New York Times - Wexner Center for the Arts

wexarts.org

New York Times - Wexner Center for the Arts

wexner center for the arts

HigHligHts for winter/spring 2009


Cover:

tHe builder's assoCiation

Photo: Eamon Lochte-Phelps

left:

robin rHode

Classic Bike (detail), 1998

12 C-prints face-mounted with Plexiglas

on aluminum panels

11¾ x 18 in. (35.6 x 56.4 cm) each panel

Image courtesy the artist and

Perry Rubenstein Gallery, New York.

© Robin Rhode

However you travel, be sure you

are here for

the first major U.S. solo museum

exhibitions by artist Robin Rhode,

architects Coop Himmelb(l)au, and

choreographer William Forsythe.

world and U.S. theater premieres

plus international dance, jazz, and

sounds from the indie scene.

contemporary and classic films

you won’t find anywhere else around.

insights and opportunities

for audiences of all ages.

one last look

at Andy Warhol: Other Voices, Other Rooms.

Head to wexarts.org for more pictures,

video and audio clips, interviews, reviews,

details, updates, and a blog where you can

share your thoughts.

Get here.

onView

onStage

onScreen

inSight

If you’re ready to get to the Wexner Center,

head to the back pages and order your tickets.

Member-only presale continues through

Sunday, January 4 (unless otherwise indicated).

Public ticket sales begin Monday, January 5.


onView

Catch Air: Robin Rhode Coop Himmelb(l)au: Beyond the Blue

tHu, apr 2–sun, Jul 26

robin rHode

Classic Bike, 1998

12 C-prints face-mounted with Plexiglas

on aluminum panels

11¾ x 18 in. (35.6 x 56.4 cm) each panel

Image courtesy the artist and Perry

Rubenstein Gallery, New York

© Robin Rhode

Raised in Cape Town and Johannesburg, South Africa, and now

based in Berlin, Robin Rhode has emerged in the last decade as a

highly influential artist. This solo exhibition—the artist’s first in a U.S.

museum and the Wexner Center’s first organized by Senior Curator

Catharina Manchanda—brings you a firsthand look at his intriguing

work. From an acute personal perspective shaped by South Africa’s

history of racial discrimination, he highlights the push and pull

between the liberating force of the individual’s imagination and the

confines of media-driven stereotypes.

In many of his best-known projects, Rhode draws crude, life-size

outlines of everyday objects on house facades or city streets and

interacts with them as if they were the actual physical objects.

Here, he’ll chart his development with some 20 key examples of his

photographic storyboards, animations, and films. In some he focuses

on street activities such as gambling, drinking, or theft. Others stage

sequences in which he appears as an imaginary sports superstar,

music performer, or magician. Eager to engage the Wexner Center's

architecture, Rhode is also developing an installation specifically for

our lower lobby. There and throughout the show, you see how the

artist gives a radical twist to techniques such as illusionism and site

specificity, reenergizing them as fresh and potent tools.

Organized by the wexner Center.

tHu, apr 2–sun, Jul 26

Coop HiMMelb(l)au

BMW Welt, Munich, Germany, 2001– 2007

Photo © 2007 Ari Marcopoulos

The innovative approach of Coop Himmelb(l)au permeates

buildings, ideas about urban planning, and even the name of

this influential Viennese architectural firm. “Coop” signals the

firm’s identity as a cooperative. “Himmelb(l)au” offers the double

meanings of “blue sky” (with the “l”) and “sky construction”

(without). Launched in May 1968 by Wolf D. Prix and Helmet

Swiczinsky, Coop Himmelb(l)au has never yielded the radical fervor

of its founding moment and consistently rejected preconceived

notions of design across 40 years of exquisite, experimental plans

and constructions. Among its recent projects are the double helix

structure of the new BMW center (BMW Welt) in Munich, the

eye-catching addition to the Akron Art Museum, and the dramatic

headquarters for the European Central Bank in Frankfurt.

The Wexner Center is proud to host the U.S. debut of this exhibition

from MAK in Vienna, one of the world’s leading museums of

contemporary art and design. In it, you’ll have the opportunity to

study several projects in depth in large-scale models and to survey

small models of many more projects displayed on an oversize

model table. Recalling an urban landscape plan, this display

strategy evokes the firm’s belief in architecture’s need to address

spatial possibilities, while also reflecting Prix’s passionate critique

of contemporary urban planning. Choreographed light and film

sequences add to the rich visual experience. Jeffrey Kipnis, professor

of architecture at Ohio State, is the exhibition’s consulting curator.

Organized by MaK, Vienna.


Wexner CenTer reSidenCy AWArd

William

Forsythe

“To reduce choreography to a single definition is not to understand

the most crucial of its mechanisms: to resist and reform previous

conceptions of its definition.” —William Forsythe, “Choreographic Objects”

Transfigurations

Vanguard American choreographer—and 2002 Wexner

Prize recipient—William Forsythe has revolutionized

classical ballet for our time with his bold, contemporary

works. In recent years, with the establishment of The

Forsythe Company as an independent platform for his work,

he’s extended his choreographic thinking into new forms

such as installations for gallery and public spaces, video,

digital media, and publications. For Forsythe, these

projects are part of a larger sphere of interest he terms

“choreographic objects.”

Transfigurations is the first presentation of a significant

body of Forsythe’s installation projects in this country. In it,

you’ll see how the dance maker and performer, developing

his concepts through working from the body, is now

projecting his ideas into new mediums and new ways of

presentation. A highlight of the show is Monster Partitur,

a hybrid performance/installation piece that you can

experience during multiple free performances in the gallery

tHu, apr 2–sun, Jul 26

itself and as an installation of sculptural elements and text

throughout the run of the exhibition. You’ll also see four of

Forsythe’s key video installations plus his new web project,

Synchronous Objects for One Flat Thing, reproduced, which

Forsythe developed at Ohio State in collaboration with the

university’s top-rated Department of Dance and Advanced

Computing Center for the Arts and Design.

This exhibition is mounted in conjunction with the launch

of the Synchronous Objects web project and also features a

free opening day symposium. All three are outgrowths of

a sustained relationship between Forsythe and Ohio State

that began when he first visited this campus to receive the

Wexner Prize. Charles Helm, the Wexner Center’s director

of performing arts, serves as curator for the exhibition.

Organized by the wexner Center.

Read all of william

forsythe’s essay

“Choreographic objects”

on our web site.

ExhIBItIoN MAdE PoSSIBLE At thE

WExNER CENtER WIth SuPPoRt fRoM

thE NAtIoNAL ENdoWMENt foR thE ARtS’

AMERICAN MAStERPIECES: PRESENtING

INItIAtIvE ANd fRoM thE CoNtEMPoRARY

ARt CENtERS NEtWoRK, AdMINIStEREd

BY thE NEW ENGLANd fouNdAtIoN foR

thE ARtS (NEfA), WIth MAJoR SuPPoRt

fRoM thE ANdY WARhoL fouNdAtIoN

foR thE vISuAL ARtS ANd AddItIoNAL

SuPPoRt fRoM thE doRIS duKE

ChARItABLE fouNdAtIoN. AddItIoNAL

SuPPoRt PRovIdEd BY thE BAttELLE

ENdoWMENt foR tEChNoLoGY ANd

huMAN AffAIRS. ALSo MAdE PoSSIBLE

thRouGh thE WExNER CENtER RESIdENCY

AWARd PRoGRAM.

WEB PRoJECt SynChronouS oBjeCtS

for one flat thing, reproduCed BY

WILLIAM foRSYthE CoPRoduCEd

BY thE foRSYthE CoMPANY WIth

ohIo StAtE’S AdvANCEd CoMPutING

CENtER foR thE ARtS ANd dESIGN

ANd dEPARtMENt of dANCE. fuNdING

PRovIdEd BY thE foRSYthE CoMPANY,

thE foRSYthE fouNdAtIoN, thE ohIo

StAtE uNIvERSItY offICE of RESEARCh,

RottERdAMSE dANSACAdEMIE, ANd

tANzPLAN dEutSChLANd, AN INItIAtIvE

CREAtEd BY thE GERMAN fEdERAL

CuLtuRAL fouNdAtIoN.

thE foRSYthE CoMPANY IS SuPPoRtEd

BY thE CItY of dRESdEN ANd thE StAtE

of SAxoNY AS WELL AS thE CItY of

fRANKfuRt AM MAIN ANd thE StAtE of

hESSE. thE foRSYthE CoMPANY IS ALSo

SuPPoRtEd BY MRS. SuSANNE KLAttEN.

Photo: Julian Richter

Monster Partitur

wed–sun, APR 1–5 | gallery d

Free

wed, apr 1 | 2:30, 5:30, 6:30 & 7:30 pm

tHu, apr 2 | 12, 12:30 & 7 pm

fri, apr 3 | 11:30 am; 12, 12:30 & 7 pm

sat, apr 4 | 12, 12:30, 1 & 7 pm

sun, apr 5 | 12, 12:30, 2:30, 3 pm

See the U.S. premiere of this performance/installation piece during the

opening days of William Forsythe: Transfigurations. Dancer Alessio Silvestrin

delivers a mesmerizing performance against a backdrop of sculptural

elements created from life-size models of human skeletons and line

drawings traced from these gnarled forms, which also serve as cues in

the performer’s score. The work is a condensation of and companion to

Forsythe’s Bessie Award–winning You made me a monster.

Photo: dominik Mentzos

SympoSiUm

William Forsythe:

Choreographic

Objects

wed, apr 1 | 2 pm

Exhibition preview | 2 pm

Performances of Monster Partitur

2:30 & 5:30 pm

Discussions | 3–5 pm

Film/ViDEo ThEaTEr

Free

William Forsythe, his collaborators,

and other authorities discuss his

concept of choreographic objects

and how this idea took form in the

Synchronous Objects web project

and the Transfigurations exhibition.

You’ll hear about how these

interests invite a wide audience to

understand the deep structures of

choreographic thinking and how

this process can make significant

new connections with other fields

such as architecture, cognitive

science, geography, and philosophy.

PRESENtEd CoLLABoRAtIvELY BY ohIo

StAtE’S dEPARtMENt of dANCE, AdvANCEd

CoMPutING CENtER foR thE ARtS ANd

dESIGN, ANd WExNER CENtER foR thE

ARtS, WIth AddItIoNAL SuPPoRt fRoM

thE KNoWLtoN SChooL of ARChItECtuRE.


onStage

“it’s difficult to think what contemporary music

would sound like without his influence.”—The Wire

Jon Hassell

and Maarifa street

Composer and trumpeter Jon Hassell has

formulated a unique sound he dubs “Fourth World”

or “worldly” music to reflect the balance he seeks

between wide-ranging global influences and the

traditions of jazz and classical music. His lush

sound evokes magical transformation and mystery,

inspiring such collaborators as Brian Eno, Björk,

Baaba Maal, Ry Cooder, and Kronos Quartet.

Among the forces shaping his work are studies with

vanguard composer Karlheinz Stockhausen and

ideas shared with minimalists Terry Riley and Philip

Glass, as well as interactions with Indian vocal

master Pandit Pran Nath that pointed him toward

BatsHeva dance

COMMuniTy

ParTnersHiPs

coMpany

Thu, Feb 5 | 8 pm three Tue, Feb 10 | 8 pm

a new approach to the trumpet and a heightened

appreciation for the variety of the world’s music.

A longtime leader in exploring electronics, Hassell

has been active abroad but absent from U.S.

concert stages for over a decade. This tour marks

his highly anticipated return with his band Maarifa

Street in conjunction with a new release for ECM

Records. Hassell’s unique trumpet and keyboard

sound will be supported by violinist Kheir-Eddine

M’Kachiche, Peter Freeman on bass and laptop, and

live sampling from Jan Bang and Dino J.A. Deane.

Photo: J-M Lubrano

balletMet

Jazz Moves Take Two

Thu–Sun, Feb 5–8

Wed–Sat, Feb 11–14

capitol theatre at the riffe center

Bebop and brassy blue notes meet ballet as BalletMet

and the Columbus Jazz Orchestra, directed by Byron

Stripling, once again unite to create a potent fusion of

dance and live jazz.

PRESENtEd BY BALLEtMEt ANd thE CoLuMBuS JAzz oRChEStRA IN

ASSoCIAtIoN WIth thE WExNER CENtER.

“exceptionally inventive, thrilling dance.”—New York Times

Israel’s leading contemporary dance company

return with their latest work, Three, choreographed

by visionary artistic director Ohad Naharin.

The brilliant evening-length work, divided into

three sections, juxtaposes stylized, synchronized

movement with languid, liquid beauty and

explosive crisscrossing patterns of pure visual

pleasure. Lifted by a sonic collage score that ranges

from Bach’s Goldberg Variations (in Glenn Gould’s

famed interpretation) to Brian Eno’s ambient tidal

pull, Batsheva’s remarkable dancers will impress

you with their undeniable technical skills and

abundant spirit. You’ll delight in Three’s vibrant

display of modern dance mastery, which the

San Francisco Chronicle lauded for its “virtuosity,

off-center elegance and physical daring…the

dancers’ understated splendor made it impossible

to look away.”

Come early to hear an expert from Ohio

State’s dance department discuss the

work of Batsheva and tonight’s program in the

Film/Video Theater at 7 pm.

PRESENtEd IN ASSoCIAtIoN WIth

BALLEtMEt ANd IN CoNJuNCtIoN WIth

ISRAEL@60 PRoGRAMS IN CoLuMBuS.

three fuNdEd BY NEW ENGLANd

fouNdAtIoN foR thE ARtS’ NAtIoNAL

dANCE PRoJECt (NdP), WIth GENERouS

SuPPoRt BY thE doRIS duKE

ChARItABLE fouNdAtIoN, thE foRd

fouNdAtIoN, thE ANdREW W. MELLoN

fouNdAtIoN, ANd thE MEtLIfE

CoMMuNItY CoNNECtIoNS fuNd of

thE MEtLIfE fouNdAtIoN.

Photo: Gadi dagon


Hear insights on these

and other events from

Director of Performing Arts

Charles Helm at wexarts.org.

five days in March

Thu–Sat, Feb 12–14 | 8 pm

cHelfitscH

air conditioner

Sat, Feb 14 | 7 pm

free to five days in march ticket holders

(separate ticket required)

“Juxtaposes global events and personal revelations...”—Yomiuri

Rising Japanese theater ensemble chelfitsch takes its

name from a baby’s mispronunciation of “selfish.” The pun

reflects playwright and director Toshiki Okada’s view of his

generation’s failure to cope with coming of age. Already a

hit at international festivals, the company is one of the most

talked about groups to emerge from Japan’s vital theatrical

scene. Its style will surely appeal to fans of U.S.–based

theater innovators such as Nature Theater of Oklahoma,

Young Jean Lee, and Richard Maxwell.

Set during the days immediately before the U.S.A.’s “shock

and awe” bombing of Iraq in March 2003, Five Days in March

projects subtle universal truths while delivering an incisive

and deftly anticlimatic portrait of the irony, obliviousness,

and impotence of youth culture in Japan.

The show’s premise involves two young hipsters meeting

and hooking up at a Tokyo rock show for a one night stand

that evolves into five days of sex, drinking, and ennui. In

Okada’s deceptively slight narrative, a vast catalog of sly,

fidgety gestures take on choreographic scope.

Ticket holders for Five Days can also take in Air Conditioner, a

25-minute companion piece. Condensing Okada’s off-kilter

gestural choreography into a subtly humorous pas de deux,

it features a young “salaryman” office worker and his clumsy

interactions with a female colleague.

Five Days in March is intended for mature audiences.

Performed in Japanese with English subtitles.

SEvEN-CItY NoRth AMERICAN touR oRGANIzEd ANd PRoduCEd BY thE JAPAN SoCIEtY ANd SuPPoRtEd BY thE AGENCY foR CuLtuRAL AffAIRS, GovERNMENt of JAPAN;

thE JAPAN fouNdAtIoN thRouGh thE PERfoRMING ARtS JAPAN PRoGRAM; ANd thE SAISoN fouNdAtIoN foR thE JAPAN SoCIEtY’S JAPANESE thEAtER NoW INItIAtIvE.

Photos: thomas Bremond

nibroll, Baby Q, and

Thu–Sat, Feb 19–21 | 8 pm

sennichimae Blue sky dance club

Japan

dance

now

“Nibroll is a zany/serious experimental dance group from Japan…

playful and refreshing.”—New York Times

Presented back-to-back with chelfitsch, this showcase of

three dance companies offers additional insight into the

latest developments in Japan’s performance scene. See how

a new generation of choreographers and dancers there

are seeking fresh forms to echo their experience of Japan’s

hyperspeed culture.

Nibroll, a Tokyo collective, works in movement, new

media, visual art, and fashion. Its members offer excerpts

from Coffee, a visually rich work where everyday actions—

like drinking a cup of java—trigger sudden aggressive

outpourings that represent the societal and behavioral

boundaries we often cross. Yoko Higashino, founder of the

multimedia performance group Baby Q, performs E/G-Ego

Geometria, a stylized and emotionally charged solo that has

been a highlight of Baby Q’s video-enlivened repertoire.

Based in Osaka, Sennichimae Blue Sky Dance Club is an allfemale

ensemble whose work retains traces of butoh, but

with a pop edge and feminist undercurrents.

touR SuPPoRt PRovIdEd BY thE JAPAN fouNdAtIoN thRouGh thE PERfoRMING ARtS JAPAN PRoGRAM. u.S. touR oRGANIzEd BY AN CREAtIvE INC.

Photo: Banri


Photo: Steven hicks

SuPPoRt PRovIdEd BY

thE BRItISh CouNCIL.

ray lee

siren

Thu–Sat, Feb 26–28 | 8 pm

Siren, a sound installation by British composer and artist Ray Lee,

is a whirling, spinning spectacle of sight and sound. You’ll wander

among a field of tall metal tripods equipped with individually

tuned sirens and illuminated tips that trace fiery patterns in rapidly

circling trajectories. Siren produces alarming sounds for alarming

times: hypnotically intense but also strangely soothing, like a

celestial choir of harmonic overtones. Immersed in this electrifying

environment, you’ll surrender to the alluring spell of a unique sonic

and visual delight.

“a fascinating counterpoint of sound

and light….of constantly shifting

patterns”—The Independent

Image courtesy of Ray Lee

“one of the most

energizing and

provocative forces

in British theatre.”

—The Guardian

WOrld

P r e M i e r e

Wexner CenTer residenCy aWard

iMproBaBle

panic

CoMMISSIoNEd BY thE WExNER

CENtER, BARBICAN BItE09, ANd

SYdNEY oPERA houSE.

AddItIoNAL SuPPoRtEd PRovIdEd

BY thE NAtIoNAL LottERY

thRouGh ARtS CouNCIL ENGLANd.

Wed–Fri, mar 4–6 | 8 pm Sat, mar 7 | 2 & 8 pm

The ever-innovative London ensemble Improbable debut

their latest show at the conclusion of their second

Wexner Center creative residency. For the group’s many

avid local fans, the intimate scale of the piece will recall

such popular past productions as 70 Hill Lane and Spirit.

Panic plumbs the charged themes of love, sex, and, of

course, panic and features codirector Phelim McDermott

onstage, surrounded by a supporting cast of women.

here’s how improbable set the scene:

“Come into the forest. Away from civilization. Where

wild things are. Where nymphs bathe and play. Where

Pan sleeps. Careful not to wake him, he is the bringer of

Panic. The Great God Pan: goat horns, goat’s legs, goatee

beard, and goaty penis, chasing his nymphs. But Pan is

dead. Since AD 33 so the story goes. The only god to die

in our time. So that can’t be him you saw through the

window of a South London flat or running after a mugger

near Brick Lane or sporting a cowboy hat in a bar here

in Columbus. Because the Great God Pan is dead. Or is

he? Drawn from personal stories and current obsessions,

Panic is Improbable with brown paper and projections, a

lot of self-help books, and some very chaseable nymphs.”

Panic is intended for mature audiences.

Members: See Panic on Friday, March 6,

and stay after the show for a reception

with Improbable and the cast.

Photo: Ruud visser

aMir elsaffar

and tHe two

rivers enseMBle

Fri, apr 10 | 8 pm

“A gorgeous record balanced between

two worlds…a stirring example of the

creative possibilities of international

jazz in the 21st century.”—All About Jazz

Jazz trumpeter Amir ElSaffar is an Iraqi-American

composer and player who deftly connects his centuriesold

cultural heritage with forward-thinking jazz

concepts. His critically acclaimed recording Two Rivers

invokes his dual heritage along with the Tigris and the

Euphrates, rivers in the region long known as the “cradle

of civilization” whose floods were forces of creation

and destruction in the world’s first cities. Drawing on

ancient Iraqi songs and melodic sources and infusing

this traditional foundation with multilayered post-bop

rhythms, ElSaffar and his fiery ensemble dig deep in

summoning the joyful spirit and the sorrowful heartbreak

of this region’s history and legacy.

Photo: Ruud visser


“that’s not politics—it’s poetry…it’s work of

theatrical alchemy in which ideas are turned

into art by making them more beautiful.”

—Wall Street Journal

tHe

Builders

association

continuous city

Thu–Sat, apr 16–18 | 8 pm

The media-savvy Builders Association—who mesmerized

audiences here with ALLADEEN and SUPER VISION—continue

their multimedia examinations of our accelerated culture.

CONTINUOUS CITY looks at how our “networked selves”

are stretched to occupy multiple locations. Alternately

experiencing a sense of location and dislocation, a traveling

father and daughter find themselves in Shanghai, Los

Angeles, Toronto, and Mexico City as they seek to sustain

connectivity in the midst of high speed lives, transnational

business dealings, and fading cell phone signals. With

pointed humor and insight, CONTINUOUS CITY uses stateof-the-art

technology to reflect the local and far-ranging

lives people lead now.

The Wexner Center is one of the co-commissioners for this

latest Builders’ stage work, following up on our creative

development and residency support for SUPER VISION.

Sequences filmed here in Columbus will be integrated

into CONTINUOUS CITY’s globe-spanning dreamscape. The

company is also connecting directly into each locale that

hosts the piece with a participatory web site for your input

(continouscity.org).

LEAd CoPRoduCER: KRANNERt CENtER foR thE PERfoRMING ARtS, uNIvERSItY

of ILLINoIS At uRBANA-ChAMPAIGN.

CoPRoduCERS: CARoLINA PERfoRMING ARtS; dEPARtMENt of thEAtER, dANCE

ANd PERfoRMANCE StudIES ANd thE ARtS RESEARCh CENtER At thE uNIvERSItY

of CALIfoRNIA, BERKELEY; LuMINAto toRoNto fEStIvAL of ARtS & CREAtIvItY.

Co-CoMMISSIoNERS: BAM foR thE 2008 NExt WAvE fEStIvAL; WALKER ARt

CENtER; WExNER CENtER foR thE ARtS; YERBA BuENA CENtER foR thE ARtS.

Photo: Eamon Lochte-Phelps

lionel

loueke

trio

Fri, apr 24 | 8 pm

Downbeat calls guitarist Lionel Loueke “a new Afrojazz

star who clearly will be with us for a long while.”

Blessed with deep roots in the African music he heard

in his homeland of Benin, he’s equally well schooled in

sophisticated jazz. In the sound he crafts from these

sources you’ll hear strong jazz phrasing and rippling

African overtones that have impressed critics, listeners,

and fellow musicians alike. Both Herbie Hancock and

Wayne Shorter are enthusiastic fans who have invited

Loueke to play in their own bands and contributed to

his Blue Note label debut, Karibu (which means “welcome”

in Swahili).

“seamlessly blends West african harmonies

and rhythms with jazz for a fresh and

energetic sound.” —Planet

Photo: Jimmy Katz


“this is heartfelt and insightful stuff that has great power

to move. highly recommended.”—Evening Standard

u . s .

P r e M i e r e

Hoipolloi

Hugh Hughes in story of a rabbit

Discover the delightful charm of Welsh actor Hugh

Hughes of the ensemble Hoipolloi in this awardwinning

Edinburgh Fringe Festival hit. A superb

storyteller with a taste for wayward narrative threads,

he’ll surely find instant favor with fans of Improbable

or Lone Twin. Hughes serves up the perfect mix of

laugh-out-loud humor, the simplest of props, and

genuinely touching passages about life’s mysteries.

In Story of a Rabbit, he politely offers a cup of tea

then spins a tragicomic narrative about finding his

SuPPoRt PRovIdEd BY thE BRItISh CouNCIL.

neighbors’ pet rabbit—which he’s looking after while

they’re on vacation—lying dead in his garden. The

tale follows a circuitous path to a conclusion that will

truly pluck at your heartstrings and leave you with a

lingering glow. The Edinburgh Fest calls Story of a Rabbit,

“a performance that is memorable as much for its

protagonist’s overwhelming personal charm, as its

status as an uncommonly brilliant piece of theatre.”

Thu–Sat, may 14–16 | 8 pm

Sun, may 17 | 7 pm

Photo: Geraint Lewis

8 pM

8 pM

9 pM

9 pM

LAMBCHOP

SUN, JAN 25

ANTONY AND

THE JOHNSONS

WED, FEB 4

soutHern tHeatre

LOS CAMPESINOS!

WED, FEB 11

TIMES NEW

VIKING

THE VELVETS

SAT, FEB 14

Check wexarts.org for ticket on-sale dates.

These shows are not part of the members' presale.

See more indie bands on the move at our

popular Next@Wex series. Since many

of these dates develop fast, quite a few miss

the deadlines for our printed brochures and

calendars. Be the first to hear about them:

Go to wexarts.org and sign up for e-mail or text

alerts, and check out the complete current

schedule at the same time.

Next@Wex show by fleet foxes, photo: Cassie Lewis


onScreen

CineMa laTinO

Our annual series spotlights the best new

and classic films from throughout Latin

America. This year brings films set in or

from Uruguay, Argentina, Los Angeles,

and several different regions of Mexico.

One highlight is a classic: Mexican director

Roberto Galvadón’s 1960 magic realist

favorite macario, based on a story

by B. Traven (Treasure of the Sierra Madre).

Contemporary films include Carlos

Reygadas’s acclaimed Silent Light,

a tender story about a devout farmer

in an isolated modern-day Mennonite

community in rural Mexico; encarnacion,

a poignant story of an actress coping

with middle-age (and her family’s

expectations); and the festival hit The

pope’s Toilet, about one man’s attempt

to cash in on a papal visit by building a

public “facility.”

from left:

silent ligHt

(Carlos Reygadas, 2007)

Image courtesy of BAC films

tHe pope’s toilet

(César Charlone and Enrique

fernández, 2008)

Image courtesy of film Movement

below:

enCarnaCion

(Anahí Berneri, 2007)

Image courtesy of Bavaria films

Curator of Film/Video

Dave Filipi talks about

these and other upcoming

highlights at wexarts.org.

louise bourgeois: tHe

spider, tHe Mistress and

tHe tangerine

(Marion Cajori and Amei

Wallach, 2008)

Photo: Peter Bellamy

NEW DOCUMENTARY

Free jazz saxophonist Albert Ayler, the

survivors of a famed plane crash in the

frozen Andes, and iconoclastic artist (and

1999 Wexner Prize winner) Louise Bourgeois

are among the fascinating real people you

can meet in Wexner Center films. In My

Name is Albert Ayler, director Kasper

Collin traces the musician’s life from his

roots in Cleveland, Ohio, through success

in Stockholm and New York, to his untimely

death at age 34. Gonzalo Arijón’s Stranded

revisits the ordeal made famous in 1973’s

Alive in a moving film that’s won audience

and critics’ awards internationally.

Marion Cajori and Amei Wallach’s Louise

Bourgeois: The Spider, the Mistress

and the Tangerine follows the artist at

work and play and includes many moments

when she reflects on the deep emotional

roots of her work.

FeB

Jeanne dielMan, 23 Quai

du CoMMerCe, 1080

bruxelles

(Chantal Akerman, 1975)

Image courtesy of Janus films

ClassiCs

Nicholas Ray’s Bigger Than Life (1956), a

searing view of 1950s’ suburbia, is still not

available on DVD. But here is your chance to

see it the way it was meant to be seen—in

a new 35mm Cinemascope print on the

big screen. James Mason is at his best as a

school teacher who becomes addicted to

the “miracle drug” cortisone and loses his

sanity. Chantal Akerman’s Jeanne dielman,

23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles

(1975), about the mysterious double life of

a Brussels widow and mother, is one of the

rare films to instantly enter the canon of

global postwar cinema. Delphine Seyrig

inhabits the title role in one of modern cinema’s

most hypnotic performances—brought

to you in another stunning and new 35mm

print. And so many of you were disappointed

at missing Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo (1958)

in 70mm last year, we’re bringing it back for

Valentine’s Day.


e T r O s P e C T i V e :

andrZeJ WaJda

Along with Roman Polanski and Krzysztof

Kieslowski, Andrzej Wajda is one of the

most revered figures of postwar Poland’s

burgeoning filmmaking scene. Although

most identified with his early “war trilogy”

of the 1950s—A Generation, Kanal,

and Ashes and diamonds—Wajda’s

career has spanned five decades as he has

continued to explore Polish nationality.

He received an Academy Award for

lifetime achievement in 2000 and an

Oscar nomination for 2007’s Katyn. This

retrospective presents an overview of the

acclaimed director’s best-known work.

touR oRGANIzEd BY thE PoLISh CuLtuRAL

INStItutE, NEW YoRK.

from left:

asHes and diaMonds

(Andrzej Wajda, 1958)

Image courtesy of the Polish

Cultural Institute

in tHe realM of tHe senses

(Nagisa oshima, 1976)

Image courtesy of Janus films

wHen it was blue

(Jennifer Reeves, 2008)

Images courtesy of Jennifer Reeves

r e T r O s P e C T i V e :

naGisa OsHiMa

Audacious, subversive, and versatile,

Nagisa Oshima is perhaps the key director

of the Japanese new wave of the 1960s and

was one of the biggest names in world

cinema during the era. Yet he is often

overlooked by contemporary audiences

because so few of his films are available

on subtitled DVDs. Best known in the

U.S. for the controversial in the realm

of the Senses (1976) and the World War

II film merry Christmas, mr. Lawrence

(1983), which starred David Bowie and

Takeshi Kitano, Oshima produced a diverse

body of work that is almost impossible to

categorize. He rejected convention and

challenged audiences (even to the point

of alienation) at every opportunity and

virtually reinvented himself film by film,

while always exploring themes of sex

and politics.

touR oRGANIzEd BY JAMES QuANdt,

CINEMAthEQuE oNtARIo.

W H e n i T W a s B l u e

Jennifer Reeves, a Wexner Center

Residency Award recipient in 2006–07,

returns to the center on friday, May 8 at

7 pm. She'll present her latest film, which

is intended to be shown as two overlapping

16mm projections. Glorious in its sense of

ambition and emotion, when it was blue

is an epic of personal, experimental cinema

and one woman’s attempt to preserve as

much as possible of the troubling beauty

of two endangered things that she

holds dear: the natural world and 16mm

film. The film’s sold-out world premiere

was one of the most enthusiastically

received screenings at the 2008 Toronto

International Film Festival.

Look forward to the return of

monthly programs in The Box,

our dedicated video exhibition

space, beginning in March.

One of the varied works we’ll

feature this spring and summer is

Cecilia dougherty’s Gone (2001),

which was supported through

the Wexner Center’s Art & Tech

residency program. Inspired by

the landmark PBS reality series

American Family, Gone explores

family life and community but

inserts contemporary artists and

writers (including Amy Sillman and

Laurie Weeks) into the narrative.

The video includes music by Le Tigre

and Mike Iveson. Also watch for

Morakot (Emerald, 2007) by 2004–5

Wexner Residency Award artist

Apichatpong Weerasethakul.

Shot in Bangkok in a once thriving

but now dilapidated hotel, the video

infuses magic and new memories

into the empty rooms through the

stories of three actors who speak to

each other of their dreams, loves,

and personal histories.

Other artists to watch for in the

upcoming year are Javier Tellez

from Venezuela and New York

collaborators melissa dubbin

and Aaron davidson.


inSight

iNterNatioNal PerFormiNg

arts For Families

tickets for these shows are on sale now to all audiences.

attention teachers:

You can bring your class

to see a school performance

of Wolf Under the Bed or At

Nightfall. Find details in the

Learn section of our web site.

For agES 7 anD uP For all agES For agES 4 anD uP

Wolf under the Bed

Theater Sgaramusch

(Switzerland)

fri, Jan 16 | 7 pm

sat, Jan 17 | 1 pm and 3 pm

Here’s a lively performance perfect for kids

who love scary stories. It’s based on 12 stories

written by schoolchildren especially for this Swiss

company and accompanied by music performed

live. The tales, which are told by four characters

who huddle in a hut after seeing wolf tracks

outside in the snow, get wilder and weirder and

scarier as the show goes on. Come get the shivers

with your family.

Image: courtesy of theater Sgaramusch

speCial engageMent

dan Zanes and

Friends (U.S.A.)

sat, Mar 28 | 11 am

Former Del Fuegos rocker Dan Zanes returns to

Columbus for a funky family-friendly concert.

Known for incorporating music as culturally

diverse as contemporary Spanish salsa and old

English maritime tunes, Zanes performs with a

local Columbus band and finishes off the concert

with one of his famous “dance parties.”

Photo: Arthur Elgort

at nightfall

Sursaut compaigne

de danse (Canada)

fri, apr 24 | 7 pm

sat, apr 25 | 2 pm

This Canadian troupe’s joyful and touching

creations thrill spectators young and old alike.

At Nightfall features a tiny people who occupy

the territory where shade and light intermingle.

Crazy, tender, tipsy, or delicate, their nocturnal

dances include turning, jumping, and frolicking

in total abandon. The elusive beauty, casualness,

and antic character of the tiny people exercise

an undeniable charm on passersby who venture

into their world of dance. Your family will surely

come under their spell too.

Photo: françois Lafrance


inSight

Photo: Nathan Gallagher

Director of Education

shelly Casto talks about

this and other upcoming

programs at wexarts.org.

director’s dialogue on art & social Change:

CaPe FareWell

wed, apr 22

Free

In 2000, British artist David Buckland

founded the Cape Farewell project to enrich

the dialogue about global climate change.

Buckland’s hope was that, by bringing artists

and scientists together for group expeditions

to the High Arctic, both groups might emerge

with a better understanding of the crisis and

the means to communicate this information

in new and innovative ways. The list of past

crew members includes many names familiar

to fans of contemporary culture, including

Feist, Laurie Anderson, Rachel Whiteread,

and Sophie Calle. For this year's Director's

Dialogue, Buckland leads a panel discussion

featuring recent Cape Farewell participants.

Photo: david Buckland

For

Families

summer youth

Workshops

We know how early you start making

plans for the summer. Watch for the

complete schedule of our summer workshops

on wexarts.org in February or call

(614) 292-6493 to request a brochure

with all the details.

Advance registration for Wexner Center

members at the Household level (and

above) is from March 2 to March 15.

Public registration begins March 16.

For teens

teenarts

fusion: summer

experiments

Keep the explorations going this June and July

at these weeklong programs for artists ages

15–18. Bring your ideas and join practicing

artists in experimenting with cuttingedge

technology and creative practices.

Scholarships are available. Visit wexarts.org/

learn in February for complete workshop

descriptions or call (614) 292-6493 to request a

brochure with all the details.

Advance registration for Wexner Center

members at the Household level (and above)

is from March 2 to March 15.

Public registration begins March 16.

Call for entries

Ohio short Film &

Video showcase 2009

youth division

Deadline: fri, Mar 27

The Wexner Center is now accepting entries

for the Youth Division of our annual Ohio

Short Film & Video Showcase. The Youth

Division provides Ohio’s independent young

media artists a chance to show their work

in a theatrical setting before an audience.

Pieces must be independently produced, no

longer than 10 minutes, and produced in Ohio

within the last 18 months by an artist who

will be 18 years of age or younger at the time

of the public showcase screening on May 9.

Prizes are awarded for the top youthproduced

videos. In addition, this year’s

youth entrants will have the opportunity to

be selected for a commission from Cardinal

Health (with a stipend of $1,000–$2,500) to

create a public service announcement.

Head to wexarts.org to find entry forms

and details. Call (614) 292-6493 or e-mail

edweb@wexarts.org with questions.

Free

exHibition

interventions:

students respond to

the environment

tHu, May 28–tue, June 2

During the winter and spring of 2009 high

school students from all over central Ohio

will set out to explore art and environmental

issues as part of a half-year course at the

Wexner Center. Come view the artwork

they create. The exhibition is always full of

surprising and intriguing works. The show

is open during regular Wexner Center gallery

hours. Artist-led tours are available for

school groups.


Andy Warhol’s art and ideas are as fresh and

timely as ever, as you’ll see in this spectacular

exhibition. You’ll be astonished by the incredible

range and depth of the works in the show—some

700 films, videos, paintings, drawings, prints,

wallpaper, installations, objects, television

episodes, seldom heard audio recordings, and

extraordinary archival material—and by the way

it has completely transformed our galleries.

lEaD SuPPorT major SuPPorT

The few weeks left to see this show will go by

faster than you can imagine. Don’t let yourself

miss it—or miss visiting it again.

organized by the Stedelijk museum, amsterdam, and

moderna museet, Stockholm, in collaboration with

the andy Warhol museum, one of the four Carnegie

museums of Pittsburgh. Curator: Eva meyer-hermann.

Scenography: chezweitz & roseapple, berlin.

SigniFiCanT ConTribuTionS


“a feast of riches.”

—Columbus Dispatch

PromoTional SuPPorT

Columbus DispatCh

Cota

NBC 4

ohio magazine

Admission

$8 General admission

$5 Senior citizens,

youth 13–17

Free Wexner Center members,

Warhol Club cardholders,

college students, children 12

and under

Free First Sunday of the month and

every Thursday after 4 pm

Walk-in Tours

Through February 14

Saturdays at 1 pm

Thursdays at 5 pm

oraNge Barrel media

time WarNer CaBle

WBNS Fm mix 97.1

WoSu

tHougH sunday,

february 15

See the show on a lively, interactive

tour with no reservations required.

Tours are free with exhibition admission

on Saturdays and free on Thursdays.

aCCommoDaTionS

the BlaCkWell iNN

Photo: Al zanyk

BreAKinG Up iS hArd To do


A Warhol

Closing Weekend

Celebration

fri–sun, feb 13–15

Warhol Farewell party

sat, feb 14 | 5–7 pm

Vertigo sat, feb 14 | 7 pm

Times new Viking

the Velvets

sat, feb 14 | 9 pm

Come celebrate love (both tainted and/or true).

Join us as we bid a fond farewell to Other Voices,

Other Rooms with a Valentine’s weekend of events

throughout the entire center. We’ll have late

gallery hours (til 10 p m) so you can take a last

look at the show, plus deep discounts on Warhol

merchandise in the store, a concert that explores

the darker side of the Velvet Underground, Vertigo

in 70mm, and Japanese theater from chelfitsch.

At the Saturday evening farewell party, you’ll find

chat, snacks, and a cash bar. Members, bring your

friends. Remember, a ticket to any concert or film

admits one to the exhibition on the same day for

free. Keep reading and see the film and performing

arts pages for more about these events.

Local breakout band Times new Viking dedicate

their show this evening to the eternally lovable

tunes of the Velvet Underground, the art rock icons

launched with the help of Warhol himself. Times

New Viking, like the Velvets, know the addictive

lure of twisted pop riding on buzzing droning riffs

and are keen to rev up the Velvets' songbook.

For Members

save the date

SprinG

exhiBiTionS

openinG

CeLeBrATion

wed, apr 1 | loWEr lobby

Be among the first in town to see the

three new exhibitions.

use your benefits!

memBer TiCKeT preSALe

Choose your tickets for the performing arts events in

this booklet right now, before public sales begin on

Monday, January 5.

Free BATSheVA TiCKeTS

Sponsor, Fellow, and Donor Circles members can

receive two free tickets to see Batsheva dance

Company on February 10 and enjoy an evening of

outstanding dance from one of the world’s leading

companies. Reserve yours now by calling the ticket

office at (614) 292-3535.

eArLy reGiSTrATion For

SUmmer WorKShopS

Mark your calendar for march 2–15, when members

at the Household level and above can register for our

popular summer workshops for children and teens.

This is a great perk for families, since many of the

most-sought-after programs sell out very quickly.

reCepTion WiTh improBABLe

Celebrate this residency project with the artists and

cast after the March 6 performance of Panic.

Join

Not a member? Join today. You can

save on tickets to the music, dance,

and theater events previewed here and

enjoy member-only benefits including…

member-only Ticket presale

Through January 4*

You can buy tickets in advance and save on the

music, dance, and theater events previewed here.

Public ticket sales begin January 5.

*except as noted.

Free Gallery Admission

Visit Andy Warhol: Other Voices, Other Rooms,

as often as you like, every day of the show,

throughout its run.

Additional member Benefits

• Member-only films and invitations to special

events, including the April 1 exhibitions preview.

• Savings at the store and café

• Reciprocal member privileges at more than

250 major arts institutions

• Free exhibition catalogues

• Breaking news on Wexner Center artists

and events by e-mail and mail

• Members’ web site—set your browser to

wexarts.org/members

Join now, order your tickets at the same time,

and start saving immediately. see the order

form for details.


Photo: Kevin fitzsimons

Authorized Campus Store

order your

PerFormiNg

arts tiCkets

NoW

tickets on sale to

wexner Center

members only through

sunday, January 4,

except as noted.

public and student

ticket sales begin

Monday, January 5.

act now for the best selection.

tickets for some shows are limited

and expected to sell quickly.

Call the ticket office to order by

phone at (614) 292-3535

OR

Send your completed form

with payment to:

wexner Center ticket office

The Ohio State University

1871 North High Street

Columbus, OH 43210-1393

Complete both sides of the form and

have your order ready when you call.

membership/ticket order form side one

name membership # (current/renewing members)

e-mail

address

city state zip

day phone evening phone

place of employment

work address

city state zip

preferred recognition name: (patron members and above)

select your membership level

Indicate if you are a new or renewing member.

new member

renewing member

Friend $50

household $75

patron $125

Sponsor $250

Fellow $500

enter dollar amount at right.

Check if your employer offers

a matching gift program.

donor Circles

Levels of membership begin at $1000.

For more information call the Donor

Circles Manager at (614) 292-0444.

order amount

$ Membership total (from left)

$ Ticket total (from other side)

$ 5.00 Annual ticket service charge

$ total enclosed or to be charged

Method of payment

CHeCK

CHarge

Enclosed (made payable to the ohio state university/wexner center)

American Express Discover

Mastercard VISA

account # exp. date

name as it appears on card

X

signature


membership/ticket order form side two for eaCH event—CHeCK date/tiMe, enter tiCKet Quantity, tHen CalCulate event total.

Jon hassell and

maarifa Street

Performance Space

tHu, feb 5 8 pm

$17 members X = $

$20 general public X = $

$17 students X = $

Batsheva dance

Company

three

Mershon Auditorium

tue, feb 10 8 pm

$22 members and

BalletMet subscribers X = $

$26 general public X = $

$10 students X = $

Sponsor, Fellow, and Donor Circle

members, you are eligible for two free

tickets to Batsheva Dance Company,

subject to availability, as a benefit of

your membership.

Balletmet Columbus

jazz Moves take 2

Capitol Theatre, Riffe Center

tHu, feb 5 8 pm

fri, feb 6 8 pm

sat, feb 7 8 pm

sun, feb 8 2 pm

7:30 pm

wed, feb 11 8 pm

tHu, feb 12 8 pm

fri, feb 13 8 pm

sat, feb 14 2 pm

8 pm

$31–42 members &

BalletMet membersubscribers

X = $

$14–22.50 MetPass

member tickets X = $

$28–45 general public X = $

($10 student rush tickets available

two hours before shows)

chelfitsch

five days in March

Performance Space

tHu, feb 12 8 pm

fri, feb 13 8 pm

sat, feb 14 8 pm

$13 members X = $

$16 general public X = $

$10 students X = $

air Conditioner

Performance Space

sat, feb 14 7 pm

Japan dance now

Nibroll, Baby Q, and

Sennichimae Blue Sky

dance Club

Performance Space

tHu, feb 19 8 pm

fri, feb 20 8 pm

sat, feb 21 8 pm

$13 members X = $

$16 general public X = $

$10 students X = $

ray Lee

Siren

Black Box on Mershon Stage

tHu, feb 26 8 pm

fri, feb 27 8 pm

sat, feb 28 8 pm

$10 members X = $

$12 general public X = $

$10 students X = $

Wexner Center Residency Award

World Premiere

improbable

panic

Performance Space

wed, Mar 4 8 pm

tHu, Mar 5 8 pm

fri, Mar 6 8 pm

Reception for members

after the show

sat, Mar 7 2 pm

8 pm

$17 members X = $

$20 general public X = $

free to Five Days in

$10 students X = $

$10 students X = $

March ticket holders X = $0

onStage inSight

All programs and schedules are subject to change.

Sorry, no refunds or exchanges unless a program

is canceled.

At some artists’ requests, late seating is not

permitted at their performances. When late seating

is possible, latecomers will be seated during a break

in the performance.

Amir elSaffar and the Two

rivers ensemble

Performance Space

fri, apr 10 8 pm

$13 members X = $

$16 general public X = $

$13 students X = $

The Builders Association

ContinuouS City

Black Box on Mershon Stage

tHu, feb 12 8 pm

fri, feb 13 8 pm

sat, feb 14 8 pm

$17 members X = $

$20 general public X = $

$10 students X = $

Lionel Loueke Trio

Performance Space

fri, apr 24 8 pm

$13 members X = $

$16 general public X = $

$13 students X = $

U.S Premiere

hoipolloi

hugh hughes in Story of a rabbit

Performance Space

tHu, May 14 8 pm

fri, May 15 8 pm

sat, May 16 8 pm

sun, May 17 7 pm

$13 members X = $

$16 general public X = $

Friend, Household, and Patron members may buy

TWO performing arts tickets and FOUR film tickets

at the member price. Sponsor and higher level

members may buy FOUR performing arts and SIX

film tickets at the member price.

international performing

Arts for Families

theater Sgaramusch

(Switzerland)

Wolf Under the Bed

Performance Space

fri, Jan 16 7 pm

sat, Jan 17 1 pm

3 pm

$10 members X = $

$14 general public X = $

$8 children under 12 X = $

dan zanes and friends

(u.S.A.)

Mershon Auditorium

sat, Mar 28 11 am

$20 members, students,

senior citizens X = $

$25 general public X = $

$17 kids 18 and under X = $

Free children 1 and under

Sursaut compaigne

de danse (Canada)

At Nightfall

Mershon Auditorium

fri, apr 24 7 pm

sat, apr 24 2 pm

$10 members, students,

senior citizens X = $

$14 general public X = $

$8 children under 12 X = $

The Wexner Center strives to make our events

and facilities accessible to all our patrons. If you

have questions about access or wish to request

ASL interpreter or visual guide accommodations,

please see wexarts.org or contact the Wexner

Center's patron services staff at (614) 688-3890

(TTY/TDD: 614 292-1210).

the Wexner Center thanks our major donors and sponsors

The Broad arT

FoundaTion

ColuCCi & umans

BarBara Fergus m/i homes The TauBman Company

georgeTown Company

ann and gordon geTTy

FoundaTion

glimCher

agnes gund

linda i. heasley and

sTephen F. Coady

mary g. and C. roBerT

Kidder

John s. KoBaCKer and

CaTherine Chapin KoBaCKer

Bill and sheila lamBerT

The pizzuTi Family

FoundaTion

The JudiTh roThsChild

FoundaTion

JoyCe and Charles shenK

Trueman Family FoundaTion

ValCo assoCiaTes, inC.

The andy warhol FoundaTion

For The Visual arTs

aBigail and leslie wexner

ann and John F. wolFe

ward & oliVo

wolFe assoCiaTes, inC

Alliance data

American Airlines/American Eagle

Carol and david Aronowitz

Arts Midwest

At&t

Banc of America Securities LLC

Bob Evans farms

Coca Cola

Commercial Contractors, Inc.

Concept Creator fashion Ltd.

Corna/Kokosing Construction Company

Loann W. Crane

Crane Group

davis Polk & Wardwell

the forbes Company

General Growth Properties

Nancy and dave Gill

huquette and dennis hersch

honda of America Manufacturing, Inc.

Ingram–White Castle foundation

Martha holden Jennings foundation

Nancy Kramer and Christopher Celeste

toby devan Lewis

dorothy Lichtenstein

Live technologies

Lt Custom furnishings Inc.

the Macerich Company

MANChu

Microsoft Corporation

the harry C. Moores foundation

Mark A. Morrow and Jeffery d. Chaddock

NCR

Peter Norton family foundation

Carole and Morton olshan

Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment trust

Rohauer Collection foundation

Judy and dick Ruhl

Sogeti uSA, LLC

target

teradata Corporation

tiffany & Co.

time Warner Cable

tri tech Laboratories, Inc.

vee Pak, Inc.

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