2.0

canurb

1NLpZkD

LET’S GET STARTED

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE +PLACE MAKERS EVENT NOVEMBER 20, 2015

MORE CLICKS.

LESS BRICKS?

INFRASTRUCTURE OPTIMIZATION

GOOD DENSITY

VITAL PLACES

ENABLED TEAMS

2.0


MODERATOR & EVENT MC

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE +PLACE MAKERS EVENT NOVEMBER 20, 2015

DR. TONY HERNANDEZ

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF COMMERCIAL ACTIVITY,

RYERSON UNIVERSITY

@ C A N U R B

# C L I C K S A N D B R I C K S


CLICKS & BRICKS 2.0

Rethinking urban form to match the demands of rapidly

evolving e-retail business models

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Name that store?

Name of Presenter

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Name that store?

Name of Presenter

Source: www.time.com

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Amazon Goes

B&M

Name of Presenter

Source: www.time.com

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


• Retailing is becoming

increasingly complex

• Omni-channel reality

• Many questions

about the future of

the industry???

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Key Themes

• How are Canadian’s shopping online?

• What role does distribution play in the online

world? How does this impact the way we shop

and our need for retail space?

• Are urban planners, designers, architects and

city builders prepared for the omni-channel

reality?

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Our Experts

Keynote Speaker

• Maureen Atkinson, Senior Partner, J.C. Williams Group

Panelists:

• Marc Smith, Director, Strategy & eCommerce Market

Development, Canada Post

• Egil Nielsen, Senior VP, SmartCentres

• Ute Maya-Giambattista, MCIP, RPP, Partner, SGL Planning

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


KEYNOTE PRESENTATION

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE +PLACE MAKERS EVENT NOVEMBER 20, 2015

MAUREEN ATKINSON

SENIOR PARTNER, JC WILLIAMS GROUP

@ C A N U R B

# C L I C K S A N D B R I C K S


+PLACE MAKER

Clicks and Bricks 2.0 – The Last Mile

Maureen Atkinson

November 2015


Canadian Retail Growth

6.0%

5.0%

5.1%

4.7%

4.0%

3.6%

3.0%

2.0%

1.0%

2.5% 2.5%

2.0%

0.0%

-1.0%

2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 YTD

-2.0%

-3.0%

-4.0%

-3.0%

Source: Statistics Canada; YTD November 2015/2014

2


E-commerce – $30B Industry

• B2C e-commerce sales in Canada, 2013–2018

(in billion Canadian dollars)

$50

$43.95

$40

$34.04

$38.74

$30

$20

$21.61

$25.37

$29.63

$10

Source: eMarketer, 2015

$0

2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

3


Omni-channel on the Rise

E-commerce

Omni-channel

International E-commerce

Mobile Commerce

E-commerce

Omni-channel

International E-commerce

Emerging Growth Maturity Decline

Source: J.C. Williams Group 4


CANADIAN

E-TAIL

REPORT


Methodology

• An online survey of 1,000 respondents representative of the Canadian

population

• A quarterly survey tracks Canadian online shopping behaviour, since Q4

2013

• The design, data collection, and analysis was undertaken by J.C. Williams

Group

6


7


Multi-channel Shoppers are Worth More to All

Retailers in Nearly All Categories!

Difference in Spend

102%

78%

46%

25%

-23%

-28%

49%

11%

10%

2%

-6%

Kitchenware & Homeware

Entertainment

Footwear

$194

$154

$393

$274

$280

$408

Offline shopper

Multi-channel shopper

Children/Baby, Toys & Games

$218

$274

Jewellery & Watches

$225

$174

Appliances

$276

$386

Health & Beauty Products

$349

$520

Sports & Leisure Equipment

$403

$445

Clothing

$483

$532

Electronics

$495

$504

Furniture

$768

$719

$- $100 $200 $300 $400 $500 $600 $700 $800 $900

Q: How much did you spend overall in the past 3 /6/12 months on [Category]?

*Note: Overall/total spend = both offline and online expenditure **Expenditure is based on total spend by customers who purchased in the category. 8


No One Way to Shop – Online Plays a Big Role

Even for Store Purchases

Shopping Behaviour

Shopping Behaviour by Age

18–24 25–34 35–44

Purchase in-store Purchase online

Research online and buy online

Research online and in-store and buy online

Research in-store and buy online

Research online and buy in-store

Research online and in-store and buy in-store

Research in-store and buy in-store

27%

18%

17%

28%

25%

50%

29% 29% 26%

12% 20% 22%

16% 22% 25%

52% 58% 56%

31% 26% 30%

21% 18% 26%

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60%

Q:Thinking about your shopping behavior for retail products, what is your most common research and shopping habit?

*Note: Q2 2015 chart contained errors. See Appendix for corrected data

> Average

< Average

9


Shopping Location Visit Frequency

3%

19%

10%

17% 15% 19%

52%

30%

23% 31%

35% 38%

40%

42%

30%

26% 24% 21%

14% 9%

Shopping

Centre/Enclosed

Mall

Main Street/Town

or City Centre

Online Retail Site or

Marketplace

Power Centre

Outlet Centre Store

At least weekly At least monthly More than 3 months ago Never

Q: How frequently did you visit the following locations AND make a non-grocery related

purchase through this location, in the past 3 months?

10


Shopping Behaviour (P3M) Major Cities

74%

57%

74%

67%

78%

67%

73%

Canada

56%

Vancouver

% Of Online Shoppers (P3M)

% Of Online Cross-border Shoppers (P3M)

GTA

Montreal

11


Satisfaction with Online Purchases is Greater

in Most Developed Categories

Satisfied & Very Satisfied

Children/Baby, Toys & Games

Clothing

Health & Beauty Products

Furniture

Footwear

Kitchenware & Homeware

Sports & Leisure Equipment

Jewellery & Watches

Appliances

Electronics

Entertainment

57%

61%

59%

56%

59%

54%

52%

59%

61%

71%

76%

0% 50% 100%

Q: Indicate your overall level of satisfaction with your most recent or last online purchase, which required shipping, for the categories listed

*Rating of satisfied or very satisfied on a seven point satisfaction rating scale. Furniture has a low respondent base = 91 12


TRENDING


E-commerce Penetration by Category

E-commerce Penetration

Entertainment

*Jewellery & Watches

23%

43%

35%

34%

Electronics

*Sports & Leisure Equipment

*Furniture

Clothing

*Appliances

*Children /Baby, Toys & Games

*Kitchenware & Homeware

Footwear

Health & Beauty Products

33%

28%

21%

17%

11%

13%

19%

18%

18%

18%

18%

20%

14%

15%

18%

13%

14%

15%

Q3–2015

Q3–2014

0% 20% 40% 60%

Q: What % of your (total category) expenditure was spent online? (% penetration represents mean penetration)

Note: Time frames varied based on the category discussed (e.g., Entertainment – past 6 months; Furniture – past 12 months)

*Indicates small base of respondents

14


List of Top 5 Online Retailers and Brands

Top Online Retailers Q3 2015 Top Online Retailers Q3 2014

Amazon

502

Amazon

401

eBay

222

Walmart

190

Walmart

Chapters/Indigo

87

140

# of Times Mentioned

eBay

Sears

92

174

# of Times Mentioned

Best Buy

86

Future Shop

69

0 100 200 300 400 500 600

0 100 200 300 400 500

Q: What are the top five retailers or brands from whom you prefer to and have purchased non grocery products, online?

15


List of Top 5 In-store Retailers and Brands

Top In-store Retailers Q3 2015 Top In-store Retailers Q3 2014

Walmart

468

Walmart

468

Canadian Tire

204

Sears

193

Sears

Best Buy

142

141

# of Times Mentioned

Canadian Tire

Target

132

182

# of Times Mentioned

Hudson's Bay

115

Costco

111

0 100 200 300 400 500

0 100 200 300 400 500

Q: What are the top five retailers or brands from whom you prefer to and have purchased non-grocery products in-store?

16


Cross-Border Shopping Over Time

Percentage Cross Border Shopping

70%

65%

67%

Total Canada

British Columbia

Prairies

Ontario

Quebec

60%

55%

50%

60%

57%

51%

50%

55%

53%

49%

55%

54%

51%

57% 59%

56%

52%

52%

51%

59%

54%

51%

59%

56%

57%

56%

50%

49%

48% 49%

45%

47% 45%

43%

40%

Q4 2013 Q1 2014 Q2 2014 Q3 2014 Q4 2014 Q1 2015 Q2 2015 Q3 2015

40%

17


LAST MILE


Product Delivery and Preferences Are Driven

by What is Available

Buy in-store and take it home

immediately

38%

62%

Buy online and deliver to home

46%

47%

Buy online and pick-up in-store

4%

10%

Buy in-store and deliver to home or

work

3%

7%

Buy online and deliver to work

4%

6%

Buy online and deliver to a 3rd party

location to pick up

3%

4%

Buy in-store and pick-up later

2%

2%

Actual Delivery Method of Last Purchase

Delivery Preference

Q: Thinking about how you normally buy products, please indicate your PREFERENCE for purchase and delivery when shopping

Q:Thinking about your last purchase, how were your product(s) bought and delivered? Did you.

19


Online Purchase Returns

• 8.7% of goods purchased online are returned

• Men are far more likely to return purchases

% of Return by Sex

Average M F

% who made no returns 73% 70% 76%

Average rate of return 9% 11% 6%

Q. Thinking about your overall purchases in the past 3 months that were bought online and shipped to you, what percentage of your

purchases did you return to the retailer(s)?

20


Delivery is Still the Greatest Pain Point for

Online Shoppers

Reasons for Dissatisfaction

Delivery

Product

39%

34%

39%

43%

35%

23%

27%

31%

40%

51%

Website experience

Amount paid did not

meet expection

Could not use both

website and store for

purchases/returns

17%

24%

24%

31%

26%

11%

14%

11%

20%

16%

10%

17%

9%

4%

11%

Jewellery & Watches

Entertainment

Electronics

Footwear

Clothing

*Data based on limited sample size

Q: Please select the reason(s) for your dissatisfaction with your LAST purchase

0% 20% 40% 60%

21


Consumers

• Continue to move purchases to the web

• Will search the world for products they want

• Low Canadian dollar has not sunk cross-border shopping

• Delivery is a major pain point for online shoppers

• In-store pick-up is still a work in progress

22


Impact on Retail

• Retailers are looking at stores strategically

• Brand experience

• Delivery potential

• Stores are being rationalized, downsized, re-planned

• Categories with the most online penetration continue to see that trend

• Most Canadian retailers are now online – can they catch up?

23


Planning Issues for Cities

• How much retail is really needed?

• Retail growth continues to go online

• Growth in power centres is slowing – will they be repurposed?

• “Last mile”

• Change retail definitions

• Create design/traffic challenges

• Potential vacancy issues

24


The Retail Shop.

Toronto Chicago Montreal

www.jcwg.com

(416) 921-4181

Maureen Atkinson

matkinson@jcwg.com


EXPERT PANELIST

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE +PLACE MAKERS EVENT NOVEMBER 20, 2015

MARC SMITH

DIRECTOR, STRATEGY & ECOMMERCE MARKET

DEVELOPMENT, CANADA POST

@ C A N U R B

# C L I C K S A N D B R I C K S


Canada Post

Perspectives on

e-Commerce and its

impact on The Last

Mile

CLICKS+BRICKS 2.0

RETHINKING URBAN FORM

TO MATCH THE DEMANDS

OF RAPIDLY EVOLVING E-RETAIL BUSINESS MODELS

Marc Smith

Director, Strategy and eCommerce Market Development

Marc.smith@Canadapost.ca


Projected eCommerce Market Growth

2014-2019

• eCommerce will double

in size from 2014 to 2019

(14.2% CAGR)

• Retail sales will grow 2%-2.5%

overall

• Traffic migrating from store

purchases to digital

• With significant impact on

delivery and the last mile

Page 13 | November 2015| Clicks+Bricks 2.0

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


The Peaks are Exceptionally Impactful

November & December 2014

accounted for 25% of e-commerce

parcel volumes

Source: 2014 Canada Post Domestic e-commerce Volume from 3,505 merchants.

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Online shopping adoption on the rise

75

% of Canadians have made more than

one online purchase in the past year

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


With significant changes in frequency

23 %

45 %

32 %

Occasional

(2-3)

Frequent

(4-10)

Hyper

(11+)

Source: Building eShopper Loyalty, CPC 15-213, August 2015.

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Hyper shoppers are key to growth

Households shopping 11+ times

40 %

Source: Data retrieved from 3,505 Canada Post e-commerce customers 2013 to 2014.

Hyper shoppers – households that purchased 11+ times in 2014.

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Delivery Network Structure and eCommerce Efficiency

• Centralized networks do not

benefit from volume density and

are not efficient (taxis vs. public

transportation)

• Traditional in-store shopping

operates like an inefficient

distributed network

• Decentralized networks are

designed to take advantage of

consolidation to increase volume

density and drive efficiencies

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Key Economic Factors of Traditional Home Delivery

National Distribution

Centre:

• Large consolidated

volume

• Centralized

geographically

Origin Pickup

• Canada Post vehicle

brings all parcels to

single local Depot

• Depot consolidates for

dispatch to regional

Plant

Sort and Dispatch

• All local/regional

parcels are

consolidated and

sorted for their regional

destinations

• Parcels dispatched to

regional depots

Local Dispatch

• Regional parcels are

sorted for local delivery

Local Delivery

• Letter Carriers visit

every residence and

deliver smaller parcels.

• Or, consolidated

delivery

• Amortizing the cost of fixed assets is key to efficient economics and performance.

• Cost of delivering individual parcels to 4.7M houses is challenging because of the low density

inherent in Home (or personal) delivery.

• Consolidation of parcel volume from Pickup at origin to Delivery is the key to economically

sustainable service.

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Omni-channel Fulfillment – The New Reality

The Order

Logistics

Distribution Centre

• Distributing order fulfillment

to drive efficiencies:

Proximity to Consumer

Store

3PL

Inventory Optimization

Increase Store Traffic

Improve Capacity at Peak

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org

20


Ship From Store With Canada Post

Next Day Local

2-day Regional

Over 800

locations to be serviced with

Ship From Store by the end of

2015!

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


eCommerce – Last Mile Challenge

In 35% of Canadian households,

no one can be home during the day

to receive deliveries.

Consumer Delivery Preferences, CP 14-206, August 2014

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Delivery Flexibility: Options are Required for Convenience

Delivery Flexibility provides Consumers with options to switch from

default to convenient mode of their choice

=

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Canada Post Delivery Network

Delivery to 15.7M Business and Residential Addresses

4.7M Houses

3.6M Apartments and Condos

4.1M Community Mailboxes

Over 6,000 Postal Outlets

800K Rural Mailboxes

1.2M Post Office Boxes (primary delivery address):

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Community Mail Box (CMB)- Parcel Compartments

Community Mailbox Delivery provides consolidated

delivery and offers Canadian consumers a convenient

and secure way to receive items

Source: Canada Post CMB Baseline Survey – December 2013

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


• Canadian Apartments / Condos

3.6 Million apartments /

condos

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Canada Post Parcel Lockers

Providing Canadian households living in apartments

and condos the ultimate receiving experience

70%

of parcels are

successfully delivered in

parcel lockers.

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Canada Post Pickup Points

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


FlexDelivery & Deliver To Post Office (DTPO)

FlexDelivery

(Customer Centric Option)

Deliver to Post Office

(Merchant Integration Required)

Launch Date: May 4, 2015

Launch Date: Jan 2013

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Canada Post Retail Lab – Prototype Store

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Drive-thru Parcel Pick-up

Drive Thru & Trunk Delivery

• Extended hours

• Electronic notification card

• Drive-thru scanner initiates transaction

• To trunk service for larger items

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Self-service 24/7

• Access to secure postal

and parcel boxes

• 24/7 self-serve lobby

• Full shipping capability

• Parcel induction

• Vending to support shipping needs

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


A Change Rooms and Digital Screens

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Delivered Tonight TM : GTA, Vancouver, Montréal

Delivered Tonight is offered to 8.5 million residents in

combined markets.

GTA

(Fall 2013)

4.6 Million

Vancouver

(Fall 2014)

1.7 Million

Montréal

(Fall 2015)

2.2 Million

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


EXPERT PANELIST

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE +PLACE MAKERS EVENT NOVEMBER 20, 2015

EGIL NIELSEN

SENIOR VP, SMART CENTRES

@ C A N U R B

# C L I C K S A N D B R I C K S


Penguin Pick-Up & Penguin Fresh

CUI Nov. 20th 2015

Egil Moller Nielsen

SVP SmartCentres & Head of business


Economies of Cost to Serve for grocery store

Measured the cost-to-serve across a range of options for a sample basket of;

23 grocery staples totaling US$100

• $32 click/collect with fulfilment from store - this would be like Loblaws and

Walmart click/collect

• $21 for traditional retail where consumers go to store and buy themselves

(overhead, leasing, labor account for $19 alone)

• $19 for pure-play i.e. consumer buy at eComm site and ship direct to home

address - this is the Amazon model

• $11 for pure-pay with Penguin Pick-Up, less $8 due to savings on delivery

Source Strategy+Business http://www.strategy-business.com/article/00369?gko=ad8b1

November 9 th 2015 Tim Laseter, Matt Egol, Scott Bauer

37


Penguin Pick-Up concept

Current eComm Distribution Model

Local

Delivery

Assumptions:

$10 shipping cost is the Canada Post

rate for a 13” x 12” x 4” parcel

(non-food GTA to GTA 3 day service)

$3 residential surcharge is charged by

UPS and FedEx

Retailer

Distribution

Centre

Courier

Distribution

Centre

$3

Residential

surcharge

Customer

Home

Regional / Local

Courier Depots

Per package cost breakdown = $10 per parcel + $3 residential surcharge = $13 per parcel

Penguin Pick-Up Model

Customer collects

package at their

convenience

Assumptions: 50 parcels per skid

Retailer

Distribution

Centre

$50

Per skid load

Customer

Home

Per package cost breakdown = $1-2 per parcel (skid cost) + $2.50 pick-up fee = $3.50-4.50 per parcel (cost savings of ~70%)

• By simplifying the distribution model, Penguin Pick-Up can reduce the lead time by 50%+ between the distribution centre

and the customer.

• Residential delivery typically take 3-5 business days, whereas Penguin Pick-Up can offer same-day or next-day service

38


Services offered at Penguin Pick-Up

Proud Shipping Partner of:

• Penguin Pick-Up is a flexible omnichannel solution. Capabilities include:

• Pick-up for e-commerce sales

• Fresh and frozen products

• Dry cleaning pick up and drop off

• Return points for refunds/exchanges

• Vendor-managed inventory solutions

• Pick-up point for missed deliveries

• Collection point for leased products

• Tailored marketing solutions

39


Penguin Fresh

Food is the same quality as the ingredients used at high-end restaurants and hotels in Toronto

• Same day when order before 9am

• NO Minimum Order

• NO Shipping Fee

40


EXPERT PANELIST

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE +PLACE MAKERS EVENT NOVEMBER 20, 2015

UTE MAYA-GIAMBATTISTA

MCIP, RPP, PARTNER, SGL PLANNING

@ C A N U R B

# C L I C K S A N D B R I C K S


Ute Maya-Giambattista

Land Use Planning & Urban Design:

catching up to technology

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Ute Maya-Giambattista

Land Use Planning & Urban Design:

City/Regional Scale

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Land Use Structure (Official Plans + Secondary

Plans)

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


e-Commerce at the Regional

Scale

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Land Use Structure (Official Plans + Secondary

Plans)

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Ute Maya-Giambattista

Land Use Planning & Urban Design:

Site/Local Scale

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Urban Design (Site Plans)

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


E-Commerce at the Site/Local

Scale

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Niagara on the Lake Outlet Centre,

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


University Mall, Tampa FL

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Shops of Don Mills, Toronto

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Birkdale Village, North Carolina

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


Addison Circle, Addison TX.

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA www.canurb.org


MAKING AN IMPACT

CANADIAN URBAN INSTITUTE / INSTITUT URBAIN DU CANADA

LEARN MORE ABOUT US

www.canurb.org

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