Annual Report 2014 - 2015

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Volunteer-Cornwall-Annual-Report-2014-2015

This document has been produced and compiled by

Volunteer Cornwall

and printed using inks and paper from sustainable sources

Annual Report

2014 - 2015

Registered Office:

Volunteer Cornwall, Acorn House, Heron Way, Newham, Truro, TR1 2XN

Tel: 01872 265304 Fax: 01872 888567

Registered Charity No. 1069957

VAT No. 643 5247 41 Company No. 3562830

Limited by Guarantee Registered in England and Wales


Contents

4 - Chair’s and Chief Executive Statement

5 - The Numbers Behind Our Work in 2014/15

6 - East Cornwall Volunteer Centre

7 - East Cornwall Community Maker

8 - West Cornwall Volunteer Centre

9 - West Cornwall Community Maker

10 - Mid Cornwall Volunteer Centre

11 - Mid Cornwall Community Maker

12 - Falmouth Tall Ships Regatta

13 - Children and Family Services

14 - Community Hospital Volunteers

15 - Corporate Volunteer Offi cer

16 - Changing Lives

17 - Training

18 - Cornwall Celebrates Volunteering 2014

20 - Community Transport

24 - Bude Cleaner Seas Project

26 - Viva

28 - Sustainability

29 - What Else Have We Been Up To?

30 - Statement of Financial Activities

31 - Balance Sheet

32 - Directors’ and Auditor’s Statement

33 - Contact Us

34 - Thank You!

Working in Partnership

Here at Volunteer Cornwall, we are always trying to respond to new challenges in society

including working with vulnerable groups and building community capacity despite ever

decreasing financial resources. Over the last five years, we have met some of these

challenges by working in partnership with Professor Catherine Leyshon and Dr Michael

Leyshon from the University of Exeter’s Penryn Campus. It all began in 2010 with a project

that refocused Volunteer Cornwall on supporting solutions from the community. In 2013-

14 we worked together on redrafting our values and realigning our behaviours, presenting

these in last year’s Annual Report. This work was also a catalyst to engage senior

representatives from our partner organizations in the local authority, health and police

looking at shared values, outcomes and impact. Since then, Prof and Dr Leyshon have

undertaken research on people, place, health and the environment which is helping us to

transform service delivery in projects like Living Well.

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Chair’s and Chief Executive Statement

The Numbers Behind Our Work in 2014/15

For many years Volunteer Cornwall has

been championing the need to empower

local people to participate in the design and

delivery of services, this is commonly known

as coproduction. It is essential that in the

years ahead people have the opportunity to

provide solutions to the challenges we face.

We also believe that we have to collaborate

through outcome driven networks underpinned

by common values and not in the old narrowly

bounded organisational models that can create

division within our communities.

Recently leading edge thinkers from universities

such as Stanford, Berkley and MIT in the USA

have been researching and writing about new

ways of achieving collective impact. Various

capabilities have been identified such as people

having the ability to see the larger system,

fostering reflection and more generative

conversations shifting the collective focus

from reactive problem solving to cocreating

the future.

Four principles for collaborative success have

also been identified: Focus on mission before

organisation; Manage through trust, not

control: Promote others, not yourself; Build

constellations, not stars.

This systemic approach is what underpins

Changing Lives and Living Well, developed with

Age UK Cornwall and partners in the NHS and

Cornwall Council. Cultivating trust is essential

in this cooperative endeavour and over the next

few years this values driven work will be crucial

in achieving common outcomes across the

system to improve the wellbeing of individuals

and the resilience of Cornwall’s communities.

It is the thousands of volunteers in Cornwall

that make this possible. We would like to thank

everyone for the time they put in and the huge

contribution they make to our communities from

Lands End to the Tamar.

You must trust and believe in people or life

becomes impossible.

Anton Checkhov

With best wishes

Scott Bennett – Chair

Ian Jones – Chief Executive

Top 5 most popular roles:

1. Advice, Info and Support

2. Befriending & Buddying

3. General & Helping

4. Youth Work

5. Teaching, Training & Leading

◊ 1,895,323 miles travelled.

That’s equivalent to around 4,491 trips around

the Cornish coastline, 76 trips around the

equator or 6,424 one-way trips from Lands

End to London! This works out to be about

5,193 miles travelled each calendar day by all

of our volunteers combined.

◊ On average, each journey is 36.3 miles

long for the volunteer to travel.

That’s roughly equivalent to a one-way car trip

from Truro to Liskeard.

Volunteer Centres

Volunteer Enquiries 3790

Volunteers Placed 421

Do-it Placements 2204

Partnership Meetings 161

New Host Organisations 38

New Volunteering Opportunities 249

Community Car Scheme

Top 5 most popular areas of interest:

1. Children

2. Animals

3. Health & Social Care

4. Youth

5. Older People

◊ 6383 Passengers carried on average each

month.

◊ 24/7/365.

Our volunteers are available throughout the

year including weekends and Christmas.

◊ On average, there are 143 journeys

carried out by our volunteers each

calendar day.

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East Cornwall Volunteer Centre

East Cornwall Community Maker

2014/15 was a year of change for East Cornwall

Volunteer Centre and one of the first changes

was the introduction of the Update Service for

the Disclosure and Barring Service (previously

CRB). This meant that anyone eligible for a

DBS could register with the service to make

their DBS portable, an improvement on the

previous situation which required a check for

each volunteering role. We spent time explaining

this to our clients and for those who were not

computer-literate, we assisted them with their

registrations.

We continued to support partners like Cornwall

Rural Community Charity and attended several

meetings with local community groups to discuss

their plans and how Volunteer Cornwall could

assist.

In October we held our Volunteer Managers

Forum in Bodmin and were delighted to have

over 40 people attend. Presentations were given

by Steve Roberts from Cornwall Marine Network

on Apprenticeships; Nick Bonell spoke about the

importance of training and our very own Lorna

Jones gave a brief overview of the new Do-it

website. The floor was then open for questions

and answers and a lively debate took place over

the role of DBS checks in safeguarding.

The feedback was very positive and everyone

said they found the event useful - for us it led

to a busy spell afterwards as we followed up

enquiries from the event and offered additional

support to those organisations with particular

volunteer recruitment challenges.

At the end of the operational year, with some

sadness, we closed our doors for the last time

on the old service and switched to the new,

centralised service with one number –

01872 266988 – and one email –

mid@volunteercornwall.org.uk for all enquiries.

Part of the role of Community Maker is to

support the local Timebanks. Timebank

members, as well as exchanging time with

each other, can also work as a group. A great

example of this was in Bodmin where members

got together to help clean up the old ruins

in Bodmin ‘The Priory of St. Marys and St.

Petrocs. It was a gloriously sunny afternoon and

working as a team the Timebankers made a big

difference to this site.

During October, Volunteer Cornwall’s East office

surprised its local learning disability centre,

Morley Tamblyn Lodge, with a basket full of

treats as part of our Random Acts of Kindness

Week. Just a small gesture but with a big impact!

To raise awareness of our health work (see

elsewhere in report) Age UK and Volunteer

Cornwall hosted some events in the East of the

County called ‘Local People Local Conversations’.

The aim being to bring the community together

for networking and information sharing to

explore how groups and individuals can work

together to improve the health and wellbeing of

local people.

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West Cornwall Volunteer Centre

West Cornwall Community Maker

This year we held a Volunteer Managers’ Forum

in Redruth Community Centre which enabled

local organisations to find out what services we

had to offer and a forum to raise any issues they

had. Feedback from the event: “Very informative

and well run”.

We continued supporting young people (16 – 18)

through our 180 programme into placements and

training allowing them to learn and gain skills to

help them make the most of life opportunities.

Similarly, we guided clients on the Work

Programme to find voluntary placements to

enhance their employability. One such client,

after a year of volunteering as a computer

buddy, let us know that he had received a card

from the Host to thank him for “generously

giving his time to helping others understand

computers” This was heartening to hear as not

only was the volunteer making a difference but

the organisation had acknowledged it.

Across the county we ran our Random Acts of

Kindness Week events and in the west we stood

outside the office on a cold, grey day in an

attempt to bring some sunshine into peoples’

lives by giving out gift bags and roses. Although

initially suspicious of our motives, it did make

people smile and even prompted a kiss from one

recipient. Let’s hope they continue to pass on

the kindness.

We continued our support of the Healthy

Redruth initiative and their launch on Murdoch

Day which gave us the opportunity to offer free

health checks to anyone who was eligible. One

grateful person wrote: “Thank you so much I feel

I can tackle my health really well now” On the

day we were asking people to make promises

to themselves to encourage healthy lifestyle

changes such as eating more fruit and veg and

less sweets, puddings and sugar.

The above highlights the ‘other things’ that we

were involved in through the year. However, our

day to day work is more accurately reflected in

the statistics we collect.

In West Cornwall we have been involved

in supporting communities in many ways,

particularly around the ‘Changing Lives’ agenda.

Across Penwith, as part of Living Well / Penwith

Pioneer, we have been involved in many

activities and promotional events with the Local

Conversation Local People group. This included

giving presentations to the two community

panels covering the area, being involved in

training for Age UK staff and volunteers,

participating in community workshops and

having a stand at the Penwith 50+ Forum

Life Skills event, where we had our Tree of

Talents, encouraging people to recognise what

they do and what they have to offer in their

communities.

In Hayle we have been working with a small

team of community activists who, seeing the

current and future cuts in statutory services,

have started looking at how the community

in their area can work together to provide

alternative services. They started by mapping

what is already going on in the community

and who is volunteering and are working to

encourage more people to give time to support

their town. We joined with them at the annual

Hayle in Bloom celebration day and the Hayle

Lion’s fun day to promote ‘Hayle Heroes’, offering

a different way for people to get involved rather

than the traditional model of just volunteering

for a single organisation.

Other events and activities we have been

involved in across West Cornwall include

organising a workshop, in conjunction with

NatWest, on business skills for charities and

community groups (as part of Nat West Employer

Supported Volunteering). We have also been

involved in promoting Healthchecks for the

over 40s, sat on the West Cornwall Local Action

Group and we participated in a roadshow run by

Transition Penwith, promoting volunteering as a

way of bringing about change in communities.

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Mid Cornwall Volunteer Centre

Mid Cornwall Community Maker

Although based in Truro City Centre, throughout

2014/15 we continued to support our local

communities with regular weekly drop in sessions

at the Falmouth and St Austell One Stop Shops,

helping local people, partners and organisations.

We supported events including Meet the Funders

with Cornwall Rural Community Charity, the

launch of Dementia Friendly Truro and Market

Place events with Cornwall Council. In October

we held a Volunteer Managers Forum to support

Mid Cornwall organisations and held meetings

with others to give information on volunteering

practice and procedures, safeguarding advice

and signposting to partners.

As well as helping to recruit volunteers for the

Tall Ships event in Falmouth in August, we

found gardening volunteers for local schools,

environmental projects and Gardens, continued

to support health-related work with volunteers

for opportunities including Memory Cafes,

Befriending and Community Hospitals, visited

Care Homes with advice on volunteering and

attended events such as Health Awareness Day

at St Austell Library.

invitations to Christmas parties!

We attended the Welfare Reform meetings

in Truro, supported local Food Banks with

volunteers and gave talks to groups of single

parents about the benefits of volunteering as

they began looking for work.

There was also continuing support for

young people, through programmes offering

volunteering placements based on their

interests and aspirations which helped improve

confidence, develop self esteem, knowledge

and life skills. These placements made a real

difference and helped give young people

opportunities to progress for the future.

In March of 2015, we moved across town to

Volunteer Cornwall’s main office to run the new

centralised brokerage service.

During the last 12 months we have continued to

have a particular presence in the Newquay area,

with a member of staff regularly attending the

Health Centre and the Library in order to meet

clients and talk to them about the wide range

of volunteering opportunities and community

activities taking place in the area.

This has been linked to our Changing Lives /

Living Well work and one example of this is

our involvement with Newquay Community

Orchard. We have delivered training to staff and

volunteers, helped with volunteer recruitment

and provided advice and guidance where

needed.

We have also continued to support other

organisations in the voluntary/charitable sector

and we have helped promote one off events that

benefit, or involve, the local community such as

the Art Festival (ART8), Newquay Carnival and

Polo on the Beach.

We also supported long- term unemployed

people by brokering volunteering placements to

help improve confidence, learn new skills and

increase the opportunity to find paid work. Some

placements even led to additional training and

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Falmouth Tall Ships Regatta

Children and Family Services

The Falmouth Tall Ships Regatta took place from

28th – 31st August 2014. It was the culmination

of months of planning and preparation by a

whole range of partners including Volunteer

Cornwall as we took on the challenge of

recruiting volunteers for the event.

The weather was kind and more than 70,000

people visited the Tall Ships Regatta site at

Falmouth Docks during the first three days.

Over 100,000 people took to the water on boats

and made the most of vantage points around

the town for the magnificent Parade of Sail on

Sunday.

In total, over 220 volunteers took part, many

working with Volunteer Cornwall, and in addition

a number of companies and organisations

such as the National Maritime Museum, A&P,

Port Pendennis Marina, Falmouth Tall Ships

Association, Cornwall Marine Network, Falmouth

Town Council and Falmouth BID provided

resources, infrastructure, staff time and support

in a plethora of ways. In addition a huge

number of event partners, supporters, volunteers

and individuals continually went above the norm

to help stage the event and make it such a

resounding success.

Meanwhile the Falmouth Tall Ships Regatta

Chairman John Hick said, “We are constantly

hearing about amazing examples of kindness,

generosity and Cornish spirit as well as great

figures of brilliant business that have boosted

this town and this county as a result of the

event. It’s been an incredible amount of work for

every single person who has been involved and

we just cannot say thank you enough.”

Our two volunteer projects for supporting

children continued to grow and develop through

2014/15. Working with Cornwall Council,

Education, Health & Social Care, we recruited

and trained more volunteers who supported

more children and families.

• Cornwall Advocates for Looked After

Children

This scheme provides volunteer advocates who

have been trained in safeguarding, advocacy

and dynamic listening skills to advocate

on behalf of children/young people in care

who need representation at their Care Plan

Reviews.

• Cornwall Mentors for Children At Risk

Families with child protection plans are given

support in taking their children out of child

protection through volunteer mentors who

have been trained in safeguarding, mentoring

and dynamic listening skills. They support

the family and social worker to try to remove

the child from child protection and stop them

being taken into care.

“I have had some really positive results from the

Care Plan Reviews and feel I have been able to

make a difference for the child”

Feedback from a volunteer advocate

Last year we had 44 volunteer advocates and

21 volunteer mentors. Typically an advocate will

form a long-term link with a child, attending

reviews on a 6-monthly basis whilst a mentor will

work with a family for an intensive but relatively

short period of time until a set goal is achieved.

For more information about both schemes, visit

our website or call 01872 266993.

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Community Hospital Volunteers

Corporate Volunteer Officer

Throughout 2014/15 we worked closely with

Peninsula Community Health (PCH) to set up

an exciting Befriending and Spiritual & Pastoral

Volunteer Service across the thirteen Community

Hospitals in Cornwall.

One of our staff, Jenny Wilkins, was appointed

Volunteer Coordinator for this project and

recruited and trained over 50 dedicated

befrienders who spend time talking with and

listening to patients, encouraging them to take

part in activities such as reading; doing puzzles

or just having a friendly conversation.

The role of the Hospital Befriender has helped

to enhance services already provided to patients

by PCH, whilst giving those in the community an

opportunity to be actively involved in their local

hospital.

Due to the nature of the role, all volunteers must

go through a strict recruitment and screening

process as well as attending a mandatory

training programme. The comprehensive

training and induction has been put together

in collaboration with Becky Holden, Training

Manager for PCH, and includes all elements

of Health and Safety, Infection Control,

Safeguarding, Confidentiality, Dementia

Awareness and Communication Skills to ensure

all volunteers can feel confident in carrying out

the role safely and effectively.

The Befrienders have spent time with patients

and their families; providing a friendly listening

ear, signposting to other services such as

volunteer transport and other befriending

services in the community and offering simple

advice and practical support.

Jenny has also provided support to the volunteer

chaplaincy team, giving them the opportunity

to attend regular meetings for peer support and

holding events with the Bishops Chaplain and

other Health Care Ministry teams to share good

practice and information.

Since July 2014 the volunteers have spent more

than 650 hours with over 3000 patients, and

in excess of 200 activities have taken place,

from playing cards to getting patients online, to

sharing a prayer and delivering Holy Communion,

as well as referring some on to our Welcome

Home project.

The service is continuing to develop, with

new roles including Mealtime Assistants, who

help patients to eat and drink, and volunteer

beauticians who will be offering treatments such

as facials, manicures and hand massages.

These volunteers are making a real difference to

a patient’s life, giving comfort, reassurance and

helping improve their emotional and spiritual well

being.

Now in its fourth year, Cornwall Council

Employee Volunteering Scheme offers Council

staff the opportunity to volunteer up to two days

a year of work time in their local communities.

This year, 106 volunteers took part in 29

different placements across Cornwall.

The partnership with Macmillan Cancer Support,

which started in 2013, has continued and over

the last 12 months 45 volunteers completed 17

garden and home makeovers for people affected

by cancer. Volunteers have been digging,

pruning, cutting, mowing and weeding; painting

and staining, trimming and strimming and

generally making a difference to people’s lives.

In Redruth, four volunteers cleared a back

garden of rubbish before cleaning the patio and

painting the walls so that the family’s children

could enjoy the outdoor space. In another on the

Roseland, a woman, who had recently lost her

husband to cancer, had five volunteers help her

get back on top of the garden.

The Macmillan project has also been supported

with resources and time by Cory Environmental

and CORMAC.

Other placements over the last year have

included seven Council volunteers tidying up

the patient’s garden at Falmouth Community

Hospital, nine volunteers from the Affordable

Housing Team taking part in a litter pick at

Perranporth and one volunteer working at the

Re:Source community garden in Bodmin.

A huge 16 volunteers helped maintain fences and

grounds at Maria’s Animal Shelter in Probus, and

in November six volunteers supported Operation

Christmas Child, packing Christmas shoeboxes

for children in Eastern Europe. Six volunteers

spent the day working at the CHICKS Coastal

Retreat near Par, maintaining the grounds and

helping to build outdoor play equipment, and

other partners include Kehelland Trust, Together

for Families and the Cornwall Citizen’s Advice

Bureau.

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Changing Lives

Training

Over the last 12 months, we have continued as

key partners in the pioneering new approach

to health and social care which is based on the

‘Changing Lives’ principles. Working alongside

voluntary and public sector partners, we have

been involved in several pieces of work:

Newquay Pathfinder

We have a staff member based in the Health

Centre on St Thomas Rd, Newquay one day each

week. This allows us to accept referrals directly

from nurses and GPs for people they think would

benefit from some social activity or volunteering

alongside any medical treatment they might be

receiving.

Living Well

Living Well now operates in both East and West

Cornwall and is revolutionising the provision of

health and social care services. The results are

extremely encouraging with hospital admissions

down and well being scores up amongst people

we have supported with this approach. Several

of our staff work as part of the Living Well teams

and we support the recruitment of volunteers

who are so critical to the success of Living Well.

Welcome Home

Welcome Home is a ‘home from hospital’

service designed to support people who need

a little extra help on discharge from hospital.

Welcome Home is about ensuring people recently

discharged from hospital have the help and

support they need to manage.

This goes beyond just getting them back home

and settled but looks at the social networks

around them – have they got friends, family

or neighbours they can rely on for help and

support or do they need volunteers or paid

services to support them? And are they aware

of and in touch with support groups or other

community-based resources (such as Memory

Cafes, Coffee Mornings, Arts & Crafts groups etc)

which provide such a vital service in combatting

loneliness and isolation?

You can find out more about this important

strand of work, or how to become a volunteer,

from our website:

www.volunteercornwall.org.uk/living-well

and

www.volunteercornwall.org.uk/welcome-home

Our training team enjoyed another busy year in

a time of considerable change. We delivered 58

courses of which 76% were accredited and we

trained 425 learners.

Although this represents a fall from 2013/4 many

of our courses are now longer than those we

ran in the past. So although we continued to run

short courses in areas such as Health and Safety

and First Aid, we developed longer programmes

in Customer Service, Event Volunteering,

Education & Training, Information Technology

and Fundraising, in addition to our ongoing

commitment to designing and delivering a range

of Volunteer Management courses.

Amongst the non-accredited courses we ran

this year were Advocacy, Safeguarding and

Mentoring, plus training designed to support

volunteers working as our drivers and on our

own projects such as Welcome Home.

We worked closely with other training

organisations to help develop the skills of the

voluntary and community sector and continued

to offer much of our training at reduced rates

or free thanks to our involvement in ESF-funded

programmes via the Learning Partnership and

Cornwall College.

One of the highlights of 2014 was running a

Level 1 Event Volunteering course for some of

the volunteers who took part in the Tall Ships

event in Falmouth in August. This was an

extremely successful programme and we are

hoping to adapt this course to other events that

take place throughout Cornwall.

One of the changes we introduced this year

involved the way we monitor feedback from

our courses. Our learners told us how our

programmes helped them in terms of providing

useful skills for their roles, giving them additional

qualifications and boosting their self-confidence

and self-esteem. For these reasons, our training

team is proud to continue to help develop people

working or volunteering in the voluntary and

community sector.

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Cornwall Celebrates Volunteering 2014

Guests from around the Duchy gathered

together on 6th November at The Atlantic Hotel,

Newquay, to attend the Cornwall Celebrates

Volunteering Awards.

This annual event, held by Volunteer Cornwall for

the 6th year, highlights the important work done

by thousands of volunteers around the County

each and every day.

Before taking their seats in the ballroom, guests

circulated and enjoyed refreshments whilst our

work colleague, Nick Bonell, who just happens to

be a classically trained pianist, played a selection

of well know pieces on the keyboard.

We were fortunate and privileged to be joined

by The Lord Lieutenant, Colonel Edward

Bolitho OBE and Daphne Skinnard from BBC

Radio Cornwall who are avid supporters of this

event. Together with the sponsor of each of

the twelve categories, Colonel Bolitho presented

the volunteers with awards whilst Daphne, our

compere, gave a summary of each volunteer’s

achievements.

The overall Volunteer of the Year Award for 2014

sponsored by the Atlantic Hotel was won by

Peter Davison, who was also the winner of the

Volunteer Supporting Elders Award. Peter was

presented with a framed award signed by the

Lord Lieutenant and received the star prize of a

nights stay with breakfast in one of the Atlantic

Hotel’s luxury balcony suites.

Following the presentations, photos and

congratulations, guests were served a delicious

two course buffet lunch.

Volunteer Cornwall would like to thank the

volunteers throughout Cornwall who continue to

give their time and effort throughout the year;

the sponsors for their financial backing - without

this the event could not be held; the Lord

Lieutenant and Daphne Skinnard for their time

and support and finally all the nominators who

took the time to put a volunteer forward for an

award.

The three shortlisted volunteers from each

category were invited on stage to collect their

awards. Two of the volunteers received a highly

commended award and the category winner

received a stylish engraved glass bowl.

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Community Transport

Once again, it has been a busy and interesting

year in the Community Transport part of the

Charity. Changes and developments in other

departments have changed some of the roles of

our small team.

This year we said goodbye to a long-standing

member of the organisation due to retirement

and welcome a number of new employees.

Our aim continues to be to reduce isolation

within our picturesque county of Cornwall

through the provision of community transport.

Cornwall, and it’s strong community spirit, is a

beautiful place to live. However many individuals

find themselves isolated from essential services

and social interaction with friends and loved

ones. For those on low incomes, or outside

of the rural bus network, getting around

our County, whether it is to a local hospital

appointment or to take part in a contact visit for

Social Services, can be virtually impossible.

Community transport seeks to fill in these

gaps in provision by connecting individuals,

either directly to their appointments or to

other (commercial) transport services that can

complete their trip. Volunteer Cornwall continues

to work with other like minded groups and

organisations to grow a transport network where

community transport services feed in or out of

the existing routes. This will provide the most

efficient solutions possible in a climate of funding

reductions, bus service changes, rising fuel costs

and environmental pressures.

We have worked closely with the Local

Authority to provide services that support the

most isolated and to provide solutions, either

through the provision of advice or direct service

provision.

Community Car Scheme

Our largest community transport project has

existed since 1978 and continues to develop to

meet the evolving needs of both organisations

and individuals. Changes to recruitment of

volunteers during the financial year have

reduced the time between initial enquiries and

volunteers undertaking their first journey which

means we can help more people, quicker and

more efficiently. However we continue to have

difficulty in finding volunteers in the areas

outside the larger towns of the County. This will

be a focus for the next financial year.

Our Transport Team have continued to work

closely with the Accounts Team to streamline our

services and to meet the expectations of new

and existing clients whilst maintaining the same

level of service across the operation. This interdepartmental

brainstorming has encouraged

team and individual development strengthening

the teams and providing opportunities for

innovative thinking. A great example of our

values at work.

Our volunteers have donated their time through

the year to carry members of the community

across the County in their personal vehicles.

We hope to celebrate their success and

achievements later in 2015 with a special Thank

You event.

Transport Training

Volunteer Cornwall remains committed to

providing training, not only for our own volunteer

drivers, but all volunteers within Cornwall

involved in the transport of others. This training

includes the full suite of MiDAS training courses:

• MiDAS Car and MPV

• 5 Steps to Safety

• MiDAS Minibus Driver Training

• MiDAS Passenger Assistant Training

In addition to this we have written our own

AQA Unit in Safeguarding for Volunteer Drivers

which we have delivered for free through funding

from Awards for All alongside 5 Steps to Safety

Training. The success and continued need for

training means that we will be seeking repeat

funding for this project in the new financial year.

We work closely with Falmouth and Exeter

University Student Union (FXU) to train up young

people as MiDAS minibus drivers so that they

can support their activities and volunteering both

within and outside of the University.

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Community Transport

Commercial Transport Training

As the main deadline for the CPC Periodic

Training for drivers with acquired rights has

passed, we have adapted the way we provide

these courses. We have been able to provide a

suite of internally written courses suitable for

both LGV and PCV drivers to enable them to

work towards their next 35 hours requirement.

Not only has this enabled the department

to continue to generate revenue to support

additional volunteer transport training but has

also provided CPD opportunities for staff involved

with this project.

Although CPC Periodic Training remains

the product with the largest demand, we

have advertised the provision of MiDAS and

Safeguarding to the commercial sector to meet

the minimum requirements set by the Local

Authority in relation to service delivery.

Advice and Support

Throughout this year we have continued to work

with existing organisations, such as Launceston

Community Transport Partnership, as well as

newer ones. Luxulyan Community Transport

has now successfully become a charity and a

company and a Lottery funding application is

being completed after a successful consultation.

In addition to formal support, we have continued

to attend and play an active role at meetings

and events relating to transport both within and

outside the County. This includes the Penwith

Rural Transport Forum and the Chartered

Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT). Our

presentation about community transport within

Cornwall and Devon was well attended by people

within and outside of the sector.

We continue to play an active part in the

Community Transport Association (CTA UK)

and remain a source of information locally to

individuals and organisations about community

transport.

Minibus Driver Scheme

Our Minibus Driver Programme continues to

provide support to organisations who do not

have trained minibus drivers of their own.

We have been fortunate, alongside a number

of other Cornwall based community transport

operators, to have been awarded a community

minibus from the Department for Transport.

We are awaiting further information regarding

the procurement of the vehicle, but expect to

take receipt of it in the new financial year. We

aim for this vehicle to be a community resource

and to provide a flexible answer to changing

requirements for communities with accessibility

issues.

Truro Shopmobility

With the extension of the

equipment compound

successfully completed and

the receipt of additional

equipment we are looking to increase the

awareness of the scheme to potential users.

We are still seeking a ‘solution’ to the next

challenge for the scheme. This is to how to

expand in the future as the current premises will

be unable to support any additional expansion.

The availability of staff time during this year has

meant that we have not been able to hold our

Community Transport Awareness Day. We plan

to hold one next year as staff roles adapt to the

changes across the department.

Accessible Vehicle

The scheme continues to provide opportunities

for individuals to travel. However the biggest

challenge for the scheme is the availability of

volunteers to drive the vehicle. A recruitment

drive is underway to change this so we can

increase service availability to more individuals

that could benefit from it.

Cornwall Community Transport Forum

The Cornwall Community Transport Forum

remains a resource for community transport

schemes within the County.

www.cornwallcommunitytransport.org.uk

Thank you

Last, but by no means least, we wish to thank all of our volunteers across all of our projects -

volunteer drivers, admin assistants, shopmobility volunteers - for their continued support. Without

your support none of these projects would be able to exist, and we would be unable to even consider

expanding our services further. All of the team would like to take this opportunity to thank you all for

the time and effort that you put in every day to help our local communities.

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Bude Cleaner Seas Project

Achievements in the past year:

The Bude Cleaner Seas Project, now in its

third year, is a national pilot project, being

delivered by Volunteer Cornwall on behalf of the

Environment Agency.

The project aims to raise awareness of the

issues which contribute towards poor quality

bathing water by engaging with all sections of

Bude’s community. Historically, bathing water

at Bude has been affected by pollution entering

the river Neet which empties onto Summerleaze

- the town’s main beach. As a result, bathing

water quality at Summerleaze has failed the

Environment Agency’s minimum standards in

recent years.

Throughout the past year the Cleaner Seas

Project has worked closely with partners

including Cornwall Wildlife Trust, Cornwall

Sustainable Tourism (CoaST), Cornwall Council,

Natural England and of course the Environment

Agency and thanks to that partnership work,

bathing waters at Summerleaze exceeded the

Environment Agency’s minimum standards

in 2013 and 2014, and look set to meet the

tougher, revised standards in 2015.

We have also been sharing best practice and

working collaboratively with a range of voluntary

organisations including Widemouth Task Force,

Bude Arts & Music, Friends of Bude Sea Pool,

2 Minute Beach Clean, Rame Peninsular Beach

Care and many others.

• The project secured further funding and was

extended beyond its initial 18 months. It will

now continue until at least June 2015.

• Working with Cornwall Wildlife Trust, we

delivered advice and practical interventions

on 5 farms in the catchment of the river Neet.

This work will directly reduce the potential for

pollution at Bude’s beaches.

• We held 3 successful beach cleans attracting

over 80 volunteers.

• We worked with Budehaven Community

School and the local MP Dan Rogerson to raise

awareness of fats, oils and grease blocking

drains and polluting the environment.

• Over 400 ‘Gunk Pots’ were handed-out to

school children – the pots are designed to hold

household fats and oils to prevent them from

being poured into kitchen sinks.

• The project was regularly promoted in local

print media, on the radio, and featured in one

of Cornwall’s leading magazines.

• We worked with South West Water to ensure

the delivery of sewer and drain improvements

in Bude and promoted the work to the local

community.

• We successfully raised £475 from local

businesses towards the application fee towards

for a ‘Seaside Award’ for Summerleaze Beach.

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25


Viva

Viva is a service delivered by Volunteer

Cornwall. It receives its core funding from

Cornwall Council, Education, Health and Social

Care. The project focuses on people with a

physical, learning or sensory disability, mental

health issues and people with long term illness.

We find welcoming, fun, meaningful volunteering

opportunities and positive activities for people

who may never have volunteered before but

have an incredible amount to give. The aim

is to make volunteering accessible to anyone

who wishes to give their time freely to a host

organisation.

In 2014/15, Viva signed up 393 volunteers

of whom 75.4% were active in either viva,

Friendship Clubs or Special Olympics. We

also recruited and trained 16 people to act as

mentors, supporting clients into placements and

helping deal with any issues that arise.

Details of events activities and information can

be found at www.vivacornwall.org.uk

A Positive Journey

“A Positive Journey” (APJ) aims, through

European cooperation, to address the stigma

that disadvantaged groups face in their life’s

journey – it demonstrates that there is life

beyond disadvantage. The partners are from

the UK, Greece, Lithuania and Italy exchange

best practice and are create a media and

communication learning toolkit to help tackle this

stigma. www.apositivejourney.com

Friendship Clubs

A range of ‘Friendship Clubs’ have been

developed to support people with a learning

disability. There are 49 people currently signed

up as members. The aim is to provide people

with positive and fun activities that encourage

them to meet and form friendships using a

theme or an activity as the common factor, the

bond between people. They range from cookery

to mosaic and art clubs; to sport via the Special

Olympics.

Special Olympics Cornwall

Volunteer Cornwall is an active partner in

Special Olympics Cornwall (SOC). SOC started

in December 2013 and now has a membership

of 123 people with a learning disability. The

partnership, involving Tempus Leisure and

Cornwall Sports Partnership, was awarded

£166,000 from Sport England to fund the LD

Active Kernow program to get people with a

learning disability involved in sport and other

physical activity. We held regular meetings

in Truro, Helston, Penzance and Newquay,

delivering a number of sports, both at team

and individual level. We competed in two

competitions during the year, taking a small

team of swimmers to a gala at the Life Centre

in Plymouth and won a number of medals.

The second competition was in Truro between

Plymouth and District SOC and Special Olympics

Cornwall; 64 athletes took part.

More information can be found at

www.specialolympicscornwall.org

F3 – Food Fun & Friends – The Perfect

Recipe

F3 operates from Café Chaos in Truro every

other Thursday. It is run by volunteers and is

overseen by the Chef, Sanjay Kumar. Food is

at the heart of all our social activity; people

learn how to cook and in the process make new

friends. The club visits various social locations

such as the cinema, theatre, pubs and clubs.

The Mosaic Club

The mosaic club started as a result of a piece of

research being undertaken by Arts for Health,

examining the provision of and access to art for

people with a learning disability. The mosaic club

ran in the Elms in Redruth and the Dracaena

Centre Falmouth during March to August 2014.

The club was co-led by an arts facilitator and

a mosaics facilitator, who was also a Viva

volunteer. The members of the club successfully

exhibited their mosaic creations at Falmouth

Pavilions in July 2014.

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Sustainability

What Else Have We Been Up To?

Operating in a sustainable manner is very

important to us at Volunteer Cornwall. We try to

set an example and ensure that we minimise any

negative impact we might have on people and

planet as a result of our work whilst adopting

policies that we hope make us a great place to

work or volunteer:

• We practice Reduce, Re-use, Recycle – we

have on-site recycling and composting and use

recycled products such as paper and towels

wherever we can.

• We use smart technology such as photocopiers

which use less energy and resources and we

switch off electrical appliances when not in

use.

• We have photo-voltaic panels on the roof of

Acorn House to generate electricity whilst

double glazing and insulation make this an

energy efficient office.

• We have offset 100% of the emissions from

our Acorn House site by purchasing ‘green

energy’

• We use Fair Trade products (tea, coffee, sugar)

and purchase from local suppliers wherever we

can

• We use voluntary sector venues such as village

halls and community centres for our meetings

and events whenever we can as a way of

supporting the sector

• Our staff are encouraged to participate in staff

volunteering days as part of their personal and

team development

• We achieved a Healthy Workplace ‘Silver’

Award thanks to the efforts of our staff team

• We encourage car sharing and have an electric

bike available for staff to use for journeys in

and around Truro

• All of our staff are paid at least the living

wage, going above and beyond the legal

minimum wage

• The highest paid person is paid around three

times the lowest paid person – in the private

& public sector, the difference can be between

10 and 100 times!

• We have developed a set of values to underpin

all of our work and we are now working with

staff to embed them in our recruitment and

appraisal systems to ensure we ‘live’ our

values.

Community Resilience

Volunteer Cornwall continues to work closely

with emergency services and statutory partners

to plan, prepare and respond in times of

problems such as severe weather. We have a

seat on the Cornwall Risk & Resilience Group to

provide a voluntary sector perspective and assist

in co-ordinating voluntary action. We have also

recently facilitated a new Cornwall Voluntary

& Community Sector Resilience Group to bring

together organisations from across our sector

who have a role to play in times of crisis. We

continue to operate our Winter Friends scheme

and although they may seldom be called upon, it

is always reassuring to know they are available

to help if the need arises. You can find out about

becoming a Winter Friend on our website:

www.volunteercornwall.org.uk/winter-friends/

Random Acts of Kindness

As in previous years, we organised a Random

Acts of Kindness Week for Cornwall in

partnership with Nat West, Cormac and Cornwall

Fire & Rescue Service. Giving out flowers and

chocolates to passers by in Truro, Liskeard &

Redruth, we helped put a smile on the faces of

strangers and encouraged them to share the

kindness.

Find out more at www.facebook.com/raok.cwl

Time Banks

Cornwall currently has seven Time Banks in

Liskeard, Bodmin, St Austell, Newquay, Truro,

Pool and Hayle which are free to join and open

to anyone in those towns. Resource requirements

have prevented us from developing the Time

Banks in the way we would have liked this year

but we have great plans for 2015/16. Go to

www.volunteercornwall.org.uk/which-project/

time-bank

for more information.

Deed A Day

We all see or hear things in the press and think

“I wish I could do something about that”. Deed

A Day is our attempt to make voluntary action

easier by presenting an action you can take each

day on a topical or relevant issue. From signing

petitions to getting your hands dirty with beach

cleans and guerrilla gardening, we offer a oneclick

way to get started, whatever your passion.

Find out more from

www.volunteercornwall.org.uk/deed-a-day

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29


Incoming Resources

Statement of Financial Activities (Incorporating Income and Expenditure Account)

For the year ended 31 March 2015

Incoming Resources from generated funds

Voluntary income

Activities for generating funds

Investment Income

Incoming resources from charitable activities:

Volunteer Centres

Employment Projects

Young Volunteers

Adult Volunteering Development

Community Transport Scheme

Shopmobility

Big Lottery Fund Grants

Real Choices

Time Bank Projects

Changing Lives

Environment Volunteer Projects

Unrestricted Funds £ Restricted Funds £ 2015 Total Funds £ 2014 Total Funds £

15.060

124.068

3

229,546

10,556

6,300

0

1,187,804

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

230,254

84,502

0

50,825

38,032

17,147

0

31,299

0

0

30,000

15,060

124.068

3

459,800

95,058

6,300

50,825

1,225,836

17,147

0

31,299

0

0

30,000

16.263

185.338

63

270,260

46,822

41,930

76,888

1,096,423

20,071

88,025

19,894

27,559

7,387

50,380

Fixed Assets

Tangible fixed assets

Investments

Current Assets

Debtors

Cash at bank,deposit and in hand

Balance Sheet

As at 31 March 2015

2015 Total Funds 2014 Prior Year Funds

£ £ £ £

149,849

608,857

546,109

500

556,488

501

546,609 556,989

251,332

282,705

Total Incoming resources 1,573,337 482,059 2,055,396 1,947,303

Total Current Assets 758,706 534,037

Resources Expended

Costs of generating funds 165,358 0 165,358 188,433

Liabilities

Charitable Activities:

Volunteer Centres

Employment Projects

Young Volunteers

Adult Volunteering Development

Community Transport Scheme

Shopmobility

Big Lottery Fund Grants

Real Choices

Time Bank Projects

Changing Lives

Environment Volunteer Projects

228,290

10,556

6,300

0

979,309

9,445

35

0

0

0

0

126,550

84,335

0

63,144

38,632

17,147

11,879

31,909

0

7,256

48,460

354,840

94,891

6,300

63,144

1,017,941

26,592

11,914

31,909

0

7,256

48,460

320,658

45,448

37,102

56,163

1,066,052

26,004

85,323

23,206

50,756

1,814

52,354

Creditors:

Amounts falling due within one year (163,618) (160,537)

Net Current Assets 595,088 373,500

Total Assets less current liabilities 1,141,697 930,489

Governance costs 15,583 0 15,583 15,230

Total resources expended 1,414,876 429,312 1,844,188 1,968,543

Funds

Net income/(expenditure) and net movement of funds 158,461 52,747 211,208 (21,240)

Reconciliation of funds

Total funds brought forward 820,399 110,090 930,489 951,729

Restricted Income Funds

Designated Income Funds

Unrestricted Income Funds

162,837

616,476

362,384

110,090

628,021

192,378

Total funds carried forward 978,860 162,837 1,141,697 930,489

Total Charity Funds 1,141,697 930,489

The charity has no recognised gains or losses in the years to 31 March 2015 and 2014 other than those passing through the

statement of financial activities. There were no acquisitions or discontinued operations during the years to 31 March 2015 and 2014.

Company Number 03562830

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Directors’ Statement

The Directors’ certify that:

• these are not the statutory accounts but a

summary of information relating to both the

Statement of Financial Activities and the

Balance Sheet;

• the full accounts from which the summarised

financial statements are derived have been

externally scrutinised by audit;

• the audit report contained no concerns;

• the full Directors’ Report and Financial

Statements can be obtained from Volunteer

Cornwall, Acorn House, Heron Way, Newham,

Truro, Cornwall TR1 2XN or from our website

www.volunteercornwall.org.uk;

• the Directors’ Report and Financial Statements

were approved on 1 July 2015;

• the Directors’ Report and Financial Statements

have been submitted to the Charity

Commission and Companies House.

By order of the Directors

Statement from Auditors

The auditors certify that, in their opinion, the

summarised financial statements are consistent

with the full statutory Director’s Report and

Financial Statements as submitted to Companies

House and the Charity Commission.

Thomas Roach FCA Senior Statutory Auditor

for and on the behalf of

Francis Clark LLP

Chartered Accountants

Statutory Auditors

Lowin House

Tregolls Road

Truro

Cornwall

Get in touch with us in one of the following ways...

For Transport Queries

Tel: 01872 265300

Email: bookings@volunteercornwall.org.uk

Our Head Office Address is:

Volunteer Cornwall

Acorn House

Heron Way

Truro

TR1 2XN

Tel: 01872 265305

Email: enquiries@volunteercornwall.org.uk

Contact Us

For Volunteering Enquiries

Tel: 01872 266988

Email: mid@volunteercornwall.org.uk

Scott Bennett

Chair

Volunteer Cornwall

Acorn House

Heron Way

Newham

Truro

Cornwall

TR1 2XN

Visit Our Website

www.volunteercornwall.org.uk

Find us on Facebook

www.facebook.com/volunteercornwall

Watch us on YouTube

www.youtube.com/volunteercornwall

Follow us on Twitter

www.twitter.com/volcornwall

Be sure to sign up for our free bi-monthly e-newsletter on the website!

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Thank You!

Volunteer Cornwall wishes to both acknowledge and thank the following organisations and groups for

their continuing support for our work to engage local people in voluntary action in the Duchy:

Age UK (Cornwall & Isles of Scilly)

BBC Radio Cornwall

Big Lottery Fund

Cornwall College

Cornwall Council

Cornwall Development Company

Cornwall Partnership Foundation Trust

Cornwall Rural Community Charity

Cornwall Sports Partnership

Devon & Cornwall Constabulary

Diocese of Truro

Duchy Health Charity

European Social Fund

Fifteen Cornwall

Health Promotion Service

Inclusion Cornwall

Learning Partnership

Lord Lieutenant of Cornwall

Macmillian

NHS Kernow

Peninsula Community Health

Pentreath Ltd

Truro Business Improvement District

Truro City Council

Truro and Penwith College

University of Exeter

Voluntary Sector Forum

Working Links

Young People Cornwall

Inside Cover

Finally, thanks to all our volunteers for their dedication and commitment to serving the community of

Cornwall. Without our volunteers Volunteer Cornwall could not exist.

Our Values

At Volunteer Cornwall, we are integrating our values into everything we do.

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To be bold and passionate.

To work reciprocally, with collective purpose, promoting neighbourliness.

We relate these to our daily work by being enabling, creating opportunity,

innovating, providing proactive leadership and being inclusive.

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