Cosmetic Surgery & Beauty Magazine #70

bellamedia

genital

lasers&

gynaecology

ADELAIDE GYNAECOLOGIST AND

PELVIC RECONSTRUCTION SURGEON

DR OSEKA ONUMA DISCUSSES THE

GROWING POPUALRITY OF LASERS

IN THE GYNAECOLOGY SECTOR.

Lasers are one of the most well-known tools of medicine

today, and there is a huge variety of lasers with very

specific applications in many industries. Within

medicine, lasers were originally used for their destructive,

excisional and coagulation properties and recently they

have become synonymous with cosmetic medicine and

facial rejuvenation.

Gynaecology was one of the earlier adopters of laser

technology. In 1973 it was used to treat erosions of the

cervix, and soon after for excising or coagulating cervical

pre-cancer lesions and fallopian tube micro-surgery. The

CO 2

laser, originally developed in 1961 was the first laser

used in gynaecological practice in 1973. It was the cost

of laser technology, particularly in the 1990s, which limited

its wider adoption.

In gynaecological practice, depending on the doctor’s

preference and availability, lasers can be used to treat

endometriosis, utero-sacral nerve ablation, division of

adhesions, excision/ablation of cervical and vulval lesions

and ovarian/fallopian tube surgery.

Within the past 20 years, there has been an addition to

the scope of gynaecological use of lasers: the improvement

of quality of life issues such as sexual function. Laser

Vaginal Rejuvenation (LVR), a term coined by a US

gynaecologist, refers to a technique of using a diode laser

as a cutting/dissecting tool when performing prolapse

surgery - surgery designed to correct physical defects but

not addressing sexual issues, rather, simply concerned with

the size of a lump. Laser-assisted vaginal surgery is a more

accurate description of this treatment.

Lasers are now being used in

gynaecology to improve quality of

life issues such as sexual function

The surgery remains controversial, not due to its efficacy

but rather because the concept of female sexual function

is not routinely taught in specialist gynaecological training.

There has been a struggle to place women and their needs

at the forefront of treatment and this remains a significant

issue in current gynaecological practice. A variety of

terminologies, seemingly pejorative, such as vaginoplasty,

vaginal rejuvenation, cosmetic gynaecology, cosmetogynaecology,

designer vagina, has been used for laserassisted

vaginal therapy adding to the controversy.

78 www.cosbeauty.com.au