected to attend every meeting of their

classes, are responsible for class attendance, and are expected to punctual. No matter what basis

exists for absence or tardiness, students are held accountable for academic activities, and faculty

may require special work or tests to make up for the missed class or information.

Students will be allowed two excused absences each academic year in compliance with the

religious observance policy (S.L. 2010-211). Students who miss class assignments or tests due to

religious observances required by the faith of the student will the given the opportunity to make

up the work missed. Students are required to call me in advance if a class will be missed for

any reason.

Regardless of the reason for an absence or tardiness, students are required to meet with me to

discuss makeup work for classes missed. Failure to contact me regarding absences or regarding

makeup work will result in a deduction of 50 points per incident from a student’s cumulative

points. Failure to arrive to class on time will result in a deduction of 10 points per incident from a

student’s cumulative points.

Participation: Each student is expected to contribute to the class both individually and in

groups. Participation is defined as coming to class with completed class assignments and project

work, joining in class discussions, posing questions, and sharing ideas and concerns. Your ideas

and opinions are welcome in this class. Students are expected to use class time effectively and

responsibly, as well as, demonstrate respect for fellow students, guest speakers, and instructors.

Tardiness to class is not acceptable.

Professional Behavior: Each student is expected to demonstrate professional behavior in the

classroom. Professional behavior includes maintaining a positive attitude, listening respectfully to

others, and using appropriate channels to express concerns. Professionals attempt to solve

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problems constructively and maturely. Actively listening to speakers and focusing on class

discussions are forms of professional behavior.

Homework : Students are expected to complete all assigned readings and activity-based

homework assignments. These readings and activities have been designed to help you master the

course objectives. Homework assignments will not be graded but you are expected to hand in

those with an asterisk placed next to them. This is so the Instructor can evaluate how the class is

learning.

Office of Disabilities/ Learning Assistance Program: Appalachian State University is

committed to making reasonable accommodations for individuals with documented qualifying

disabilities in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and Section 504 of

the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. If you have a disability and may need reasonable accommodations

in order to have equal access to the University’s courses, programs and activities, please contact

the Office of Disability Services (828.262.3056 or www.ods.appstate.edu). Once registration is

complete, individuals will meet with ODS staff to discuss eligibility and appropriate

accommodations.

Code of Academic Integrity: As a community of learners at Appalachian State University, we

must create an atmosphere of honesty, fairness, and responsibility, without which we cannot earn

the trust and respect of each other. Furthermore, we

Student Engagement with Courses: In its mission statement, Appalachian State University aims

at “providing undergraduate students a rigorous liberal education that emphasizes transferable

skills and preparation for professional careers” as well as “maintaining a faculty whose members

serve as excellent teachers and scholarly mentors for their students.” Such rigor means that the

foremost activity of Appalachian students is an intense engagement with their courses. In

practical terms, students should expect to spend two to three hours of studying for every hour of

class time. Hence, a fifteen-hour academic load might reasonably require between 30 and 45

hours per week of out-of-class work.

Inclement Weather: Each student is expected to adhere to the following weather policy. In the

event of serious weather problems that could affect the safety and well being of students and/or

instructor traveling from off-campus, the class will be postponed only if all students can be

notified by telephone. See inclement weather policy on page 75 of the university catalogue. If a

class needs to be rescheduled because of inclement weather, please use one of the following

options: check your campus email or course website for instructions, call Dr. Flippin’s office for

recorded instructions.

Evaluation

Task

4 Exams, 20% each

Please let the Instructor know, in advance of exams, if you need special testing

accommodations.

% of

Final

Grade

80%

Homework 10%

Class Participation 10%

Total 100%

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Grading Scale

Undergraduate

95-100%: A 90-94%: A- 87-89%: B+

84-86%: B 80-83%: B- 77-79%: C+

74-76%: C 70-73%: C- 67-69%: D+

60-66%: D


11/3 Suprasegmentals, Acoustic Phonetics, & Diacritic

Markers

Read Chapter 6 in Text /

Suprasegmentals

11/8 Suprasegmentals, Acoustic Phonetics, & Diacritic Study for test #3

Markers

11/10 Test #3 – suprasegmentals, diacritic markers, Read Appendix F in Text

acoustic phonetics, and applying phonetics to

spelling, speech, and phonological development.

11/15 Assessment & Phonetic Considerations for Read Cheng (1999) article

Special Populations

11/17 No Class ASHA Convention

11/22 Cleft Palate Cont., Fragile X and Down Syndrome Read Chapter 7 in Text

11/24 NO CLASS --Thanksgiving

11/29 Accents & Dialects Consider and create 5

questions for final exam

12/1 More commentary on dialects & application of

phonetics in the schools

12/6 Exam Review

12/8 Review for Test #4, Final Exam Study for final exam

Sat., 12/6 Final Examination 4 PM

Required Text

Shriberg, L.D., & Kent, R. D. (2003). Clinical Phonetics (3 rd ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Required Readings

Cheng. L., L. (1999). Moving beyond accent: Social and cultural realities of living with

many tongues. Topics in Language Disorders, 19(4), 1-10.

Micco, A.W. (2002). Clinical Problem Solving: Assessment of Phonological Disorders.

American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 11, 221-229.

Stoel-Gammon, C. (2001). Transcribing the speech of young children. Topics in

Language Disorders, 21(4), 12-21.

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