Insights

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Digital

Salary &

Industry

Insights

6th Edition

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propelllondon.com

0207 432 6340

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@propellondon.com


2 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Contents

Preface 4

Methodology 5

Demographics 6

Industry Overview 7

Job satisfaction 8

Willingness to move roles 10

Factors that drive job change 11

How professionals find a role 12

Bonus 14

C-Level Insights 15

Contractual Staff & Freelancers 16

Remuneration Perceptions 17

Salary overview 18

Gender pay gap 18

Marketing 19

Highlights & Key demographics 20

Factors that drive job change 21

Job satisfaction 22

Salaries 23

Contract Rates 24

Advertising-Operations/Trafficking 25

Affiliates 25

Content Management 26

eCommerce 26

eCRM 27

Online Marketing/Digital Generalist 27

Paid Search 28

Paid Social 28

Planning 29

Product management 29

Project management 30

RTB 30

SEO 31

Social Media 31

Operations 32

Commercial 33

Highlights & Key demographics 34

Factors that drive job change 35

Job satisfaction 36

Salaries 37

Contract Rates 38

Business Development 39

Pre-Sales 39

Publisher Development 40

Advertising Sales 40

Technology Sales 41

Sales Management 41

Technical Account Management 42

Technical 43

Highlights & Key demographics 44

Factors that drive job change 45

Job satisfaction 46

Salaries 47

ontract Rates

48

.NET

49

Back End

49

Business Analyst

50

Data Science

50

Database

51

Front End

51

IT Support

52

Java

52

Testing

53

Project Management 53

Creative Services 55

Highlights & Key demographics 56

Factors that drive job changes 57

Job satisfaction 58

Salaries 59

Contract Rates 60

UX 60

Design 61

Artwork 61

Creative 62

Technologist 62


Digital Salary Industry Insights 3

Welcome

“ This year our research delves even

deeper into the working lives of

the professionals who drive the

global digital economy.”

The sixth edition of our ‘Salary & Industry Insights’ report builds on the success of

last year’s and continues to be an invaluable tool for employers and job seekers alike.

This year our research delves even deeper into the working lives of the professionals

who drive the global digital economy.

Similar to last year’s edition, our research combines the results from an online

survey (with over 1,800 respondents) with data taken from our own internal records

and relationships with employers. This method of data collection allows us to

present a broad insight not only into people’s salaries, but also their opinions on

their current jobs.

How does your salary compare to your peers? How satisfied are digital

professionals and what factors drive job change?

Thanks to our extensive insight we are now able to answer these questions

and more.

So whether you’re looking to hire, get hired or are just interested in the results, our

report is a fantastic resource for the people who make up the global digital economy.

Melina Jacovou

CEO & Founder

Propel


4 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Preface

Propel’s sixth annual ‘Digital Salary & Industry Insights’ combines our own internal salary

data with over 1,800 respondents to a survey we conducted in February and March of 2015.

The survey builds on the successful introduction of this element in our 2014 research, and

provides insight into levels of satisfaction and role perceptions within the global digital

economy.

The report is split into five main sections. First, an industry overview section breaks

down the overall results from our findings across our entire sample, showing differences

across seniority, length of tenure, gender and sector.

The remaining four sections analyse our sample based on their wider role

classification. We split out our respondents into four main groups: Marketing, Commercial,

Technical and Creative roles. We also included a wider 'Operations' group.

Within these role groups, data is broken down further by seniority. The classification of

these seniorities varies dependent on the particular occupation being analysed, but for the

vast majority of roles, the following definitions are appropriate:

• Junior: 0 - 3 years experience, non management role

• Mid-level: 3 - 7 years experience, mid management level

• Senior: 8+ years experience, senior management level

• C-level: Country Manager, Director or Board level status

The following pages provide a brief overview of the methodology adopted to compile the

report, and a summary of the demographic splits for the entire sample in terms of gender, type

of business, age and skill set.

This document has been produced by Propel in partnership with The Drum.

Any queries regarding the contents of this report, as well as any media queries, can be directed

to our marketing department on 0207 432 6340 or by emailing us at survey@propellondon.com.


Digital Salary Industry Insights 5

Methodology

Our research data is drawn from two primary sources; an online survey carried out in early

2015, and internal salary records drawn from our own database.

Online survey

We gathered the data through a pre-tested and then revised questionnaire throughout

February and March of 2015. The responses were collected online and hosted on

SurveyMonkey, then analysed in Microsoft Office Excel and IBM SPSS.

We received 1,849 responses to the survey. 213 of these responses were invalidated due to being

either incomplete, irrelevant or due to respondent error.

The final survey data set therefore consists of 1,636 respondents working across the digital

economy.

The questionnaire structure took into consideration a number of factors regarding

respondents behaviour, namely:

• Direct influences - demographic variables (age, gender, seniority, job title and salary)

• Behavioural variables - career level, years in industry, skill

• Deduced influences - job satisfaction, attitudes, lifestyle, career patterns

Internal data

We took a total of 1,650 records from our own administrative database, which allowed us to

supplement the salary data provided by survey respondents with robust data drawn from

placed candidates.

Final data total

In total we have 3,286 individual data records to form the basis of our analysis.


6 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Demographics

Demographics are widely consistent to the sample observed in our 2014 salary survey. Positively,

women now account for slightly more of the sample at 40%, compared to 36% in 2014.

In terms of geography, 78% of respondents are based in the Greater London area.

55-64, 1%

18-24, 7%

Women 40%

Men 60%

35-54, 36%

25-34, 56%

Demographics overview: Gender

Demographics overview: Age

Senior 39%

C-level 9%

Junior 13%

Technology

Vendor 18%

In an

agency 39%

Mid-level 39%

In-house/

clientside 43%

Demographics overview: Seniority

Demographics overview: Type of business

Technical 21%

Commercial 19%

2-5 years

25%

5 years + 7%

Less than

1 year 40%

Creative

16%

Marketing &

Advertising 44%

Demographics overview: Skill Set

1-2 years

28%

Demographics overview: Time in role

Approximately 15% are from the remaining regions of the UK and the remaining 7% are

from overseas (predominantly the USA and Europe at 55% and 33% respectively).


Section 1:

Industry

Overview

Before delving deeper into the four main

sections, we break down the main trends in

the industry overview section.

This section acts to provide perspective to

the rest of the report and provide a general

summary of employee perceptions across

the sector.


8 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Job satisfaction

One of the primary factors explored in the survey is job satisfaction, and the factors which act

to influence this across individuals.

The results show that 63% of respondents are either satisfied or very satisfied in their roles,

a slight decrease compared to 2014 (64%). C-level and junior respondents show the highest

level of job satisfaction (approx. 25% of employees across both groups state that they are

‘very’ satisfied). As with 2014, there are no significant differences when satisfaction is split

by gender.

Similar to our 2014 salary survey, length of tenure continues to hold a strong link to

satisfaction. Those with 2-5 years of service continue to be the most dissatisfied group (27% of

this group are dissatisfied, and only 8% are very satisfied). Those working at an organisation

for under a year continue to be the most satisfied, with 67% of this group showing some level

of positive satisfaction (28% are “very satisfied”).

In terms of the factors most likely to influence satisfaction, a number of crucial components

were highlighted by our respondents. The most important was deemed to be working

environment and culture, followed closely by financial remuneration, feedback and

recognition, and work life balance.

In the 2014 report, we highlighted the importance of linking company success to an individual’s

own sense of professional success. There still appear to be challenges with engaging junior

members of staff with overall company success. Only 20% of juniors believe company success

is important to their own professional success, in comparison with 52% of C-level individuals.

In contrast, more than 67% junior level professionals determine financial success as the

most important factor in their own achievements.

Recommendations

• Engaging with staff at the 2-5 year period remains crucial for employers, as these

individuals continue to display the lowest levels of satisfaction across the sample.

• Junior members of staff remain distanced from company success as an influence to their

own perceptions of achievement. More remains to be done to convince staff outside the

boardroom that wider company success is important.

• Developing a productive and welcoming organisational culture and working environment

is particularly crucial to employees. More focus should be given to fostering an effective

culture, and towards recruiting employees that display a good cultural fit.

Industry Overview


Digital Salary Industry Insights 9

63% of respondents are SATISFIED in their roles

MOST SATISFIED LEAST

25%

C-level

VERY

SATISFIED

27% dissatisfied / 2-5 years in role

23% dissatisfied / 1-2 years in role

17% dissatisfied /


10 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Willingness to move roles

Despite the upturn in the economy, the results show that willingness to move roles has

actually decreased from 2014, with only 52% of individuals looking to change roles compared

to 59% last year.

Intentions continue to be slightly higher amongst men (53% to 50% of women). There is also a

downward trend based on seniority, with juniors the most likely to move at 54%, followed by

mid-level (53%), senior (52%) and C-level at 49%.

All types of organisation covered in the survey display similar leaving intentions, with

agency and client side respondents hovering around the 52% average, and tech vendors

just below at 51%.

As observed in the 2014 report, bonus receipt continues to influence leaving intentions. Only

50% of those receiving a bonus are seeking to leave, in comparison to 57% of those who do not

receive this type of incentive.

One interesting insight was that perceptions of remuneration are a crucial influence on

leaving intentions. To illustrate this, 60% of those believing they are fairly paid intend to stay

in their role this year. Furthermore, out of those believing they are overpaid, 71% have no

intention of changing roles. In sharp contrast to this, only 28% of those believing they are

underpaid are not seeking to change roles this year.

Another important financial aspect refers to previous compensation vs. current

compensation. 60% of the individuals who accepted a pay cut when taking on their current

role are planning to move on, in comparison to only 47% of those earning more.

Time in post also remains as a persistent predictor of leaving intentions. Only 37% of those in

post for a year are intending to leave, in comparison with 68% of those who have held a role for

between 2-5 years.

Recommendations

• As observed in the job satisfaction section, it remains crucial to build initiatives designed

to engage those in post for 2-5 years, as they remain the most likely to move on.

• Bonus receipt continues to have an effect on leaving intentions, but perceptions of

remuneration appear even more important.

• Recruitment and salary reviews need to take remuneration perceptions into account.

Employees should be confident that they are fairly compensated for their roles.

Similarly, a candidate’s previous salary should be considered in the recruitment stage, as

if the suggested salary for the role doesn’t compare favourably with their previous

wage, they are more likely to move on.

Industry Overview


Digital Salary Industry Insights 11

Factors that drive job change

Respondents were asked two questions relative to job change, with the first focused on

reasons for leaving their previous roles. The main reasons for moving on are consistent

with those observed in our 2014 research.

The most commonly provided reason overall was lack of career development opportunities,

with 21% of respondents stating this as their main reason. This is closely followed by the need

for a new challenge (17%), with salary the third most stated reason at 14%.

Salary decreases in importance as seniority increases. With senior individuals focusing on

career development and new challenges (both 18%) and salary dropping to 12% in this group.

This is even more pronounced among C-level individuals, with salary only accounting for 5%

of leaving decisions, with new challenges and career development at 25% and 21% respectively.

As seniority increases, redundancy also becomes more salient as a factor, accounting for approximately

7% in the junior and mid-level brackets, but rising to 12% in the senior and C-level.

Respondents were also asked, if they opted to move roles now, what their most likely reasons

for doing so would be (rated from 1-6). Interestingly, the reason which was rated the most likely

(across all seniority brackets) was financial remuneration (rated at 4.5 on average), followed by

career progression (4.1 average).

40%

30%

new challenge % lack of development opportunities % uncompetitive salary %

20%

10%

20%

17%

13%

15%

24%

17%

18% 18%

12%

25%

21%

5%

Junior Mid-level Senior C-level

Graphic: Most significant factors driving job change (Overall)

Recommendations

• Financial remuneration remains critical to retaining and engaging employees.

• Career progression should be carefully considered along with job enrichment initiatives

to ensure that individuals aren’t moving on due to a lack of development opportunities.

Industry Overview


12 Digital Salary Industry Insights

How professionals find a role

The most popular methods overall for searching for roles are LinkedIn (51%), recruitment

consultancies (47%) and online job boards/personal networks (both at 44%). Headhunting firms

and direct applications are also seen as viable methods, at 39% and 37% respectively.

Social media is increasing in relevance but is still low overall, at 16%. The continued decline of

print is also evident, with only 5% of respondents considering this an appropriate option.

The most stable source across all levels appears to be LinkedIn, which hovers at approximately

45% across all levels.

If we split the results by seniority, we find a pronounced preference among the more senior

levels for personalised methods of search. C-level and senior individuals are much more

likely to use headhunting firms (58% and 44% respectively), compared to only 23% of juniors.

Personal networks also hover around 50% for the more senior levels, and drop to 35% for

juniors.

Conversely, juniors show the highest use of social media (24%) which drops to only 10%

for C-level individuals.

In terms of sector based preferences, creative individuals are the most likely to consider social

media (23%) and least likely to use headhunters. (33%) This is mirrored on the commercial

side, with these individuals the least likely to use social (12%) and the most likely to use

headhunters (48%).

60% Junior

58%

Mid-level

54% 52%

Senior

50%

C-level

46% 46%

45% 45%

44% 44%

40%

30%

20%

24%

18%

23%

34%

26%

39% 38%

35%

32%

35%

40%

50% 50%

42%

51%

48%

36%

10%

13%

10%

LinkedIn

Social Media

(Twitter,

Facebook)

Headhunter

Online

advertisement

/job boards

Direct

application

Personal

network

Recruitment

consultancy

Graphic: Methods of finding a role by seniority (Overall)

Industry Overview


Digital Salary Industry Insights 13

In terms of how individuals found their current roles, the most common method overall is

through a recruitment consultancy, with this accounting for 26% of roles. When combined

with headhunting firms at 16%, recruitment services firms account for 42% of all roles.

40%

30%

20%

10%

30%

22%

15%

13%

6% 5%

28%

20%

16%

14%

9%

6%

Recruitment consultancy

Personal network

Headhunter

Online advertisement

Applied directly

LinkedIn

23%

20%

19%

15%

6% 7% 22% 24% 20%

10%

7% 8%

Creative

Marketing &

Advertising

Technical

Commercial

Graphic: How roles were found by sector (Overall)

Personal network is the second largest individual factor, accounting for 21% of roles across the

entire sample. Less than 1% of all roles were found through a print advertisement.

There are clear differences across seniority which mirror the search preferences found in the

previous page, with recruitment consultancies the primary source in the junior groups,

shifting to headhunting firms as seniority increases.

Across sectors, role sources are widely similar. There are some specific differences however,

particularly between the creative and commercial sectors - with creatives showing a marked

preference for recruitment firms (30% to 22% commercial) and commercial individuals more

likely to have found their role through a headhunting firm (20% to 13% creative).

Recommendations

• LinkedIn continues to be a stable preferred search option for individuals, so a

strong presence on here is essential.

• Building relationships with headhunters and recruitment firms is crucial, as these are

still the most likely route for an individual into a role, outside of their own personal

network.

Industry Overview


14 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Bonus

Bonus receipt has increased relative to the 2014 report, in which 50% of the sample received

some type of bonus. 55% of the 2015 respondents to our survey are receiving some form of

bonus.

80%

70%

no

yes

71%

60%

50%

40%

58%

42%

47%

53%

43%

57%

30%

20%

29%

10%

Junior Mid-level Senior C-level

Graphic: Receipt of bonus by seniority (Overall)

Slightly more men (56%) than women (51%) receive a bonus, and bonus receipt also rises

dramatically based on age, with 89% of the over 55 group receiving a bonus, in comparison to

48% of 18-24 year olds.

As would be expected, those in senior roles are also more likely to receive a bonus, with 70%

of C-level individuals receiving a bonus in comparison to 40% of juniors. Although this still

represents an increase for juniors relative to the 2014 survey.

Bonus receipt is most common in tech vendor organisations, with 72% of these individuals in

receipt of a bonus, in comparison to only 44% of agency staff.

In terms of actual bonus size, they are most likely to be within 0-10% of an individual’s

salary, with 52% of all respondents receiving a bonus of this size.

As previously mentioned, an individual’s perception of their remuneration is crucial to their

decision to stay in post or not. Bonus receipt does not appear to affect this by more than a

few percentage points however, with 65% of individuals receiving a bonus believing they are

fairly paid, in comparison to 61% of those who do not. This suggests that the relatively small

average bonus of 10% or less is not enough to change remuneration perceptions in a

meaningful way.

Industry Overview


Digital Salary Industry Insights 15

C-Level Insights

As part of our survey, we collected specific data on C-level executives and their experiences

of employment.

Of our C-level sample, 40% hold global responsibility, with 32% responsible for UK operations

only and an additional 21% accountable for European performance.

85% of C-level individuals are working more than the standard forty hours per week,

with approximately 40% of the C-level group working for over 50 hours per week.

C-Level individuals appear invested in their roles, with more than 47% of executives seeking

to remain in their position for two years or more, with the most common notice period for

changing roles sitting at 3 months (approx. 58%).

Bonus receipt appears to have a more pronounced effect on C-level leaving intentions than

with other groups in the report, 57% of those not receiving a bonus intend to leave in 2015,

compared to 47% of those in receipt of one. The most common size of bonus is 0-10% of salary

as with the overall sample, with a third of executives receiving this percentage.

Trends present in other sections of our analysis also apply to our executive sample. For

example, remuneration perception continues to be critical, with 66% of executives that

perceive themselves as being underpaid intending to change roles this year, compared to 43%

of fairly paid directors. The 2-5 year tenure and its effects on satisfaction also persist at

C-level, with just under a quarter of these individuals dissatisfied with their current role, and

a staggering 73% of directors in post for this time seeking to change roles.

Interestingly, only 33% of C-level individuals have received some form of executive coaching.

The most common commute time is around 30 minutes to an hour, with 45% of individuals in

this bracket – which is consistent with the UK average commute of 56 minutes.


16 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Contractual Staff & Freelancers

We were also interested in the unique experiences of freelance and contract staff with regards

to their working habits and preferences.

Of the contract staff we surveyed, length of contract was fairly evenly split between the

brackets we specified, with approximately 30% of staff in each bracket (less than three, three

to six and over six months). Our sample of freelancers also appear to secure new contracts

reasonably quickly, with over a third stating their average time period between contracts as

less than 1 week. Overall, 90% of the group are able to secure a new contract within a

month or less.

over 3 months, 4%

3 months, 3%

2 months, 3%

less than 1 wk, 36%

1 month, 15%

3-4 wks, 13%

1-2 wks, 26%

Graphic: Average time between contracts

The most common legal framework by far is the limited company, with 77% of the sample

opting to trade under this arrangement.

The majority of freelancers sampled are only willing to travel for up to two hours or less

per project, with only 10% of the sample happy to travel more for a role. When working on

a project, approximately 60% are willing to stay away from home for a significant period of

time

Recruitment agencies are the preferred job search method by a significant margin with 64%

of our contract staff gaining their next role this way.

Interestingly, despite freelancer satisfaction being higher than the survey average at 70%,

over 52% of freelancers surveyed would consider a permanent role as a future career move.

Industry Overview


Digital Salary Industry Insights 17

Remuneration Perceptions

One of the most commonly observed trends throughout our sample was that remuneration

perception appeared to have a strong influence on leaving intentions, with individuals who

believe they are underpaid consistently more likely to be seeking a new role.

Remuneration perception and satisfaction also appear to be related, with 74% of respondents

that are very dissatisfied across the sample stating that they are underpaid. In sharp contrast,

84% of individuals who are very satisfied, state that they are fairly paid. Whenever we increase

a level in terms of satisfaction, we also see higher levels of positive remuneration perception.

As financial success also persists as one the most important factors in determining individual

views of professional success among the sample, it is crucial that organisations are communicating

reward systems effectively to ensure that employees have an open understanding of

how their remuneration has been determined, and why this is appropriate in relation to other

members of the organisation.

Traditionally, it has been argued that individuals base their own pay perceptions on equity

models in relation to their co-workers, and perceive these levels of pay in the wider context of

organisational justice.

Perceptions of organisational justice have been studied extensively by academics and HR

professionals, and have been determined to influence a wide range of behaviours, including

satisfaction and leaving intentions. Views of organisational justice have also been shown to

impact behaviours within the workplace, linking to withdrawal behaviours such as absenteeism

and lateness, and a number of behaviours linked to job performance.

Therefore, although complete organisational transparency may not always be appropriate or

possible in terms of pay communication, there should be a level of focus applied within

organisations to ensure that employees believe their pay is fair and equitable.

Where this is not the case, creating communication programs that outline the reasoning behind

remuneration models to ensure that employees are aware of the mechanics behind

them is important. Employers should also react appropriately to any injustices highlighted in

existing reward systems, to ensure that these do not impact on retention levels or employee

performance.

Industry Overview


18 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Salary overview

Before examining the four main sectors, it is important to illustrate the overall industry

salary averages observed in the report. Contrasting with the 2014 salary survey, those based

in agencies appear to be earning more than their colleagues on the client-side across most

seniority levels.

Overall Agency Client-side Tech Vendors

Junior £26,046/£188 £28,454 £26,271 £35,142

Mid-level £40,312/£287 £39,263 £38,898 £48,099

Senior £63,623/£378 £60,558 £59,017 £69,294

C-level £108,618 £100,913 £104,737 £108,858

As observed last year - these figures are encouraging overall for the industry at large. With

the UK average salary currently placed at £27,200 per year, juniors across the industry are well

placed to earn close to or even surpass the average wage early in their careers.

Gender pay gap

The gender pay gap observed in the 2015 salary survey is significantly different to that

observed in our 2014 report.

Whereas last year, the gap was only observed to be 4%, a comparison between the survey

respondents shows that the average wage for women is only 80% of men (£45,744 to £57,012).

This can be observed across all levels of seniority, with the gender gap widening as seniority

increases. Women in junior positions earn 93% in comparison to men, but this widens to 90%

for those in senior roles.

Women are also poorly represented in the higher seniority brackets, accounting for only 35%

of senior posts and 22% of C-level positions, which will also act to distort the figures in terms

of the average wage across the sample.

Industry Overview


Section 2:

Marketing

The Marketing section summarises the

salaries of those working across a range of

digital marketing services.

These individuals represent the voice of

organisations across the UK, and

increasingly specialise in narrow digital

disciplines, illustrating the increasing

complexity of modern marketing.


20 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Marketing highlights

Our survey highlighted a range of interesting themes across the marketing sector. Some of

the key points are summarised below:

• 64% of marketers earning less than they achieved in their previous role are seeking a new

position.

• 62% of marketers aged between 18-24 intend to stay in their post in 2015.

• Almost 70% of affiliate marketers are looking to change roles in 2015, in comparison with only

17% of those in paid social.

• Just under a third (28%) of marketers secured their role through a recruitment consultancy,

which was the most prominent source for securing a role.

• 58% of men working in marketing receive a bonus, in comparison with just 49% of women.

Key demographics

Marketing differs from the overall survey demographics in a number of ways. The marketing

sample is more balanced in terms of gender, with 48% of the sample being females relative to

40% overall.

Marketing also features more individuals in the 25-34 bracket, at 64% compared to 56%.

55-64, 1% 18-24, 7%

Women 48%

35-54, 28%

Men 52%

25-34, 64%

Mid-level 45%

C-level 8%

Junior 15%

Senior 32%

Marketing


Digital Salary Industry Insights 21

Factors that drive job change

Marketing respondents are slightly less likely change roles than the industry average, with

51% of these individuals looking to move on compared to 52%.

There are differences in terms of gender, with men expressing a larger desire to change roles

(54% of men compared to 47% of women).

100%

90%

80%

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

50.5%

50.5% 50%

57.5%

38%

59%

64%

47%

20%

10%

Junior Mid-level Senior C-level


22 Digital Salary Industry Insights

60% of respondents are SATISFIED in their roles

MOST SATISFIED LEAST

28%

Junior

VERY

SATISFIED

30% dissatisfied / 2-5 years in role

25% dissatisfied / 1-2 years in role

18% dissatisfied /


Digital Salary Industry Insights 23

Job satisfaction

Job satisfaction statistics can be viewed on the infographic on the adjacent page. Marketing

satisfaction is overall slightly lower than the industry average at 60% (compared to 63%).

Juniors are most likely to be “very satisfied” but the mid-level group has the highest level

of satisfaction overall (63%).

Salaries

Marketing salaries for the most part are below that of the industry average by a small margin.

This is with the exception of junior salaries that are slightly above the industry average.

Unlike some of the other groups, the marketing junior salary is just below the UK average

salary of £27,200.

The following pages provide an overview of the salary averages for the specific skill sets within

the marketing sector, and a breakdown of the freelance rates.

130,000

120,000

marketing (£) industry average (£)

110,000

100,000

90,000

80,000

70,000

106,782

108,618

60,000

50,000

62,672 63,623

40,000

30,000

20,000

10,000

26,404 26,046

39,418 40,312

Junior

Mid-level

Senior

C-level

Graphic: Average sector salaries compared to industry averages

(Marketing)

Marketing


24 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Contract Rates

Although more common in the creative and technical areas of the report, there are a range

of individuals offering contracting services across marketing skillsets, particularly as this

becomes more technical in nature.

A summary of the average contract rates for these individuals can be viewed in the table below.

Skill Junior Mid-level Senior

Advertising Operations/Trafficking - - £260

Content Management £120 £150 £294

eCRM £100 £165 £200

Online Marketing/Digital Generalist £141 £269 -

Paid Search - - £250

Product Management - - £438

Project Management - £255 £349

Social Media £125 £150 £350

Marketing


Digital Salary Industry Insights 25

Advertising-Operations/Trafficking

Ad-Ops professionals remain core to the marketing operations of most organisations

and, as such, the volume of roles in this area are still growing, including entry level roles.

This, combined with the large salary bands on offer across all job types (particularly in

senior roles), means that opportunities to move through the ranks are frequent.

C-level

£82,714

Senior

£57,679

Mid-level

£40,052

Junior

£27,500

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Affiliates

With the landscape dominated by agency roles, salary bandings remain tight across all levels

of affiliate professionals. However, large retailers are continuing to create more affiliate roles in

house, driving a spike in the salaries of C-level affiliate experts.

C-level

£82,300

Senior

£50,854

Mid-level

£35,684

Junior

£25,143

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Marketing


26 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Content Management

Content marketing has firmly established itself as a job market over the past twelve months,

with businesses large and small embracing the creation of original content as a crucial tool in

their online marketing arsenal. The huge salary bands on offer for both senior and C-level

positions demonstrate that strategic content, planning and delivery expertise are very

valuable to a lot of organisations right now.

C-level

£140,000

Senior

£59,332

Mid-level

£36,405

Junior

£23,196

£0k £20k £40k £60k £80k £100k £120k £140k £160k £180k £200k £220k £240k £260k

eCommerce

eCommerce and merchandising professionals remain in strong demand with excellent

salaries on offer to strong performers, meaning that professionals in this area have

excellent prospects of progression.

C-level

£111,571

Senior

£67,889

Mid-level

£44,113

Junior

£22,375

£0k

£20k £40k £60k £80k £100k £120k £140k £160k £180k £200k £220k £240k £260k

Marketing


Digital Salary Industry Insights 27

eCRM

Salaries at senior level in eCRM continue to have a high average, however, the relatively

limited salary band in both junior and mid-level roles may lead many candidates to ruleout

a role in eCRM.

Senior

£59,483

Mid-level

£42,551

Junior

£28,600

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Online Marketing/Digital Generalist

Digital generalists with a mixed skill set remain hugely valuable in the current climate,

given that they are able to ‘translate’ different aspects of business technology projects to a

variety of internal audiences within an organisation. The market momentum behind ‘digital

transformation’ puts C-level salaries up with some of the highest in the industry, with inhouse

roles particularly well rewarded.

C-level

£117,950

Senior

£64,576

Mid-level

£41,877

Junior

£26,604

£0k

£20k £40k £60k £80k £100k £120k £140k £160k £180k £200k £220k £240k £260k

Marketing


28 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Paid Search

As the search industry – and its associated labour market - has matured, a broad spread of

specialists roles have been created, from entry level positions to senior strategic roles. The wide

range of salaries seen for senior levels and the significant crossover of salary bands at mid

and senior levels indicate a high level of opportunity for career advancement across the Paid

Search job market.

Senior

£59,031

Mid-level

£37,855

Junior

£27,636

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Paid Social

The lack of any crossover (and sizable gap) between mid-level and senior salary bands suggests

that while the market is currently well supplied in terms of entry-level and mid-level ‘millennial’

paid social practitioners and project managers, senior level strategic positions are proving

harder to fill – meaning candidates with the right mix of social knowledge and wider business

experience can command a comparatively far higher wage than their more junior colleagues.

Senior

£70,833

Mid-level

£39,571

Junior

£0

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

£27,200

Marketing


Digital Salary Industry Insights 29

Planning

The survey revealed relatively little cross-over between junior and mid-level positions and

clear cross-over point between mid-level and senior positions at £45K. The huge range of senior

salaries and sharp spike at the higher end of the senior salary bracket indicate a high-level

of cross-industry demand for those with leadership experience in digital marketing planning.

Senior

£64,738

Mid-level

£35,078

Junior

£26,098

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Product Management

The central importance of product marketing to the majority of organisations means that it

remains one of the most rewarding skill sets in the wider marketing industry comparatively,

particularly in relation to junior and mid-level positions. The high level of crossover shown

between mid-level, senior and C-level position indicates a vibrant job market with lots of

potential opportunities for career advancement.

C-level

£95,000

Senior

£65,900

Mid-level

£51,917

Junior

£32,667

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Marketing


30 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Project Management

While there is little crossover between the salary spread in junior, mid-level and senior PM

roles, the relatively narrow salary bands of junior and mid-level roles, combined with the

clear gap between mid-level and senior roles, suggests that it is still difficult to climb the

corporate ladder through specialising in PM, with senior salaries reflecting the wider

experience of the post-holders.

Senior

£72,000

Mid-level

£40,968

Junior

£26,273

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

RTB

Remuneration for junior RTB roles show a fairly narrow spread, however the wider range of

salaries on offer for mid-level and senior level bidding positions reflect the rapidly growing

demand for experienced executives who can deliver budget efficiencies and improved ROI by

leveraging RTB in media buying.

Senior

£77,143

Mid-level

£48,810

Junior

£26,000

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Marketing


Digital Salary Industry Insights 31

SEO

Salaries in SEO broadly reflect the industry average, perhaps due to the fact that the term

‘SEO’ has evolved to incorporate a range of different digital marketing specialisms. The

limited overlap between junior, mid-level and senior remuneration also points towards an

increas-ingly mature employment sector, offering ambitious junior execs the opportunity of

smooth progression through the ranks.

Senior

£59,195

Mid-level

£39,477

Junior

£25,633

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Social Media

While junior and mid-level social media marketing jobs are remunerated within a fairly

narrow spectrum, salaries increase markedly for senior level execs capable of successfully

navigating the murky – and potentially dangerous – waters of marketing on social media.

With senior salaries peaking at £120K, it’s clear that many organisations are still prepared to

pay a premium for strategic leadership in their social media activity.

Senior

£67,836

Mid-level

£35,883

Junior

£27,417

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Marketing


32 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Operations

The close average in salaries in operations roles at junior and mid-level suggest that many

will struggle with career progression early on in their careers. However, persistence is

rewarded: salary averages at senior and C-level in particular are far more competitive.

C-level

£105,636

Senior

£58,500

Mid-level

£36,045

Junior

£26,297

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k

Marketing


Section 3:

Commercial

The Commercial section provides a

summary of those at the front line of

business development in organisations,

charged with the responsibility of bringing

in the essential revenue streams needed to

foster growth.


34 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Commercial highlights

Insights from our research into individuals in commercial roles include:

• Less than 50% of juniors in commercial posts are satisfied in their roles, compared to approximately

80% of C-level professionals.

• Over 70% of commercial staff that believe they are “underpaid” are intending to source a

new role in 2015.

• Approximately 80% of commercial employees receive a bonus, but this does not appear to

affect their intentions to change roles, with the the group in receipt of a bonus split evenly

in terms of leaving intent.

• More than 20% of C-level individuals in the commercial sector had to leave their previous

role due to redundancy.

Key demographics

The commercial group matches the sample average in terms of gender diversity, with males

accounting for 60% of the sample There are more individuals in the 35-54 group by 5% proportionaly,

and C-level individuals are also significantly more represented (18% compared to 9%).

55-64, 2% 18-24, 7%

Women 40%

Men 60%

35-54, 41%

25-34, 50%

Mid-level 35%

C-level 18%

Junior 11%

Senior 36%

Commercial


Digital Salary Industry Insights 35

Factors that drive job change

Commercial individuals match the industry average in terms of leaving intentions, with a

52% average.

Unlike marketing professionals, women are most likely to be considering a career change by a

small margin, with 53% of women intending to leave in comparison to 51% of men.

Those on the client side are much more likely to leave when it comes to commercial skills, with

only 46% of agency staff seeking to change roles compared to 58% of client staff.

Leaving intentions also have a clear relationship with seniority, with juniors significantly

more likely to leave than those at C-level (65% of juniors compared to only 40% of C-level

individuals). Length of tenure is influential as with the overall sample, with 74% of those in the

2-5 year bracket intending to change roles.

Bonus receipt also appears significantly more influential to commercial staff, with 60% of

those who don’t receive a bonus intending to find a new role this year.

Uncompetitive salary is particularly important for juniors in commercial roles. with 22% of

these individuals looking to move on for this reason, compared to only 3.5% for C-level.

Redundancy is also a significant factor for C-level individuals in this sector, with 21% of the

group specifying this as a factor compared to 10% or less in the other seniorities.

40%

30%

new challenge % lack of development opportunity % uncompetitive salary %

20%

22% 22%

26%

26%

21%

20% 20.5% 12.5%

10%

16%

15%

14%

3.5%

Junior

Mid-level Graphic:

Senior

C-level

Most significant factors driving job change (Commercial)

Commercial


36 Digital Salary Industry Insights

62% of respondents are SATISFIED in their roles

MOST SATISFIED LEAST

39%

C-level

VERY

SATISFIED

23% dissatisfied / 2-5 years in role

17% dissatisfied / 1-2 years in role

18% dissatisfied /


Digital Salary Industry Insights 37

Job Satisfaction

Commercial satisfaction statistics can be observed in the preceding infographic. Perhaps the

most critical observation from this is that only 48% of junior level staff have expressed

a positive level of job satisfaction.

Salaries

As may be expected for an area with a focus on financial performance as the ultimate goal,

salaries across the commercial side are higher than the industry average throughout.

At the mid-level and senior seniorities, commercial salaries are approximately 10% higher

than the industry average.

The gender pay gap is also significantly more pronounced based on the survey data we

collected, with women earning on average 65% of the annual wage compared to men.

The junior level suffers the most from this, with women professionals only earning 68%

that of men.

The bracket which comes closest to achieving parity is mid-level, but even in this

bracket, women are only achieving 88% in comparison to men.

130,000

120,000

commercial (£) industry average (£)

110,000

100,000

90,000

80,000

110,069 108,618

70,000

60,000

69,997

63,623

50,000

40,000

30,000

44,428

40,312

20,000

26,865 26,046

10,000

Junior

Mid-level

Senior

C-level

Graphic: Average sector salaries compared to industry averages (Commercial)

Commercial


38 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Contract Rates

Contractors are less common in the commercial sector than within others covered in the

report, but they are still present at a senior level and can command strong rates depending

on their specialism.

The commercial contract rates are presented in the table below.

Skill Junior Mid-level Senior

Business Development - - £200

Pre-Sales - - £450

Sales Management - - £288

Technical Account Management - - £300

Commercial


Digital Salary Industry Insights 39

Business Development

Broad salary bands are in evidence across this sub-sector (outside of junior business development

roles) confirming demand is always high for successful salespeople. Strong average

salaries and clear opportunities for advancement persist across all categories of employee

ensuring that many entry level executives will continue to pursue careers in business

development.

C-level

£112,390

Senior

£74,933

Mid-level

£43,019

Junior

£25,265

£0k

£20k £40k £60k £80k £100k £120k £140k £160k £180k £200k £220k £240k £260k

Pre-Sales

While salaries for junior pre-sales positions are relatively consistent (at around £24K) with

the rest of the industry salaries can vary greatly for mid-level and senior roles. This suggests

that, even in the digital world, sales experience is still a highly desirable quality for

employers large and small.

Senior

£82,333

Mid-level

£45,905

Junior

£24,500

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Commercial


40 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Publisher Development

Salaries at junior level are competitive and above the industry average and show a

significant overlap with mid-level salaries. As the level of seniority increases so to do the

salary ranges indicating good opportunities to progress, with the top senior salaries reaching

close to the £150k mark.

Senior

£91,250

Mid-level

£48,750

Junior

£27,500

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k ... £150k

Advertising Sales

As you might expect of the ever-vibrant advertising sales employment market, salaries for

junior, mid-level and senior roles equate broadly with the industry averages, with clear route

for progression from one category to the next available. Holders of C-level positions,

however, can expect to see remuneration far north of the industry average, ranging from

£85K to £175K for the right candidates.

C-level

£119,444

Senior

£58,161

Mid-level

£39,125

Junior

£26,222

£0k

£20k £40k £60k £80k £100k £120k £140k £160k £180k £200k £220k £240k £260k

Commercial


Digital Salary Industry Insights 41

Technology Sales

Average salaries compete well with the industry average, perhaps due to the commission or

bonus payments common to technology sales roles. Salary ranges broaden as we progress

upward through junior, mid-level, senior and C-level technology sales roles commanding up

to £150K.

C-level

£108,000

Senior

£65,679

Mid-level

£47,536

Junior

£30,833

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k ... £150k

Sales Management

While starting salaries remain tight for junior sales management executives the significant

level of overlap between mid-level and senior salary bands is a clear indicator of the

opportunities available to high-performers to boost earnings rapidly, with C-level positions

earning between £90K and £150K.

C-level

£117,778

Senior

£70,480

Mid-level

£49,389

Junior

£29,382

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k ... £150k

Commercial


42 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Technical Account Management

Moving upward through the salaries, there is considerable overlap between one band and

the next, with upper C-level salaries topping out at £115K. While this is considerably short of

the £150K available in C-level sales management positions, for example, in an increasingly

fragmented technological marketplace, specialist technical knowledge (combined with

people skills) is still a widely valued attribute.

C-level

£80,250

Senior

£54,813

Mid-level

£39,806

Junior

£26,500

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Commercial


Section 4:

Technical

Technical staff have become essential in

an environment in which all aspects of

business increasingly require digital skills

as standard.

Here we review the salaries and perceptions

of the talented members of staff driving the

technology behind modern businesses.


44 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Technical highlights

Highlights from our respondents based in technical focused roles are as follows:

• 80% of data science professionals are satisfied in their posts, compared to only 43% of those

working in IT support.

• Under 20% of junior technical employees believe company success is important to their own

personal success.

• The most stated reason for technical staff seeking to change roles is due to a lack of career

development opportunities, with this trend observed from junior to C-level seniorities.

• Of those technical employees who have been in post for 2-5 years, only 47% state they are

satisfied in their role. This compares to a 75% satisfaction rate amongst those in their post

for under a year.

Key demographics

Women continue to be underrepresented in the technical field, although their representation

has increased from last year (22% of the sample compared to 11% last year).

The demographics are also skewed towards senior staff, who compose 45% of the sample.

55-64, 2% 18-24, 7%

Women 22%

Men 78%

35-54, 43%

25-34, 48%

Mid-level 37%

C-level 6%

Junior 12%

Senior 45%

Technical


Digital Salary Industry Insights 45

Factors that drive job change

As may be expected in a sector in which skills are in particularly demand, technical

staff are more likely to be seeking to change roles than the industry average, with 57%

of the technical group planning to find alternative employment.

In an unexpected contrast with last year, women are now more likely to look to leave than

men. Last year, only 39% of women were seeking to change roles within technical services,

but in our 2015 sample this is now 59%, 3% higher than men.

Agency staff are the most likely to leave on the technical side, with 66% of this group seeking

to change roles. There is no steady trend in seniority across this group, with junior individuals

just as likely to leave as senior members of staff (both at 54%).

A staggering 79% of those in the 2-5 year bracket are intending to change roles - suggesting

that within organisations, particular attention should be provided towards the technical

individuals who have been employed for this period of time.

Bonus receipt also appears to have a positive effect on technical staff, but although it lowers

overall leaving intentions, 54% of technical staff that receive a bonus still intend to find a new role.

The main drivers of change are consistent with the industry average, with uncompetitive

salary being particularly important at junior and mid level seniorities (18% and 20%

respectively).

40%

new challenge % lack of development opportunity % uncompetitive salary%

30%

27%

20%

10%

10%

22%

18%

15%

20% 20%

15% 17% 12%

18%

9%

Junior

Mid-level

Senior

C-level

Graphic: Most significant factors driving job change (Technical Services)

Technical


46 Digital Salary Industry Insights

66% of respondents are SATISFIED in their roles

MOST SATISFIED LEAST

31%

Junior

VERY

SATISFIED

36% dissatisfied / 2-5 years in role

21% dissatisfied / 1-2 years in role

12.5% dissatisfied /


Digital Salary Industry Insights 47

Job Satisfaction

Technical staff actually sit slightly above the industry average in terms of satisfaction, however

there are some groups within the sector that show very low levels of satisfaction. Groups such

as IT support and Java developers show levels of satisfaction significantly below the average,

with only 43% of IT support staff satisfied.

Salaries

It is unusual that the salaries for junior technical staff are listed as below the industry

average in our data. Salaries for senior technical staff also list as slightly lower than the

industry aver-age, although mid-level is marginally higher.

This contrasts significantly with the 2014 salary survey, in which all seniorities showed

higher salaries than the recorded industry averages.

Full breakdowns of the rates for technical contractors, and salary scales can be observed in the

following pages.

100,000

90,000

80,000

technical (£) industry average (£)

70,000

60,000

50,000

63,372

63,623

40,000

30,000

20,000

10,000

25,050

26,046

41,785

40,3012

Junior Mid-level Senior

Graphic: Average sector salaries compared to industry averages (Technical)

Technical


48 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Contract Rates

The employment of technical contractors and freelancers is a common practice among organisations,

with many individuals opting to act as contractors rather than taking salaried roles.

The average daily rates for technical contractors can be found in the table below.

Skill

Mid-level Senior

.NET

£338 £403

Back-end

£266 £358

Business Analyst

£410 £513

Database

£296 £345

Front-end

£255 £398

IT support

£177 £220

Java

£330 £438

Testing

£310 £398

Project Management £328 £432

Technical


Digital Salary Industry Insights 49

.NET

While demand for .NET skills remains solid, the relative spread of junior, mid-level and senior

salaries – with senior salaries topping out at £70K – suggest that anyone with six-figure

salary expectations will need to develop a broader skill set than simply .NET.

Senior

£52,897

Mid-level

£43,857

Junior

£31,100

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Back-end

Due to the business-critical nature of back-end development work, junior positions are

generally hard to find in this area. Large salary ranges at mid-level and senior level suggest

great opportunities for candidates with experience.

Senior

£58,118

Mid-level

£43,404

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Technical


50 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Business Analyst

Demand for business analysts remains fairly strong across junior, mid-level and senior roles,

suggesting a clear route for progression for new entrants, with senior salaries reaching up

to £100K.

Senior

£71,667

Mid-level

£42,875

Junior

£26,250

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Data Science

With big data exerting an increasing influence on many organisations, the job market for

data scientists began to mature considerably last year, with a range of new junior, mid-level

and senior positions being created.

Senior

£69,143

Senior

£39,414

Mid-level

£27,250

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Technical


Digital Salary Industry Insights 51

Database

With smart data-handling now being taken seriously and underpinning the operations of

most organisations, junior positions in this field are not common. Salaries for mid-level and

senior positions remain competitive for those with the right skills and experience.

Senior

£57,926

Mid-level

£36,571

£5k

£10k £15k £20k £25k £30k £35k £40k £45k £50k £55k £60k £65k £70k

Front-end

The huge growth in the use of mobile devices (and the resultant demand for UX skills)

has seen front-end developers become more important than ever to businesses. Salary

spreads show significant overlap across junior, mid-level and senior positions, indicating

a sector of increasing maturity and depth.

Senior

£58,234

Mid-level

£39,285

Junior

£23,583

£15k £20k £25k £30k £35k £40k £45k £50k £55k £60k £65k £70k £75k £80k £90k

Technical


52 Digital Salary Industry Insights

IT Support

The sizable salary bands apparent across both mid-level and senior roles indicate the

premium being placed on specialist IT knowledge by employers, particularly on those with

expertise in implementing the latest generation of digital and online business tools.

Senior

£63,077

Mid-level

£41,914

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Java

Demand for Java developers grew throughout 2014 and is still on the increase, leading to a

spike in senior salaries as competition to secure top talent has intensified.

Senior

£70,063

Mid-level

£40,278

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Technical


Digital Salary Industry Insights 53

Testing

Testing and assurance is a fairly mature area of technology with salaries remaining

consistent with the wider industry. Both mid-level and senior roles show a wide salary

spread and crossover between seniority.

Senior

£60,500

Mid-level

£42,136

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Project Management

Project management continues to offer a potentially lucrative career path in the

technology industry, with average mid-level and senior salaries competing well with the

wider industry and senior salaries reaching as high as £120K for specialist PMs.

Senior

£75,381

Mid-level

£49,321

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Technical


54 Digital Salary Industry Insights

- Intentionally blank -


Section 5:

Creative

Services

Creative professionals are the skilled

individuals that ensure marketing

campaigns are truly distinctive. Whether

that is through eye-catching design,

concise copywriting or increasingly, a

unique use of technology.


56 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Creative highlights

Interesting observations about our creative respondents include:

• Creative individuals are the most likely to use social media when searching for roles, with

30% of mid-level creatives stating they would search for roles through social channels.

• Creatives are the least likely to receive a bonus out of all of the sectors surveyed, with only

42% in receipt of a bonus. Individuals in creative services are most likely to receive a bonus if

they work on the client-side (46%), with agency workers showing the lowest level of bonus

receipt (37%).

• Despite the lower levels of bonus receipt, creatives have the most positive perception of

their remuneration out of the sample, with 66% believing they are fairly paid.

• 30% of creatives sourced their current role through a recruitment agency, the highest of

all the sectors surveyed.

Key demographics

Women are under-represented across the creative sector, with men accounting for 59% of the

sample. However, this remains slightly more favourable than the 60% of men to 40% of

women ratio observed across the total sample.

Senior individuals compose the majority of our creative respondents, accounting for 51%

of the group.

55-64, 1% 18-24, 7%

Women 41%

Men 59%

35-54, 41%

25-34, 51%

Mid-level 32%

C-level 6%

Junior 11%

Senior 51%

Creative Services


Digital Salary Industry Insights 57

Factors that drive job change

Creative professionals match the industry average when it comes to leaving intention, with

52% of individuals seeking a new post in 2015.

Women are slightly more likely than men to be looking for a new role (56% to 50%). This

is significantly different from the creative sample of 2014, in which almost 68% of men

were seeking a new post.

In terms of business type, the stand out statistic is that 67% of creative staff in technology

vendors intend to change roles in the coming year, compared to only 44% of creative agency

staff.

Linking to our findings last year and the industry averages observed throughout the report,

over 60% of staff who have been in post for either a year or more are looking to move on,

across both the 1-2 year bracket and the 2-5 year brackets. This trend flattens out after 5 years,

as only 45% of these longer tenure individuals are intending to move on.

Counter-intuitively, bonus does not seem to affect creative leaving intentions at all, with

those receiving a bonus actually marginally more likely to be seeking a new role (53% of

those receiving a bonus compared to 50% of those not receiving one).

Change drivers are in line with the industry averages, with new challenges and a lack of

development opportunities the largest factors dependent on seniority.

40%

new challenge % lack of development opportunity % uncompetitive salary %

30%

35%

27%

20%

10%

15%

20%

15%

16%

18%

23%

18%

12%

22%

9%

Junior

Mid-level Graphic: Most

Senior

C-level

significant factors driving job change (Creative Services)

Creative Services


58 Digital Salary Industry Insights

68% of respondents are SATISFIED in their roles

MOST SATISFIED LEAST

19%

Senior

VERY

SATISFIED

15% dissatisfied / 2-5 years in role

27% dissatisfied / 1-2 years in role

18% dissatisfied /


Digital Salary Industry Insights 59

Job satisfaction

Job satisfaction statistics for the creative group can be seen in the preceding infographic.

Although overall, creatives are 5% above the average for satisfaction, some groups are outside

of expected trends, with C-level creatives actually showing lower levels of satisfaction in comparison

to their counterpart executives in other marketing disciplines.

Salaries

Consistent with our 2014 review, creative salaries remain somewhat below the industry

average for the most part, but experience a significant increase once individuals reach c-level

positions.

130,000

120,000

creative (£) industry average (£)

110,000

100,000

90,000

80,000

110,136 108,618

70,000

60,000

50,000

55,775

63,623

40,000

30,000

20,000

24,021 26,046

36,410

40,312

10,000

Junior Mid-level Senior C-level

Graphic: Average sector salaries compared to industry averages (Creative Services)

Creative Services


60 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Contract Rates

The project orientated nature of creative work ensures that skilled contractors will always be

in demand. The table below highlights the average day rates creative workers can expect to

achieve across the industry,

Skill Junior Mid-level Senior

Artwork £193 £308 £425

Creative £97 £367 £387

Creative Technologist - £300 -

Design £200 £288 £342

UX £278 £363 £450

UX

The incredible rise in popularity of mobile devices continues to push UX skills further up

the wish-list of most e,ployers. While junior and mid-level positions currently top-out at

around £30K and £55K respectively, experienced senior UX strategists can command

salaries in excess of £90K.

Senior

£64,860

Mid-level

£42,296

Junior

£27,500

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Creative Services


Digital Salary Industry Insights 61

Design

Designers remain crucial to any campaign, be it online and offline, and the spread of

salaries revealed it's a sector which continues to require a wide range of talent. The salary

spread shows fairly consistent wage progression across junior and mid-level roles, while

senior design roles show a wider spectrum and range from £40K up to

£100K.

Senior

£57,660

Mid-level

£35,208

Junior

£24,242

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Artwork

Salaries for junior, mid-level and senior artwork positions show a fairly limited spread

reflecting the lack of managerial responsibility generally associated with such roles. The

spread of salaries suggests fairly limited opportunities for progression, with earnings in

this type of reaching around £55K at their highest.

Senior

£43,333

Mid-level

£28,500

Junior

£21,000

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Creative Services


62 Digital Salary Industry Insights

Technologist

The trend towards the creation of Creative Technologist roles gathered pace in 2014, with

fairly wide salary bands across both mid-level and senior roles. This looks like a potentially

attractive job sector for the future, with more C-level positions likely to emerge over the next

few years as the market further matures.

Senior

£55,333

Mid-level

£40,700

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k

Creative Services


Digital Salary Industry Insights 63

Until next time...

Thank you for taking the time to read the sixth edition of our ‘Digital Salary & Industry

Insights’ report. We hope you found it useful.

Our report is an annual undertaking produced for the digital talent industry, so we will

be back in the future with our seventh edition full of more insight and information. In

the meantime, you can get in touch with any questions or queries you have on

0207 432 6340, or by emailing survey@propellondon.com.

Propel: Recruiters for the global digital economy

Propel are the UK’s largest independent provider of permanent and contract recruitment

services to the global digital economy, specialising in commercial, marketing, technical and

creative talent.

Our client base ranges from large global corporates and venture backed start-ups to

international businesses expanding in Europe.


propelllondon.com

0207 432 6340

hello@propellondon.com

@propellondon.com

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