TECHNOLOGY

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CENTRAL PENN BUSINESS JOURNAL’S

TECHNOLOGY

2015 EDITION

REPORT

STEM

rollers

Science, tech businesses

advance across region

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2 TECHNOLOGY REPORT 2015 Central Penn Business Journal


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CENTRAL PENN BUSINESS JOURNAL’S

TECHNOLOGY REPORT

TABLE OF CONTENTS 2015

CEO/Publisher

David A. Schankweiler

President

Larry Kluger

Business Manager

Donna Schankweiler

Associate Publisher

Douglas D. Cooper

NEWS

Editor

Joel Berg

Managing Editor

Amy Gulli

Copy/Web Editor

Larissa Newton

Researcher

Alaine Keisling

Photographer

Amy Spangler

DESIGN

Operations Director

Chad Pickard

Senior Graphic Designer

Ann Marie Irvine

Contributing Designers

Amanda Eisner, Amy Goropoulos,

Mark Lockley

AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT

Vice President

Zander Gambill

Manager

Sherry Andersen

Specialist

Carlin Luz

Coordinator

Raquel Campbell

CAPITAL AREA PEGGED AS RISING

FORCE IN STEM EMPLOYMENT

PAGE 4

HOW THE INDUSTRIAL INTERNET

OF THINGS IS CHANGING THE WAY

COMPANIES FUNCTION

PAGE 8

ADD IT UP

Tech services find home in CPA firms

PAGE 6

IMAGE CONTROL

Companies face raft of outlets for

feedback, good and bad

PAGE 10

THE LISTS

■ Database software firms PAGE 19

■ Regional technology occupations

PAGE 20

■ Systems integrators PAGE 21

■ Computer consultants PAGE 22

ADVERTISING

Sales Manager

ShaunJude McCoach

Account Executive

Lori Dietrich

WHAT TO DO WHEN TECH

SUPPORT ENDS

PAGE 14

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TECHNOLOGY REPORT 2015

3


CAPITAL AREA PEGGED

AS RISING FORCE IN

STEM

EMPLOYMENT

By Susan Lindt

When a recent Bloomberg report listed

the Harrisburg area as a top hub for jobs in

science, technology, engineering and math,

some might have thought it was a misprint.

Bloomberg represented

metropolitan areas in its Sept.

3 report as “unlikely cities that

will power the U.S. economy,”

ranking Harrisburg 90th

with 19,900 so-called STEM

employees comprising 6.5 percent

of its workforce — putting it

behind front-runners such as

Boston, Houston and Seattle.

Harrisburg’s showing was

no surprise to Harrisburg

University of Science and

Technology President Eric

Darr, but he admits it’s not the

region’s obvious strength.

“We don’t have a lot of

companies with words like

‘technology’ in their names or

companies thought of as big in

the Internet sense,” Darr said.

“But we have a lot of banks,

health insurers and insurance

companies in the region. And

the commonwealth is a huge

employer of tech workers. We also

have a fair number of hospital

systems for a region our size.

They are all centered in Central

Pennsylvania, and they all rest on

large, sophisticated technologies.”

Filling all those jobs

takes a coordinated effort,

starting with education.

For a decade, HU graduates

have filled local STEM

positions. Darr said 92 percent

of undergraduates find jobs in

their fields within six months

of graduation, and most often

in the region from which most

hail — Central Pennsylvania,

Maryland and New Jersey.

$ STEM pay

In a recent look at top

metropolitan areas for STEM

workers — those in the

fields of science, technology,

engineering and math —

Bloomberg uncovered the

most popular and highestpaying

jobs in those fields.

In Harrisburg, the highestpaying

STEM jobs are

in architectural and

engineering management,

at a median salary of

$129,020. The most

popular jobs were in

software development,

applications, which boast a

median salary of $76,170.

4 TECHNOLOGY REPORT 2015

Central Penn Business Journal


To draw people into its

graduate programs, the university

recruits internationally, pulling

2,000 students from about a dozen

countries, but they’re difficult to

keep in the area after graduation.

“They tend to go work for

big consulting companies with

offices around the globe,” Darr

said. “I would like them to

stay in Central Pennsylvania.

… That’s the direction the

university wants to work toward

in the next five or six years. We

want to make it comfortable

for those students and their

families to live and work here.”

So does the Harrisburg

Regional Chamber &

How we compare

In September, Bloomberg combed through data from the U.S.

Department of Labor to identify the top 100 metropolitan areas

for workers in fields covered by the acronym STEM, for science,

technology, engineering and math. Harrisburg was among them.

Here is how the capital city stacks up against Pennsylvania’s other

major metropolitan areas, based on number of STEM workers and

percentage of the total workforce.

City No. of STEM employees Share of total workforce

Harrisburg 19,990 6.5%

Philadelphia 137,420 7.4%

Pittsburgh 73,690 6.5%

Source: Bloomberg

Capital Region Economic

Development Corp.

“Live the Life You Want” is a

collaborative long-term campaign

that went live in mid-March. It

boasts about the region’s quality

of life, low crime and cost of

living in an effort to retain recent

graduates and lure skilled workers

from elsewhere to midstate jobs.

“Response has been excellent,”

said Linda Goldstein, vice

president and COO of the

Harrisburg Regional Chamber

& CREDC. “Analytic traffic has

been extremely strong. Our

digital ad campaigns had many

click-throughs to the job postings

– and not only from individuals

in Pennsylvania; they’re coming

from all over the country.”

Among those hiring is

Highmark Health, one of those

behind-the-scenes, tech-heavy

companies Darr referenced. In

March, Highmark HM Health

Solutions, an affiliate offering

advanced, integrated end-toend

health insurance solutions,

launched. It employs more

than 3,000 IT professionals,

but pooling that many experts

wasn’t easy. So Sandra Stefanic,

vice president of IT solutions at

HM Health Solutions, developed

a co-op program for HU

students to gain IT experience

while completing degrees.

STEM continued on page 18

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TECHNOLOGY REPORT 2015

5


Add IT up

Tech services find home in CPA firms

BY SUSAN LINDT // CONTRIBUTING WRITER

The one-stop-shop approach to business is putting

the accounting industry on the cutting edge of

technology.

Following a path blazed by their peers, more accounting

firms today are adding affiliates specializing in IT services.

The moves harness the established trust between

accountant and client, a critical point in areas such as

cybersecurity, and allow clients to access multiple services

under one roof.

“They may go to one firm

for auditing and another for the

technology side of it. But if there’s

an all-inclusive firm out there,

that’s the one-stop shop those

companies are looking for because

they want to have everything

under one umbrella,” said Philip

Keeney, director of technology

and client relations at Stambaugh

Ness Business Solutions, the IT

affiliate of Stambaugh Ness PC,

an accounting firm based in

Springettsbury Township, York

County.

Accounting firms have long

offered basic IT support for clients

struggling to keep up with the

growing sophistication of common

software packages. As accounting

firms diversified to build their

client base, it often meant offering

their own in-house IT expertise to

outside clients.

“Most firms offer some level of

IT services,” said Ed Monborne,

partner and CEO of Reinsel

6 TECHNOLOGY REPORT 2015 Central Penn Business Journal


At their offices in Lancaster

County are Brett Tennis, left,

president of Walz Group, and

Bill Hicks, Walz IT president.

PHOTO/JORDAN BUSH

Kuntz Lesher LLP, a Manheim

Township, Lancaster Countybased

accounting firm. “Some

offer very basic support; others,

like us, offer fairly sophisticated

support, doing custom coding,

network support and design;

and some firms above us are

doing cybersecurity and internal

computer audit testing. It comes

down to what people in the firm

want to offer and what’s being

asked for in that marketplace.”

IT affiliates quickly developed

independent client bases.

Monborne said his firm’s IT

affiliate, RKL eSolutions LLC,

originally survived on accounting

firm clients. Twenty years later, 95

❝Unless an accounting

firm shows they’re tech

savvy, they might end

up losing the client.❞

—Michael Cohn,

AccountingToday.com

percent of RKL eSolutions clients

are unrelated to RKL accounting

services. RKL eSolutions employs

60 people and offers a suite of IT

services in 12 states.

A distinct client base is also

quickly developing at Walz IT

LLC, the new affiliate of The

Walz Group PC, a regional

accounting firm headquartered

in Manheim Township. With

offices in Lancaster County

and King of Prussia, Walz IT

provides custom coding and

other expertise in eastern and

southcentral Pennsylvania. Walz

Group President Brett Tennis said

the IT affiliate that was announced

in August has five employees

now, but he anticipates growth

that will also bring returns to the

accounting firm.

“We’re doing well. We’re

progressing ahead of schedule,”

Tennis said. “We set up Walz

IT to bring notification that

we’re in a large midmarket

range besides what traditional

accounting firms are doing. Firms

are always looking for services

their clients need and that will

provide opportunities back to the

accounting firm.”

Offering IT services brings

greater responsibility for securing

client information and requires

accounting firms to carry more

liability insurance. But with

recent news of major retail and

government security breaches,

nervous clients are turning to their

trusted accountants for the knowhow

to avoid hacking.

“The cybersecurity side of

this is huge,” said Keeney, of

Stambaugh Ness. “It comes up

more in client conversations than

it used to. But firms wanting to

ADD continued on page 16

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TECHNOLOGY REPORT 2015

7


How the industrial

is changing the way companies function

BY REBECCA HANLON // CONTRIBUTING WRITER

It wasn’t that long ago that manufacturers at

a water station kept a close eye on the steam

gauge to determine whether a machine was

working properly. But thanks to advances in

technology, data management and mobile

computing, the Industrial Internet of Things is

changing the way companies function.

Earlier this year, Red Lion

Controls Inc. in Manchester

Township launched a new

Industrial Internet of Things

(IIoT) Innovation Center in St.

Louis where engineering, product

and sales teams are working to get

this technology into the hands of

manufacturers.

Red Lion uses the vision

of The Connected Factory, a

manufacturing environment in

which every machine and device

can speak to the others, helping to

monitor and control everything

from operation productivity to

profitability.

“It’s been an evolution that

started more than 10 years ago,”

said Mike Granby, president of

Red Lion Controls. “We have

been helping to enable the IIoT

with cellular connectivity, protocol

conversions and automation from

before the concept even had a

name.”

In manufacturing, the drive

to boost productivity has long

meant a need for resources that

laid out data simply and clearly.

For years, one employee might

look at an individual machine’s

dials and tweak how it functioned.

Then an operator looked at the

cells of a machine while the

information was given to someone

in a supervisory control system,

Granby said.

Today, the IIoT allows data

from multiple factories to show

up in one place, offering a more

strategic view of the business as a

whole.

“At the end of the day,

companies are trying to do the

same things they’ve done for years,

which is to reduce downtime,

It’s been an evolution that started more than 10

years ago. We have been helping to enable the IIoT

with cellular connectivity, protocol conversions and

automation from before the concept even had a name.

MIKE GRANBY // PRESIDENT OF RED LION CONTROLS

8 TECHNOLOGY REPORT 2015 Central Penn Business Journal


Illustration/Submitted. Products offered by Red Lion Controls

improve inventory uses and boost

productivity,” said Brian Rosema,

director of IIoT Strategy with Red

Lion Controls. “Now we take all of

the display systems so we can see

them at once. The larger trends are

no longer a mystery.”

Using Red Lion’s remote units,

known as RAM 4G LTE cellular

RTUs, data is shared over a secure,

all-in-one platform that integrates

with existing equipment for

remote monitoring and control,

according to a news release. Red

Lion’s Data Station Plus and

Graphite HMI also work together

to enable communications from

different devices and different

manufacturers, the release states.

With an increase in

connectivity comes in an increased

need for data security, and Red

Lion Controls has implemented

several areas in which companies

can securely use the system.

Routers that limit network traffic

to certain users and Network

Address Translation (NAT) that

obscures inbound access help

minimize the risk of cyber attacks.

In some cases, factory-to-factory

and supply-chain-to-factory

securities use virtual tunnels to

transmit data.

IIOT continued on page 18

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9


Companies face raft of outlets for feedback, good and bad

BY COLIN SNYDER // CONTRIBUTING WRITER

It wasn’t that long ago that businesses

concerned about their online reputations

worried primarily about Google rankings.

Today, they have to monitor

not just search-engine results, but

also Facebook, Twitter, Instragram

and Glassdoor, a website where

employees past and present

purport to give unvarnished

opinions about their workplaces.

“Conversations about your

business are going on online

whether or not you are an active

participant,” said Julie Lando,

president of York-based Moxie

Design & Marketing, now doing

business as Grit Marketing Group.

“Having a strategy to monitor and

engage is critical to managing your

online reputation.”

Lando recently shared tips on

how to frame and approach the

challenge. Comments are edited

for space and clarity.

Q: WHAT ARE SOME BASIC

STEPS THAT A COMPANY CAN

TAKE TO BETTER MANAGE

THEIR ONLINE REPUTATION?

A: Many companies overlook the

importance of managing their

online reputations and are caught

off-guard by how to handle online

situations that can negatively

impact their reputations. The

best first step towards taking a

proactive approach to managing

your online reputation is to own

your search engine results page and

what people see when they search

your company’s name. Having an

active public relations strategy is a

good first step as well as blogging

frequently and claiming your

company’s pages on various social

media platforms. Then monitor

your brand through tools such as

Google Alerts, Twitter Search or

Trackur. It’s important to remain

diligent and active when it comes

to reputation management.

Q: WHAT ARE SOME

COMMON ISSUES INVOLVING

ONLINE REPUTATION

THAT A COMPANY COULD

EXPERIENCE?

10 TECHNOLOGY REPORT 2015 Central Penn Business Journal


A: The first and most prevalent

issue is regarding transparency. As

a company, opening yourself up

to criticism and feedback can be

extremely beneficial but also risky.

Companies need to be prepared

to respond and not hide criticism

while addressing it publicly when

asking for public feedback.

Also, websites such as

Glassdoor.com that rank

companies and their leadership

allow an online platform for both

current and former employees

to discuss the strengths and

weaknesses of companies,

including pay.

First impressions count,

and if something is coming up

negative on page one of Google,

it’s important to address it and

manage your online reputation.

Q: WHEN SHOULD

COMPANIES RESPOND TO

SOCIAL MEDIA POSTS?

A: Social media is all about “realtime”

interaction, an extension of

“real-life” customer interaction.

A company should monitor

and respond as soon as possible

to show that they are engaged

and available to its followers. If

responding within minutes isn’t

possible, you should respond

within 30 minutes to an hour max.

First impressions

COUNT,

and if something is coming

up negative on page one

of Google, it’s important to

address it and manage your

online reputation.

JULIE LANDO // PRESIDENT OF MOXIE DESIGN & MARKETING

Typically, companies should, at

the very least, respond within 24

hours. If a post is a question for

your company, you should respond

as soon as possible. If the post is

a comment or compliment, it can

wait an hour or until the end of

day, but in the meantime make

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13


WHAT TO DO WHEN

IT

SUPPORT

ENDS

BY JENNIFER DEINLEIN // CONTRIBUTING WRITER

TECHNOLOGY HAS ITS OWN LIFE

CYCLE. That cycle has become more

of a concern for businesses as suppliers

end tech support for many products.

Most notable of these is Microsoft’s

2014 move to end support for

Windows XP, an operating system

both popular and even necessary for

some programs to run.

So how can businesses function when support for

key technology ends? And how can they safely operate

without the ability to update regularly their protection

against vulnerabilities?

Midstate IT professionals agree: It takes planning

and care. It’s not easy, but it can be done. ➤

14 TECHNOLOGY REPORT 2015 Central Penn Business Journal


PLAN AHEAD

The end of a product’s life, and the subsequent

end of support, should not come as a surprise,

those in the IT field said. Suppliers offer

information on product life cycles, including the

end of support. Users need to plan ahead when

purchasing those products.

“A lot of these products, on a regular basis,

are being phased out,” said Nathan Balagopal,

president of Harrisburg-based Domino

Technologies Inc. “Vendors typically support

a product for about 10 years, then they have a

newer product to replace the existing product.”

Alan Estes, business development manager

for GDC IT Solutions in Chambersburg, said his

company encourages clients to adapt a set rotation

plan for hardware. The optimum rotation is about

four to five years, he said, but some clients cannot

afford that and go to a six-to-eight-year rotation.

One client of York-based Coulson

Technologies still runs two XP

computers because the software

necessary for its business only

runs on that operating system. A

hardware and software upgrade

would cost approximately $50,000.

SUPPORT continued on page 17

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TECHNOLOGY REPORT 2015


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get into this area need to tread

carefully because if you don’t

have experts who understand the

liability of doing this work, you

could go under.”

With that in mind, as

accounting firms spend more

money to beef up their own

cybersecurity, offering IT expertise

to outside clients helps pay for

itself and boost their image in the

marketplace.

Michael Cohn , the New

York-based editor in chief of

AccountingToday.com , a site

dedicated to industry news, said

accounting firms that want to stay

competitive need to offer the latest

accounting technology to existing

clients, but they also need a techsharp

appearance to lure new

clients. Adding IT affiliates is one

way to do both.

“It’s something a lot of firms

look to as a way to show that

they’re future-oriented and savvy,

that they can deal with emerging

technologies and advise clients

on the latest and greatest tools

they should be using,” Cohn said.

“Unless an accounting firm shows

they’re tech savvy, they might end

up losing the client.” <

IMAGE continued from page 11

sure to “like” it to acknowledge.

For negative feedback, determine

if you are going to respond and

then act — do not let the negative

comment linger. An easy way

to monitor comments is to set

notifications for social media

interactions and to handle them

throughout the day.

Q: HOW SHOULD A COMPANY

RESPOND TO NEGATIVE

SOCIAL MEDIA POSTS?

A: Just like real-time negative

feedback, companies should

remember that the client always

wins and that the goal is for

customers to be happy with their

experience. When responding

to negative feedback, one

should promote a message of

understanding, care and desire

to fix the problem. Providing

a solution to the feedback and

enticing the customer to further

follow up through email or phone

is a good way to answer. Saying

something along the lines of,

“We take customer happiness

very seriously and would love

to hear more about how we can

create a positive experience for

you. Please give us a call/email

at XXX with additional details,

and we will be sure to look into

this.” A good rule of thumb for

answering negative comments is

to treat the user in the same way

that you would treat a friend you

care about. Make sure to step out

of victim mode and to be in the

right frame of mind. Come from

a place of compassion and show

that you want to proactively turn

that negative into a positive.

Q: WHEN IS IT BEST TO STAY

SILENT ON A SOCIAL MEDIA

POST, EVEN IF YOU REALLY,

REALLY, REALLY WANT TO

RESPOND?

A: This is situational. If the

post is negative without any real

complaints or backing, ignore

it. If the content is inappropriate

(for example if the post includes

inappropriate language), you can

consider deleting it; however, you

should avoid deleting comments

just because they are negative.

Tucking away pride and anger

is key when interacting with

customers on social media. If

your gut instinct is that answering

will further the negativity,

then hold out on responding.

Sometimes, staying silent or

giving options for the user to

move the conversation offline is

the best choice, especially if you

are a popular brand with followers

who may come to your defense

without your involvement. <

16 TECHNOLOGY REPORT 2015 Central Penn Business Journal


SUPPORT

continued from page 15

UPGRADES NOT

ALWAYS FEASIBLE

But for some businesses,

an upgrade is simply not

feasible at the time support

ends. This may be due to

costs, but often is because

their technology needs require

continued use of a product.

Microsoft’s move away from

Windows XP was a significant

example, so how can companies

continue to safely use XP?

“Most of the clients we deal

with have software that still

works with XP, so they’re looking

for a quick fix or long-term

solution,” said Chris Coulson,

owner of Coulson Technologies

in York. “Is there a newer version

(of the software) that runs on

a Windows 7 or 8 computer?

We may have to look at cloud

solutions.”

Coulson cited one client that

still runs two XP computers

because the software necessary

for its business only runs on that

operating system. A hardware

and software upgrade would cost

approximately $50,000, he said.

The solution? Isolation.

“Disconnect from the network

and Internet,” he said. “Don’t

even use a USB drive. Isolate that

machine as much as possible. Get

all other business processes on

another computer and just limit

that use as much as possible.”

COST-EFFECTIVE

IN THE LONG RUN

While the cost of upgrading a

product or even an entire system

may seem daunting to a business,

in the long run it is worth it,

from a cost and productivity

standpoint, IT professionals said.

“Taking the precautions of

disconnecting your computers

and doing things off line,

you’re actually losing time and

productivity for staff, because

they have to do things on another

computer,” Coulson said.

And the improvements to the

product often pay for themselves,

Estes noted.

“The bare-bone efficiencies

of the (new) computer pay for

the upgrade,” he said. “Less

headaches and troubleshooting.

The machine might be the

same cost as six years ago, but

what you’re getting is 10 times

better — more memory, bigger,

faster hard drives. It should get

you more efficiency and less

problematic hardware failure and

inconsistencies with software.”

“Use that opportunity to

improve your systems so you have

a critical advantage and improve

the efficiency of your operations,”

Balagopal said. “We are now in a

technology age that things change

so fast, there are a lot of benefits

by using newer technologies.” <

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STEM continued from page 5 IIOT continued from page 9

In tandem with its existing

internships that take up to 50

students annually, Highmark

offers jobs to the best and brightest

before they even start interviewing

for jobs elsewhere. Those hires

arrive for work already knowing

the business. And with plenty of

opportunities for advancement,

they’re inclined to stay.

The effort pays off

for Highmark — and the

region as a whole.

“We don’t have as much

turnover. We have a very tenured

staff,” Stefanic said. “It’s cheaper

to train someone from the inside

than hire from outside and start

all over again. It can take up to six

months to get someone trained

and acclimated, and productivity

is higher when you hire from

within. And once they’re in

central PA and see how much

our community has to offer,

people don’t want to leave.”<

Red Lion also was intentional

in allowing the IIoT to work with

legacy equipment, Granby said.

It didn’t make sense to

sell a solution that required a

manufacturer to rip out everything

they had,” he said. “It’s easier to

start in a new factory, but part of

the key was to make it affordable

for companies that have been

around for some time.”

Red Lion reports that many

manufacturers saw a return on

their investment within six months

of using the hardware.

“We’re not in the business of

telling people how to run their

factory but providing them with

the tools they need to run it,”

Granby said. “There’s the IT

world, the cloud world and then

the world of the shop floor. As

IIoT takes off, I see a deeper

and broader use in terms of the

customer’s imagination.” <

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18 TECHNOLOGY REPORT 2015 Central Penn Business Journal


Database mgt. and software development firms

www.CPBJ.com

TECHNOLOGY REPORT 2015

19


Regional technology occupations

Ranked by average salary

Rank Prev.

rank

Profession

( Standard occupation code )

2014 average

salary

% change from

2013

Adams

County

Cumberland

County

Dauphin

County

Lancaster

County

Lebanon

County

Perry

County

York

County

Background/training

1

3 COMPUTER AND INFORMATION RESEARCH

SCIENTISTS

( 15-1111 )

$124,890

15.61%

$124,890 $124,890 $124,890 NA $124,890 $124,890 $124,890 Doctorate

2

1 TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT MANAGERS

( 11-3131 )

$111,281

-0.77%

$111,630 $94,830 $104,430 $133,190 $111,630 $111,630 $111,630 Bachelor's degree plus

experience

3

2 COMPUTER AND INFORMATION-SYSTEMS

MANAGERS

( 11-3021 )

$109,264

-2.47%

$93,660 $121,630 $115,410 $97,960 $91,140 $118,380 $126,670 Bachelor's degree plus

experience

4

6 INFORMATION SECURITY ANALYSTS

( 15-1122 )

$87,143

0.09%

$87,930 $79,510 $83,800 $80,180 $87,930 $87,930 $102,720 Bachelor's degree plus

experience

5

4 SYSTEMS SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS

( 15-1133 )

$86,581

-5.21%

$86,660 $85,760 $96,560 $85,670 $86,660 $86,660 $78,100 Bachelor's degree

6

5 COMPUTER-HARDWARE ENGINEERS

( 17-2061 )

$83,081

-7.2%

$82,730 $77,030 $98,870 $86,510 $82,730 $82,730 $70,970 Bachelor's degree

7

7 COMPUTER-NETWORK ARCHITECTS

( 15-1143 )

$81,507

-1.9%

$78,930 $85,530 $78,990 $88,020 $78,930 $78,930 $81,220 Bachelor's degree plus

experience

8

10 OTHER COMPUTER OCCUPATIONS

( 15-1199 )

$79,664

4.47%

$81,030 $84,790 $71,680 $79,710 $71,560 $81,030 $87,850 Bachelor's degree

9

8 SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS DEVELOPERS

( 15-1132 )

$79,193

0.94%

$79,240 $79,990 $76,800 $75,610 $78,590 $79,240 $84,880 Bachelor's degree

10

9 COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS

( 15-1121 )

$76,377

-2.3%

$83,140 $76,740 $72,180 $70,300 $83,180 $74,190 $74,910 Bachelor's degree

11

16 COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS

( 15-1131 )

$70,950

4.22%

$58,080 $73,430 $74,820 $67,500 $79,380 $72,300 $71,140 Bachelor's degree

12

12 DATABASE ADMINISTRATORS

( 15-1141 )

$70,209

-1.71%

$73,920 $71,850 $71,290 $73,710 $70,280 $70,280 $60,130 Bachelor's degree plus

experience

13

13 POSTSECONDARY COMPUTER SCIENCE

TEACHERS

( 25-1021 )

$70,047

1.29%

$68,260 $61,670 $85,690 $80,920 $68,260 $68,260 $57,270 Doctorate

14

11 NETWORK AND COMPUTER SYSTEMS

ADMINISTRATORS

( 15-1142 )

$69,309

-6.92%

$68,920 $70,740 $71,880 $67,700 $69,240 $70,550 $66,130 Bachelor's degree

15

15 OPERATIONS RESEARCH ANALYSTS

( 15-2031 )

$68,743

-0.21%

$67,880 $71,490 $61,100 $74,230 $67,880 $67,880 $70,740 Bachelor's degree

16

14 COMPUTER AND MATHEMATICAL

OCCUPATIONS

( 15-0000 )

$68,429

-0.87%

$56,300 $72,510 $71,370 $67,930 $61,030 $78,090 $71,770 NA

17

17 TECHNICAL WRITERS

( 27-3042 )

$65,173

5.48%

$62,790 $59,400 $72,560 $73,090 $62,790 $62,790 $62,790 Bachelor's degree plus

experience

18

19 COMPUTER-NETWORK SUPPORT

SPECIALISTS

( 15-1152 )

$59,843

14.36%

$51,620 $63,220 $62,370 $58,780 $62,150 $62,150 $58,610 Associate degree

19

18 WEB DEVELOPERS

( 15-1134 )

$55,143

-10.17%

$57,960 $57,970 $60,770 $51,300 $42,610 $57,960 $57,430 Associate degree

20

21 COMPUTER-USER SUPPORT SPECIALISTS

( 15-1151 )

$46,360

4.81%

$34,550 $48,140 $53,660 $45,120 $44,380 $49,280 $49,390 Postsecondary training plus

experience

21

23 AUDIO-VISUAL AND MULTIMEDIA

COLLECTIONS SPECIALISTS

( 25-9011 )

$44,040

14.82%

$44,040 $44,040 $44,040 NA $44,040 $44,040 $44,040 Bachelor's degree plus

experience

22

22 COMPUTER OPERATORS

( 43-9011 )

$40,653

-0.68%

$40,480 $39,310 $44,490 $41,990 NA $40,480 $37,170 Medium-term on-the-job

training

NA-not available The Central Penn Business Journal's list of regional technology occupations is based on occupational-wage data from the Pennsylvania Department of Labor &

Industry and limited to occupations for which county or regional information was available. To access the Business Journal's online database, visit www.CPBJ.com/ListCentral.

Surveys available at www.CPBJsurveys.info; follow @CPBJListCentral on Twitter. Published Nov. 27, 2015.

Researched by Alaine Keisling

20 TECHNOLOGY REPORT 2015 Central Penn Business Journal


Systems integrators

Ranked by local systems-integration revenue

Rank Prev. Company

rank Address

2014 local

systems

integration/total

revenue

Top local executive

Title

Website

Phone

F-T/P-T local emp.

Local/total locations

Headquarters

Year estab. locally

Services provided

1 1 MOREFIELD

COMMUNICATIONS INC.

35 N. 35th St.

Camp Hill, PA 17011-2797

2 SAGE TECHNOLOGY

2 SOLUTIONS INC.

1040 W. Main St.

Mount Joy, PA 17552

NR STANLEY CONVERGENT

3 SECURITY SOLUTIONS INC.

34 Woburn Abbey Ave.

Camp Hill, PA 17011

9 PIERSON COMPUTING

4 CONNECTION INC.

6 N. Frederick St.

Mechanicsburg, PA 17055

NR BUSINESS INFORMATION

5 GROUP INC.

156 N. George St.

York, PA 17401

3 GES AUTOMATION

6 TECHNOLOGY INC.

2020 Greenwood St.

Harrisburg, PA 17104

7 4 PRISMWORKS

TECHNOLOGY INC.

520 Hershey Road

Hummelstown, PA 17036-9414

5 GLOBAL DATA

8 CONSULTANTS LLC

1144 Kennebec Drive

Chambersburg, PA 17201

NR CSB TECHNOLOGY

9 PARTNERS LLC

1595 S. Mount Joy St., Suite 109

Elizabethtown, PA 17022

6 RKL ESOLUTIONS LLC

10 1800 Fruitville Pike

P.O. Box 8408

Lancaster, PA 17604-8408

11 7 APPALACHIA

TECHNOLOGIES LLC

5012 Lenker St.

Mechanicsburg, PA 17050

10 ANNAGEN LLC DBA

12 NETREPID

2330 Vartan Way, Suite 185

Harrisburg, PA 17110

11 DOMINO

13 TECHNOLOGIES INC.

2001 N. Front St., Suite 334

Harrisburg, PA 17102-2109

16 PHILLIPS OFFICE

14 PRODUCTS INC. DBA

PHILLIPS OFFICE

SOLUTIONS

501 Fulling Mill Road

Middletown, PA 17057

14 MAIN STREET

15 SOFTWARE INC.

172 Main St.

Landisville, PA 17538

$19.13 million

$24 million

$12.50 million

$12.50 million

$10 million

DNR

$6.92 million

$7.23 million

$6.49 million

$14.13 million

$6.37 million

$8.49 million

$5.40 million

$5.40 million

$4.50 million

$36.50 million

$4.09 million

$4.09 million

$3.50 million

$9.10 million

$3.50 million

$3.50 million

$1.50 million

$4 million

$1.45 million

$6.04 million

$1.14 million

$41.10 million

$1.07 million

$1.29 million

John D. Morefield

President

Daniel L. Rohrer

President

Michael Jaworowski

Regional sales

manager

Debra A. Pierson

President

Scott A. Dolmetsch

CEO

Gary E. Slatt

President

Mike J. Glumac

Owner

Gregory D. Courtney

President and CEO

Jason Moyer and

Timothy Maier

Partners

Joe L. Noll

President

Larry Arnold

General manager

Samuel D. Coyl

President

Nathan Balagopal

President

Peter H. Phillips

President

Valerie S. Aubry

President

www.morefield.com

717-761-6170

800-382-1266

www.sagetechs.com

717-653-6641

www.stanleycss.com

717-648-5506

877-766-4876

www.piersoncci.com

717-796-0493

www.4service.net

717-854-9983

877-508-9983

www.gestech.com

717-236-8733

www.prismworks.net

717-566-8100

866-403-7300

www.gdcitsolutions.com

717-262-2080

866-966-4562

www.csbtech.net

717-689-3990

www.rklesolutions.com

717-735-9109

www.appalachiatech.com

717-918-3301

888-277-8320

www.netrepid.com

717-730-0780

800-577-6981

www.dominotech.net

717-730-6265

www.buyphillips.com

717-944-0400

800-538-7500

www.mssinc.com

717-898-2946

877-898-2946

89/8

1/2

Hampden Twp.

1945

54/1

1/1

Mount Joy

1993

30/0

1/75

Naperville, Ill.

1985

7/20

2/2

Silver Spring Twp.

1993

67/3

1/1

York

1992

28/1

1/1

Harrisburg

1986

12/8

1/2

W. Hanover Twp.

2002

222/13

4/6

Chambersburg

1995

9/0

1/1

Elizabethtown

2005

18/0

1/6

Manheim Twp.

2007

30/5

1/1

Hampden Twp.

2004

19/0

1/1

Susquehanna Twp.

2013

52/3

2/2

Harrisburg

1996

116/4

4/6

Lower Swatara Twp.

1940

10/0

1/1

E. Hempfield Twp.

1984

Technology and IT services, VoIP,

computer networking, video

conferencing, security, audiovisual;

enterprise and small business

Communications systems integrator;

voice, data, wireless, video, sound,

security

Intrusion detection, access control,

video surveillance, fire detection,

integrated systems

Wireless network analysis and design;

server consulting and implementation;

audio/video, PC, laptop and peripherals

installation; networking equipment

24/7 IT support services and consulting

for businesses: networking, application

development and wireless

communication

Industrial automation, including controls

systems integration, process design and

engineering and information technology

Technology consulting and hardware for

education, government and commercial

customers

Application development, networking

and infrastructure, desktop support,

telephony and cabling, hardware sales

and deployment, 24/7 technical service

IP communications, network security,

wired and wireless networking,

virtualization and storage

Information systems, integration and

Sage ERP

IT professional services, consulting and

integration services

Data center

Network design and administration,

router administration, firewall design,

security auditing, software installation,

disaster-recovery planning

Document, project and asset

management; managed networks,

workplace design, furniture installation

and cleaning, office moving, HR

outsourcing

IT managed services, business continuity

and disaster recovery, network

integration, depot and on-site repair

service, mid-range accounting

DBA-doing business as DNR-did not respond NA-not applicable NR-not ranked

The Central Penn Business Journal's list of systems integrators is limited to those in or near Adams, Cumberland, Dauphin, Lancaster, Lebanon, Perry or York counties. Information

came from the individual companies and other Business Journal research. To access the Business Journal's online database, visit www.CPBJ.com/ListCentral. Surveys available at

www.CPBJsurveys.info; follow @CPBJListCentral on Twitter. Published Sept. 25, 2015; updated Oct. 29, 2015.

Researched by Alaine Keisling

www.CPBJ.com

TECHNOLOGY REPORT 2015

21


Computer consultants

Ranked by local revenue

Rank

Prev.

rank

Company

Address

2014 local/total

revenue

Top local executive

Title

Website

Phone

Local F-T/P-T emp.

Local/total

locations

Headquarters

Year estab. locally

Consulting expertise

1

2

1 PHILLIPS OFFICE PRODUCTS

INC. DBA PHILLIPS OFFICE

SOLUTIONS

501 Fulling Mill Road

Middletown, PA 17057

2 GLOBAL DATA

CONSULTANTS LLC

1144 Kennebec Drive

Chambersburg, PA 17201

$37.82 million

$41.1 million

$30 million

$36.5 million

Peter H. Phillips

President

Gregory D. Courtney

President and CEO

www.buyphillips.com

717-944-0400

800-538-7500

www.gdcitsolutions.com

717-262-2080

866-966-4562

116/4 Project and managed network services,

4/6 electronic content management

Lower Swatara Twp.

1940

222/13

4/6

Chambersburg

1995

Software selection; server architecture

and design; security, technology and IT

organizational assessments, project

management

3

NR BUSINESS INFORMATION

GROUP INC.

156 N. George St.

York, PA 17401

$14.13 million

$14.13 million

Scott A. Dolmetsch

CEO

www.4service.net

717-854-9983

877-508-9983

67/3

1/1

York

1992

Network and wireless infrastructure

design; IT planning; risk assessment; IT

policy development and implementation;

IT audits

4

NR MOMENTUM INC.

2120 Market St., Suite 100

Camp Hill, PA 17011-4709

$9.3 million

$9.3 million

S. Clay; L. Daniels

and K.L. Sarabok

Principals

www.m-inc.com

717-214-8000

51/2

1/1

Camp Hill

1998

Business analysis, project management,

organizational change management,

training, facilitation, implementation

support

5

3 GES AUTOMATION

TECHNOLOGY INC.

2020 Greenwood St.

Harrisburg, PA 17104

$8.49 million

$8.49 million

Gary E. Slatt

President

www.gestech.com

717-236-8733

28/1

1/1

Harrisburg

1986

Industrial automation applications

including controls systems and

information technology for manufacturing

6

14 PIERSON COMPUTING

CONNECTION INC.

6 N. Frederick St.

Mechanicsburg, PA 17055

$7.23 million

$7.23 million

Debra A. Pierson

President

www.piersoncci.com

717-796-0493

7/20

2/2

Silver Spring Twp.

1993

Project management of complex,

multiple-location installation; technology

infrastructure installation, including e-

classroom equipment, servers, PCs

7

4 TARGET MEDIA MID ATLANTIC

INC. DBA TARGET SYSTEMS

700 Bent Creek Blvd.

Mechanicsburg, PA 17050-1875

$6.39 million

$8.65 million

Virginia J. Kenyon

CEO

www.target-sys.com

717-795-8646

39/3

1/3

Silver Spring Twp.

1994

Single- and multi-platform networks,

custom Web-based applications and

software, training, system security project

management, application integration

8

5 DOMINO TECHNOLOGIES INC.

2001 N. Front St., Suite 334

Harrisburg, PA 17102-2109

$6.04 million

$6.04 million

Nathan Balagopal

President

www.dominotech.net

717-730-6265

52/3

2/2

Harrisburg

1996

Custom app development, database

programming, Web-based training, Web

design, business-process reengineering,

network design, server virtualization

9

7 RKL ESOLUTIONS LLC

1800 Fruitville Pike, P.O. Box 8408

Lancaster, PA 17604-8408

$5.5 million

$9.1 million

Joe L. Noll

President

www.rklesolutions.com

717-735-9109

18/0

1/6

Manheim Twp.

2007

VMware, Cisco, Exchange, SAN, SQL

Server, Sage ERP X3, Sage ERP 500 and

Sage ERP 100

10

9 TCW COMPUTER

SYSTEMS INC.

254 S. Esbenshade Road

Manheim, PA 17366-9129

$4.13 million

$4.13 million

Lamar S. Weaver

President

www.tcwcomputers.com

717-653-2700

888-228-7779

24/2

1/1

Rapho Twp.

1993

Windows/networking, server/WS

virtualization, VPN/remote access, VoIP

telephony, Wi-Fi, network security,

remote backup, disaster recovery

11

NR CSB TECHNOLOGY

PARTNERS LLC

1595 S. Mount Joy St., Suite 109

Elizabethtown, PA 17022

$4.09 million

$4.09 million

Jason Moyer and

Timothy Maier

Partners

www.csbtech.net

717-689-3990

9/0

1/1

Elizabethtown

2005

Network integration, VoIP, wireless,

network security and virtualization

12

13 ANNAGEN LLC DBA NETREPID

2330 Vartan Way, Suite 185

Harrisburg, PA 17110

$4 million

$4 million

Samuel D. Coyl

President

www.netrepid.com

717-730-0780

800-577-6981

19/0

1/1

Susquehanna Twp.

2013

Evolving technology to the cloud with

hosted infrastructure and software

services; helps eliminate capex and

focuses on opex. relative to production

13

8 CONESTOGA DATA SERVICES

INC. DBA CDS GROUP

46 E. King St.

Lancaster, PA 17602

$3.8 million

$3.8 million

Ren Baker

Chairman and CEO

www.cdsgroup.com

717-569-7728

888-309-8002

18/0

1/1

Lancaster

1981

End-to-end analysis; designs and

supports non-core, but critical,

automated-edge business processes;

enterprise-class data collection; storage

14

15 APPALACHIA

TECHNOLOGIES LLC

5012 Lenker St.

Mechanicsburg, PA 17050

$3.5 million

$3.5 million

Larry Arnold

General manager

www.appalachiatech.com

717-918-3301

888-277-8320

30/5

1/1

Hampden Twp.

2004

Project management, comprehensive

security services, PCI compliance, VoIP,

managed services, NOC/SOC services,

network design and integration

15

18 SUSAN GRAHAM

CONSULTING LLC

111 Cocoa Ave., P.O. Box 625

Hershey, PA 17033

$2.7 million

$2.7 million

Susan Graham

President

www.susangconsulting.com

717-533-4470

35/2

1/1

Derry Twp.

2006

Information technology direct placement

and staffing augmentation services

including developers, Web designers,

project managers, account executives

DBA-doing business as DNR-did not respond NA-not applicable NR-not ranked

The Central Penn Business Journal's list of computer consultants is limited to those in or near Adams, Cumberland, Dauphin, Lancaster, Lebanon, Perry or York counties. Information

came from the individual companies and other Business Journal research. To access the Business Journal's online database, visit www.CentralPennBusiness.com/ListCentral.

Surveys available at www.CPBJsurveys.info; follow @CPBJListCentral on Twitter. Published Nov. 27, 2015.

Researched by Alaine Keisling

22 TECHNOLOGY REPORT 2015 Central Penn Business Journal


Transforming Retail

Listrak is a digital marketing

automation company that works

with retailers like LUSH, Oscar de

la Renta, Burpee and Waterford

to reach shoppers through email,

mobile, social, web, display and

in-store channels to help them

grow their businesses.

Headquartered in

Lancaster County

www.listrak.com

www.CPBJ.com

TECHNOLOGY REPORT 2015

23

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