STEM STERN II

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Synopsis of 4 Regional Workshops - Florida Sea Grant

HOW THE

CONFERENCE

ORGANIZING

COMMITTEE BUILT

THE AGENDA FOR

STEM TO STERN II

Using results from strategic planning sessions

held at four regional boating and waterways

workshops to gather stakeholder input.


OBJECTIVES OF THE

CONFERENCE & THE WORKSHOPS

• To provide state, regional, county, and local entities the

opportunity to showcase innovative and timely efforts

related to boating and waterways management.

• To provide attendees an opportunity to network with

others who are involved in the same types of

professional issues and, together, develop strategies,

timelines, funding sources, and regional alliances to

address them.

• To provide an opportunity for attendees to obtain training

on topics of relevance.


What entities

comprise the

Stem to Stern II

organizing

committee?


SANTA ROSA

COUNTY

TAYLOR

COUNTY

BREVARD

COUNTY

PINELLAS

COUNTY

CHARLOTTE

COUNTY

LEE

COUNTY

COLLIER

COUNTY

MIAMI-DADE

COUNTY


Four Regional

Boating and

Waterways

Workshops


September 9-10, 2010

Punta Gorda


March 14-15, 2011

West Palm Beach


August 16-17, 2011

Milton


November 30 &

December 1, 2011

St. Augustine


How Participants

Identified Themselves


Strategic Planning Process

Summary of topics from previous day’s

presentations and Q&A sessions

Write down most pressing

boating & waterways issues

Stand by groups

deemed most important

Participants then grouped issues


Boater Safety & Education:

Issues

• Need for boater education and resources

• Boater safety (on the water communication; boater inexperience;

PWC safety; large vessel wake management)

• Identifying best method of communicating with the boating public

• Easy access to boating information

• Mandatory boating safety class

• Boater’s license law

• Statistics on effects of vessel inspections and boating education to

evaluate effectiveness


Boater Safety & Education:

Actions

• State-regulated boater education and safety course (book and inwater

operation); also for PWCs, boat renters, and rental

vendors/employees; refresher course w/ law changes

• Develop Boater’s license system with exam—Permanent and

Temporary (visitor) licenses; Additional boat licenses by size and

endorsement

• Better/more creative marketing of boater education and information

• Develop resource personnel directory (educators, planners, DVs,

etc.) so know who to contact with question

• City, County, State, Federal (USCG) collaboration on boating safety

& education


Planning: Issues

• Disjointed flow of information (top down; bottom up)

• Need for public engagement techniques and user conflict resolution

• Lack of planning

• Counties lack dedicated marine planner

• Planning for artificial reef placement

• Placement of marinas; sufficient distance from channels

• Balancing Local and State Interests in Waterways Management

(surface water use policy)

• Need a forum to share information and stay connected among

boating and waterways practitioners


Planning: Actions

• Provide marine and waterway planning workshops/ trainings/

education (general, databases, current technology, how to create

boating zones, who to talk to, artificial reef placement)

• Waterway and Access planning and research (use patterns;

prioritize access sites; want vs. need a boating restricted area;

master plan for waterways, future use; Repair/replacement of

existing facilities)

• Outreach to user groups (understand target audience; workshop

attendance; conflict resolution)

• Web host to keep boating and waterway stakeholders connected

• State Summit/Regional Workshops to keep boating and waterway

stakeholders connected (frequency?)

• Each county should have a marine resource planner


Funding: Issues

• Communication of available/future funding sources

• Restrictions or limitations on how funding is used; Use funding or

lose it

• Funding for artificial reefs

• Funding for public access, deep water access

• Secure/protected funding mechanisms for waterway management

• Canoe and kayak launches cannot be funded with federal dollars;

don’t want to pay fees

• Canoe and kayak registration - Pay for improved infrastructure and

access


Funding: Actions

• Central repository of available funding (i.e., access, working

waterfronts, enforcement)

• Workshops (education) for the “ABCs” of funding and where to find

funding (refer them to repository)

• Dedicated Marine Funding Sources (ex: fees from exam or boat

license)

• Canoe/Kayak Registration - Same process as boater registration;

Minimal fee; Temporary registrations available at facilities where

fishing licenses are sold for transients; Tax at purchase; Education

• Increase spending flexibility (Reduce artificial limitations on

how/where to spend; Give field staff spending authority)

• Establish roll over accounts for unused allocated funds

• Pressure on law makers to introduce model legislation to prevent

raiding of trust funds (Constitutional amendments/ballot reform)


Environmental: Issues

• Resource Protection (Education; Data management; Monitoring;

Permitting)

• Better valuation of natural resources as related to boating site

economic studies (Environmental, recreational, social, and aesthetic

values)


Environmental: Actions

• Annual dissemination of actual economic, recreational,

environmental value of marine infrastructure and waterways

(disseminate to politicians to use in decision making process)

• Reduce impacts to natural resources (seagrass, mangroves,

Derelict Vessel damage, manatees, water quality) (ex: Prop scars;

mooring and pump outs; docks, marinas, trimming, and dredging)

• Address natural resource protection via educational campaigns

• Evaluate effectiveness of resource protection/ restoration plans

(seagrass, fishing populations; Feasibility, Socio-economic

benefit/asset, and Boater Access)

• Increase enforcement of existing regulations to protect natural

resources (seagrass, mangroves, manatees, fishing regulations)

• Determine carry capacity as related to environmental, recreational

and aesthetic sectors factoring in balance between environmental

and human valued goods and services


Derelict Vessels:

Issues

• Derelict Vessel Removal

• Stronger enforcement and prosecution of violators

• Different agencies managing Derelict Vessels on the waterway

• Lack of funding for Derelict Vessel removal

• Lack of education for boat owners regarding disposal options (to

prevent becoming DVs)

• Environmental impact of Derelict Vessels (i.e. seagrass, chemicals,

hazardous waste, dredging, marine life, removal and disposal)

• Lack of financial means to maintain the boat (boat owner)


Derelict Vessels:

Actions

• Derelict Vessel Education/awareness for public, boaters, nonexperienced

law enforcement, legislature, prosecutors, and State

attorney

• Project collaboration between agencies (federal, state, and local,

volunteer groups) to remove DVs and marine debris (illegal

moorings, unauthorized nav. aids)

• Create fee to cover costs associated with Derelict Vessel removal

(require DV insurance to operate on state waters; use vessel

registration funds; additional fee on vessel registration; ask boaters

what willing to pay; transferable disposal fee; DV license plate)

• Increased penalties for Derelict Vessel offenders (Any community

service hours must be in an environmental service capacity)


Regulations: Issues

• Issues with the Permitting Process

• Regulatory Discrepancies / Unapproved ordinances

• Enforcement - On the water enforcement; Regulation enforcement

• Clear and standardized waterway channel and restriction markings


Regulations: Actions

• Streamline Permitting Process (Eliminate duplicative permitting

rules; Expedite permits for projects with resource protection benefits

or previously approved projects (maintenance))

• Better Interagency coordination of the permitting process

• Increase Uniformity of Waterway regulations (speed zones; improve

channel markings; manatee zones)

• Pre-application process meetings with permitting agencies

(Checklist of what permits are needed, from whom and when)

• Develop annual update sheet with any regulation changes (i.e.,

boating, planning)

• Develop reasonable anchoring time limits for enforcement


Access: Issues

• Public Access & amenities (pump out; ramp capacity; parking; Clean

Marinas)

• Physical navigational hazards; Unauthorized navigation aids; Illegal

moorings

• Dredging to keep waterways passable (including ICW)


FIRST BOAT RIDE!

THANK YOU

SEE YOU AT STEM TO STERN III

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