yearbook

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the

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2016

from the creators of Personal Trainer magazine

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Hello!

Because we love you brilliant bunch so much for supporting

Personal Trainer every month, we’ve put together a fantastic

New Year present for all of our subscribers. Welcome to your

Personal Trainer Yearbook 2016, the ultimate nutrition and

workout guide to kick start your January regime in style.

Whether you want to tone your upper body, strengthen your

core, or rack up a 10km, we have programmes to help you

achieve your goals, as well as a whole host of lip smacking

recipes that prove healthy eating is anything but dull.

We hope you enjoy the ebook! Please do get in touch with

your feedback at katie@ptmagazine.co.uk

Katie x

@PTMagazine

/PTMagazine

www.ptmagazine.co.uk

PUBLISHER Myles Davies | GROUP EDITOR Victoria Guthrie | EDITOR Katie Scott katie@ptmagazine.co.uk

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inside...

06 11

BREAKFAST LUNCH

DINNER

21

DESSERT

27

SNACKS

32

SHAKES

37

WARM UPS

76

PLANS

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50

WORKOUTS

89

COOL DOWNS

4

exclusive

tips & tricks

from your

favourite

industry

experts


© wow.subtropica | shutterstock.com


nutrition

Morning

munchies

Fitness blogger and Swedish personal trainer Faya Nilsson

shows why breakfast is the most important meal of the day

Muesli makes up an

absolutely core part

of my daily nutrition;

it’s the raw calorific

breakfast overflowing with

the essential vitamins and

minerals to fuel me for the day

ahead. I’m not talking about

pre-fabricated supermarketsourced

muesli which tends

to be long on sugar and short

on nutrients, but something

altogether more bespoke

and nourishing.

The following 10 ingredients

are those which I consider

crucial in my current muesli:

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nutrition

1 Oats

I opt for organic, whole rolled

gluten free porridge oats. Whilst

all oats are gluten free, be

aware that some are handled in

factories that cannot claim to

be gluten free. Regardless, all are

complex carbs and low GI for

slow-release energy throughout

the morning.

2 Chia seeds

They feature in every healthy

blog I follow, legitimately

making them ‘all the rage’.

Understandably so, because

about half of each seed is

‘dietary fibre’ (you need to eat

only 25g of seeds to tick off a

third of your RDA), they’re rich

in omega 3 (13g per 100g) for

mental health, have calcium and

phosphorus for bone and teeth

strength, and boast about 14g

of protein per 100g too. But

my favourite part is the natural

Tryptophan content – an amino

acid which helps to regulate

sleep and appetite, plus it picks

up the mood too.

3 Sunflower seeds

Mono and polyunsaturate

rich, with heaps of folic acid

and antioxidants for healthy

cell regeneration. They’re a

long term staple of my

muesli recipes.

4 Toasted almond flakes

These add about 10

dimensions to the flavour of

the overall muesli. It develops a

burnt-caramel essence in your

mouth because of the toasting

process. They also happen to

reduce bad LDL cholesterol,

strengthen bones and teeth

thanks to their phosphorous

content and help to control

spikes in blood sugar

after meals.

5 Pumpkin seeds

These little gems promote the

production of seratonin, your

natural sleeping pill, plus each

seed is about 30% protein.

6 Toasted pine nuts

Yes, they’re rich in vitamin

E for healthy skin, vitamin

B for digestion, and monounsaturates

that reduce bad

cholesterol, but the ‘toasted’

part is the key – it develops

a lot of extra flavour, and

reduces the fat content by

20%, whilst preserving the

overall monounsaturate

benefits of these tasty little

seeds. Toasting ‘may actually

improve the bioavailability of

some bioactive compounds’

according to Cornell University.

7 Organic

milled flaxseed

20g of protein per 100g, it’s

a rich source of dietary fibre

and omega 3 fatty acids,

plus lowers cholesterol and

stabilises blood sugar. Very low

in sodium too, and because

it’s milled, it’s more easily

absorbed and processed by

the body.

8

Chopped dried apricots

A fabulous source of dietary

fibre, plus vitamin A for

healthier eyesight and vitamin

C for immune strength. Also,

there’s a lower sugar content

than most of the other dried

fruits found in muesli.

9 Dried blueberries

Even after drying, they retain

all their antioxidant properties.

The only difference is that

the sugar content per berry

is higher as there’s no water.

That means that I like to

limit the absolute amount I

use per serving to a quarter

of a cup (which should only

contain around 11g sugar, the

equivalent of an entire cup’s

worth of fresh blueberries).

They make a wonderful

difference to the texture and

taste of the muesli, and at that

time in the morning, you need

some natural, simple sugars.

10 Raw, shelled hemp

A bonafide superfood to my

mind. Super rich in easily

digestible proteins and dietary

fibre, there’s no foodstuff that

can match up to the sheer

amounts of essential fatty

acids in these seeds, not even

the mighty flax, and the ratio

of omega 3 to 6 is thought

to be conducive to a healthy

constitution. They also contain

a complete list of the essential

amino acids, which is a fabulous

way to access high quality

protein from vegetable sources.

I always add fresh blueberries

or some type of berries on top

with my almond milk to serve.

Each 150g serving of this

muesli, excluding almond milk,

contains 580 good calories for

an energetic start to the day,

with just 5g of saturated fat

(0 transfats), 56g of carbs (of

which only 16g are sugars),

28g of protein, and 15% of

your daily iron intake. With

added benefits like healthier

skin, better circulation,

stronger heart function and

lower cholesterol, it’s surely

the best way to start any day.

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nutrition

Sweet Potato Pancakes and

Homemade Jam

Sweet potato has a

glycemic load of nine,

which is super low for

a food who’s calories

come from carbs (93%) – that’s

a very low GI, for slow release

energy throughout the day.

They’re also a strong source of

beta-carotene (which converts

into vitamin A for healthy skin,

an immune boost and strong

vision), are high in dietary fibre

(for effective digestion and

absorption, along with heart

and blood benefits from the

vitamin B6 content), very low

in sodium, with practically no

fat content (and 0g saturates),

contains peonidins and

cyanidins (antioxidant and

anti-inflammatory properties

to maintain the body). They

are also high in potassium

to lower blood pressure by

banishing excess sodium

and regulating the body’s

fluid balance.

The carrots contribute an

additional sweetness and

flavour to the pancakes.

They’re also rich in dietary fibre

to promote better digestion,

vitamin A for healthy vision,

and are proven to reduce the

risk of cardiovascular disease.

The main purpose of the eggs

is to help bind the potato and

carrots. Nevertheless, they

contribute a good amount

of protein (13g protein per

100g), and are very low in

carbohydrates (1g per 100g).

Ingredients:

• 200g of sweet potato

• 200g of carrots

• 2 eggs

• 0.5tsp pink salt

• Black pepper

• Coconut butter for frying

• Low fat cottage cheese

• 13tbsp of water

• 3tbsp chia seeds

• 1tbsp of UMF 10+ Manuka

honey (I used this Comvita

UMF 10+ honey for my jam)

• 1tsp of vanilla extract

• A generous handful of

berries of your choice. I

used a mix of raspberries,

blueberries

and blackcurrants

For the pancakes:

Start by boiling the sweet

1 potato whole for about

10-15 minutes or until tender.

Let them cool off and peel

the skin. Make sure you avoid

peeling and cutting it first as

it creates a larger surface area

which increases the amount of

oxidation. This in turn will take

away more of the nutrients.

Grate the potatoes

2

3

and carrots.

Whisk the eggs in a

bowl. Add a pinch of

pink salt and black pepper.

Finally add the grated carrots

and potatoes.

4

Heat the tiniest amount

of coconut butter in

frying pan . Add small fist sized

pancakes (I personally prefer

mine thinner and crispier) and

gently flatten them with a

spatula. Fry them on a medium

heat, allowing a few minutes

on each side.

5

Serve with some low fat

cottage cheese and top

with homemade jam.

For the homemade jam:

Pour water into a bowl

1 and add the chia seeds.

Stir, and keep stirring every 10

minutes or so for about 20 to

30 minutes.

2

Let the chia seeds absorb

the water and expand for

at least an hour or, better still,

overnight in the fridge.

Mush the berries with a

3 fork or using your clean

hands and pop on top.

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nutrition

Blueberry and Almond

Protein Shake

Be inventive and make your own

protein powder recipes! Rather

than some horrific chemical

tasting ‘banana’ concoction, why

not try adding almonds, oats,

chia seeds, hemp seeds, frozen

or fresh blueberries, blackberries

and plain yoghurt to thicken the

texture, diversify the flavour and

inject some nutrients. This is one

of my personal favourite protein

recipes which is super easy to

make. A great start to the day,

a strong boost before/during a

workout, and an excellent reload

after a tough session.

Ingredients:

• 1/2 cup unsweetened

almond milk

• 1 cup mixed blueberries

• 2 to 4 ice cubes

• 2 scoops of vanilla protein

powder (though flavour of

your choice)

• 5 whole almonds

Method:

Blend all ingredients for 30

1 seconds on high power.

Enjoy within 30 minutes

post workout. Simple!

2

Based in the West End of

London, Swedish personal

trainer and fitness blogger

Faya started her blog,

Fitness on Toast, back in

January 2013 as a way to

share her food, fashion and

fitness experience with her

wealth of clients. See more

of what Faya has to say at

www.fitnessontoast.com

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Try to consume

between 2.2l

and 2.5l litres

of water per

day from your

food and drink.

© worldlion | shutterstock.com


nutrition

lunching

lets get

Health expert Claire

Rother shares

these healthy lunch

time dishes to help

beat hunger pangs

Prep time:

Cooking time:

Total time:

5 minutes

10 minutes

15 minutes

Cabbage Satay Stir Fry

with Sweet Potato and

Buckwheat Noodles

Ingredients:

• ½ small savoy cabbage,

thinly shredded

• 1 small white onion, chopped

• 1tbsp coconut cream

• ¼ - ½ tsp chilli flakes

• 1 clove garlic, chopped

• 1tbsp crunchy peanut

butter

• 1tbsp fresh lemon juice

• 3tsp tamari soy sauce

• 2tsp sesame seed oil

• 2tbsp boiling water

• 1 2x2cm piece of ginger,

finely chopped

• Small handful chopped fresh

coriander

• 1 portion King Soba sweet

potato and buckwheat

noodles (or rice noodles if

unavailable)

Method:

In a small bowl, mix

1 together the boiling

water, coconut cream, peanut

butter, lemon juice and tamari

soy sauce. Set aside.

Heat the sesame oil in a

wok on medium heat. Add

2

the chopped onion,

garlic, ginger and chilli

flakes and fry for about

one minute.

Add the shredded cabbage

3 and fry for another three to

four minutes then add the satay

sauce; mix and stir through.

Cook the noodles in

a saucepan for three

4

minutes or until tender.

Rinse with cold water then add

to the wok.

5

Heat through for

another minute and

then serve with a sprinkling of

fresh coriander.

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nutrition

Prep time:

Cooking time:

Total time:

5 minutes

10 minutes

15 minutes

Baked Eggs

Ingredients:

• 3 eggs

• 1 stick celery (thinly sliced)

plus handful celery leaves,

chopped

• 5-8 cherry tomatoes,

quartered

• 100g spinach leaves

• 1 red onion, chopped

• 1 clove garlic, chopped

• ¼ tsp celery salt

• ¼ tsp paprika

• Pinch of ground cumin

• ½ tsp black pepper

• Pinch of chilli pepper

• 1tbsp olive oil

Method:

In a frying pan, heat up

1 the oil with the onion,

tomatoes, garlic, celery salt,

paprika, chilli flakes and ½

the black pepper for two

minutes. Add the celery, celery

leaves and spinach and fry for

another three minutes.

Make a little space in the

2 middle of the pan and

crack the eggs over the other

ingredients. Fry for another

two minutes before covering

the saucepan with a lid and

leaving for a further three

minutes or until the eggs

are cooked.

3

To serve, sprinkle on

the rest of the black

pepper and a pinch of salt

over the eggs.

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nutrition

Prep time:

Cooking time:

Total time:

10 minutes

10 minutes

20 minutes

Mushroom Burgers with

Cauliflower Couscous

Ingredients:

• 100g chestnut mushrooms,

diced into small pieces

• 200g chickpeas

• 1 chia egg (1tbsp chia seeds

plus 3tbsp water)

• 1 clove garlic

• 1tbsp olive oil

• 2tsp buckwheat flour/plain

gluten free flour

• Pinch Himalayan crystal salt

• ¼ tsp ground cumin

• Pinch smoked paprika

• ¼ tsp black pepper

• Juice of 1 lemon

• 2-3 radishes

• Small handful chives

• Small handful fresh

coriander/parsley

Method:

In a small bowl, make the

1 chia egg by mixing three

tablespoons water with one

tablespoon chia seeds.

Set aside.

2

In a frying pan, heat half

the olive oil (one to two

tablespoons) with the chopped

mushrooms, cumin, paprika

and garlic for five minutes.

Mash the chickpeas with

a potato masher, leaving

3

a few chunkier pieces. Add the

mushroom mixture, the chia

‘egg’, half the lemon juice and

the flour. Mix well then shape

into two patties.

4

Fry the burgers in the

remaining oil for about

three minutes on each side or

until browned and crispy on

the outside.

5

To make the cauliflower

couscous, cut half a small

cauliflower into pieces and

steam/boil for five minutes.

Place into a food processor

(or use a potato masher) with

the salt, black pepper and

remaining lemon juice until the

cauliflower pieces resemble

couscous. Add the sliced radish

and the chives.

6

To serve, place the

mushroom burgers on top

of the cauliflower couscous

and sprinkle with some fresh

coriander/parsley and a drizzle

of olive oil.

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nutrition

Avocado and Mackerel Salad

Ingredients:

• 1 fillet smoked mackerel,

chopped into chunks

• 1 small head broccoli, cut

into florets

• 1 medium hass avocado,

diced

• 1 small bag of rocket

• 3 spring onions, chopped

• 1 fresh green chilli, thinly

sliced

For the dressing:

• 1tsp Dijon mustard

• 1tsp honey

• Juice of 1 lemon

• ½ tsp ground black pepper

• 1 clove garlic, finely chopped

• 1 small piece ginger, finely

chopped

• ½ tsp tamari soy sauce

• 1tbsp olive oil

Method:

Place all of the salad

1 ingredients into a bowl

and toss together.

To make the dressing,

2 place all the ingredients

into a small bowl and whisk

together until smooth and

combined.

3

Pour over the salad before

serving.

Claire is an integrative

health expert and runs a

health and wellness blog

called The Life Delight.

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nutrition

Delicious

Dinners

Nutritionist Marie Felton

dishes up her favourite

healthy suppers

Prep time: 10 minutes

Cooking time: 30 minutes

© Sandhya Hariharan | shutterstock.com

Luscious Lean Lentil Curry

This dish makes it on my budget

meals list, packed with loads

of good stuff like fibre, iron

manganese, calcium and vitamin

B, all without breaking the bank!

Ingredients:

• 2 cups red lentils

• 1 large red onion, diced

• 1tbsp coconut oil

• 2tbsps curry paste

• 1tbsp curry powder

• 1tsp ground turmeric

• 1tsp ground cumin

• 1tsp chilli powder

• 1tsp sea salt

• 1tsp sugar

• 1tsp minced garlic

• 1tsp minced fresh ginger

• 1 can tomato puree

Method:

Wash/rinse the lentils in

1 cold water, until the water

runs clear. Put the lentils in

a pan with enough water

to cover, bring it to the boil,

place the lid on the pan, and

reduce the heat to medium –

low. Leave to simmer, adding

more water during cooking as

and when needed. Keep the

pan covered, until the lentils

become tender – this takes

about 15 to 20 minutes. Drain

and put to one side.

2

Heat the coconut oil

in a large frying pan or

skillet over medium heat, stir

in the onions, cook in the hot

oil until caramelised, taking

about 20 minutes.

3

Mix curry paste, curry

powder, turmeric,

cumin, chilli powder, salt,

sugar, garlic, and ginger

together in a large bowl,

stirring into the onions. Turn

the heat to high and cook,

stirring constantly, until the

mixture becomes fragrant,

taking approx. one to two

minutes. Remove from heat

and stir the tomato puree into

the lentils.

4

Serve and enjoy with

basmati rice. I love mine

on a bed of spinach.

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nutrition

© Stephanie Frey | shutterstock.com

Chipotle and White Bean

Chilli Chicken

Beans are budget busting and

are a great source of fibre.

Did you know beans mixed

with rice are a great source of

complete protein?

Ingredients:

• 2tsps coconut oil

• 1 cup finely chopped onion

• 1tsp ground cumin

• 3 cans white beans, rinsed

and drained

• 2 cups low salt chicken stock

• 1 can chipotle chiles in

adobo sauce

• 2 cups diced cooked chicken

breast

• 1tbsp chopped fresh

coriander

• Red kidney beans as an

optional extra

Method:

Heat oil in a non stick

1 saucepan over medium

heat. Add the onion and sauté

until soft.

2

Add cumin, beans, and

broth to the pan. Remove

the seeds from one chilli

and chop. Add chilli and two

teaspoons adobo sauce to

bean mixture, bringing to a

boil. Reduce heat and simmer

for 15 minutes.

3

Prep time: 10 minutes

Cooking time: 20-25 minutes

Calories: 431

Fat:

5g

Protein:

42g

Carbs:

55g

Serves: 4


Blend one cup of bean

mixture in a blender or

food processor until smooth.

Return puree to pan and add

chicken. Cook for five minutes

or until thoroughly heated, stir

in the fresh coriander.

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nutrition

Prep time: 30 minutes

Total cooking time: 70 minutes

Serves: 4

Calories: 413

Total Fat:

11g

(saturated fat: 2.2g)

Protein:

24g

Carbs:

59g

Fibre:

10g

© svariophoto | shutterstock.com

Marvellous Meatballs

Ingredients:

• 1 slice whole wheat sandwich

bread, ground into coarse

crumbs

• 8oz lean steak mince

• 1 medium onion, chopped

• 1 portobello mushroom,

stem removed and chopped

• 4 garlic cloves, chopped

• 1/4 cup fresh parsley leaves

• 1 large egg white (free

range)

• Sea salt and freshly ground

black pepper

• Freshly grated nutmeg

• 2tbsp coconut oil

• 1 can whole peeled tomatoes

in juice, crushed by hand

• 1/2 cup low salt beef stock

• 1 small bunch fresh basil

• 3 sprigs fresh thyme

• 8oz whole grain spaghetti/

low carb pasta

• Parmesan for serving

(optional)

Method:

Pulse/blitz the sandwich

1 bread in a food processor

or Nutribullet to form coarse

crumbs. Add the lean mince,

1/4 cup onion, mushroom,

1tbsp garlic, parsley, and

egg white, season with salt,

pepper and nutmeg, pulse/

blitz again to finely chop and

combine. Portion into about

20 meatballs (about an inch in

diameter) and place on a plate.

In a medium saucepan,

heat the oil over a

2

medium heat and add the

remaining garlic and onion.

Cook, stirring occasionally, until

tender – this should take about

10 to 12 minutes. Stir in the

tomatoes and stock. Tie sprigs

of basil and thyme together

with kitchen string and add

to the tomatoes. Simmer and

cook, stirring occasionally, for

approx. 20 minutes.

3

Add the meatballs and

continue to simmer,

without stirring, until the

meatballs are partially cooked,

this should be about 10

minutes. Turn the meatballs,

and cook 10 minutes more or

until fully cooked.

4

Meanwhile, cook the

low carb pasta (or

whatever you have opted

for) according to package

directions in boiling salted

water. When fully cooked

serve and enjoy the delicious

meatballs and sauce over

veggie courgetti or traditional

whole grain spaghetti.

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nutrition

Prep time: 10-12 minutes

Cooking time: 2 minutes

Serves: 2

Use

the precut

pittas,

so much

easier!

© Ahturner | shutterstock.com

Mackerel Pittas

I love this quick and satisfying

dish, packed with a protein

punch. Alternatively, fish

herring, sardines, pilchards

and tuna also work really well,

but so does any meat in my

opinion.

Ingredients:

• 2 smoked mackerel fillets

• 125ml Greek plain natural

yoghurt

• Black pepper

• 1 medium red onion,

chopped

• A wedge of cucumber,

chopped

• 1 red apple

• 4 wholemeal mini pitta

breads

• A sprinkle of sesame seeds

Method:

Finely slice and dice all the

1 veggies. Remember to do

the apple last, so it doesn't get

a chance to go a yucky brown.

Skin and flake the

2 mackerel into a bowl, add

the yoghurt, season with black

pepper and seeds. Mix well and

set to one side.

3

Warm the pittas under

the grill/toaster for about

a minute each side, slice open

and simply stuff with the

yummy filling.

Serve and enjoy!

4

Marie is a nutritionist,

fitness trainer, writer and

top UK food blogger.

Find out more at

www.nakednut35.blog.co.uk

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19

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OFTEN, PLANT DERIVED PROTEIN SOURCES

CONTAIN LESS FAT FOR A HEALTHIER OPTION.

10-15% OF OUR DAILY CALORIES

SHOULD COME FROM PROTEIN

© Elena Schweitzer | shutterstock.com


nutrition

dive in to

dessert!

Coconut oil experts

Lucy Bee sure know

how to whip up a

proper pud – check

out this tasty array to

hit your sweet spot

Strawberry Tart

Ingredients:

You will need: an 18 inch

lined spring based tin

For the base:

• 175g mixed nuts and

seeds, for example,

hazelnuts, walnuts,

pecans, almonds,

pumpkin and sunflower

• 75g dried apricots

• 75g dates

• 50g Lucy Bee Coconut

Oil

For the topping:

• 100g frozen banana

• 75g Greek yoghurt

• 30g chia seeds

• Strawberries, halved

Method:

In a food processor,

1 blitz together all the

base ingredients and press

into the lined tin. Place in

the fridge whilst preparing

the topping.

Blitz together the

2 frozen banana, Greek

yoghurt and chia seeds.

Cover the base with

3 the topping, decorate

with strawberries and place

in the fridge for one hour

before serving.

Can be frozen, just

4 remove from freezer

for 45 minutes before

serving.

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nutrition

Cooked fresh

cherries combined with

cherry jam makes this filling

bright and fruit filled. It

keeps well in the fridge for a

few days and is great as a

sauce for ice cream

Black Forest Cake

Ingredients:

For the chocolate mixture:

• 200ml lactose free milk (can

be full fat milk)

• 25g gluten free plain flour

• 200g 70% dark chocolate

• 75ml Lucy Bee Coconut Oil

For the cake:

• 250g caster sugar

• 3tsp vanilla extract

• 6 medium eggs

• 175g gluten free plain flour

• 2tsp baking powder

• To finish, kirsch or brandy

For the cherry cake filling:

• 400g fresh ripe cherries

• Juice of half a lemon

• 100ml cold water

• 150g cherry jam

• 2tsp cornflour

Method:

Preheat the oven to 180 C,

350 F, gas mark 4.

1

2

1

2

Line 2 x 20cm cake tins.

For the chocolate mixture:

Put the milk in a saucepan

with the flour and whisk

well, bringing to the boil.

Break the chocolate into

small pieces and add to the

milk and flour mixture, along

with the Lucy Bee. Stir well.

Spoon the mixture into

a large mixing bowl, add

3

sugar and vanilla then beat

together with an electric mixer,

until smooth and glossy.

For the cake:

In a separate bowl,

1 beat the eggs before

slowly adding to the chocolate

mixture.

Now fold in the flour and

2 baking powder and mix

until smooth.

Divide the mixture

3 between the tins and bake

for about 40 minutes until a

skewer poked in comes out

clean, and leave to cool.

For the cherry cake filling:

Pit and halve the cherries.

1 Place in a saucepan with

lemon and water. Bring to the

boil and simmer for about

10 minutes until the liquid

has almost vanished and the

cherries are tender.

2

Mix the jam with the

cornflour and stir in with

the cherries and bring to the

boil again. Let it cool before

using.

Assembling the cake:

Take the cakes out of the

1 tins, spoon two to three

tablespoons of kirsch over each.

Spread half of the cherry

2 mixture over one half. If

using cream, place over cherry

mixture then place second cake

on top. Spread the rest of the

cherry mixture over the top of

the cake and spoon on cream,

if using.

3

Grate chocolate over to

finish.

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22

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nutrition

Plum Puddings

with Almonds

Ingredients:

• 100g Lucy Bee Coconut Oil

• 100g caster sugar

• 2 large eggs

• ½ tsp almond essence

• 100g gluten free self

raising flour

• 50g ground almonds

• 240g diced Victoria plums

• 80g golden syrup

Method:

Preheat the oven

1 to 180 C, 350 F, gas

mark 4.

In a mixing bowl, mix

2 together the coconut

oil and sugar, using an

electric whisk.

Add the eggs and

3 almond essence.

Fold in the flour and

4 ground almonds and

mix well.

5

Place 30g of the plums

and about one teaspoon

of the syrup in the bottom

of eight 200ml oven proof

pudding basins.

6

7

8

Pour 80g of the sponge

mixture over the plums

and syrup.

Bake for about 15 minutes

until firm to touch.

Turn out and serve, or

they will keep in the basins

until you are ready to eat.

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23

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nutrition

Fruity Rocky Road Bites

Ingredients:

• 100g of dried mixed berries

(such as blueberries,

cranberries and raisins)

• 100ml apple juice

• 50g popcorn

• 6tbsp of melted Lucy Bee

Coconut Oil

• 6tbsp of cacao

• 80g of chopped hazelnuts

Method:

Add the berries

1 and apple juice to a

saucepan and simmer for

five to six minutes on a

medium heat.

2

3

Place your popcorn in a

small 5 x 5 inch (approx.)

foil wrapped baking tray.

Mix together the Lucy

Bee, cacao and chopped

hazelnuts.

4

Pour the mix over

the popcorn (the

popcorn does not need to

be covered completely). Top

with berries and press down

firmly with the back of a

large spoon. Honey can be

used here.

5

Freeze for 25 to 30

minutes. Once frozen,

peel away the foil and cut

into squares.

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24

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nutrition

Frozen Banana Delights

Ingredients:

• 2 bananas

• 3tbsp Lucy Bee Coconut Oil,

melted

• 1tbsp raw cacao powder

For the topping:

• 1tsp flaked almonds

• 1tsp goji berries

• 1tsp desiccated coconut

or raisins

Method:

Freeze the bananas

1 for one hour.

Mix together the Lucy

Bee and cacao.

Half the bananas

and roll each one in

2

3

the chocolate sauce

then the topping of

your choice.

See even more delicious

recipes at www.lucybee.co

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25

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No more than

35% of our daily

calories should

be from fat

beware saturated fats and

trans fat in particular.

© Christian Jung | shutterstock.com


nutrition

Nutritionist Hanna Sillitoe

showcases these guilt

free munchies, perfect for

inbetween meals or after dinner

Chewy Nutty Flapjacks

I love flapjacks and my

favourite ones are light golden

brown on top and chewy in

the middle. These are super

easy and really don't take long

to make.

Ingredients:

• 400g muesli

• 50g trail mix

• 3 heaped tbsp coconut oil

• 2tbsp honey

• 2tbsp nut butter

• 2 bananas

• Handful of chopped dates

Method:

Melt the coconut oil, nut

1 butter and honey gently in

a saucepan.

Whizz the bananas and

2 dates in a blender until

smooth and add to the pan.

Stir everything well.

Take the pan off the heat

3 and stir the muesli and

trail mix through the melted

ingredients.

Allow to cool just a little,

and spoon into a flapjack

4

tin lined with greaseproof

paper (I like to rub coconut

oil on the greaseproof paper

to ensure the flapjacks don't

stick when baked). Press the

mixture firmly down.

Bake in the oven for

5 around 40 minutes at

170°C until the top turns

golden brown.

6

Allow to cool and cut

into 12 little squares.

Then place in the fridge to set

further. The coconut oil will

fully set and stop the flapjacks

crumbling.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

27

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nutrition

Cacao Caramel Crunch

Makes 12 small squares

Prep time: 20 minutes

Freezer time: 90 minutes

Chocolate, salted caramel

and naturally sweet ground

almonds, what’s not to love?

This delicious paleo treat makes

for the perfect, innocent, sweet

snack. So simple to make and

stores for up to a month in the

freezer – if you’re able to resist

for that long!

Ingredients:

For the base:

• 100g ground almonds

• 100g trail mix

• 3tbsp coconut oil

For the caramel layer:

• 4tbsp nut butter

• 4tbsp coconut oil

• 1tbsp maple syrup

• Large pinch of salt

For the chocolate layer:

• 4tbsp coconut oil

• 4tbsp cacao powder

• 3tbsp honey

Method:

Combine the almonds, trail

1 mix and melted coconut

oil in a bowl. Press into a

shallow tin lined with baking

paper and put in the freezer to

set for 30 minutes.

2

Warm the salted caramel

ingredients gently in

a pan, allow to cool a little

and pour over the base layer.

Return to the freezer to set for

30 minutes.

3

Warm the chocolate layer

ingredients gently in a

pan, allow to cool a little and

pour over the frozen caramel

layer. Return to the freezer to

set for 30 minutes.

4

Allow to thaw in the

fridge for 20 minutes

before serving.

If you’re looking for a simple to

make, quick and easy dessert,

these paleo caramel squares

offer the perfect solution. They

satisfy any sweet cravings

without undoing all the

good work of a healthy diet.

Plus they’re a brilliant way

to introduce friends to the

concept of eating a clean diet,

to prove it’s not all lettuce

leaves and broccoli.

The crunchy nut base offers

a whole heap of good fats

and lets you be creative with

various trail mix options.

Including a superfood such as

cacao in dessert recipes gives

that chocolate fix without

the grainy, sickly sweetness.

Raw cacao differs from the

common 'cocoa' you may have

tried as a drink or dessert.

Cacao (pronounced 'cu-COW')

refers to the Theobroma

Cacao tree from which cocoa

is derived, and is used when

referring to unprocessed

versions of the cacao bean. It’s

the healthiest form of chocolate

you can eat. Recipes for sweet

desserts that involve very little

effort or baking also means they

can be whipped up in an instant.

These little squares freeze

perfectly so you can easily make

them in advance and store them

until required.

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28

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nutrition

Mini Mango Bites

Makes 12 small bites

I adore these little mini mango

bites. They're so simple to make

and look bright and beautiful.

You can make them well in

advance and store them in the

freezer, and they really look

the part as pretty, dinner party

desserts. Mangos have been

shown to fight cancer, alkalise

the body, aid in weight loss,

regulate diabetes, help digestion

and clear your skin. Even more

reason to get making – and

eating – these beauties.

Ingredients:

For the base:

• 200g chopped dates

• 50g almonds

• 50g Wyldsson trail mix

• 1tbsp coconut oil

For the layers:

• 4tbsp coconut oil

• 2tbsp honey or maple syrup

• 200g soaked cashews (soak

for a couple of hours)

• Cream of one 400ml tin

coconut milk (sometimes

the fat will already have

separated and be sat at the

top – this is the bit you need.

If not simply pop the tin in

the fridge overnight. Save

the coconut water to drink

or make chia pudding)

• 1 mango

• Dried rose petals to decorate

Method:

Blitz the base ingredients

1 together. Don’t worry

about getting it too smooth.

Spoon the blitzed base

2 into a flapjack tin lined

with greaseproof paper and

press flat with the back of a

spoon. Put in the freezer.

Blitz the layer ingredients

3 – aside from the mango

– together until it forms

a smooth, cashew cream

consistency.

Remove the tray with the

4 base from the freezer and

spoon half the white cashew

cream into it, smoothing the

layer with the back of a spoon

– leave enough room on top

for the mango layer and return

to the freezer.

Add the mango to the

5 remaining cashew cream

in the food processor and

blend again.

Remove the cheesecake

6 from the freezer ensuring

the mid layer is fairly firm.

Spoon on the mango layer and

smooth. Return to the freezer.

Slice into little squares

7 and serve slightly

softened. I like to allow at

least a couple of hours for

the mango squares to thaw.

Transfer them from the freezer

to the fridge for a few hours

ahead of serving.

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29

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nutrition

Nut Butter Caramel Popcorn

Makes 1 bowl

Ingredients:

• 100g popping corn

• 3tbsp of coconut oil

• 2tbsp of nut butter (I love

almond butter)

• 1tsp of maple syrup

(optional)

• Pinch of salt

Method:

Gently heat two

1 tablespoons of coconut

oil, the nut butter and maple

syrup in a saucepan until

everything is beautifully

melted together. Put to one

side to cool.

Give the pan a quick

2 rinse, add the remaining

tablespoon of coconut oil and

gently warm until it melts.

Add the corn and put a lid

3 on the pan. Wait! It will

take around five minutes of

gentle heat to encourage the

corn to begin popping.

Once all the corn has

popped, transfer the

4

popcorn to a big mixing bowl

and stir in the nut butter

caramel and ensure every piece

is well coated. Add a pinch of

salt and shake.

5

Serve with your favourite

movie!

Hanna is a nutritionist,

food blogger, juicer and

recipe creator. See more of

her recipes and ideas at

www.beyondfit.co.uk or get

in touch via

info@beyondfit.co.uk or

@BeyondFitUK

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30

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© Antonio Gravante | shutterstock.com


nutrition

Smoothies

& shakes

Kitchen consultant and wellness

coach Naomi Buff shares the

tastiest ways to blitz your protein

Pure Indulgence Protein

Serves 1

Ingredients:

• 1 cup unsweetened almond

milk

• 1 banana

• 4 walnuts

• 2 pitted medjool dates

• 1 heaped tbs raw cacoa

• 1tbsp maca

• 1 scoop chocolate

protein powder

• 4-5 ice cubes

• 1tbsp cacoa nibs to garnish

Method:

Blend everything together

1 in a high speed blender, pour

into a glass, top with cacoa nibs

and drink immediately with a

smile!

Naomi’s tip: Freeze the bananas

but don’t forget to peel them

first before storing in a sealed

freezer bag.

Tropical Spirulina

Surprise Slushy

Ingredients:

• 1 cup coconut water

• 1tsp spirulina

• 1 cup frozen pineapple

chunks

• 1 frozen banana

• 2 handfuls of organic spinach

To garnish:

• 1tsp shredded coconut

• 1tsp goji berries

Method:

Add all ingredients (not the

1 garnish) to a high speed

blender and whizz until smooth.

Pour into a glass, add the

2 coconut and goji berries

and drink immediately.

Naomi’s tip: To freeze the

bananas, peel first and place in a

sealed food bag.

Berry Chocolately

Ingredients:

• 1 cup unsweetened

• almond milk

• 1 cup fresh blueberries

• 1/2 frozen banana

• 1 scoop chocolate

protein powder

• 1tsp baobab (optional)

• 1tsp vanilla powder or essence

• 1tbsp cacoa nibs

• 2-3 ice cubes

Method:

Blend in a high speed

1 blender until totally smooth

and enjoy immediately!

Naomi’s tip: If fresh blueberries

aren’t available, replace with

frozen.

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nutrition

Green Vanilla

Protein Smoothie

Ingredients:

• 1 cup of filter water

• 1 large handful of spinach or

one frozen pellet

• ½ bulb of fennel

• ½ avocado

• 1 scoop vanilla

protein powder

• 1tsp vanilla powder

Serve with 1tsp of bee pollen

and 1tsp of hemp seeds

Method:

Blend on high speed until

1 completely smooth and

drink immediately.

Naomi’s tip: If you are not

using frozen spinach, add 3-4

ice cubes. Add half a banana for

sweetness or two medjool dates.

BOOSTing Berry Blast

Ingredients:

• 1 cup water

• 1 cup of frozen berries

• 1tbsp raw organic hemp

protein powder

• 1 peeled orange

• 4 fresh mint leaves

• 4 brazil nuts

1tsp cold milled flax seed for an

optional topping

Method:

Add all ingredients apart

1 from the flax seed to a high

speed blender and blend on the

high for about 60 seconds until

a smooth consistency is reached

(if your blender isn’t high speed

it may take a little longer).

Sprinkle the flax seed on

top and drink immediately

2

Naomi’s tip: Add spinach or

kale for more greens!

Strawberry, Basil and

Green Tea Iced Latte

Ingredients:

• 3/4 cup cooled green tea

(brew for 10 minutes then

set aside to cool)

• 3/4 cup unsweetened

almond milk

• 1 frozen banana (freeze the

day before – without the

skin!)

• 1 cup fresh strawberries

(stalks removed)

• 1 cup ice

• 1/2 vanilla bean powder

or essence

• 3 basil leaves

• 1tsp raw honey

• 1tbsp hulled raw organic

hemp seeds plus 1tsp to

garnish (optional)

Method:

Blend all the ingredients in

1 a high speed blender until

smooth.

Serve immediately with

2 some more hemp seeds

sprinkled on top.

Naomi’s tip: Replace the raw

honey with maple syrup. This

recipe serves two people.

Naomi creates nutritious recipes that avoid gluten, dairy and

refined sugar. Naomi shares her love of nutrition and wellness

through Naomi’s Kitchen blog, workshops, talks, coaching and

consultancy in her home town of Monaco, also reaching out to

many worldwide clients. Find out more at www.naomis.kitchen

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33

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warm up

Warm up

Avoid aches and

injuries by ensuring

you prepare for your

workout correctly

Running short on time?

Usually the first thing

to get ditched from

a workout will be the

warm up – you're going to

get toasty enough during the

session itself, right? Wrong.

Warm ups provide an essential

preparation to the main

workout, normally utilising both

flexibility based stretches as

well as a cardiovascular element

to ensure your body is ready

and raring to go when you

want to push yourself during

the session. Warm ups prepare

your muscles for the full ranges

of movement that they will

experience during your exercise.

What stretches are

used in a warm up?

For the flexibility aspect, there

are two main types of stretches

that you will use:

• Dynamic stretches

• Static maintenance

stretches

Dynamic stretching is based

on movement, and using the

momentum generated to

help increase your range of

movement through your joints.

Performed under control,

these often mimic the sport

or activity you will undertake

during the session, like a

practice almost.

Static maintenance stretches

on the other hand is where your

muscles are taken to the end of

their normal range of motion

and then held there without

bouncing for approximately six

to 10 seconds. These help to

maintain the normal length of

the muscle, especially as during

exercise, your muscles will be

contracting, getting shorter

and thicker.

What components do you usually see in a warm up?

Mobility

Pulse Raising Exercises

Preparatory Stretches

Second Pulse Raiser / Re-Warm

This heats up the synovial

fluid within your joint

capsules, allowing the joint

to move more freely and

smoothly, also acting as a

better shock absorber

Elevating the heart rate

and increasing body

temperature, this gives time

for vasodilatation (widening

of the blood vessels) to

prepare for more strenous

exercise

Stretches the main muscle

groups that will be worked

in the session to prepare and

lengthen them

Gradually warms the client

after a temperature drop

during the stretches

Katie is the editor of

Personal Trainer magazine,

a qualified Level 2

Gym Instructor and is

currently undergoing her

Level 3 Personal Trainer

qualification with Discovery

Learning. Get in touch at

katie@ptmagazine.co.uk

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

34


Make sure

to perform

activation and

mobilisation

exercises...

...if you plan

on tackling

heavy, compound

lifts during

your session.

© dreamwaves | shutterstock.com


WARM UP

Aerobic/Cardio Warm Up

British Kettlebell champion and fitness

author Jamie Lloyd gets your muscles

going with this fast paced warm up

Heel flicks

Stay on your tippy toes

and kick heels to bum.

Travel over 10m and this

warms up the hamstrings.

I

always start with dynamic

movement drills before

doing any lifting. The body

is meant to move three

dimensionally so the warm up

should be three dimensional

too,followed by joint mobility.

High knees

Gets your heart rate up as well

as improves running technique

and ground force reaction

along with knee drive.

Alternate skipping

Skip alternating arms and

legs. Helps with coordination

and knee drive.

Cross-overs

Bring one leg in front, one behind

and rotate trunk. This warms up

the lower back and core as well

as gets the heart rate up.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

36


WARM UP

Inch worms

Start in a push up position, then keep legs straight and walk toes in towards

hands. Great dynamic drill for opening up the hamstrings, calves and lower back.

Walking lunges with

arms overhead

Lunge forwards with arms

overhead. This opens up the

hips and activates the glutes.

Reverse lunges

The opposite movement to the

previous drill. Use your big toe

to find your balance, and step

back carefully.

Lateral squats

Bring your hands by your ears. Squat and step round and move

sidewards. Try to keep elbows back to open up the upper back.

Jamie Lloyd is the director

of Buggybells and runs a

successful fitness business

in SW London. He is a

Kettlebell enthusiast,

winning the British

Kettlebell Championships

in 2014, as well as an

international fitness

author. Check him out at

www.iamjamielloyd.com

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

37


warm up

Boxing warm up

Personal trainer and boxer Gemma

Fromage Crawford highlights how

to kickstart your workout

Despite the huge

variety of methods

in which you can

warm up, the overall

purpose of any method is to

increase your heart rate and

body temperature as well as

facilitating blood flow to the

muscles to be used during

activity. Not only will warming

up thoroughly reduce the

likelihood of injury but it will

also improve the elasticity

of muscles and joints as well

as stimulating muscles and

alerting the appropriate neural

pathways in preparation

for activity.

Gemma is a registered

pharmacist who has worked

in this field for 15 years.

Qualified as a PT, she is a

keen runner, and a boxer.

30 SECOND

STRAIGHT LEG MARCH

Straight leg march is a dynamic

warm up to help improve

flexibility in the hamstrings,

glutes and lower back muscles.

It also improves dynamic

balance. Swing one leg forward

until a slight stretch is felt in

the hamstrings, pull the leg

back down forcefully whilst

contracting the glutes and

repeat with the other leg.

30 SECOND

LUNGE WITH ROTATION

When performing the lunge,

stand with your feet together

and stepping the right foot

back, lower into a rear lunge

and rotate to both sides.

Return to start and repeat,

alternating sides.

30 SECONDS SKIPPING

Skipping is a popular

component of a warm up and

gets the heart rate pumping

and the lungs working. If you

don’t have a rope to hand,

you can still create the same

movement. There are many

skipping techniques, from two

foot, single foot, arms crossed

and double skips.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

38


warm up

30 SECONDS SHADOW BOXING – The aim of these familiar exercises is to elevate your heart and

breathing rates. It is therefore important that when shadow boxing (boxing against an imaginary

opponent), there is rotation in the body as power comes initially from the legs and through the hips.

Always keep your fists up high as if protecting the face and ensure you use the full body rather than

just your arms.

30 SECONDS HEEL FLICKS 30 SECONDS SHADOW BOXING

Jab, straight 2, 4, 6.

30 SECONDS

BODYWEIGHT SQUATS

Bodyweight squats incorporate

all the lower body muscles and

encourage blood flow to them.

This increases the heart rate

as well increasing oxygen

supply around the body. Start

by standing with feet hip

width apart, arms by sides.

Sit back into hips and lower

into a squat, extending the

arms in front and then return

and repeat.

30 SECONDS SKIPPING

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

39


warm up

Strength Training

Warm Up

Fitness expert and author Matt

Weik helps you limber up for

a resistance based workout

Getting your body

ready for the

workout ahead is

just as important as

starting your car in freezing

temperatures and allowing it

to warm up prior to driving off.

You want the oil in your engine

to warm up, to lubricate and

help the engine parts move

smoothly. Think of the blood in

your body as oil in your car and

by warming up, it helps push

the blood into the muscles

and prepares them for the

workload ahead as well as

helping to warm up your core

temperature. A good strength

training warm up readies your

body/muscles as well as your

nervous system and should

follow your cardiovascular

warm up. Doing this helps the

muscles loosen up and become

more pliable.

Here are some great warm up

exercises for each body part

you could work in the gym.

If you do full body workouts,

it would be ideal to do all of

the warm up exercises shown

before starting your workout.

Complete two warm up sets

per muscle group you will

be working in the gym. Work

with a weight that is around

50% of your 10 rep max.

Complete six reps for each

warm up set. Only do the six

reps because you don’t want

to start building up lactic acid

in the muscle before your

working sets of 8-12 reps.

Each warm up set should be

done in a controlled manner.

Use a cadence of three

seconds on the concentric

portion of the movement and

another three seconds on the

eccentric portion.

CHEST PRESS

Lay down on the bench with your back and head in contact with the surface of the bench. Keep your

feet planted firmly on the ground. Grab the weight with your palms facing away from you, using a

grip slightly wider than your shoulders. With the weight above you (directly in line with the middle of

your chest), slowly lower the weight towards your chest, keeping your elbows flared out. When your

upper arms are parallel with the ground or slightly lower, pause and then press the weight back up

squeezing your chest throughout the movement.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

40


warm up

ROW

Grab the weight with your palms facing your body (grip can be shoulder width or wider). Bend at the

knees and slightly lean forward, keeping your back straight. Using your lats, pull the weight up until it

just about touches your ribcage in a controlled manner (envision having your shoulder blades coming

closer together during the motion) and pause briefly at the top of the movement. Then slowly lower

the weight back down to the starting position while feeling your upper back stretch.

SQUAT

Take a stance with your feet slightly wider than your shoulders and your feet pointed slightly

outward. With the weight across your upper back resting on the upper portion of your traps and

having a light grip on the bar with your hands, slowly bend at the knees while pushing your glutes

back as if you were going to sit down, making sure your knees stay over your feet (your feet should

stay firmly planted on the floor). Your head should stay straight or slightly up.

When your upper legs are parallel or slightly below parallel, pause and then drive upwards propelling

your hips forward and standing upright. Stop just short of your knees locking out as to not

hyperextend your knees.

STIFF-LEG DEADLIFT

Grab the weight with your palms facing your body (grip can be shoulder width or wider just as long

as it’s outside of your quads). Take a stance with your feet shoulder width apart or slightly wider.

Bend your knees slightly and slowly lower the weight following the line of your body. Allow your

glutes to move behind you which will help you maintain balance. Make sure your head follows your

body and keep your spine in a neutral position during the movement.

Allow the bar to stay about two inches from your shins until the bar is in line with the middle or

lower part of your shins. Pause briefly and then using your hamstrings, thrust your hips forward and

bring the weight back up, again following the line of your body. Make sure your hips and shoulders

are moving simultaneously to ensure you are using your hamstrings and not your lower back.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

41


warm up

BICEP CURL

Grab the weight with your palms facing away

from your body and your grip just outside of

your shoulders. With your knees slightly bent

and your elbows tucked into your sides, curl

the weight up without swinging your body

and squeeze your biceps at the top of the

movement. Slowly lower the weight back down

while maintaining your elbows at your sides until

your arms are straight at the starting position.

SHOULDER PRESS

Grab the weight with your palms facing away

from your body and your grip just outside of

your shoulders. With your knees slightly bent,

press the weight straight up stopping just

short of your arms fully extending (keep your

head facing forward in a neutral position).

Pause briefly at the top of the movement and

then slowly lower the weight back down until

your upper arms are parallel to the floor or just

slightly below parallel.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

42


warm up

TRICEP EXTENSION

Stand with your knees slightly bent. Grab the weight just above the handle with both hands and

cradle one end of the weight in your hands. With the weight straight over your head, slowly lower

the weight behind you while keeping your elbows locked above your head (the pivot point of the

movement should be at your elbows). Allow your triceps to stretch to the bottom position of the

movement where the weight should just about be touching your upper back and pause at that point.

Slowly push the weight back up above your head while not allowing your elbows to move.

CALF RAISE

Stand on an aerobic step and have your heels off of the edge.

With the weight across your upper back. Slowly push upward

using your calves, pausing briefly at the top of the movement

while keeping your knees bent slightly as to not hyperextend

them. Slowly reverse the movement and allow your heels to dip

below parallel to get a good stretch in your calves.

Matt is a well respected

fitness expert and author

with a global following.

He’s a certified strength

and conditioning specialist,

personal trainer, and

sports nutritionist. You

can contact Matt via

www.mattweik.com or

@mattweikfitness

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

43


WORKOUTS

Upper body

training

programme

Nathan Johnson reveals how to define your

limbs with this upper body centric regime

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

44


WORKOUTS

This programme is

designed to move from

a moderately high

volume approach to a

low volume, high frequency

approach, which is quite

different to normal upper

body training routines. The

ultimate goal by the fifth week

is to be able to perform very

high intensity rest pause sets

multiple times per week for

the same body part.

We start in week one with

a less advanced form of

low volume training, but this

still requires high intensity

in the build up and maximal

set. The programme is geared

towards someone moving

from a beginners level into

intermediate/advanced,

and for those transitioning

between two types

of training.

Although these sessions are

focused on the upper body,

leg workouts of your own

choice can be trained on the

non upper body days but for

the purpose of building a

great upper body, more time

must be spent stimulating

those muscles.

The volume being low means

that less recovery is needed.

The theory behind low volume

training is that it allows

for focus on beating your

weight from the previous

session and the research finds

that more frequent muscle

stimulus throughout the week

increases muscle protein

synthesis which will help with

the facilitation of new muscle

and strength.

PROGRESSION

THROUGH THE WEEK

Week one

Use warm up sets for each of

your exercises.

A1, B1, C1 – 12 reps, 12 reps, 10

reps (ramp up sets building the

weight to find out what your

maximal set weight will be).

10 reps are used for the

maximal set.

Week two

A1, B1, C1 - 12 reps, 12 reps,

10 reps (ramp up sets with

your weight from last week in

mind to beat). Same weight as

week one but complete more

repetitions in this all out set

(maximum set).

Week three

A1, B1, C1 - 12 reps, 12 reps,

10 reps (ramp up sets with

your weight from last week in

mind to beat). For the maximal

set, this is now increasing to a

rest pause variation – complete

maximal set, rest 10 seconds

and then try and complete

as many repetitions as

possible. The number of total

repetitions of both maximal

sets will be the number to aim

for in next session.

Week four

This is the same as week three

– try to beat your log book.

A1, B1, C1 - 12 reps, 12 reps,

10 reps (ramp up sets with

your weight from last week in

mind to beat). For the maximal

set, this is now increasing to a

rest pause variation – complete

maximal set, rest 10 seconds

and then try and complete

as many repetitions as

possible. The number of total

repetitions of both maximal

sets will be the number to aim

for in next session.

Week five

From now on, your workouts

can continue as follows, as you

have built up the progression

to this point.

A1, B1, C1 - 12 reps, 12

reps, 10 reps (ramp up sets

with your weight from last

week in mind to beat). For

the maximal set, this is now

increasing to a rest pause

variation – complete maximal

set, rest 10 seconds and then

try and complete as many

repetitions as possible, rest

10 seconds again and then

try for a third maximal set,

aiming for all out maximal

effort and number of reps.

The number of total

repetitions of both maximal

sets will be the number to

aim for in next session.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

45


WORKOUTS

MON

TUES

WEEK 1-5 WEEK 2 WEEK 3 WEEK 4 WEEK 5

Chest/Back

Thickness/Bicep 1

Delts/Back

Width/Tricep 1

Chest/Back

Thickness/Bicep 1

Delts/Back

Width/Tricep 1

Chest/Back

Thickness/Bicep 1

Delts/Back

Width/Tricep 1

Chest/Back

Thickness/Bicep 1

Delts/Back

Width/Tricep 1

WED Rest Rest Legs Legs Legs

THU

FRI

Chest/Back

Thickness/

Bicep 2

Delts/Back

Width/Tricep 2

Chest/Back

Thickness/

Bicep 2

Delts/Back

Width/Tricep 2

Chest/Back

Thickness/

Bicep 2

Delts/Back

Width/Tricep 2

Chest/Back

Thickness/

Bicep 2

Delts/Back

Width/Tricep 2

SAT Legs Legs Legs Legs Legs

SUN Rest Rest Rest Rest Rest

Chest/Back

Thickness/Bicep 1

Delts/Back

Width/Tricep 1

Chest/Back

Thickness/

Bicep 2

Delts/Back

Width/Tricep 2

CHEST/BACK THICKNESS/BICEP ROUTINE 1

A1. Deadlift Variation

B1. Dips

C1. Barbell Bicep Curl

D1. Accessory exercises for those body parts but

only 2 x 10-12 reps

SHOULDERS/BACK WIDTH/TRICEPS ROUTINE 1

A1. DB Shoulder Press / Push press

B1. Pull Ups

C1. Close grip bench press

D1. Accessory exercises for those body parts but

only 2 x 10-12 reps

CHEST/BACK THICKNESS/BICEP ROUTINE 2

A1. DB Chest Press

B1. T-Bar Row Close grip handle

C1. Incline Db Curl

D1. Accessory exercises for those body parts but

only 2 x 10-12 reps

SHOULDERS/BACK WIDTH/TRICEPS ROUTINE 2

A1. DB Lateral Raises

B1. Wide Grip Pulldown

C1. Lying EZ bar skullcrushers

D1. Accessory exercises for those body parts but

only 2 x 10-12 reps

Nathan is a personal

trainer working at Ultimate

Performance in London. He

has a sports rehabilitation

degree and combines previous

experience of hands on therapy

and sports performance

based programming to create

optimal body compositional

changes in his clientele.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

46


workouts

Precision Arm Workout

Sports therapist and

fitness instructor

Georgina Spenceley

showcases how

toned arms are just a

workout away

Photos taken at CrossFit Raeda, by

Lauren Elizabeth Dodd Photography.

Georgina wears Hey Jo leggings, Charli

Cohen Dynamo tank, adidas sports bra

and inov8 f-lite trainers.

The answer to strong

and defined arms is a

heavy load. Compound

movements allow you

to shift more weight, hitting

those arms hard. This workout

starts with those big, functional

movements and just when

you thought you couldn’t do

any more, the precision work

comes in.

The exercises are coupled as

antagonist supersets; one

movement for each opposing

muscle group, performed back

to back with little or no rest

between. This allows you to get

more work in a shorter space

of time, maximising intensity

and developing muscularity.

Rest for 90 seconds between

sets and complete all sets of

the superset before moving

on to the next couplet. You’ll

notice the rep ranges increase

from one pair of exercises to

the next. Mixing up rep ranges

within a workout means you’ll

target the muscles for strength,

size and endurance, as well as

avoiding plateaus. For weighted

exercises, use a weight that

allows you to finish the set with

good form, but with only one

rep left in the tank.

SUPERSET ONE – Heavy compound

Pull-ups: lats, traps, biceps,

forearms

Grip the rig just outside

shoulder width. Squeeze your

lats and flex your elbows to pull

yourself up until your chin is

above the rig. Pause at the top

and slowly lower to the start

position. You can use varying

weight bands to support you.

Ring dips: triceps, chest,

shoulders

Taking an overhand grip of the

rings, jump up so your elbows

are fully extended and you are

supporting your own weight.

Keeping the rings in tight to

your body, bend your arms

to lower yourself down until

the rings touch your chest.

Pause at the bottom and push

yourself back up to the top.

You can use a band looped

round the rings to support you.

3 sets, 4-6 reps

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

47


workouts

SUPERSET TWO – Supported bodyweight

Supine row: middle back,

biceps, traps

Grasp the rings and lower

yourself into a diagonal

position with your arms fully

extended. This is your start

position. Pull yourself up

until the rings touch your

chest by flexing your arms

and retracting your shoulder

blades. Pause at the top and

lower yourself under control

to the start. The greater the

angle of your body from the

floor the easier it becomes.

Diamond push-up: chest, triceps, shoulders

Start in the top of a push up position but with your hands forming a diamond shape beneath your

chest. Keeping your elbows tucked in, lower yourself towards the ground. Pause at the bottom and

contract your triceps and chest to push you back to the start. To make the exercise easier, go onto

your knees, or for more of a challenge, elevate your feet. 3 sets, 6-8 reps

SUPERSET THREE – Focusing precision

Bar curls: biceps, forearms

Stand up holding a bar with

a shoulder width, underhand

grip. Keeping your elbows in

tight to your body, flex your

elbows to bring the bar up

to your shoulders. Only your

forearms should be moving.

Try not to hitch with your

back. Lower the bar back

slowly to the start and repeat.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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workouts

Close grip bench press: triceps, chest, shoulders

Lie on a bench with the bar racked above you. Take the bar with a narrow grip, at most shoulder

width. Keep your elbows in tight and lower the bar to your chest under control. Squeeze your triceps

and push with your chest to extend your elbows back up to the start position. If the bar is uneven

take a wider grip. 3 sets, 8-12 reps

SUPERSET FOUR – Isolation overload

Overhead tricep extensions:

triceps, shoulders

Hold a dumbbell in both hands,

you may need to hold one end

of the dumbbell to get a good

grip. Raise your arms straight

above your head, this is your

start position. Bend your

elbows to lower the weight

behind you, keeping your

upper arms by your ears and

your elbows in tight. Push your

hands back up to the start by

contracting your triceps. Be

careful not to overarch your

back. 3 sets, 12-15 reps

Supination curls: biceps,

forearms

Hold a dumbbell in each hand

with your arms by your sides,

palms facing in. Flex your elbows

to bring your hands up towards

your shoulders, rotating the

palms to face you. Pause, then

return your arms to the start

position, rotating your hands

outwards as you lower.

Georgina is a freelance

writer, sport therapist,

fitness instructor with a

passion for CrossFit and

experience in both long and

short distance running.

Find out more at

www.fitcetera.co.uk

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

49


programme

Core and ab

exercise programme

Personal trainer Barry Stalker reveals

how you can work your core to the max

THE EXERCISES

THE PLANK

THE JACK KNIFE

LEG RAISES

SWISS BALL SIT UPS

The plank works your entire core as well as upper and lower body

muscles. Lie down on your stomach. Lift your body off the floor with your

forearms and toes, keeping your elbows at 90 degrees. Keep your body in

a straight position (without arching your back) and hold for 30 seconds

to one minute and more if you can manage it. Lift one foot in the air for

added difficulty, which you can alternate on each set.

The jack knife targets your central abdominal muscles. Place your hands

on the ground and the top of your feet on top of the ball. Keep your

hands in place and bend at the knees to bring the ball toward your chest.

Hold this position for a second and roll back out. Focus on squeezing

your abs throughout the movement; do not use your hip flexors to bring

the ball toward you.

Make sure when you are performing this exercise you pull your legs with

your abdominal wall and not force your legs up using your hips. Try not

to swing and use momentum as you will find your body will start to

move around.

Make sure you do not over extend on this movement by laying over the

ball to much. Keep your hands either by the side of your head of placed on

your chest along with your chin pointing away from your chest at all times.

Make sure your feet are firmly on the floor to keep you body stabilised.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

50


programme

THE PLAN

WEEK 1:

WEEK 2 :

WEEK 3:

WEEK 4:

I would aim to perform two of the above four exercises. To start, look at aiming for

20-30 seconds when first starting the plank and a rep range of around 10-12 reps

when doing Swiss ball sit ups. Once you have completed your first set , have a one

minute rest and then repeat again for two sets. Repeat this twice a week.

Add a third exercise of leg raises. Increase your plank to 30-45 seconds if you are

able to. Your rep range should stay the same of 10-12 reps. Decrease your rest time

between each set to 45 seconds and increase your sets from two to three. Duplicate

the workout three times a week.

Finally add the fourth and hardest exercise, the Swiss ball jack knives. Your plank

needs to be at least a minute now, with a rep range between 12-15 and the rest

time between each set should be at 30 seconds. This workout can now be completed

three to four times a week.

You can now make this routine extremely challenging by doing a large super set. You

can either do two exercises consecutively, rest and then repeat three to four sets

with both an increase in reps and time on plank, or added weight to make the plank

harder. If you are slightly more advanced, you can do all four exercises back to back.

YOU

WILL NEED A

SWISS BALL TO

COMPLETE THIS

PROGRAMME

Barry first got into sports

at 11 years old, playing

rugby, basketball, shotput

and boxing, with this soon

developing into a passion

for weight lifting. Having

competed in several

bodybuilding contests,

Barry has now been working

as a personal trainer for the

past eight years.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

51


workout

Back & Shoulder

Workout

PT to the athletes, Kristoph Thompson, demonstrates how you

can tone your upper body with this back and shoulder blitz

The following exercises target the back and shoulders. Perform

three sets of 12-15 repetitions of each exercise before

moving on to the next. Rest for 45-60 seconds between each

set. Repeat the workout twice or three times per week.

ROW

Bend your knees slightly and hinge forward from the hips so your back is parallel to the ground. Let

your arms hang down in line with your shoulders, with palms facing towards each other – this is your

starting position. Bend your elbows and bring your arms in towards your ribs, keeping your upper

arms close to your body as you do so. Reverse the movement to return to the start, then repeat.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

52


workout

UPRIGHT ROW

Begin kneeling on the rounded side of a BOSU, holding a dumbbell in each hand with palms facing

towards you. Keeping your upper body still, lift your hands towards your shoulders, lifting your

elbows upwards as you do so. Return slowly to the start and repeat.

ROW AND RAISE

Begin lying on your front with your arms outstretched, holding a rolled up t-shirt or towel with your

hands just above the floor. Try to pull the t-shirt apart, whilst bringing your hands towards your

chest for a count of four. When your hands reach your chest, lift your upper body off the floor and

hold for a count of one. Reverse the movement to return to the start, following the same count.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

53


workout

ALTERNATING PRESS

Begin kneeling on the rounded side of a BOSU, holding a dumbbell in each hand level with your

shoulders and with your palms facing away you. Slowly straighten your right arm, taking the

dumbbell straight upwards. Lower the arm and repeat on the other arm.

REAR FLYS

Bend your knees and hinge forward from the hips so your back is parallel to the ground. Let your

arms hang down in line with your shoulders, with palms facing towards each other and elbows

slightly bent – this is your starting position. Take your arms out to the side so they are level with your

shoulders, without bending or straightening your elbows. Slowly lower back to the start and repeat.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

54


workout

SIDE/FRONT RAISES

Begin standing holding a dumbbell in each hand by your sides. Slowly

take your arms straight out to the sides. Bring your hands straight

out in front of you, without allowing them to lift or lower. Lower

your arms back to the start and repeat, reversing the movement to

lift the hands to the front, then to the side and back down.

Photographer: Marcel Grabowski (www.marcelgphotography.com)

Model: Nadia Al-Bazaz (Nadia ABSolute Personal Training)

Clothing: Lija (www.lijastyle.com)

Personal trainer and

ex strength and

conditioning coach, Kristoph

has experience with

professional baseball and

basketball teams, as well

as his own successful PT

business. Find out more at

www.sideways8.co.uk

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

55


To see strength gains,

tackle 1-5 reps at 85-

100% 1RM for 2-3 sets,

© Ho Yeow Hui | shutterstock.com

with 3-5 minutes

rest between sets.


workout

Lower body workout

Personal trainer and SWITCH UK owner Ronny Terry

gives his go-to workout for a toned lower body

Everyone knows you don’t miss leg day. There is nothing worse than seeing a

well developed upper body attached to a pair of pins befitting a small farmyard

bird. This express lower body workout consists of two sets per exercise with 90

seconds of rest in between. Time is no longer a valid excuse for skipping leg work.

TRAP BAR DEADLIFT: 2 SETS OF 8 REPS

This lift places extra emphasis on the knee extenders compared with the straight bar version.

Stand inside the bar with your feet shoulder width apart and grip the handles tightly while squatting

down. Drive your feet into the ground, straightening your legs and extending your hips before

returning the bar to the ground.

BACK SQUAT: 2 SETS OF 8 REPS

This king of all exercises must be included in any leg workout.

Take the bar from the rack and step back, with your feet a little wider than shoulder width apart and

your toes pointing slightly outwards. Lower the bar by bending your knees and hips until the angle

between your thighs and calves reaches 90 degrees. Drive your feet into the ground and return to

the starting position, maintaining a neutral spine throughout the movement.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

57


workout

HIP THRUSTERS: 2 SETS OF 12 REPS

This exercise is great for power development and specifically targets the glutes.

Hinge your upper back on a bench and position your feet flat on the floor, shoulder width apart.

Place a barbell just above your hip bone and secure it with a pronated grip. Push through your heels

and fully extend hips, holding for one second at the top before returning to the floor.

HACK SQUAT: 2 SETS OF 12 REPS

The hack squat demands more from the quads and less from the hips.

Position your shoulders under the pads and place your feet shoulder width apart on the platform.

Undock the levers and descend by bending your knees, lowering until just short of full knee flexion.

Push back up to the starting position.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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workout

FORWARD LUNGES: 2 SETS OF 15 REPS

The forward lunge can be performed with or without additional weight and is great for working

the quads.

With your feet together and keeping your torso upright, step forward with one leg and land on the

heel, then forefoot. Lower your body by bending the knee and hip of your lead leg until the knee of your

rear leg is almost in contact with the floor. Return to starting position by pushing back with lead leg.

REVERSE LUNGES: 2 SETS OF 15 REPS

This lunge variation places extra emphasis on the glutes. The forward lean increases hip range of motion.

As above, but keeping most of the weight on your front leg. Step back and lean forward around 30

degrees lowering your rear leg towards the floor, before rising up to the starting position.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

59


workout

SMITH MACHINE CALF

RAISES: 2 SETS OF 15 REPS

Isolate the calf muscles with this lower leg staple.

With the balls of your feet, step onto weight plates positioned underneath the loaded bar of a Smith

machine. Place the bar on the back of your shoulders and unrack it. Keeping your knees extended,

raise your heels as high as possible before descending to the starting position. Use multiple plates or

a step for increased range of motion.

JUMP SQUATS:

1 SET TO FAILURE

Inserted at the end of the

workout as a finisher, these

jumping squats will take any

remaining energy you have left.

Drop into the lower position of

a squat, drive your feet in to the

ground, and push up off the floor

into the air. As your feet contact

the ground, immediately repeat

the process until fatigue prevents

you from continuing.

Images: Jacob Ford | Venue: Kiss Gyms

Specialising in body sculpting,

weight loss and elite fitness,

personal trainer Ronny Terry is

owner and director of SWITCH

FIT UK. Find out more at

www.switchfituk.co.uk

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

60


WHEN LIFE

KNOCKS

YOU DOWN...

SQUAT IT OUT!

© murphy81 | shutterstock.com


workouts

Plyometric

workout

Personal trainer Robert

Sharpe bounces his

way through this jump

based session

ALTERNATE LEG

BOUNDING

Muscles worked – Legs

and Core

Benefit – Leg strength and

improved speed performance

A relatively simple exercise.

Assume a running position and

proceed to move forward with

exaggerated steps whilst really

pushing off the back foot. Like

running, continue to move

forward repeating the pushing

motion on both legs.

180 SQUAT JUMPS

Muscles worked – Legs, Glutes and Core

Benefit – Leg strength and increased jumping capacity

Take your feet slightly wider than hips to find an athletic squat position. Start to bend the knees then

explosively jump up into the air and rotate the body. As you are in the air, turn the body 180 degrees

and land with soft knees facing in the opposite direction.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

62


workouts

DEPTH JUMPS

Muscles worked – Legs and Glutes

Benefit – Increase vertical jump

Stand on top of a raised platform or box. Slightly bend the knees and leap forward and off the

platform. When landing ensure you bend your knees and land as softly as possible.

BOX JUMPS

Muscles worked – Legs and Glutes

Benefit – Improve reaction of fast twitch fibres throughout the body

Stand facing a raised platform in a squat stance. Bend the knees until thighs are parallel with the

floor and swing the arms back and behind the body. Then, as you start to straighten the legs by

exploding upwards and off the floor, use the arms to propel yourself up and forward and land on the

raised platform with bent legs.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

63


workouts

PLANK HAND HOPS

Muscles worked – Core, Chest,

Shoulders, Arms

Benefit – Improved upper body

stability and core strength

Roll a towel up and place it on

the floor. Now place the body

into a plank position so the

centre of the chest is above

the towel. Place one hand

above the towel and one hand

below. Bend the elbows slightly

then push the body away from

the floor. Whilst in the air,

switch the hand positions and

land with soft elbows.

JACK PRESS-UPS

Muscles worked – Core, Chest,

Shoulders, Arms

Benefit – Improved upper body

stability and core strength

Assume a high plank position

with the hands and feet in

a narrow stance. Bend the

elbows and push the body

away from the floor. As you

land, take both the hands and

feet wide and drop down into

a push-up position. When

pushing the body back up,

again push the body away

from the floor and bring the

hands and feet back to the

narrow position.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

64


workouts

PLYO V PRESS

Muscles worked – Shoulders, Arms, Core, Chest

Benefit – Shoulder and core strength

Place the hands on the floor at shoulder width apart. Now walk the feet in towards the hands

until the bottom is in the air and the body resembles an upside down ‘V’ shape. With the feet in a

comfortable position, start to lower the head down to the floor between the hands. Then explosively

push the body back up and away from the floor until both hands are slightly off the ground. When

landing ensure you bend your elbows.

SQUAT TO LUNGE JUMPS

Muscles worked – Legs and Glutes

Benefit – Leg strength and improved jumping ability

Start in a squat position. Bend the knees to complete a squat, then explosively jump upwards. When

landing, bring one leg forward and one back to land into a lunge position. Drop straight into a lunge

and then explosively jump back up and return back to the squat position. Repeat this process to

complete lunges on both sides.

Robert is an international

fitness presenter, fitness

tutor and PT with over

10 years experience in

the industry. Find out

more via his Facebook

page www.facebook.com/

pages/Robert-Sharpe-

Instructor/323690523902

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

65


workout

Combat workout

The Biggest Loser’s

master trainer Richard

Callender demonstrates

how you can get

fighting fit with this

combat style workout

This workout is based on the Armageddon VIIT

principle and works the whole body. Complete each

exercise for either 30/45/60 seconds with a maximum

ten second rest inbetween, working your way down

the list and completing at least three rounds minimum.

SPEEDBALLS – CARDIO

High knee raises on the spot while rotating your

arms in a circle as fast as you can non stop.

SURFERS – SPECIAL

Low squat position, drop

forward into full push-up

position, complete one press

and then bounce up into

your start position using a

plyometric action.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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workout

SHAOLIN PUNCHES

– SPECIAL

Assume a low isometric

squat position, position

your arms in a karate

stance and punch forward

as fast as you can, ensuring

you rotate through the hips

to work your abdominals.

SUMO SQUATS

– LOWER

Position your feet at 45

degrees, wide apart and as

low as possible. The aim is to

pulse up and down, at speed

and maintain good form.

RENEGADE PRESS

– UPPER

From a push-up starting

position, bring one arm

up to your side and

place back down, repeat

with other arm and then

complete a full push-up.

BOXERS CRUNCH

– CORE

Lay on back, feet on floor

and arms up beside your

face. Crunch up to over 45

degrees, punch eight times

from side to side and then

lower to the floor.

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workout

HIGH KNEES

– CARDIO

Fast alternating knee

lifts, arms fixed to your

sides, bringing your legs

high and landing softly.

COSSACK KICKS

– SPECIAL

Sit with arms straight, keep

your bottom off the floor

and extend one leg outwards

and up. Alternate legs by

completing a small jump,

kicking out and keeping your

triceps and core engaged.

SHADOW BOXING

– CARDIO

Throw a series of fast

punches with both hands

and flick between jabs, hooks,

crosses and uppercuts.

Richard has over 18 years

of experience within the

health and fitness industry,

not only working as a PT

and The Biggest Loser

UK’s master trainer, but

also as a well recognised

tutor and presenter both

nationally and worldwide.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

68


workouts

Lower Body Workout Plan

PT Gillian Hirst provides the perfect

session structure for a toned lower body

MON

WEEK 1

Repeat x 2– 2 min Rest between circuits

Session 1: 15 sec Rest per exercise

• Squats – 45 Sec

• Forward lunges- 45 Sec

• Step ups- 45 Sec

• Jump Jacks 45 Sec

• Pile Squats 45 Sec

• Reverse Lunge with front kick 45 Sec

• Lateral leg lifts 45 Sec

• High Knees -45 Sec

2 Min Rest

Total time: 10 x 2 = 20 Mins

WEEK 2

Repeat x 3 – 1 min Rest between circuits

Session 2: 15 sec Rest per exercise

• Burpees– 45 Sec

• Squats– 45 Sec

• Calf Raises– 45 Sec

• Curtsy Lunges– 45 Sec

1min Rest

• Bridge– 45 Sec– 45 Sec

• Inner thigh leg lifts– 45 Sec

• High Knees– 45 Sec

• Donkey Kick Backs– 45 Sec

• Straight Leg Donkey Kickbacks– 45 Sec

• Straight Leg lift Pulses – All fours– 45 Sec

1min Rest

• Mountain Climbers– 45 Sec

• High Knees– 45 Sec

Total Time: 14 x 3 = 42 Mins

TUE Active Rest: 30mins Walking Active Rest: 30mins Walking

WED

Session 2: 15 sec Rest per exercise

• Burpees– 45 Sec

• Squats– 45 Sec

• Calf Raises– 45 Sec

• Curtsy Lunges– 45 Sec

• Bridge– 45 Sec

• Inner thigh leg lifts– 45 Sec

• High Knees– 45 Sec

• Donkey Kick Backs– 45 Sec

• Straight Leg Donkey Kickbacks– 45 Sec

• Straight Leg lift Pulses – All fours– 45 Sec

• Mountain Climbers– 45 Sec

• High Knees– 45 Sec

2 Min Rest

Total Time: 12 x2 = 24 Mins

Session 1: 15 sec Rest per exercise

• Squats – 45 Sec

• Forward lunges- 45 Sec

• Step ups- 45 Sec

• Jump Jacks 45 Sec

• Pile Squats 45 Sec

• Reverse Lunge with front kick 45 Sec

• Lateral leg lifts 45 Sec

• High Knees -45 Sec

1 Min Rest

Total Time: 9 x 3 = 27 Mins

THUR Rest Rest

FRI

Session 1: 15 sec Rest per exercise

• Squats – 45 Sec

• Forward lunges- 45 Sec

• Step ups- 45 Sec

• Jump Jacks 45 Sec

• Pile Squats 45 Sec

• Reverse Lunge with front kick 45 Sec

• Lateral leg lifts 45 Sec

• High Knees -45 Sec

2 Min Rest

Total time: 10 x 2 = 20 Mins

Session 2: 15 sec Rest per exercise

• Burpees– 45 Sec

• Squats– 45 Sec

• Calf Raises– 45 Sec

• Curtsy Lunges– 45 Sec

1 Min Rest

• Bridge– 45 Sec

• Inner thigh leg lifts– 45 Sec

• High Knees– 45 Sec

• Donkey Kick Backs– 45 Sec

• Straight Leg Donkey Kickbacks– 45 Sec

• Straight Leg lift Pulses – All fours– 45 Sec

1min Rest

• Mountain Climbers– 45 Sec

• High Knees– 45 Sec

Total Time: 14 x 3 = 42 Mins

SAT Flexibility- 30min Yoga-beginnings Flexibility- 30min Yoga-beginnings

SUN Rest Rest

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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workouts

MON

WEEK 3

Repeat x 3/4 – 1 min Rest between circuits

Session 2: 15 sec Rest per exercise

• Burpees 45 Sec

• Squats 45 Sec

• Calf Raises 45 Sec

• Curtsy Lunges 45 Sec

1 Min Rest

• Bridge 45 Sec

• Inner thigh leg lifts 45 Sec

• High Knees 45 Sec

• Donkey Kick Backs 45 Sec

• Straight Leg Donkey Kickbacks45 Sec

• Straight Leg lift Pulses – All fours 45 Sec

1 Min Rest

• Mountain Climbers45 Sec

• High Knees 45 Sec

Total Time: 14 x 3 = 42 Mins

14 x 4 = 56 Mins

WEEK 4

Repeat x 4 – 30 Sec Rest between circuits

Session 3: 15 sec Rest per exercise

• Split Squat Jumps– 45 Sec

• Squat with leg kick backs– 45 Sec

• Calf Raise– 45 Sec

30 Sec Rest

• Lateral Lunges– 45 Sec– 45 Sec

• Lying Lateral Scissors legs– 45 Sec

• Fire Hydrants – side knee lifts– 45 Sec

• Wide Deep Squats– 45 Sec

• High Knee Lifts– 45 Sec

30 Sec Rest

• Burpees – 45 Sec

• Squat Jump to Calf Raise– 45 Sec

• Forward Lunge to High Knee– 45 Sec

• Mountain Climbers – 45 Sec

Total Time: 13 x 4 = 52 Mins

TUE Active Rest: 30mins Walking Active Rest: 30mins Walking

WED

Session 3: 15 sec Rest per exercise

• Split Squat Jumps– 45 Sec

• Squat with leg kick backs– 45 Sec

• Calf Raise– 45 Sec

1 Min Rest

• Lateral Lunges– 45 Sec

• Lying Lateral Scissors legs– 45 Sec

• Fire Hydrants – side knee lifts– 45 Sec

• Wide Deep Squats– 45 Sec

• High Knee Lifts

1 Min Rest

• Burpees– 45 Sec

• Squat Jump to Calf Raise– 45– 45 Sec Sec

• Forward Lunge to High Knee

• Mountain Climbers – 45 Sec

Total Time: 14 x 3 = 42 Mins

14 x 4 = 56 Mins

Session 2: 15 sec Rest per exercise

• Burpees– 45 Sec

• Squats– 45 Sec

• Calf Raises– 45 Sec

• Curtsy Lunges– 45 Sec

30 Sec Rest

• Bridge– 45 Sec

• Inner thigh leg lifts– 45 Sec

• High Knees– 45 Sec

• Donkey Kick Backs– 45 Sec

• Straight Leg Donkey Kickbacks– 45 Sec

• Straight Leg lift Pulses – All fours– 45 Sec

30 Sec Rest

• Mountain Climbers– 45 Sec

• High Knees– 45 Sec

Total Time: 13 x 4 = 52 Mins

THUR Rest Rest

FRI

Session 2: 15 sec Rest per exercise

• Burpees– 45 Sec

• Squats– 45 Sec

• Calf Raises– 45 Sec

• Curtsy Lunges

1 Min Rest

• Bridge– 45 Sec

• Inner thigh leg lifts– 45 Sec

• High Knees– 45 Sec

• Donkey Kick Backs– 45 Sec

• Straight Leg Donkey Kickbacks

• Straight Leg lift Pulses – All fours

1 Min Rest

• Mountain Climbers– 45 Sec

• High Knees– 45 Sec

Total Time: 14 x 3 = 42 Mins

14 x 4 = 56 Mins

Session 3: 15 sec Rest per exercise

• Split Squat Jumps– 45 Sec

• Squat with leg kick backs– 45 Sec

• Calf Raise– 45 Sec

30 Sec Rest

• Lateral Lunges– 45 Sec

• Lying Lateral Scissors legs– 45 Sec

• Fire Hydrants – side knee lifts– 45 Sec

• Wide Deep Squats– 45 Sec

• High Knee Lifts– 45 Sec

30 Sec Rest

• Burpees– 45 Sec

• Squat Jump to Calf Raise– 45 Sec

• Forward Lunge to High Knee– 45 Sec

• Mountain Climbers – 45 Sec

Total Time: 13 x 4 = 52 Mins

SAT Flexibility- 30min Yoga-beginnings Flexibility- 30min Yoga-beginnings

SUN Rest Rest

Gillian is a personal trainer specialising in

weight loss, sports conditioning and GP

referral. Find out more or get in touch via

www.healthynationfitness.co.uk

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workout

30 minute

HIIT workout

Stamina and

endurance pro Ged

Musto shows how to

blast your workout

This 30 minute HIIT

workout will ensure

that you burn fat and

increase your stamina

and endurance just by using

short bursts of high intensity

intervals. Hard work but

satisfying and rewarding in

the long term!

Perform each exercise for

4 sets, compromising of 50

seconds on and 10 seconds off

for each set.

GETTING STARTED

4 minute jog on the spot

Placing your palms out in

front of your abdomen, bring

your knees up one at a time

simultaneously to the palms.

This will warm up the body and

raise blood pressure.

MOUNTAIN CLIMBERS

Assume a press-up position so your hands are directly under your chest, shoulder width apart with

straight arms. Your body should form a straight line from your shoulders to your ankles. Lift your

right foot off the floor and slowly raise your knee as close to your chest as you can. Return to the

starting position and repeat with your left leg. Continue alternating.

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workout

PLANK TWISTS

Get into a prone position on the floor, supporting your weight on your toes and your forearms.

Make certain your arms are bent and directly below the shoulders. Keep your body straight at all

times. Pivot to one side, raising the arm vertically above you as you twist. Pause and return to the

starting position, and then repeat on the other side.

JUMPING JACKS

Stand with your feet together

and your hands down by your

side. In one motion jump your

feet out to the side and raise

your arms above your head.

Immediately reverse that

motion by jumping back to

the starting position.

TRICEP DIPS

Hoist yourself up onto a bench,

chair or step. Hands should be

shoulder width apart fingers

facing forward and elbows

pointing backwards with a slight

bend in the elbows. Legs should

be extended out in front of you

with a slight bend in the knee.

Slowly lower your body until

your shoulder joints are below

your elbows. Push back up until

your elbows are nearly straight

but do not lock them out.

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workout

BICYCLE CRUNCHES

Lie on your back on a mat

with knees bent, feet on the

floor and hands behind your

head (don’t clasp your fingers).

Press your lower back into

the mat and tighten your ab

muscles as you lift your head,

shoulders, and upper back off

the floor and simultaneously

move your right elbow and

left knee toward each other

while straightening your

right leg (don’t let it touch

the ground). Draw your right

knee back up and immediately

move your left elbow and

right knee toward each other

while straightening your left

leg; thats one rep. Continue

to move continuously, as if

pedalling a bicycle.

PUSH-UPS

Get on the floor and position your hands slightly wider than your

shoulders. Raise up onto your toes so you are balanced on your

hands and toes. Keep your body in a straight line from head to

toe without sagging in the middle or arching your back. Your feet

can be close together or a bit wider depending upon what is most

comfortable for you. Before you begin any movement, contract

your abs and tighten your core by pulling your belly button

toward your spine.

COOL DOWN

Brisk walking on the spot for two minutes.

Ged is an award winning

personal and celebrity

trainer from Wales, with

over 30 years experience.

He is currently the official

number one PT within

Herefordshire, and is

now working throughout

Gwent. He is a stamina and

endurance expert and an

international fitness writer.

Ged can be contacted on

www.gedmusto.org

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

73


© lzf | shutterstock.com

No more

tomorrows...

start #today


workouts

Power through TRX

Personal trainer Craig Libby gets to

grips with this functional fitness tool

for the ultimate full body workout

TRX SQUAT

Standing in your neutral

position, feet shoulder width

apart, take hold of the TRX

on its longest length, in each

hand with elbows slightly bent.

As you bend your knees, push

your hips back into the squat

and allow your hands and arms

to move forward, keeping

tension through the TRX.

TRX PUSH-UP TO

KNEE TUCK

Place your feet into the TRX

through the loops. Once

your feet are in position

come out into the push-up

position. In this position you

will lower your chest to the

floor maintaining a strong

core. On the upward motion

drive through the chest and

straighten your arms; as

you do this pull your knees

underneath you to your chest

and squeeze your abdominals.

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75


workouts

TRX SPLIT SQUAT

Place one foot through both

loops of the TRX and take that

foot back. Ensuring your hips

stay in alignment, both hips

facing forward like headlights

on a car, bend your front knee

and let the foot in the TRX

push backwards. Again keeping

the correct alignment, drive

through the front leg and

bring yourself to the start

position again.

TRX ROLL OUT

Using a mat to kneel on,

take hold of the TRX in each

hand. As you push forward

into the TRX concentrate on

pushing your hips forward

first and then taking the arms

up. Push forward to what is

comfortable for you. To make

this harder, take the TRX straps

lower and push out further.

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

76


workouts

TRX ROW

Taking the TRX in each hand,

keep the TRX tight and walk

your feet forward until you

feel comfortable in a position

to start your rows. Once in

position, concentrate on

pulling your elbows up and

back, then when at the top of

the movement slowly lower

yourself back down to the

start position.

TRX SINGLE LEG SQUAT

Starting in the same position

as the TRX squat take one leg

up. Maintaining your balance,

lower yourself down into the

squat. If you need to, use the

TRX to pull yourself up or just

as a balancing aid.

Based in the Tunbridge

Wells and Tonbridge area,

Craig delivers one to one

personal training sessions

and group exercise classes.

He is a strength and

conditioning coach and

also has qualifications in

Armageddon, Boxercise and

nutrition to name a few.

Find out more at

www.craigsfitness.com

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77


WORKOUTS

The 10km Zen Master Plan

Julia Willmott provides this four week training

programme for advanced runners

This is a great four week

plan for an advanced

runner who has

competed in 10km

runs before and wants to

improve his/her personal best.

It combines runs with yoga

and Pilates to achieve peak

performance of body and

mind. It’s essential that

each session has a warm up

component to release the

synovial fluid in the joints,

warm up the muscles and

increase the heart rate

gradually and safely. A cool

down/stretch session at the

end is also essential to help

prevent injury (especially

for those calf muscles). The

importance of stretching

is still underestimated by

many runners, leading to

unnecessary joint injuries and

muscle strains.

Pilates, yoga and stretching

sessions have also been

incorporated into the plan

on rest days to improve

flexibility, core strength and

joint mobility. Not only will

these help to keep joints and

muscles safe, they will also

improve running performance

and technique. Ideally you

would want to add in some

regular myofascia release

techniques with foam rollers/

balls to help muscle recovery

too. A fortnightly massage

with a sports physio will really

help pinpoint any troublesome

areas and release muscle

tightness and imbalances.

A short meditation at the

start of each day with positive

affirmations will keep you

focused on your goal so you

can hit your personal best on

race day.

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78


WORKOUTS

MON

WEEK 1 WEEK 2 WEEK 3 WEEK 4

Hill run, 1 min, walk

down recovery. X 7

Constant speed

slightly above race

pace 3x10 mins (5

min recovery run)

Hill run, 2 min, walk

down recovery. X 4

8km, 2km easy, 5km

race pace, 2km easy

TUE 10k moderate 6km Fartlek 8km Fartlek 5km easy

WED Rest day

Hill run, 1 min, walk 5km easy

Rest

(Pilates/Yoga) down recovery. X 8

(Stretch Session)

THUR

Track run: Intervals

6 x 800m (400m

recovery run

btw sets)

Track run:Intervals

5 x 1000m (400m

recovery run

btw sets)

FRI Rest (Pilates/Yoga) Rest

(Stretch Session)

Track run: Intervals

8 x 400m (200m

recovery run

btw sets)

Rest (Pilates/Yoga)

Rest (Pilates/Yoga)

Rest

(Stretch Session)

SAT 8km easy 8km easy 8km moderate Rest

(Stretch Session)

SUN

10km long run

race pace

12km long run

race pace

14km long run

race pace

RACE 10km race

Julia is a personal trainer

and Pilates instructor based

in Petersfield, Hampshire.

She is the founder of Julia

Willmott Fitness and Funky

Buddha Retreats. She also

runs regular myofascia

release workshops for

runners and triathletes.

Find out more at

www.juliawillmott.com or

get in touch @juliawillmott

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK

79


When

one

door

closes

attach

a trx

to it!

© Yeko Photo Studio | shutterstock.com


workout

Personal trainer

Declan O’Sullivan

compiles a session

to really target your

muscular fitness

This workout is designed to create a high metabolic stress

within the body and promote fat loss, using a mixture of

large, multi joint dumbbell and barbell exercises to utilise

as much muscle as possible. The exercises are paired up in

super sets to keep the lactic acid from building up and delaying

the onset of fatigue, allowing you to work harder for longer. As

well as creating a high growth hormone response for fat loss,

this workout will also help to build muscle with a sarcoplasmic

hypertrophy rep range of 10-15.

A1: DUMBBELL SQUAT

(HEELS ELEVATED)

3 sets of 15 reps

Start by placing the heels of

your feet on some 2.5kg plates

or a foam wedge, and set your

feet at shoulder width. With

the dumbbells by your side

and shoulders squeezed tight,

descend down to your deepest

position whilst maintaining

your knees over toes and an

upright torso. Then, squeezing

the glutes and quads, drive

back to the starting position.

A2: DUMBBELL

STANDING

OVERHEAD PRESS

(NEUTRAL GRIP)

3 sets of 12 reps

Stand with soft knees and feet

under hips. Hold the dumbbells

on top of your shoulders in a

neutral position (palms facing

in). Ensuring the core is braced,

and then drive the dumbbells

overhead, keeping them in line

with the shoulder. Once fully

extended at the elbow, slowly

descend back to the starting

position and maintain tension

in the shoulder.

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workout

B1: INCLINE PRONE

DUMBBELL ROW

3 sets of 15 reps

Set a bench to 45 degrees, lie

prone (chest onto bench) and

start with the dumbbells at

full stretch. Keep the thoracic

spine extended and row the

dumbbells into the side of the

ribs, squeeze for one second,

then return to a full stretch.

B2: INCLINE

DUMBBELL PRESS

3 sets of 15 reps

Set the bench to 45 degrees

and set your shoulders into the

bench, ensuring you are stable

with feet in contact with

floor. Then, with palms slightly

turned in, drive the dumbbells

up over the top of the chest

and squeeze for one second.

Then slowly descend back to a

full stretch of the chest.

C1: BARBELL

WALKING LUNGES

3 sets of 12 reps on each leg

Set the barbell across the

top of the back and keep the

shoulders tight, ensuring

a good vertical torso. Step

forward and bring the front

thigh parallel to the floor,

dropping the back knee to

within an inch off the floor.

Then, using the front leg, drive

up and forward and repeat on

the opposite side.

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workout

C2: BARBELL

ROMANIAN

DEADLIFT

3 sets of 15 reps

Start in an upright position

with the bar at arms length,

in contact with the thigh,

maintaining good posture

(shoulders back and chest up).

Then, initiating the movement

by pushing the hips back, slowly

lower the bar down the thigh

until the hamstrings are fully

stretched, again ensuring the

back is straight. Then squeeze

the glutes and return back to

an upright position.

D1: DIPS

3 sets of 12 reps

Start with the shoulders

squeezed tight to stabilise, and

slowly lower the body until the

elbows reach approximately

90 degrees and the chest is

stretched. Keeping the chest

lifted, drive through the arms

back to an upright position and

focus on squeezing the triceps

at lockout.

D2: BARBELL CURLS

3 sets of 12 reps

Stand tall with good posture and hands set to just inside

shoulder width on the bar. Keeping the elbows locked in at the

side and abdominal strain braced, squeeze the biceps and flex

the elbow to bring the bar towards the chest. Then, slowly lower

the bar, squeezing the triceps at the bottom to ensure a full

stretch of the biceps.

Declan is a sport and exercise

science graduate and

exercise specialist. Declan

has a great passion for sport

and fitness, having worked

at Portsmouth Football

Academy as a strength

and conditioning intern.

He has a keen interest in

both strength training and

metabolic conditioning.

Find out more at

www.strengthtostrengthpt.com

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83


cool down

Cool down

Slowing down at the end of your session is

about so much more than just relaxation

Many exercisers are

guilty of cutting

their sessions short,

and although this

may mean you miss the traffic

on your way home, it also

means that you most likely

skipped an important step in

your workout – the cool down.

The cool down does so much

more than just letting your

heart rate return to normal;

for example it also prevents

blood pooling, which is when

blood collects in your legs

and feet instead of circulating

back to the heart. This

tends to happen if you stop

exercising suddenly. Cool

downs also give your body

time to remove metabolic

waste products, such as lactic

acid – the main culprit of

cramp. As well as these goals,

the cool down is also one of

the flexibility aspects of your

session, working to maintain

or improve your flexibility

– at the end of the workout

your muscles will be at their

warmest and will be

more extendable.

Your cool down will usually

involve two types of flexibility

based stretches:

• Static Maintenance

Stretches

• Static Developmental

Stretches

Static maintenance stretches

are used to help return muscles

to their pre exercise length.

They are only short stretches –

held for about six to 10 seconds

– where you take the stretch to

the end of your usual range of

motion without bouncing and

then hold the position.

Static developmental

stretches on the other hand

are used to develop the

length of the muscle fibres,

which increases the range of

movement at a joint.

Holding a static

developmental stretch

• Take the stretch to the

point where you can feel it,

keeping good posture and

alignment

• Hold for about 15 seconds

or until the tension in the

muscle has reduced

• Relax the position briefly

and then return to the

stretch, increasing the range

of movement until tension is

felt again – you should find

that you can stretch a bit

further this time

• Hold again for

approximately 15 seconds

• Return to your

normal position

Cool down tips

Although cool down stretches

could often be said to be the

same as the ones used in

the warm up, it's important

to remember that you are

using them for a difference

purpose – instead of ramping

up your heart rate, you want

to be lowering it. For that

purpose, try and encourage

relaxation in your cool down,

for example, the majority of

stretches that you would do

standing up for the wam up,

you can do sitting or lying on

the floor instead. Instead of

trying to balance on one foot

for a quad stretch, why don't

you lie on your stomach and

kick your heel to your glutes

instead, resting your head on

the floor? Even stretching out

your triceps or chest can be

done cross legged on the floor

rather than standing.

Katie is the editor of

Personal Trainer magazine,

a qualified Level 2

gym instructor and is

currently undergoing her

Level 3 Personal Trainer

qualification with Discovery

Learning. Get in touch at

katie@ptmagazine.co.uk

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cool down

Yoga

Cool Down

Just like the warm up to prepare the body,

cooling down after yoga/exercise to repair

the body is just as important. Yoga cool

down poses are light stretches helping the

body to transition from working hard to resting.

Done after a heavy workout, these poses will

help the cardiovascular system to gradually

Personal yoga trainer Suzan Altay

shows how to stretch your muscles

in this relaxing cool down

return to normal functioning by circulating

blood to help restore muscles, reduce strain

on the heart muscle, prevent sudden blood

pressure drops, counteract dizziness/light

headedness and promote relaxation. After a

yoga session, the cool down prepares the body

for the final relaxation. It calms the mind, slows

the breath and balances emotions.

Easy pose

Stretches the hips, knees and

ankles. Sitting cross legged,

push your knees towards the

floor and elongate your spine.

An alternative is to twist the

spine, reaching one arm to

the opposite thigh.

Pigeon pose

Stretches the thighs, groin, psoas,

abdomen, chest, shoulders, and

neck. From all fours, place your

right knee underneath your right

shoulder. Then slide your left leg

back and lower your hips to

the floor.

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cool down

Cat and cow pose

Stretches the back, shoulders, torso and

neck. From all fours, inhale and bring your

belly button towards the floor, arch your

back and lengthen the neck. With the

exhalation, push the belly button towards

the spine and round the spine.

Extended puppy pose

Stretches the spine and shoulders. From all

fours, extend your arms forwards and bring

your chest towards the floor.

Legs up the wall pose

Stretches the back of the legs, front of the torso, and the

back of the neck. Lying down on your back, extend your legs

up the wall and flex the toes. Relax the shoulders and lower

back. An alternative is to place a bolster underneath the

lower back.

Child’s pose

Stretches the hips, thighs, and ankles. Kneeling

down, bring your toes together, knees apart

and allow your forehead to rest on the floor.

An alternative is to place a block

underneath the forehead and hips.

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cool down

Figure 4 pose

Stretches the inner thigh and gluteus. Lying

on your back, cross one ankle over opposite

knee. Interlace your fingers behind the thigh

and pull your knee towards your chest. An

alternative is to place one foot on the wall

and push the opposite knee.

Happy baby pose

Stretches the inner thighs and the back.

Holding on to your feet, bend your knees and

pull them towards the floor besides your chest.

An alternative would be to use belts as an

extension to reach to

your feet easier.

Supine spinal twist pose

Stretches the spine, hips, legs and shoulders. Pulling your knees into

your chest, release them both towards one side whilst extending

your left arm to the opposite side and pressing the shoulder down.

Reclining bound angle pose

Stretches the inner thighs, groin, and

knees. Lying down on your back, bring

the soles of your feet together, allow your

knees to drop and relax the spine. An

alternative would be strapping the legs,

and recline on to a bolster.

Suzan has been practising yoga for

14 years, teaching Hatha yoga to

groups and in private classes. As well

as being a Thai massage therapist,

she is also a personal yoga trainer at

Reebok Sports Club – Canary Wharf.

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cool down

Full Body Cool Down

Seasoned PT Russ

Howe breaks down

how to relax your

muscles after an

intense workout

This is a standard full

body cool down I

like to use after a

tough workout. The

idea here is to bring your

heart rate down and give

your muscles a good stretch,

reducing the risk of injury and

improving your flexibility for

future workouts.

1. INCLINE TREADMILL LUNGES FOR FIVE

MINUTES

Particularly great after a leg workout, but generally useful after any

training session, incline treadmill lunges are one of my favourite

ways to bring my muscles down after some heavy weights.

I like to set the treadmill to it’s highest incline – or as high as you

are comfortable going – and a speed of 1 mp/h, then lunge up the

track, alternating legs with each step. The slow speed and the deep

stretch you can achieve here makes it a very useful yet rarely seen

alternative to standard cool down exercises.

2. RECUMBENT BIKE

FOR FIVE MINUTES

My main cool down session can

be done on any cardiovascular

equipment although my

outright favourite is the

recumbent bike. That’s because

the seated position really

allows you to focus on bringing

your heart rate down a little

better than other options.

3. STATIC STRETCH

HOLDS

While we do dynamic

stretches before we train,

post workout is the time

for static stretches to make

an appearance. Depending

upon which muscles you have

worked, the stretches you

choose can be a combination

focusing on the areas you have

hit or a full body session. Here

are some easy examples to use

which will get the job done.

Set the machine for five

minutes and start at a

moderate intensity; your heart

rate will still be quite high from

your training session, so over

the course of the time slowly

reduce the resistance level

every 60 seconds. By the time

you hit your final two minutes

it should feel like the machine

is almost ‘too easy’. But that’s

the point here, it shouldn’t feel

like hard work.

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cool down

A. PEC STRETCH

Hold your hands together behind your bum.

Focus here on pushing your shoulder blades

together and your chest out, standing proud.

You’ll know if you’re doing it correctly, as your

hands will move away from your bum. Hold this

stretch for 20-30 seconds for maximum results.

B. DELT STRETCH

This is the easiest stretch in the book, but many

people make one simple mistake. Bring your

shoulder across your body, look in the opposite

direction and use your other arm to pull your

outstretched arm into your chest. Hold for

20-30 seconds on each arm. The ‘trick’ is to

place your non working arm above or below (not

on) the elbow. This will give you a much better

stretch. The good thing about this move is it can

even be combined with lower body stretches to

do two at once. Try throwing it together with a

lunge

C. LAT STRETCH

The stretch which can be obtained here is glorious. Get on your knees and reach out as if trying to

make a letter ‘Y’. Now sit back into the stretch and try to keep your hands as far in front of you as

possible. Feel your lats stretch out as you do this; hold for 20-30 seconds.

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89


COOL DOWN

D. QUAD STRETCH

Use something for balance if you need to. Your goal here is to hold

your stretching leg so that both knees remain in line with each

other – don’t let yourself sway forward or backward. Hold for 20-30

seconds on each leg.

E. HAMSTRING STRETCH

This can be done with a towel on the floor

too, but I prefer the standing version as it

allows you to control the stretch a little more.

Keep your working leg outstretched in front

and keep your heel on the ground, as you

rest your hands on your non working leg and

sit back into the stretch. The further you sit

back, the deeper the stretch goes. Hold for

20-30 seconds on each leg.

F. CORE STRETCH

Known as ‘the angry cat’, this stretch is great for your abs and

lower back. As most sessions involve these muscle groups, you’ll

find this one becomes a firm favourite. While on all fours, focus on

letting your abs sink, creating a dip in your lower back, and hold

this for 20-30 seconds. Then switch to tucking in your abs and

arching your back, holding this for another 20-30 seconds.

Celebrity trainer Russ PTI

is among the UK’s most

sought after personal

trainers, renowned for

his hard but effective fat

loss training and his no

nonsense teaching style.

Inside the gym, Russ’

clients range from models

and actors to busy

parents. Find out more at

www.russhowepti.com

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90

PT_WORKOUT_COOLDOWN_RUSSHOWE.indd 88 11/12/2015 11:51


cool down

Fitness Pilates cool down

Fitness Pilates co-founder Kelly Reed-Banks

shares the perfect stretches for a relaxation

and flexibility based cool down

The cool down in Fitness Pilates can take many different

formats, some instructors like to do meditation or

relaxation techniques, some simply just like to stretch

out and realign the body after the workout, so here I am

going to share with you some of my favorite cool down moves.

MERMAID

I love this move as a hip release and lat stretch, however I do

understand it’s not great for everyone’s knees. Mermaid can be

taught as a static stretch or more dynamically, lifting and lowering

the hips from the floor whilst stretching an arm overhead from

one side to the other. If this is uncomfortable on the back knee,

then feel free to perform this with the leg stretched out in front

rather than bent.

HIP RELEASE

Either just push the knee away

or you can take the hands

through the supporting leg

and pull into you, but make

sure that the leg that is across,

is pushing against the stretch.

I personally like to lift the hips

up and work through the spine,

vertebrae by vertebrae coming

up and down into a shoulder

bridge before changing sides –

that way the back and hips are

released at the same time.

CALF STRETCH

This stretch is similar to a

down dog in yoga but instead

we bend one leg whilst

straightening the other, feeling

the length through the leg and

then alternating. This stretch

can also be performed with

both legs straight and turning

the feet so you have an internal

and external rotation. If there is

any discomfort in the wrists or

shoulders, come down onto the

elbows or against a wall. When

you need to rest and recover, sit

back in shell pose.

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cool down

COBRA STRETCH/SWAN DIVE

This stretch works really well

with the calf stretch and shell

pose. Lift from the chest rather

than hunching the shoulders

up to the ears, and participants

may wish to only come up on

to the elbows depending on

their spine mobility. This is

fantastic for anyone wishing

to increase the extension

of their spine through their

thoracic vertebrae.

HAMSTRING STRETCH

A must in every Fitness Pilates

class! Tight hamstrings can

play havoc with lower back

pain and cause other problems

over the body. This cool

down exercise is great when

performed with a band or

strap around the foot. If you

are holding the leg, hold either

above or below the knee,

not directly behind. For the

ultimate stretch, turn the foot

inwards and then outwards,

keeping the leg up straight and

feel the difference!

INNER THIGH/ADDUCTOR STRETCH

The main thing to be aware of

here is not to let the

pelvis twist, keeping the

supporting hip down. You

can develop the stretch by

lengthening the other arm

and leg. This stretch can be

performed as a developmental

stretch, increasing the

tension and pushing further

after 10-30 seconds or as

more of a dynamic release,

moving the knee in towards

you and then away in a

controlled manner.

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cool down

OUTER THIGH/

ABDUCTOR RELEASE

Gently pull the knee over

with the opposite hand whilst

the other arm is at shoulder

height. Only pull to the point

of mild discomfort and again

this can be enhanced by

using a band around the foot.

Turn your head to look the

other way and breath deeply

into the stretch.

SHELL POSE WITH ARMS

OVER TO ONE SIDE

This can be performed any

time you need to relax and

recover throughout the class,

not just in the cool down. Sink

back into the heels and walk

the finger tips away along

the mat, then walk them over

to the right hand side of the

room and place the left hand

on top. Take a couple of deep

breaths and allow the body to

go heavy, feeling the stretch

more through the lats as you

do this. Then repeat to the left.

SPINE STRETCH

This can be performed sitting on a block if the hamstrings and

lower back are particularly tight or with bent legs. Inhale from a

seated position and then as you exhale stretch forwards as far as

you feel comfortable, hold for a couple of natural breaths and then

repeat. You will feel the release in the hips, inner thighs and back.

These can be performed in

any order and you can pick

and choose the stretches

you perform depending on

the muscles used in the main

class. I always bring my group

up to standing at the end by

reversing the roll down move

to release the spine. For more

information on the classes I

teach, please go to

www.kellyreedfitness.com or

if you would like information

on becoming a Fitness Pilates

instructor please go to

www.choreographytogo.com

Kelly is an international

tutor, assessor and fitness

presenter, with 14 years’

experience in the industry

both in the UK and

Australia. Coming from

a professional dance and

singing background, find

out more about Kelly at

www.kellyreedfitness.com

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“Those

lady’s leggings

are basically see through...

does she even know? What if

she doesn’t know I can see

her underwear? Should

I tell her? Or is that

just weird?”

“WHY DID I

RUN TO THE

GYM!?!? WHY!”

5 things you

think in the gym

when you should

be exercising...

“Turned up

the resistance far

too early on this hill

climb – how do I turn it

down without losing face to

the lyrca-clad, toned hulk

of an athlete next to me?

Check out those leg

muscles! Argh!”

“What shall I have for

dinner? I fancy a proper spag bol,

but ooh I do have those chicken breasts

in the fridge too, I could try that new

quinoa salad recipe. I swear I

had some kale kicking around,

maybe I could try making

those crisp things I

saw online...”

“How

on earth do

I untangle these

headphones?

That knot would

leave Houdini

baffled.”

| PT YEARBOOK 2016 | WWW.PTMAGAZINE.CO.UK 94

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