Featuring Cherie Blair

larkinsurance

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LARKINSURANCE.CO.UK

ISSUE 1

Featuring Cherie Blair


Lark (Group) Limited

@larkinsurance

2


Welcome to Larklink, our new publication to

connect with clients and highlight the latest insurance issues

and legal changes that are likely to affect your company.

In an exclusive interview with Cherie Blair QC, the human

rights' lawyer talks about the continuing battle for women's

equality. From the gender pay gap to quotas on company

boards, Cherie voices her impatience with the low number

of women in government and the ramifications this has on

society.

Mind the Gap is the theme of our first Larklink which aims to

ensure you don't trip.

Every organisation has unique challenges when it comes

to protecting the business and an increasing threat comes

from cyber crime. Newly revealed figures show the UK is

the second most vulnerable when it comes to cyber attacks

and we offer advice on insuring against the consequences.

We also explain The Insurance Act in simple terms,

identifying the legal implications and challenges

your business might face as the first major change to

commercial insurance in a century kicks in.

Underinsurance is also on our radar as we look to

bridge the gap with expert support.

Landloards failing to meet energy efficiency ratings

could risk fines of up to £5,000 and can exceed this

for non-domestic properties. Don’t get caught out.

With wellbeing and happiness at work being quoted

as being as important as annual pay, many employers

are reviewing employee benefit packages to help

recruit and retain the best calibre of staff. We focus

on critical illness cover which can ease worry during

a Patient’s recovery.

We are here to provide the most appropriate

solutions at the best terms - wrapping a security

blanket around your business - so we hope Larklink

provides a platform for you to Mind the Gap.

Julie Whitehead

Director

3


4


In the

Boardroom

Stephen

Lark

STEPHEN.LARK@LARKINSURANCE.CO.UK

Firstly, it’s a great pleasure to feature

within our first Larklink publication for

our corporate clients.

Since 1948, when my grandfather founded the

business, we have always believed that the core

culture should be built around strong client

relationships and providing a tailored service.

Here we are some 67 years later and although a

lot has changed over these years this ethos still

remains at the heart of Lark and its employees.

Back in 1988, with my student days complete,

I was keen to work in the financial sector and

so some experience in what was then a family

business, seemed like a good place to start. I

initially gained experience through each part

of the business, including spending time as a

Lloyd’s broker, before becoming a Partner in

1993, after completing my insurance exams. I

then took on the role of running new business

for our Commercial and Private Client teams

before becoming Group MD in 1999.

Back in 1988 things were very different as Lark

only had one office location with 80 members

of staff. Looking back now I think one of the

areas that has given me the most satisfaction is

how the business has grown in a controlled way

and how many of our people have been able to

develop their careers within the business. We

currently have over 135 employees who have

been with Lark for more than 10 years, this

just illustrates the positive culture I think we

have created…who says insurance can’t be fun!

The business sectors in Lark have also

evolved since 1948; the core of the business

back then was placing risks into the Lloyd’s

market on behalf of UK regional brokers.

This is something that has reduced in size and

importance to us over the years and now forms

just a small part of what Lark does today.

In the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s Lark enjoyed a long

and successful relationship with Sedgwick,

until their acquisition by Marsh in 1999. At

this point Lark became 100% independent

again and between 2002 and 2014 we made 12

acquisitions of UK regional broking businesses

and rationalised these into the Lark you see

today, 330 people across our seven locations

handling Commercial, Private Client and

Employee Benefits business.

Away from work, my three teenage daughters

keep my wife and I in check and I enjoy

escaping to the golf course on a fairly regular

basis. I am also a keen follower of other sports,

including cricket. I try to contribute back to

the insurance sector through an involvement

with the Chartered Insurance Institute and

also to the area where we live in Kent.

As far as the immediate future is concerned

for Lark, our plan is to continue our steady

growth, increase investment in our online

presence in specific product lines, see

marketing play a bigger role in driving our

new business efforts, and continue to look

out for appropriate acquisition opportunities

of people and businesses who share the same

values as us.

I hope you enjoy our first edition of Larklink,

I’d love to hear your feedback so please do not

hesitate to get in touch:

stephen.lark@larkinsurance.co.uk

Enjoy the remainder of 2015.

Roger Lark and Sons was established as a Lloyd's

Broker in 1948.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF

LARK (GROUP) LIMITED

— 1948, ROGER LARK AND SONS WAS

ESTABLISHED AS A LLOYD’S BROKER

— 1960, THEY MOVED TO

IBEX HOUSE, MINORIES

— 1968, THE COMPANY

EMBARKED ON A SUCCESSFUL

ASSOCIATION WITH SEDGWICK

— IN 1977, ROGER LARK LIFE &

PENSIONS LTD WAS ESTABLISHED, LATER

KNOWN AS LARK EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

— 1990, THE COMPANY CHANGED ITS

NAME TO ROGER LARK & SEDGWICK

— IN 1998, SEDGWICK ANNOUNCED ITS

PLANS TO MERGE WITH MARSH, AND

SO IN 1999 THE COMPANY CHANGED

ITS NAME ONCE AGAIN - TO LARK

INSURANCE BROKING GROUP – AND

BECAME A LIMITED COMPANY

— 1999, ROGER LARK’S GRANDSONS,

GRAHAM AND STEPHEN, BECOME

CHAIRMAN AND MANAGING

DIRECTOR RESPECTIVELY

— 2002 - 2014, THE COMPANY MAKE

12 AQUISITIONS OF UK REGIONAL

BROKERS AND CREATES THE 7

CURRENT OFFICE LOCATIONS

— 2012 AFTER REBRANDING LARK

BECOMES LARK (GROUP) LIMITED

5


Insurance

the

Act

Key points you NEED to KNOW about

the first significant change to Commercial

Insurance Law in more than a CENTURY

THE INSURANCE ACT 2015

WILL COME INTO EFFECT

THROUGHOUT THE UK IN

2016.

Julie Whitehead, Director at Lark,

outlines the changes and explains how

organisations can prepare for it.

The Insurance Act 2015, which applies to

all classes of non-consumer insurance and

reinsurance, comes into effect on 12 August

2016. Bringing into force the Third Parties

(Rights against Insurers) Act, with minor

corrections, it represents a significant change

to the legal framework of insurance contracts,

which has been untouched since the Marine

Insurance Act 1906.

THE KEY PROVISIONS OF

THE ACT ARE AS FOLLOWS:

The Insured will be under a new duty of

fair presentation, replacing the general

obligation to disclose all material facts. The

Insured will have to disclose every material

circumstance that he or she knows or ought

to know, or sufficient information to put a

prudent Insurer on notice that it needs to

make further enquiries to reveal the material

circumstances. Currently Insurers are not

obliged to make further enquiries and can

rely totally on what is disclosed to them. This

applies to disclosure before the contract is

concluded, for new contracts and renewals,

as well as mid-term variations.

Warranties are to be treated as suspensive

conditions, meaning that an Insurer’s

liability will only be suspended during a

period of breach and a breach of warranty

will no longer automatically terminate the

policy. The breach of the warranty must have

some bearing on the actual loss by increasing

the risk of the loss occurring.

New proportionate remedies are available

to Insurers following a breach of the new

duty of fair presentation. For example,

where a deliberate or reckless breach of fair

KEY

CHANGES

presentation occurs, Insurers can still avoid

the insurance and retain any premiums

paid. This would normally be from inception

except where the breach relates to a variation

such as a mid-term adjustment. The onus will

be on the Insurer to show that a qualifying

breach is deliberate or reckless.

Remedies are also available for other

breaches of duty of fair presentation. These

are based on what the Insurer would have

done if the qualifying breach had not taken

place and the Insured had made a fair

presentation of the risk. For example, if

the Insurer would have charged a higher

premium, it can proportionally reduce any

claim payment or it may impose additional

terms retrospectively.

Basis of contract clauses are abolished. These

clauses currently operate to turn the Insured’s

pre-contractual representations, including

answers to proposal form questions, into

warranties.

Insurer remedies for fraudulent claims are

clarified so they will remain liable for all

legitimate losses suffered before the fraud.

The duty of good faith remains but the remedy

of avoidance is only available if cover would

not have been offered if a fair presentation

had been made.With the exception of the

basis of contract provisions, parties to

an insurance agreement can contract out

of the requirements of the Act, provided

that any disadvantageous amendment is

drawn to the Insured’s attention clearly and

unambiguously. We are not expecting our

key Insurers to be going down this route.

NEXT STEPS

Although the changes won’t come into effect

for more than a year, it is important to start

planning for them now. Organisations will

need to ensure they are able to satisfy the

new law and that they have adequate and

effective internal corporate governance and

communication protocols in place so that

relevant employees are fully conversant with

the changes. A good example of this is the

new duty of fair presentation.

Although the change may seem subtle,

it will require the Insured to introduce

new processes to ensure compliance. For

instance, the Insured will need to make sure

a reasonable search is undertaken to reveal

material information and that it makes the

disclosure in a manner that is reasonably

clear and accessible to a prudent Insurer. In

addition, although the information can be

contained in more than one document or oral

presentation, data-dumping a large volume

of information with insufficient direction of

structure would not be considered fair – key

facts must not be buried within less relevant

information.

Organisations are likely to see changes ahead

of the introduction of the Act. We expect that

Insurers will be more amenable to altering

policies to follow the spirit of the Act, for

example, removing basis of contract clauses

and improving warranty language.

We will be looking to discuss with our key

Insurers the possibility of implementing

these changes before the Act comes into

force. In summary the key provisions that

this act addresses are basis of contract

clauses, suspensive warranties and remedies

for non-disclosure.

We will also, in consultation with Insurers,

agree parameters for what is deemed to be a

“fair presentation of the risk”. We will provide

the appropriate guidance and support to

all of our clients, to ensure that broking

information is sufficient and compliant.

For more information about the Act, and

how to prepare for it, please call your Lark

Account Handler or alternatively contact

Julie Whitehead with any enquiries:

julie.whitehead@larkinsurance.co.uk

020 7543 2809

The pre-contract duty of

The law on breach of warrenty the law on fraudulent claims is

disclosure has been replaced by

has been changed;

clarified and remedies for such

1

a new duty of fair presentation;

2 3

claims have been set out in the

4

act; and

Provisions for contracting

out are included, subject to

compliance with transparency

requirements

6


Industry News

7


8

Claims Corner


Directors & Officers

Liability

What is a Claim?

What constitutes a Circumstance?

Daniel

Lim

DANIEL.LIM@LARKINSURANCE.CO.UK

In this article, we seek to demystify two

simple, yet fundamental claims related

questions about what is a Claim and what

is a Circumstance.

WHAT IS A CLAIM?

These type of policies are written on a “claims

made” basis, that is, unless otherwise provided,

the policy only covers claims first made against

an Insured during the policy period, regardless

of when the occurrence took place, subject to

this being within the retroactive date agreed

within the Policy. Claims arising from events

prior to the retroactive date are excluded.

A policy will generally define a claim as:

——

A written demand

——

A civil, regulatory or administrative

proceeding, including mediation or arbitration

——

A criminal proceeding which alleges a

wrongful act by an Insured person

Many policies will also include a regulatory

investigation, for example, HSE, FCA, SFO

and OFT investigations.

The policy requires you to give notice in writing

of any such claim. Generally, policies may also

require you to notify a “circumstance”, which

is something that is not yet a claim, but may

in the future become a claim. Each policy will

have a slightly different definition of what a

“circumstance” is and when to notify it. The

following may be helpful (see examples right).

EXAMPLES OF A

“CIRCUMSTANCE”

——

The removal or resignation of a Director or

Officer if not completely voluntary

——

An intimation that someone may make

a claim against a Director, Officer or other

Insured Person

——

An awareness of a failing in your

Company’s performance, or a real doubt of a

Director or Officer’s ability to undertake their

duties

——

An allegation, even if you consider this to

be completely unfounded, that any Insured

person breached their fiduciary duties,

whether express or implied

——

A statement that someone intends to bring

a suit or other proceedings

——

An oral threat or allegation

It is important that immediate notification to

your usual Lark contact or Insurer is given

as soon as you receive any spoken or written

claim, complaint, criticism, allegation of

negligence, an indication of intent to make a

claim against any Director, Officer or other

Insured Person. Do not make any admissions

or concessions, or agree to make any payment

without the prior written consent of your

Insurers. If you need to appoint a Solicitor,

obtain consent from your Insurer first.

There is a common misconception that it is

only the receipt of a lawyer’s documents that

constitute a ‘claim’ and should be notified.

However, the duty of an Insured is to notify all

‘Circumstances’ which are ‘likely’ or ‘may’ give

rise to a claim.

CLAIMS CHECKLIST

1. What does the policy state in terms of the

notification form and its provisions?

2. Is the Insured ‘aware’ of the incidents giving

rise to the circumstance and when did it arise?

3. Has the notification time requirement been

met?

4. Does the materiality of the circumstance

objectively meet the threshold test of being

“likely to” or “may” give rise to a claim?

5. Has the Insured complied with the policy

Terms & Conditions and is there sufficient

causal connection between the circumstance

and claim?

6. If the Insured is in any doubt about what

constitutes a notification, the Broker should be

consulted immediately.

Please note that all Insurers’ policies are

different on what needs to be notified and

when. Failure to comply with the terms of

your insurance policy could prejudice your

position, and Insurers would be within their

rights to repudiate and deny liability which

could leave you seriously out of pocket.

For more information from Claims Corner,

please call your Lark Claims Handler.

daniel.lim@larkinsurance.co.uk

020 7543 2815

9


Energy Efficient?

All you NEED to KNOW about

landlord’s responsibilities when it comes

to energy efficiency.

Paul

Hipson

PAUL.HIPSON@LARKINSURANCE.CO.UK

In less than three years, the majority of

landlords will have to make sure that their

privately rented properties reach a specific

minimum energy efficiency level, otherwise

they will face the prospect of those properties

sitting empty. As the Government had a duty,

a compulsory requirement of The Energy

Act 2011, to improve the energy efficiency

of properties in the private rented sector, it

created The Energy Efficiency Regulations

(2015).

From 1 April 2016, tenants will be able to

request their landlord to carry out reasonable

energy efficiency enhancements to improve

the property’s Energy Performance Certificate

(EPC) rating. The landlord cannot refuse

to carry out the necessary works if it can be

wholly financed, at no cost to the landlord,

by means of funding provided by central

government, a local authority or any other

person; can be wholly funded by the tenant; or

can be financed by a combination of those two

arrangements.

From 1 April 2018, private domestic and

non-domestic landlords will not be allowed

to let out their property if it does not have a

minimum EPC rating of an ‘E’. This applies to

any new tenancy or any renewal of an existing

tenancy agreement.

From 1 April 2020, the requirements will

apply to all properties in the private rented

sector, including existing lets in the domestic

sector.

From 1 April 2023, these requirements will

apply to all private rented sector properties,

including existing lettings in the non-domestic

sector. Any property covered by a lease of

more than six months and with a leasehold of

less than 99 years will also be covered by the

Regulations.

THERE ARE A NUMBER

OF EXEMPTIONS THAT

LANDLORDS CAN CITE:

The property is unable to be brought up to the

standard as the measures are not cost effective

within a seven year payback or under the

Green Deal’s Golden Rule.

The tenant refuses consent.

The landlord is unable to obtain consent from

a third party.

The works required to bring the property up

to the ‘E’ level would devalue the property by

more than 5% of market value.

Landlords who wish to improve the energy

efficiency of their property have the chance

to access funding support from a variety

of sources. As there is long lead time on

this legislation it provides plenty of time

for landlords and agencies to put in place

processes and procedures to make sure they

are compliant by the time it takes effect.

The Government is taking this requirement

very seriously and, where a domestic

property has been let which does not meet the

minimum standard, the tenancy will remain

valid but the landlord will face a fine of up to

£5,000 and a publication penalty consisting

of publication on the Private Rented Sector

(PRS) Exemptions Register detailing the

breach. The fines can be much greater for nondomestic

properties.

For breaches in relation to non-domestic

private rented property, fines could exceed

£5,000 ranging from 10% of the rateable

value of the property (subject to a maximum

of £50,000) up to £10,000 or 20% of the

rateable value of the property (whichever is

the greater) (maximum £150,000). This, of

course, depends on the regulation breached.

The publication penalty would also be in

addition.

That’s why it’s crucial to remember that

the responsibility for all of the property’s

compliance requirements ultimately rests with

the owner. Compliance is critical and should

be taken very seriously – it can only go badly

if it isn’t!

FINES COULD EXCEED

£5,000

Keeping up to date with all the latest rules and

regulations can be difficult, that’s why at Lark

we endeavour to keep our clients informed

about changes which may affect them.

For more information please call

your Lark Account Handler.

paul.hipson@larkinsurance.co.uk

020 7543 2856

10


11


Cyber-Attack

Protect yourself from the fallout

Mark Child, Partner at Kingston Smith Consulting LLP,

talks to us about how we can head off the threat posed

by Cyber attacks

There is no doubt that Cyber Threat is

the topic of the moment. It features on

the agenda of most board and audit

committee meetings and it is on the minds of

many organisations.

Information is the life blood of an organisation

and we are all increasingly more reliant upon

technology and information assets. In the

UK, cyber security has been defined as a Tier

1 threat to the nation, making it a strategic

risk management issue for all organisations.

In mid-2013, MI5 wrote to the board of every

FTSE350 company urging them to ensure that

they were taking adequate steps to protect

themselves.

WHAT IS ‘THE CYBER

THREAT’?

This is the million dollar question. And you

won’t get the same answer twice.

Cyber Threat is a convenient label applied to

the multitude of risks to data, information

and the systems which store and process it.

These risks could be precipitated by events or

actions as varied as external hacking, social

engineering, a compromised third-party

supplier or an employee leaking information.

These are diverse activities that are likely

to require a very different response to

remediation and ongoing management.

SHOULD WE BE CONCERNED

ABOUT THE CYBER THREAT?

The answer, categorically, is ‘Yes!’. Globally,

with security incidents on the rise, reputation,

regulatory status and financial well-being are

more at risk now than ever before.

No matter what size your business is, cyber

criminals are opportunists and will always

be on the lookout for soft targets. They know

larger organisations have big security budgets

and will, usually, have better detection

capabilities that are more likely to spot and

deal with a security breach before it escalates.

Latest government figures indicate that

81% of large corporations and 60% of small

businesses reported a cyber breach, with each

breach estimated to cost between £600,000

to £1.15m for large businesses and £65,000 to

£115,000 for smaller companies.

UNDERSTAND THE RISKS

Organisations clearly need to respond to

the threat. But where to start? Technology

companies will tell you to buy their software

whilst IT service companies will tell you to

outsource your IT to them. Software, security

tools, penetration testing and transferring

some of the risk to a third-party (via

outsourcing) may be part of the solution but,

applied in isolation to the Cyber Threat, there

is a very real risk of missing the point. The best

technology and tools can be undermined by

weaknesses in basic security practices or by a

flawed corporate culture.

Today’s cyber criminals are adopting

approaches which step away from the purely

technical and look to exploit weaknesses in the

way that organisations manage, control and

interact with their information. This means

that the corporate approach also needs to

shift from one of ‘implementing security’ to

one of ‘information risk management’. The

foundations of good information and security

governance include:

• User access management

• Clear policies on security, e.g. acceptable

system and social media use

• Staff security training and awareness

• Oversight of third party suppliers

• Timely application of software security

updates

Fundamentally, addressing the Cyber Threat

means going back to basics and understanding

your organisation’s information (where it is

and how it is used), identifying risks to your

information assets and ensuring that the

right measures are adopted to mitigate risks

to within acceptable levels (balancing cost vs

risk). That is why investment in people, skills

and robust policies and processes is crucial.

The Cyber Threat is a problem for the entire

business to solve – not just IT.

STAY ON TOP

Putting it simply, the approach that should

be taken in building a robust Cyber Security

Strategy has not really changed much in the

past 10 years.

To be truly effective, an organisation should

make sure that they consult and collaborate

with their peers and utilise the ‘weapons’ that

are available to them, whether these be close

to hand (e.g. policies, procedures, audits) or

those specifically designed by security service

vendors to keep the bad guys at bay.

Even if you successfully fight off a Cyber

Threat you can be sure that they will return;

bigger and badder than before. So, make sure

your organisation is always prepared.

For more information on the dangers of cyberattacks,

and how Cyber Liability Insurance can

protect your business interest, please contact

Martin Camp:

martin.camp@larkinsurance.co.uk

020 7543 2806

12


COMPANIES NEED TO PREPARE FOR A

DOOMSDAY SCENARIO - AT THE VERY LEAST

TO ENSURE THAT, IF AND WHEN A BREACH

OCCURS, A STRATEGY IS IN PLACE

13


Cover Spotlight

Divisional Director, Lee Scott, talks about the

dangers of underinsurance

14


under

Valued?

All you NEED to KNOW about

the risks of underinsurance...

Lee

Scott

LEE.SCOTT@LARKINSURANCE.CO.UK

In our first edition of Cover Spotlight we talk

to Lee Scott, Divisional Director at Lark’s

Croydon office, about ‘Underinsurance’- a

subject which is becoming a growing concern

for many commercial businesses.

In a tough economic climate, reports show

that more than 50% of commercial property

is not fully insured, with some only insured

for half the amount it should be. Not having

adequate limits and cover in place can

jeopardise any businesses chance of survival

and speed of recovery following a major loss.

Having a comprehensive insurance

programme in place is only the first step, this

needs to go hand in hand with continually

assessing sums insureds and ensuring

accurate levels of cover are in place. This will

help businesses recover faster and remain

in a strong commercial position following a

major claim.

SOME BUSINESSES ARE

UNDERINSURED BY

MORE THAN 50% AND

ON AVERAGE, ACROSS

ALL SECTORS THE LEVEL

OF UNDERINSURANCE

IS 20%

WHAT IS

UNDERINSURANCE?

In summary, underinsurance occurs when

either the sums insured on a policy do not

represent the current value of the items

at risk or where limits within a policy

are inadequate for a client’s needs. It is

important to remember that any sum insured

should represent the full extent of the risk.

For example, the buildings sum insured

should not only cover the building materials

and labour costs required to rebuild the

property but it also needs to cover any debris

removal costs, architects’ fees, local authority

fees and so on.

Unfortunately if all these factors are not

taken into consideration, in the event of a

claim, being underinsured will result in a

financial loss to the client as insurers will

apply average to any losses, but what does

this actually mean?

Average works by reducing the amount of the

claim by the same amount of underinsurance,

for example:

A client’s building is insured for £ 500,000

and a fire occurs causing £ 200,000 worth of

damage. If the correct value of the building is

actually £ 750,000 Insurers will consider that

the client has only insured the building for

two thirds of the risk and as such will reduce

the claim payment by a third. Therefore the

initial £ 200,000 claim would be reduced

by £66,660 and settled at £ 133,340 LESS

any policy excess that would then be applied;

this illustrates the financial loss that will be

incurred by the client.

HOW TO AVOID

UNDERINSURANCE

There are some key areas where

underinsurance can be especially prevalent.

These include, assessing the correct level of

business interruption cover (both in terms

of calculating Gross Profit for Insurance

purposes as well as identifying the correct

period of recovery), maintaining an up to

date register of all machinery, plant and

contents and understanding the replacement

value of these items and finally confusion

around the market value and rebuild costs for

commercial property.

LARK SUPPORT

We will be in contact over the next few

months to discuss this issue as it is important

we work with our clients to continually assess

sums insured and policy limits to avoid the

potential of being underinsured. In addition,

we can also put our clients in contact with

professional valuation companies who can

provide further assistance.

Please do not hesitate to contact your Lark

Account Handler for more information,

also download our PDF document about

underinsurance at:

www.larkinsurance.co.uk/commercial/

underinsurance

lee.scott@larkinsurance.co.uk

020 8256 4910

15


Mind

the

Gap

Growing up in working class 1960’s Britain gave me the

inspiration to champion changes in equality and diversity,

Cherie Blair QC tells Lark Director, Julie Whitehead, in an

exclusive interview

Julie

Whitehead

JULIE.WHITEHEAD@LARKINSURANCE.CO.UK

Cherie Blair’s mother, Gale, worked in a

fish and chip shop to make ends meet

when her husband, the actor Tony

Booth, left her for another woman.

Gale, along with Cherie, eight, and her sister

Lyndsey, six, had no choice but to continue

living with her in-laws in Liverpool. Eventually

she got a job at Lewis’s department store and

worked her way up the career ladder but she

still could not get a mortgage.

Cherie said: “The Divorce Reform Act was

not introduced until 1969 so in those days

the bank would only lend money if the man

signed for a mortgage. It was absurd because

the assumption that my father, a drunk and

a womaniser, was more reliable than my

mother, was almost unthinkable.”

Cherie’s mother had left school at 14 and

made every effort to give her daughters the

schooling she had missed.

Cherie, 60, said: “It was quite unusual in

60’s Britain for a woman to be separated

from her husband but my mother and

grandmother were obsessed with education

and determined we would have the education

they were denied. There were lots of books in

the house.

“They had high expectations so I worked hard

because I wanted to make them proud.

“It was a loving environment. We were not

much different to anyone else in Ferndale

Road. We played in the street, had a black and

white television and were generally sheltered

from the consequences of my father’s

behaviour because he was in London.”

Booth, the star of the racy Confessions films,

including Confessions of a Window Cleaner,

and TV sitcom Till Death Us Do Part ‘was not

always a good boy’, said Cherie. “Although in

some ways, it gave me some training on what

to expect with a famous husband.”

Cherie did not start out with a career plan.

When she was thinking about university, her

first boyfriend’s mother mentioned law. She

said, “you are good at debating and drama so

why not think about being a lawyer?”

“I managed to get a full scholarship and chose

the London School of Economics (LSE) which

was fairly unusual for a girl from my school.

The LSE had a radical reputation and though

it was a rebellious streak that took me to

London, once I got there I found it was the

place for me. I loved it.

“It was a huge learning curve in every way

and it was the first time I had met people

from public school - but I was determined to

succeed.

“I chose to focus on human rights – partly

because I was interested in the whole women’s

thing and there was so much happening at

that time. I was also aware there were a lot

of differences between those who came from

public schools and people like me with a

completely different background.

“I graduated in 1975 when the Labour Party

had just brought in the Sex Discrimination

Act. Times were changing and I was lucky

enough to take advantage of that for myself

and seize the opportunity to take some of the

test cases that led to the development of the

Human Rights Act.

16


Special Feature

Director, Julie Whitehead, talks with Cherie

Blair about equality

17


“I remember the women at Ford in Dagenham

going on strike. I was always interested

in politics but it was usually the men who

talked about it among themselves – but my

Auntie Audrey was always politically aware

so I would discuss things with her, while my

teacher, Mrs Speight, encouraged me to join

the Labour Party when I had turned 16.

“That was in 1970, when Barbara Castle

introduced the Equal Pay Act with a fiveyear

phasing in period, so when I went to

university, employment law was one of the

pieces of legislation I studied.”

Cherie was called to the Bar in 1976 and in

1995 she became a Queen’s Counsel. She said:

“I was the 76th woman and even now only

200 women have been appointed as silks,

compared to thousands of men.”

She said: “Look at our members of parliament,

too. Only 29% are women. I visit Rwanda

with my Foundation and its government has

60% women! Here, nobody says how strange

70% of MPs are men or that only 450 women

have ever been MPs, fewer than the men in

this single parliament.

“When my husband Tony Blair introduced

all-women shortlists in 1997, and as a result

at the next election there was a big increase in

Labour MPs, the press then called them ‘Blair

Babes’, implying that surely unless they were

‘babes’ they could not possibly have been

elected.”

Cherie is even less impressed by the

forecasts for women’s equality. She said:

“The World Economic Forum reports that it

will be another 80 years until women reach

economic equality with men”.

“There is lots we can do. Diversity in

employment is the key to making the best

return for investors and for creating a better,

more educated workforce.

“We have all the evidence from reports by

accountant Ernst & Young and Harvard

Business School to show this, not just gender

equality but all kinds of equality in the

workforce; disability, race, sexual orientation

and age. Everyone working together and

accepting their differences is much more

creative than uniform white, male employees.

I DO NOT WANT TO

WAIT 80 YEARS FOR

EQUALITY

“As for quotas for women on boards, I see this

as a necessary step, a catalyst for change - not

to be in force forever, something just to gain

momentum.”

“It has been encouraged in places likes

Norway, France and Germany but if we

think we can solve inequality with women on

executive boards we are kidding ourselves.”

“Figures for women executive directors on

boards are disappointing with about 23.5% in

the FTSE 100 and 18% in the FTSE 250.”

Cherie is also aware that one woman on a

board cannot bring systematic change. She

said: “It does not make much difference

with one woman, as she can be an isolated

voice, but if you have two or three, say 33%,

you start finding a real change and it can be

sustainable.”

“I welcome the 25% target but it would

not have come about without the threat of

compulsory legislation and we cannot be

complacent.”

Cherie has also spoken to David Cameron

before he was Prime Minister, regarding the

gender pay gap, and she says he takes the

issue seriously.

She said: “In 2010 all companies of more

than 250 employees were required to report

their gender pay gap but this was a voluntary

code and only five companies did so. It will

now be compulsory.

IT IS EXTRAORDINARY

THAT COMPARED TO

A MAN, A WOMAN

TODAY HAS TO WORK

FOR 57 DAYS FOR

NOTHING - AND THE

GENDER PAY GAP IS

EVEN WORSE FOR

WOMEN IN PART TIME

WORK

“Girls are doing better at school and

performing as well, if not better, at university

but after they enter the workplace, within five

years men are earning more and accelerating

up the career ladder.

“When I was first a young lawyer I was

determined to be as good as any male lawyer.

When I started my pupillage at a law firm in

the 1970’s, I was in direct competition for a job

with a young man. Even though I performed

better and had scored better in my studies, it

became clear that when the firm was deciding

to give one of us a permanent job, they were

going to pick the man. I found this incredibly

unfair - even the male candidate admitted

that I was better suited for the job. The firm,

however, missed out in the end, as this man

eventually left the law and went in to politics.

He also ended up being my husband.

“I would not necessarily recommend what

I did. Because I wanted to prove myself,

when I had children, I did not take maternity

leave or make any concessions. Now all

these provision are within the rules. There

is specific provision for maternity leave, for

example. That is right and proper and as it

should be.

I LEARNT THAT YOU

DON’T SOLVE THE

PROBLEMS BY NOT

CONCEDING THE

DIFFERENCES - AND

THE DIFFERENCES

ARE WHAT MAKE LIFE

INTERESTING

“Not all women are the same and not all men

are the same either. A lot of the changes have

benefited men as well as women.”

“Only one per cent of men are taking up

paternity leave because they are scared of

what might happen to their jobs - so there is

a fault in the system. The better companies

recognise that an employee has a larger

hinterland than just their work and that

makes them better people.”

Cherie has high hopes that Hillary Clinton

could also bring about great changes from

across the pond if she was elected as President

of the United States.

Cherie said: “Hillary is a friend and an

inspiration. When she failed to be nominated

in 2008, she gave a speech about the cracks

in the glass ceiling. I would like to see her go

through that ceiling.

Her breadth of knowledge and experience

over many years in public life make her

uniquely qualified to become the first woman

president of the USA.”

Although Cherie sees Hillary as an icon, she

says her mother and grandmother have been

role models and she continues to live by their

words: Never let anything defeat you, stand

up against adversity and be fearless.

“It took me a long way.”

18


CHERIE AND JULIE

CONTINUE TO TALK ABOUT

THEIR SHARED PASSION

FOR CHARITABLE CAUSES

Fighting for equal opportunities has

shaped Cherie Blair’s life and her

charitable foundation now helps

women build small and growing businesses

in 80 countries.

“We focus on the three C’s,” said Cherie.

“Confidence, capacity and access to capital.”

More than 125,000 women have benefited

from the Cherie Blair Foundation for Women

since its formation in 2008 and they are now

able to contribute to their own economies and

have a stronger voice in their societies.

Cherie said: “I come across so many fantastic

things going on across the world and because

of my own background I want to help make a

difference.

“I am entrepreneurial.

“As a barrister, I am self-employed so it

resonated with me to help other women to

help themselves.

When Ellen Johnson Sirleaf was elected as

Africa’s first woman president, in Liberia, I

was thrilled to hear a week later that a young

girl in an African school who was being told

off for being noisy in class said to her teacher

“be careful how you speak to me as I might

be president one day”. This would never

have been dreamed of before then. Isn’t that

wonderful?”

Cherie is also a self-confessed techie. She

said: “I am obsessed by technology because

I would never have coped as a self-employed

barrister, Prime Minister’s wife and mother

of three sons and a daughter if I had not been

able to use the internet to make my life easier.

“In the 21st century there is so much more

we can do through technology and we can

accelerate our reach to women so they will

not have to wait so long to achieve equality.

“We have a mentoring programme which uses

English and an innovative online platform to

help women build their computer skills and

business knowledge.

“One woman now runs an internet café in

Kigali, Rwanda and has a scanning machine

so locals can pay their taxes. While I was

visiting I commented on one woman’s lovely

dress. She said she had learned to make it

by watching dressmaking on YouTube. Such

resourcefulness is incredible – I don’t think I

could do that!

“We encourage women to look at the market

and work out the gaps. In Rwanda, we are

supporting 15,000 small businesswomen

through a project which provides finance

literacy and business training. We do it in

many different ways and also support savings

and loans clubs, sometimes in villages where

there is no electricity or running water.

“One woman I spoke to was 22, not married

and not particularly happy. She thought

saving clubs should not just be for the older

women so she borrowed 200 francs from

her parents to buy seeds to grow vegetables.

From her profit she bought a pig, which had

five piglets, and then she diversified to sell

fertiliser.

“As a result she has increased her confidence,

she has paid back her parents, pays health

insurance for her siblings and has even got

engaged.”

www.cherieblairfoundation.org

19


Equal Pay

Equal Work

Director, Julie Whitehead, discusses the introduction

of new regulation in 2016

Julie

Whitehead

JULIE.WHITEHEAD@LARKINSURANCE.CO.UK

With women, on average, earning

just 81p for every pound that a

male colleague receives in his pay

cheque, pay equality has still not fully arrived.

With the British people’s stoic attitude

towards talking about pay, many women will

be unaware that they are still earning less

than a man doing the same job as them. This

is shocking considering that the Equal Pay

Act has been in force for over 40 years!

But, things should start to change for the

better; consultation was launched on 14

July 2015 for regulations to be introduced

in 2016 requiring any organisation with 250

employees or more, to have a mandatory

obligation to publish an annual report on

gender pay gaps within their organisation.

Companies will be expected to publish the

difference between men’s and women’s

starting salaries; the difference between

average basic pay and total average earnings

(broken down by grade and job type); and

reward components at different levels, e.g.

bonuses.

This will force many companies to take a

long hard look at their pay scales before they

become the victim of scandalous headlines

and damaging lawsuits. It is expected

that companies failing to comply with the

legislation could face a fine in the region of

£5,000. Sadly, this is not an amount that will

be a huge deterrent to a business adamant

about hiding their unbalanced pay scales.

For those organisations that are willing to do

something to improve the current situation,

here are some examples of best practice

advice:

——

Make sure you understand what the

equalities’ legislation says about terms and

conditions of employment.

——

Make sure that everyone (managers,

employees, and trade unions) understand

your pay and benefit systems.

——

Have one simple pay system for all your

employees.

——

Base your pay structure on an objective

evaluation of job demands.

——

Limit local managerial discretion over all

elements of the pay package.

——

Check salaries on entry to the

organisation, and on entry to other grades, to

ensure men are not starting on higher salaries

than women. Remember, your responsibility

is to provide equal pay, not to match previous

salaries.

While the legislation does not currently affect

organisations with less than 250 employees

it is most likely only a matter of time before

this legislation is rolled out to more and more

organisations as interested parties push for

wider pay transparency within the work place

and an end to unequal pay.

There has been resounding approval of

the enforcement of this legislation and it is

believed that the overall impact will only be

positive and help women continue to close

the pay gap. We’re one step closer to equal

pay for equal work!

Julie Whitehead

Director

RETIREMENT AGE FOR

WOMEN? 80, IF THEY

WANT TO EARN AS

MUCH AS MEN

julie.whitehead@larkinsurance.co.uk

020 7543 2809

20


"I do not want to

wait 80 years for

equality"- Cherie Blair

21


Client Spotlight

An exclusive interview with Alex McLauchlan,

Financial Director of Hawksmoor Restaurants

22


A day in

the life...

Lark Account Executive, Daniel Lim, meets with

longstanding client, Alex McLauchlan, from Hawksmoor

Daniel

Lim

DANIEL.LIM@LARKINSURANCE.CO.UK

Alex McLauchlan, FD at Hawksmoor

Enjoying iconic status across the City,

Hawksmoor has built a reputation for

offering the finest steaks in London.

We know, we have tried them. A labour of love

to find the perfect beef was the inspiration

behind Hawksmoor. They are proud of their

achievements, and particularly of coming

12th in the Sunday Times Best Companies

and being shortlisted as one of the most

sustainable restaurant groups in the country,

being awarded a maximum 3 star rating at

the Sustainable Restaurant Awards.

Here we talk to the Finance Director, Alex

McLauchlan, about a typical working day at

Hawksmoor, where two days are never quite

the same…

8 am I drop my daughters off at school and

then look forward to the daily commute from

my home in Hertfordshire to our offices in

Wapping.

9 am I begin the day reviewing emails, review

the sales in our restaurants, look at any

reviews from critics, and then plan my action

points for the day

10 am Check in with HO Management teams,

and liaise with general managers within the

Hawksmoor and Foxglow restaurants.

11 am We are in expansion mode at the

moment and this occupies a significant

amount of my time, we have recently opened

in Manchester, and in advanced talks to

extend our brand internationally. I spend

time with our lawyers, our insurance brokers

and other financial advisors to finalise these

arrangements. We are very excited about

the prospect of expanding internationally – a

well cooked steak has pretty much universal

appeal, and whilst this brings different

challenges logistically, it will be good to

expand the brand and enjoy the travelling

that this will bring.

2 pm Lunch and meeting with our suppliers,

this week it is with Ginger Pig who supplies

our beef to all of our restaurants. Hawksmoor

has an ethics culture and we have always

prided ourselves on the fact that the animals

that our food comes from, have lived a decent

life.

4 pm I make a point of dropping into one of

our restaurants unannounced. This gives me

the opportunity to check out any competition

locally, I talk to the staff about how things

have been trading for that day and any

concerns that they have.

6 pm Once again, time to face the daily

commute back to Hertfordshire, and

hopefully in time to read to my daughters

before bedtime.

Account Executive, Daniel Lim, with Alex McLauchlan,

Finance Director at Hawksmoor

For all of our clients, if you quote “Larklink”

during the month of October or November in

any of their restaurants, either Hawksmoor

or Foxglow, you will receive a complimentary

glass of champagne.

daniel.lim@larkinsurance.co.uk

020 7543 2815

23


SimpliCIty

Critical Illness cover made simple

Sam

Mistry

SAM.MISTRY@LARKINSURANCE.CO.UK

MAKING CRITICAL ILLNESS

SIMPLE FOR EMPLOYERS

Employees’ health and wellbeing is

a subject that is moving up the UK

boardroom agenda.

With wellbeing and happiness at work often

being quoted as being as important and

motivational to employees as annual pay,

many employers are now taking the time to

review their employee benefit packages to

help recruit and retain the best staff.

One of the benefits on offer is Critical Illness

cover. This product has been around for

some time and supports an employee in the

event of a critical condition such as cancer, a

heart attack or stroke, by paying a lump sum

which can ease some of the financial pressure

during their recovery.

There are 63,000 people living in the UK

with a critical condition, many of whom want

to live as normal a life as possible including

being able to return to work. With one

in four women and one in five men being

affected before retirement, providing this

cover demonstrates a tangible interest in

staff wellbeing whilst helping employees to

recover and return to a normal working life.

Traditional Group Critical Illness cover has

been criticised by some employers for being

too complex, listing many conditions which

add little or no value and excluding preexisting

conditions.

That is why leading group risk insurer Unum

has worked hard to develop a truly simple

policy.

SimpliCIty Critical Illness by Unum provides

cover for the ten conditions shown to be the

majority of all critical illness claims.

Whilst an employee will not be able to claim

for a condition they have when the policy

starts, once all clear, they will be able to claim

for a new occurrence of the same condition.

Sums assured can be set by employers up to

a modest limit helping claimants with the

expense of treatment and recovery.

As a preferred partner of Unum, Lark

Employee Benefits is one of a select few

providers who can offer this market leading

product to their clients.

“It’s fantastic to be able to offer such an

effective product with so many options.

Working with an industry leader such as

Unum gives us and our clients real confidence

in the solution we are providing.” - Samantha

Mistry, Director of Employee Benefits at

Lark.

To find out more about SimpliCIty Critical

Illness by Unum or to review your employee

benefits offering please contact Samantha

Mistry.

samantha.mistry@larkinsurance.co.uk

020 7543 2818

24


IPT Bulletin

Insurance Premium Tax increase.

Adam

Fulcher

ADAM.FULCHER@LARKINSURANCE.CO.UK

INSURANCE PREMIUM TAX

INCREASE IS COMING!

In the 2015 summer budget, Chancellor

George Osborne announced that

Insurance Premium Tax (IPT) will

increase from 6% to 9.5% as of November

2015.

When introduced in 1996, it was set at a flat

rate of 2.5% and has steadily increased over

the years. The proposed increase from 6 to

9.5% represents an increase of 58%, making

it the most significant rise for many years and

is expected to generate an additional £1.75bn

a year.

The Chancellor argued that Britain’s

insurance premium tax was well below that of

other countries and an increase would affect

only one-fifth of all premiums. Currently

the level of IPT in the UK in comparison to

mainland Europe is reasonably low at 6%.

For example in Germany the tax applicable

is 19% and in Italy it is 22.25%. The British

Insurance Brokers Association (BIBA)

slammed the move as a “stealth tax” on

insurance policies that would hit millions

of ordinary households. Steve White, BIBA

chief executive also commented that the

increase in IPT “seems counterintuitive”

and the government is “taking measures

which will add to the cost – effectively taxing

protection.”

Once the increase takes place it is important

that you consider the following:

Policies incepted or renewed on or after

1/11/2015:

• Will attract the new IPT rate of 9.5%

regardless of when the quote was

provided or at any rate guarantees that

may apply

• Will attract the new IPT rate of 9.5% for

any mid-term change which results in

payment of an additional premium

• Will attract the new IPT rate of 9.5%

rebate for any mid-term adjustment

or cancellation resulting in a refund of

premium

Policies incepted or renewed prior to

1/11/2015:

• Will attract the ‘old’ rate of IPT of 6%

provided that the premium is paid by

29/02/2016

• Where the mid-term change takes

place between 1/11/2015 - 29/02/2016

(inclusive) which results in an additional

premium the ‘old’ IPT rate of 6% may be

applied to that additional premium

• Where a mid-term change or

cancellation takes place between 1/11-

2015 - 29/02/2016 (inclusive) which

results in a refund of the premium,

the ‘old’ IPT rate of 6% applies to that

refund of premium (HMRC will not

allow more IPT to be refunded than was

originally paid)

Additional premiums on or after 1/03/2016:

• Where mid-term change takes place on

or after 1/03/2016 which results in an

additional premium the new IPT rate of

9.5% applies to that additional premium

Refunds on or after 1/03/2016:

• Regardless of the date of change, where

one or more mid-term adjustment takes

place and different rates of IPT have been

applied (e.g. 6% on inception premium

but 9.5% for a mid-term adjustment) or

cancellation takes place that results in

a refund of premium being due, ideally

IPT will be apportioned.

• However HMRC accept that computer

systems may be unable to do so, in

which case the overriding consideration

is that the rebated IPT must not exceed

the rate at which IPT was originally

paid. Therefore if the computer system

is unable to apportion IPT the rate of

IPT on refund of premium will be at the

6% rate.

Anti Forestalling Provisions:

There are also anti-forestalling provisions

to deal with attempts to avoid the increased

rate by extending cover, advancing premium

payments or applying additional premiums.

PREPARE FOR

THE FUTURE

BY BUDGETING

CORRECTLY TAKING

INTO ACCOUNT THE

IMPACT THE INCREASE

WILL HAVE ON YOUR

BUSINESS

For more information on how the increase

may impact your insurance payments please

contact your Account Handler at Lark.

adam.fulcher@larkinsurance.co.uk

020 7543 2842

25


IRS joins the

nest

Paul

Wisbey

PAUL.WISBEY@INSURANCERISK.CO.UK

INSURANCE RISK SOLUTIONS

JOIN LARK (GROUP) LIMITED

Insurance Risk Solutions (IRS) is a CII

Chartered Insurance Broker that joined the

Lark (Group) Limited in July 2014.

The directors and many longstanding staff

at IRS have worked in the picturesque and

historic Suffolk market town of Bury St

Edmunds for over 25 years, from where we

have been providing commercial insurance

solutions to a diverse range of trades and

industries across the region. With both

companies sharing a like-minded approach

to staff, the insurance market place and client

service, the integration has been seamless.

By joining Lark, we have not only helped grow

their influence within East Anglia but our

current and future clients now have access

to additional products and services that Lark

have brought to the table.

My colleague, Simon Wilding, IRS

Commercial Director, summed it up best

when he said, “Lark has broadened the range

of products and services available to our

clients and prospects to make the overall

proposition even stronger.”

In other good news, all 26 members of the

staff and management team have remained

with the business and this ensures continuity

of contact and service for our loyal client base.

As the senior team has worked together for

more than 20 years, this is great news. We

are all very much looking forward to taking

all opportunities to develop and progress our

careers within Lark.

For the time being, IRS will continue to trade

under our existing brand but in January 2016

we will finally complete the merger with Lark

and take advantage of their award winning

brand name, something which everyone here

is looking forward to.

So, at IRS, we look forward to our future with

Lark with great enthusiasm, building on our

success to date for the benefit of all.

26


Life at Lark

Keep up with all the latest news involving

Lark Group

Mike

Bramford

MICHAEL.BRAMFORD@LARKINSURANCE.CO.UK

It’s been a busy, exciting year at Lark, so we

thought we would use our first edition of

Larklink as an opportunity to share with

you some of the things we have been doing so

far in 2015.

LARK CORPORATE GOLF

DAY

The annual Lark golf day took place in May

on a wet and windy Wildernesse golf course

in Kent. This year we had 40 attendees taking

part that ranged from staff, insurers and

clients, Andrew Lawrence, David Bramwell

and Dean Wright managed to battle through

the weather to take the prestigious title!

range of fund raising activities from cake

baking, bike riding and skydiving!

In addition, we recently submitted an entry to

the Aviva Community Fund on behalf of the

NFA to try and obtain £5,000 of additional

funding. We recently found out much to our

delight that our submission won and we

secured £5,000 of additional funding for the

charity.

PEDAL POWER FROM

CALUM DUNNING!

On 15 July Calum a Commercial Account

Executive in our London office, set off from

Land’s End in Cornwall, beginning a two

week cycle to John O’Groats. As an avid

cyclist, Calum committed to joining the ride

in March as a holiday challenge but also as

an opportunity to raise money alongside his

brother and brother in law.

Calum successfully completed the ride and

raised £300 for the NFA. Our favourite quote

from his regular updates was “Two more days

to go, its exhilarating, the scenery, the wind,

in fact the whole journey!”

CORPORATE ACCOUNT

EXECUTIVE DANIEL LIM

MAKES MODELLING DEBUT

NOT FORGOTTEN

ASSOCIATION (NFA)

AVIVA COMMUNITY FUND

WINNERS!

As our chosen corporate charity all our staff

continue to raise much needed funding for

the NFA. The charity provides leisure and

recreation for the benefit of serving and exservice

personnel who have been wounded or

sustained permanent injuries.

Lark started working with the NFA just over

two years ago and to date have raised over

£ 30,000 to improve the lives of the charity

beneficiaries. Our staff get involved in a wide

Chartered

Insurance

Institute

Your partner in

professionalism

• Membership

• Qualifications

• CPD scheme

• Globally

recognised

designations

• Individual and

corporate

Chartered status

• Online technical

and market data

Daniel Lim ACII

Chartered Insurance Practitioner

Account Executive, Lark (Group) Ltd

Daniel Lim

from our

London

commercial

team had the

opportunity

to appear

as the cover

photo on

all the CII

promotional

material.

LARK GROUP WIN ‘PRIVATE

CLIENTS BROKER OF

THE YEAR’ FOR A THIRD

CONSECUTIVE YEAR!

We are delighted to

announce that we

have been awarded

“Private Clients Broker

of the year” for a third

successive year at the

UK Broker Awards.

www.cii.co.uk

27


LARK EMPLOYEE BENEFITS,

BASED IN THE CITY OF LONDON

We pride ourselves on quality personal service and our honest, loyal

and professional approach. We draw on a wealth of experience and

technical knowledge to ensure that our clients receive specialised and

comprehensive advice.

Working closely with you to gain a full understanding of your business,

we will plan and implement a suitable benefit package, according to both

budget and staff profile. We select a fitting provider in the market and

relieve you of the administrative burdens of running an employee benefits

scheme.

For more information, call Samantha Mistry on 0207 543 2818

or email samantha.mistry@larkinsurance.co.uk

We are authorised by the Financial Conduct Authority in the provision of Life Assurance, Investments and Pensions.

INSURANCE MADE TO MEASURE

Lark (Group) Limited

@larkinsurance

28


GET IN TOUCH

SAMANTHA MISTRY

Employee Benefits

London

07984 786719

0207 543 2818

samantha.mistry@larkinsurance.co.uk

MICHELLE EINCHCOMB

Employee Benefits

London

020 7543 2861

michelle.einchcomb@larkinsurance.co.uk

29


OUR PEOPLE

MARK WOODWARD

Managing Director

London

0207 543 2874

07977 553 936

mark.woodward@larkinsurance.co.uk

JULIE WHITEHEAD

Director

London

0207 543 2809

07802 589 424

julie.whitehead@larkinsurance.co.uk

ROBERT KEENE

Associate Director

Maidstone

07968 853 098

robert.keene@larkinsurance.co.uk

MARTIN CAMP

Head of New Business

London

020 7543 2806

07971 271 436

martin.camp@larkinsurance.co.uk

ADAM FULCHER

Divisional Director

London

0207 543 2842

07989 422 427

adam.fulcher@larkinsurance.co.uk

RICHARD GRAHAM

Divisional Director - Maidstone/Claims

Maidstone

01622 350 811

richard.graham@larkinsurance.co.uk

LEE SCOTT

Divisional Director

Croydon

0208 256 4910

07990 563 792

lee.scott@larkinsurance.co.uk

STUART WILLIAMSON

Divisional Director

Farnborough

01252 359 070

07977 553 939

stuart.williamson@larkinsurance.co.uk

AMANDA JOLLEY

Divisional Director

Colchester

01206 771 403

07970 436 407

amanda.jolley@larkinsurance.co.uk

SIMON WILDING

Commercial Director

Bury St Edmunds

01284 777 559

07983 431 601

simon.wilding@insurancerisk.co.uk

GEOFF HALES

Risk Manager

07891 602 052

geoff.hales@larkinsurance.co.uk

30


Lark (Group) Limited

@larkinsurance

31


Lark (Group) Limited

@larkinsurance

LARKINSURANCE.CO.UK

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London

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